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amazon business account seller

Register for a Professional Selling Account on Amazon.com. For existing sellers, you can add Amazon Business features easily through Seller Central. Selling on Amazon is a powerful way to sell more products and grow it for your business, you'll just need to sign up for an FBA account. Let's answer this question for the most popular online marketplaces: The short answer is no. You don't need a business license to sell products online including.
amazon business account seller

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From the first item sold online in 1995 to becoming the largest online retailer, the growth of Amazon has transformed how we do business and how we shop. The typical ecommerce company needs its own website to draw in customers, sell products, ship orders and provide support. A seller listing products in the Amazon Marketplace, on the other hand, accesses both an array of Amazon services to facilitate sales and its mass supply of users. 

In the U.S. alone, 150 million users made Amazon the most popular shopping app by a landslide, and small and medium-sized U.S. businesses on Amazon sell more than 4000 items per minute. But, while it opens doors to opportunities for everyone, not everyone finds success on the other side. Libraries of books exist to teach you not only how to sell, but also how to make money on Amazon. If you’re thinking about getting into bed with Amazon, here are few things you should know.  

1. Amazon has a lot of fees

Amazon needs to make money like any other business. For every income opportunity offered, expect there to be something in it for Amazon too. Their Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA) program, for example, gets your product to more customers, but setup, receiving and storage can cost hundreds, or even thousands, of dollars in fees. Find out exactly what Amazon will charge to get your products to your customers before you sign up so that you can recalculate your profit margins rather than being surprised by them down the road.

Related: What Comes Next for Ecommerce and Digital Retail?

2. Competition is fierce

With 1.5 million active sellers and counting, competition is inevitable on Amazon. It’s essential that you make an effort to stand out. Take your unique seller information and research the Amazon Marketplace to find your niche. If you’re building a brand, file for trademarks on your brand name and notify the Amazon Brand Registry to protect it. If you want volume, get ready for a price war, but still, standing out discover online banking bonus your competitors can give you that extra advantage to come out on top. 

3. FBA always wins

The Fulfillment By Amazon (FBA) program lets you store your product in bulk at Amazon fulfillment centers, where they handle shipping your orders for you. As a perk, your product is listed as Prime Eligible, accessing a pool of more engaged shoppers. Your order volume will skyrocket, but at a cost. The FBA fees bring down your margins. So, while you may end up preferring to fulfill orders yourself and make more money, you can never compete with your own FBA listing. This can take away your independence as a seller, so consider it carefully before you sign up.

4. All buyers like a unique selling point

When the process of purchasing provides a better experience for your customers, even on Amazon, this unique selling point (USP) can determine if they shop with you or a competitor. Whether it's a witty product description, free bonus or better warranty, something in your selling point should make your customers love buying your products. Read reviews or ask for customer feedback, then use this insight to figure out why people choose your products. Embrace this USP as part of your brand.

Related: What Is the Secret of Amazon's Huge Success? Jeff Bezos

5. Amazon is global

Your customers are anywhere your product is needed, so think beyond the borders of your own amazon business account seller. No matter where you are, Amazon can ship your products anywhere, which means there are places where you could be selling, but aren’t. You have the ability to access more consumers and bring in more sales, so do the work and research potential international markets to make the most of what Amazon has to offer. 

6. Listing doesn't guarantee a sale

Amazon makes it easy for anyone to list a product, and anyone, in theory, can find it, but Amazon is huge, and listing a product doesn’t mean it will sell. Don’t expect to go from zero to hero just by creating an account and listing your product. Use the tools mentioned above to research the search and sales volume of your competition. Optimize your listing. Run ads through Amazon’s advertising platform. Sales will come from the efforts you put into making them.

Related: 4 Pillars of the New Ecommerce Frontier Entrepreneurs Need to Embrace

7. Opportunity abounds on Amazon

Even given all the hoops you have to jump through, the biggest benefit of selling on Amazon is that it really does offer amazing opportunities for anyone willing to put in the work. If the margins and competition don’t drive you crazy, the volume, scale and resources available are unmatched. It might be the perfect marketplace for your products, but with so many options, tools and services available, take the time to research them all to find what fits best for you.

Not every ecommerce business lists on Amazon, and not every Amazon seller has his or her own ecommerce site. Both are viable options for conducting businesses online, but stay alert to new opportunities for growth that come with emerging technologies. If the first 30 years of Amazon have taught us anything, it should be to pay attention to the new ways of doing business because the next one might be exactly what your business needs to thrive.

Ruslan Fazlyev

Written By

Ruslan Fazlyev

Entrepreneur Leadership Network Contributor

Ruslan Fazlyev is the founder and CEO of Ecwid, a freemium ecommerce platform powering millions of merchants, and the founder of X-Cart, a leading PHP ecommerce solution.

Источник: https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/381659

As an Amazon Seller, Do You Need to Form an LLC?

As an Amazon Seller, Do You Need to Form an LLC?

You just launched your Amazon seller account so you can sell your products on this popular internet marketplace. You upload your product pictures and descriptions, fine-tune your seller’s account and start racking in your first couple of sales. Great success!

After a while, your sales keep growing, and you wonder whether you need to form a Limited Liability Company (LLC) to truly be a successful Amazon seller. Could this be a good opportunity to protect your business?

The short answer is: maybe. Although you do not need to form an LLC to become an official Amazon seller, you may decide to do so for a few important reasons.

Most of these reasons deal with financial and legal bank of america cash back rewards categories. Even though you may be a tiny seller now, what happens if your Amazon business starts to suddenly take off? Or what if someone starts to pick a fight with your through the marketplace? Are you protected? Is your business protected? What about tax payments? There are so many important questions to ask yourself when scaling your business on an internet marketplace like Amazon! Here are a few answers to get you started.

[hs-cta-quiz]

Grow and Protect Your Small Business

The main reason to form an LLC as an Amazon seller is to grow and protect your business and its assets.

If selling on Amazon is a tool for you to grow or launch your business, increase brand recognition, distribute your product to customers and make city bank lubbock texas phone number decent income, then you may want to plan now for long-term business growth.

Over 80 percent of small businesses choose an LLC as their business structure because it is simple and provides them peace of mind. Even if selling your products on Amazon is “just for fun” and “nothing serious,” you never know what's on the horizon for your business in the future. Your sales could grow exponentially, or unfortunate situations may arise that could turn this fun side hustle into a bust or a liability. From the beginning, you should consider every option for how to protect yourself and your small business.

Incfile <div><h2> eBay vs. Amazon: What's the Difference?</h2><div><h3> eBay vs. Amazon: An Overview </h3><p> Whether you list things while at home in your pajamas, have money sent directly to you, or drop packages off in the mail, using eBay or Amazon is easier than the yard sales of yesteryear. But which major e-commerce site is best? It might help to understand how each of these companies makes money. </p><div><h3> Key Takeaways</h3><div><ul><li>eBay has made selling on its site easier over the years by implementing a simpler structure for calculating the fee for products sold.</li><li>Amazon’s fee structure is a bit more complicated, having variable referral and closing fees, with the latter being based on the product's weight.</li><li>Listing on Amazon allows buyers to purchase right from the Amazon website and sellers can even have Amazon fulfill the order if they choose to have it stored at one of the Amazon warehouses.</li><li>eBay offers more customized listings, as well as the ability to have eBay employees put together listings for sellers.</li><li>Getting paid from Amazon as a seller involves having money deposited directly into your bank account, while eBay still uses PayPal for the most part. In addition, customers pay you directly. </li></ul></div></div><h3> eBay </h3><p> eBay has snapped up quite a few companies since it first launched in 1995, including PayPal, Kijiji, and StubHub, and had 159 million active buyers as of the second quarter of 2021.</p><p> So how does eBay make money? First, and most importantly, is PayPal. PayPal was spun off from eBay in 2017. The money transfer/payment website is enormously profitable for eBay and makes up almost half of the company's revenue. PayPal fees can easily cut into a seller's margins with a 2.9% + $0.30 fee for each sale. But let's focus on the part of eBay that's comparable to Amazon—the Marketplace. Back in its heyday, the eBay Marketplace would charge users an insertion fee based on the item's starting bid and a final value fee when the item is sold. Today, every seller on eBay gets several free listings. </p><p> For example, If you have an eBay store, according to the website, you'll receive more zero insertion fee listings per month, unlike those sellers who do not have an eBay store subscription. However, eBay still charges a final value fee. However, the last value fee calculations have been simplified, and these days, eBay is charging a flat final value fee of 10% of the sale price (for most items).</p><p> For power sellers, eBay offers subscription packages that give sellers several free listings for a monthly fee, a lower insertion fee for sellers who go over their allotment, and a less-simplified but <b>amazon business account seller</b> range of final value fees. With the Marketplace, sellers can upgrade their listings (better placement in the search results, more pictures, etc.) or list their items at a fixed price. Fixed price listings are subject to the same fees as auction listings.</p><h3> Amazon </h3><p> Amazon has an even more complex fee structure than eBay. The company offers two options for sellers: they can either list as Individuals or as Professionals. For Individuals, Amazon charges $0.99 per item to list along with a referral fee that ranges from 8%–45% depending on the item’s listing category. </p><p> On top of that, there is a variable closing fee which, for BMDV (books, media, DVD, and video) items, is not variable at all, at a fixed $1.80 per item. Other amazon business account seller are charged a variable closing fee that is calculated by the item’s weight.</p><p> Sellers can list their items in 20-30 different categories (depending on whether they <a href=ameren bill pay selling as Individuals or as Professionals), and for BMDV sellers, have set shipping rates set and collected by Amazon. These fixed shipping rates are great for buyers who know that, when purchasing BMDV items on Amazon, the total price can be easily calculated without searching for individual sellers’ shipping rates.

Amazon allows those selling products already listed on the site to list their product simply by entering the item’s UPC or SKU number. This process cuts down on the time a seller needs to prepare a listing because the relevant information has already been input by Amazon employees. Payment is completed by periodic bank transfers to the seller’s account, and sellers are protected by Amazon’s Fraud Protection service.

Both companies offer seller protection services as well as the ability to directly contact a buyer if an issue arises. Both companies also offer tutorials and customer support for sellers who are just starting out.

Key Differences

eBay, the original auction site, used to have complicated and expensive selling fees. Since streamlining their fees, the structure looks simple and easy to understand. Amazon, by comparison, can be confusing and frustrating to navigate. Sample calculations would be helpful to compare the two sites. Still, with multi-tiered pricing structures and closing fees, which vary by item category, item weight, and buyer payment option, any examples could be construed as cherry-picking or biased towards one company or how to add money to venmo without bank account other.

Amazon has a few advantages over eBay. For starters, the site does an excellent job of making a buyer feel that they are buying directly from Amazon. Seller’s items are listed alongside Amazon’s. Purchases can be made using “1-click buying,” Unlike eBay and PayPal, buyers can complete their payment without leaving the Amazon site. With Fulfillment by Amazon, sellers can even have their items stored and shipped directly from Amazon’s warehouses.

On the other hand, a seller might prefer to use eBay to customize and personalize their listings. With the ability to post catchy full-color ads within a listing, it might be more appealing and more likely to result in a sale than Amazon’s neutral listings.

How to Get Paid

Amazon has a multi-step procedure to set up a seller’s account. Users are automatically signed up for a Professional account and Fulfillment by Amazon. Account information is input based on a user’s existing account (if any). Finally, there’s a section for Tax Identity Information.

For eBay sellers, the process is simple—open an eBay account (or use an existing one) and start selling. Getting money into a bank account is a bit more complicated. Amazon users get paid via a direct deposit to their bank account, whereas eBay users (usually) get paid through PayPal.

Advantages and Disadvantages of Selling on eBay

Selling on eBay can be an easy way to earn money off of things you no longer use (gently loved toys or in-the-box collectible items, for example) or a way to sell what you make (Halloween costumes and Christmas decorations). Most shoppers and sellers are familiar with eBay, and its search engine makes it simple to find what you need on its platform.

There are, however, disadvantages to using eBay versus other online selling platforms. First, you will have to pay eBay fees for using its platform, you have limited control over how items are sold, and you may end up with payment issues if customers don't pay you.

Pros
  • eBay has a global reach.

  • Setting up an eBay account is pretty straight forward.

  • Selling on eBay is one way to make money on the side.

Cons
  • You have to pay fees, and those fee structures may change over time.

  • You have to compete with similar sellers.

  • You may run the risk of not ending up paid for your items, if a customer doesn't pay.

Advantages and Disadvantages of Selling on Amazon

Amazon is a behemoth, and it reaches millions of potential customers, which provides online sellers with the potential of high traffic. Amazon is a well-known online shopping platform, and once you learn to tag your products, they may show up in recommended lists.

Amazon will also store your products in their massive warehouses if running a zions bank check routing number business via Amazon. This can be a significant advantage over using your garage or paying for storage for your products. Amazon Prime shoppers are more likely to do the bulk of their shopping on Amazon, and if you can reach that audience, you will likely pull in more sales.

Like eBay, the fees are a downside, you don't get any interaction with your customers (unlike eBay), and your products and your business are enveloped within Amazon, so you don't get the opportunity to grow a brand.

Pros
  • Amazon reaches millions of potential customers.

  • Amazon is beloved and trusted by online shoppers.

  • Your products (when amazon business account seller can show up under Amazon's recommended products.

Cons
  • Amazon doesn't allow you to grow your own brand.

  • Your products may not have strong visibility in a digital ocean of products.

  • Amazon has high fees.

Which is Safer, Amazon or eBay?

E-commerce can be a risky business, but overall, Amazon may have more safeguards in place because you don't have to interact with your customers. Amazon handles the payments to the seller. However, both Amazon and eBay have many safeguards in place to protect their sellers and customers.

Is eBay or Amazon Bigger?

Amazon has more potential customers than eBay, and it offers more products than eBay.

How Many Sellers Are on eBay vs. Amazon?

There are approximately 7 million U.S. sellers on eBay. Amazon has approximately 6 million global sellers.

How Many People Shop on eBay vs. Amazon?

There are around 182 million global eBay customers. Amazon has over 300 million active users around the world.

The Bottom Line

Whether selling through eBay or Amazon, the key is research. Given the different pricing schemes associated with each company, an item that might be cheaply sold on Amazon could demand high fees from eBay. But the higher price could be justified for the customer service received and a specific audience reached. Both sites offer pros and cons for sellers, but if you want to create a brand, eBay may be a better option. If you want built-in storage for your products, Amazon may be the right fit.

Источник: https://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/052615/ebay-vs-amazon-business-model.asp

How to sell on Amazon as a business or single seller through a Professional or Individual account

  • To sell anything on Amazon, you'll need to create an Amazon seller account and fill out an application. 
  • Once you submit your seller application, you may need to wait a week or more for it to process.
  • You can sell items that are already listed on Amazon, or brand new items that you've created.
  • Visit Insider's Tech Reference library for more stories.

Amazon may run their own website, but they're not the only ones allowed to sell products on it.

Amazon.com features tons of small, independent sellers. And when they first register to become an Amazon seller, they all decide between two account tiers: the Individual Plan and the Professional plan.

Here's everything else you should know about selling on Amazon — including how to set up an account. 

How to sign up for an Amazon Individual or Professional seller account

When you register for your seller account, you'll have to pick between two tiers.

Recommended for those selling under 40 units a month, and who don't foresee advertising their products or using any of Amazon's advanced selling tools, the Individual plan charges $0.99 per sale. This tier comes with the ability to add new products to Amazon's marketplace catalog and grants access to Fulfillment by Amazon — a program that provides free shipping to Amazon fulfillment centers, free storage, and free return processing, among other perks. 

The Professional plan offers all of this and significantly more platform perks for a monthly flat-rate fee of $39.99. This tier is perfect for the Amazon seller who plans to feature multiple account users, run selling and shipping promotions, sell products in restricted categories, qualify for higher placement on product pages, and would like to manage their inventory through feeds, spreadsheets, and reports. 

Both tiers have fees that are automatically taken out of your revenues, depending on what type of product you're selling.

Registered Amazon sellers have access to the Seller Center. This dashboard lets you keep track of your inventory, download custom business reports, bookmark product templates, and monitor your performance through customer metrics.

You can also contact Selling Partner Support or open help tickets when issues arise through amazon business account seller Case Log tool. Amazon sellers have access to this dashboard on both the desktop site and an Amazon seller mobile app. 

While filling out the seller account application is easy, having your account verified could take a week or more. And if, after signing up, you realize that the tier you chose isn't a good fit or you're making changes to your selling strategy, you'll have the ability to upgrade or downgrade your account at any point. 

Important: Before signing up, carefully read the terms and conditions. Depending on how you sign-up, Amazon's website can funnel users into automatically setting up the Professional plan.

If you're ever told during this process that you'll be charged $39.99 for a Professional account, be ready to contact Amazon through Seller Support. They can help you change your application type or get a refund once the process is complete.

How to set up an Amazon Seller account as an individual 

1. Visit Amazon's selling guide page and scroll to the "How to register" section. 

How to sell on Amazon 1
amazon business account seller Abbey White/Business Insider

2. Select either "Sell as an Individual" or "Sell as a professional." 

Quick tip: If you aren't logged in already or haven't created an account, you'll need to do so before you can begin the seller application. 

3. Select the country you'll manage your virtual shop out of. 

4. A new drop-down will appear, prompting you to designate the type of seller you are. Select "Sell as an individual." Then click "Agree and continue." 

5. Select or enter the following details: 

  • Citizenship country
  • Birth country
  • Birthdate
  • Proof of Identity (License or Passport ID)
  • Business address
  • Phone number
How to sell on Amazon 2
petra solano wedding dress Abbey White/Business Insider

6. Amazon will send a one-time pin to the phone number you provided. Enter it in the pop-up window. 

7. On the next page, click "I Understand" to confirm that you have:  

  • A valid credit card to pay your fees 
  • A bank account number attached to your seller account's primary contact or business name
  • Your online banking credentials or a bank statement to verify the account belongs to you

8. Enter the following information: 

  • Financial institution's name
  • Financial institution's country
  • Account holder's name  
  • Bank account number
How to sell on Amazon 3
Abbey White/Business Insider

9. Click the box at the bottom of the page to accept the terms and conditions before selecting "Verify Bank Account." 

10. Enter your credit card information and select a billing address if it isn't already selected when signing up for a Professional account. 

How to sell on Amazon 5
Abbey White/Business Insider

11. Input your store name, and tell Amazon whether you have UPC codes, diversity certifications, and whether you're the manufacturer or brand owner for all or some of your products. 

Quick tip: If you answer "yes" or "some of them" for the brand owner question, you will have to answer whether you have a government-registered trademark for those products. 

12. Confirm your personal account details and upload your ID documents and bank statement. 

13. Select "Submit." 

In five to eight business days, you'll receive a postcard with a confirmation code to verify your account. You'll then receive an email from Amazon once the verification process is complete. 

How to set up an Amazon Seller account as a business

1. Log in to your Amazon account or create one. 

2. Visit this page and click the Sign Up button. 

3. Select the country your virtual shop will be managed out of. 

4. A new dropdown will appear, prompting you to designate your business type. Select one of the following: 

  • State-owned business
  • Publicly-listed business
  • Privately-owned business
  • Non-profit

5. Enter the name of your business in the field box that appears. Then click "Agree and continue." 

6. You'll be prompted to enter your charity or business registration number, as well as confirm your address, the primary account holder's name, and enter your phone number. 

How to sell on Amazon 7
Abbey White/Business Insider

7. A one-time pin will be sent to the phone number you provided. Enter it in the pop-up window. Click "Next."

8. Select or enter the following details and then click "Save." 

  • Citizenship country
  • Birth country
  • Birthdate
  • Proof of Identity (License or Passport ID)
  • Residential address
  • Phone number
  • Whether you're the beneficial owner or legal representative of the business

9. On the next page, click "I Understand" to confirm that you have:  

  • A valid credit card to pay your fees 
  • A bank account number attached to your seller account's primary contact or business name
  • Your online banking credentials or a bank statement to verify the account belongs to you

10. Enter the following information: 

  • Financial institution's name
  • Financial institution's country
  • Account holder's name  
  • Bank account number

11. Click the box at the bottom of the page to accept the terms and conditions before selecting "Verify Bank Account." 

12. If you're registering for a professional account, enter your credit card information and select a billing address if it isn't already selected.

13. Input your store name, and tell Amazon whether you have UPC codes, diversity certifications, and whether you're the manufacturer or brand owner for all or some of your products. 

How to sell on Amazon 6
Abbey White/Business Insider amazon business account seller

Quick tip: If you answer "yes" or "some of them" on the brand owner question, you will have to answer whether you have a government-registered trademark for those products. 

14. Confirm your personal account details and upload your ID documents and bank statement. 

How to sell on Amazon 8
Vivian McCall/Business Insider

15. Select "Submit." 

Selling or reselling items on Amazon

Many small business owners create their products, some of which aren't already sold on Amazon. So if you're selling a new item, or even your own used or collectible item for the first time, you'll want to create a brand new listing. Product pages are shared with other users to add their own offers if they sell the same product. For more information on creating a listing, Amazon has a style guide and other guidelines.

Once you add a listing, customers can see and search for it within 15 minutes. If you have trouble finding your items, visit this page on locating them or the one on using search terms. If you're reselling something already available on Amazon, you'll want to match it to an existing product listing. Once that's done, you'll enter its price, condition, and a few other details.

How to list a new item to sell on Amazon

1. If you're not already logged in to your Amazon account, do so. 

2. Once on your "Seller Dashboard," click "Catalog" in the menu bar. Select "Add a Product" from the dropdown menu.

How to sell on Amazon 9
Vivian McCall/Business Insider

3. Choose "I'm adding a product not sold on Amazon."

4. Browse item categories before choosing "Select category" and picking a subcategory.

How to sell on Amazon 10
Vivian McCall/Business Insider

5. Enter your product's information in the "Vital Info" and "Offer" tabs.

How to sell on Amazon 11
Vivian McCall/Business Insider

6. Click "Save." 

How to sell an existing item on Amazon

This is for items that are already being sold on Amazon, whether by another third-party seller or Amazon itself.

1. Log in to your Amazon account.

2. Click "Catalog" in the menu bar and select "Add a Product" from the dropdown menu.

3. Search for the product type you want to sell under "Find your products in Amazon's catalog" by searching for its name or identifying information like an ISBN, EAN, or ASIN.

How to sell on Amazon 12
amazon business account seller Vivian McCall/Business Insider

4. Once you've found your product, click "Show variations." You can also just select your product from the list.

5. Choose an item condition. 

6. Click "Sell this product."

How to sell on Amazon 13
Vivian McCall/Business Insider

7. Enter any additional product details in the data fields.

8. Click "Save." 

Related coverage from Tech Reference:

Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-sell-on-amazon

iPhone Screenshots

Description

Manage your Amazon business on the go with Amazon Seller! Analyze your sales, fulfill orders, find products to sell, manage offers, inventory and returns, and quickly respond to customer questions. Capture and edit professional quality product photos and create listings right from your mobile device!

The Amazon Seller app helps you:
- Analyze your sales. View sales over time and sales growth. Drill down into sales at a product-level. Tap the bars on the Sales Chart to see sales broken down by product. Then tap on a product to view the sales trend for it.
- View account health. Stay informed of your account health with the account health dashboard.
- Fix critical issues. Quickly act on critical pricing opportunities, inventory alerts and growth opportunities from Amazon Selling Coach.
- Manage your inventory. Access product-level inventory and pricing details. Make pricing changes, view fees, and see competitive offers. Make MFN quantity changes or view FBA inbound or status statistics.
- Access Sponsored Products. Monitor performance and manage existing Sponsored Products campaigns.
- Manage your orders. Get notified when your product sells. View your pending orders and confirm shipments.
- Manage your returns. Authorize or close returns, issue refunds, and modify returns settings.
- View next payment balance. See how much and when you’ll be paid by Amazon.
- Respond to messages. Numbers that appear next to Communications inform you of how many customer messages await a response. Use customizable email templates to reply even faster to common customer inquiries.
- Capture and edit professional quality product photos using the Photo Studio.
- Create new offers to existing products and create new catalog products to sell on Amazon.
- Find new products to sell. Search with visual image match, text search or scanning bar codes. Hotels near university at buffalo current prices, sales rank, competing offers, estimated profitability, and customer reviews.
- Share the app with your team and have more attention on your business. User permissions set on Seller Central also apply in the app.
- Have a question about selling on Amazon? Use the app to contact Seller Support.

By using this app, you agree to Amazon’s Conditions of Use (www.amazon.com/conditionsofuse) and Privacy Notice (www.amazon.com/privacy).

Requirements:
• An Amazon Seller account
• iOS 9.3 or later

Bug fixes: Improvements for performance and stability.

Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5

66.3K Ratings

Unable to list & no support

I really want to love this app. It is amazing when I’m acquiring inventory making it so much easier to see whether something is profitable. And then I discovered that I had the ability to list right then and there. I just came into a huge estate buy of over 4000 books so any way I can make my life easier I will. So the first book no problem but everything after won’t list. So I contacted support who was not helpful, letting me know that I can list from a desktop computer. *sigh*. Anyway I guess I’ll have to keep at it till someone can really help me. Fix that part and I’ll be happy to give it 5 stars

Good start.More features please

A year later and some of the things I pointed out in my previous review (below) has been taken care of, like seeing all inventory and opening cases. However, we need to see seller feedback reviews. Repricing via inventory page isn’t helpful especially when you have items on sale because it only shows the lowest price and buy box price. If your item is on sale it only shows your original price against the lowest price (which could be your sale price, but you won’t know unless you log into seller central via browser). We should also be able to put items on sale from the inventory page. A lite version of Reports usps office open today be awesome.At least being able to see the comparison to last year’s numbers. I bank of eastman magnolia state bank the addition of the product photo studio and B2B Central.

Previous Review:
I use this app all day, but it needs more features. We need to be able to see all inventory, reprice, check seller reviews and open cases.

Great app, needs two things added

Really like the app, great easy way to check my account, especially to keep up with customer messages. The two things I would really like added would be PPC monitoring and ability to modify. Also I would like to be able to modify sale prices, currently I can only modify the regular what is the routing number for first interstate bank price, which doesn't help me when I want to run a sale or modify a sale. Otherwise it is great. The app actually has something that I can't get on the web app- I can filter messages to see all received messages. This is awesome for following up on customer messages that I may not have gotten a response on in a while or something. On the web app I cannot find those conversations back easily if I send several other messages out in the mean time. That would be nice to pull from the phone app and get in the web app functionality.

The developer, AMZN Mobile LLC, indicated that the app’s privacy practices may include handling of data as described below. For more information, see the developer’s privacy policy.

Data Linked to You

The following data may be collected and linked to your identity:

  • Financial Info
  • Contact Info
  • User Content
  • Search History
  • Identifiers
  • Usage Data
  • Diagnostics

Data Not Linked to You

The following data may be collected but it is not linked to your identity:

Privacy practices may vary, for example, based on the features you use or your age. Learn More

Information

Seller
AMZN Mobile LLC

Size
56.9 MB

Category
Business

Compatibility
iPhone
Requires iOS 11.0 or later.
iPod touch
Requires iOS 11.0 or later.
Languages

English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Simplified Chinese, Spanish

Age Rating
4+

Copyright
© 2018 AMZN Mobile LLC

Price
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Источник: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/amazon-seller/id794141485

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How This Company Makes $70 Million Selling Random Stuff on Amazon

To show off the secret behind Pharma­packs, his $70 million retail business, Andrew Vagenas picked up an EOS lip balm and tossed it to his buddy Brad Tramunti.

"Watch," Vagenas said. "He's like a special kid."

There is nothing about Tramunti that makes you think: lip-balm guy. He's 33 years old and hefty, with a two-day scruff and a faded T-shirt wrapped around his torso. But he held the lip balm in his paw carefully, inspecting its lollipop-purple-swirl case like a savant.

"This is a new flavor," he said. "Just came out. Blackberry nectar." He took it to his desk and brought up its Amazon.com product page. He checked its weight--0.25 ounce. He pursed his lips and calculated the shipping cost in his head: "$1.89," he muttered. He looked at its Amazon sales rank: 54,000. He brought up a page with suppliers' prices.

"We get this wholesale for $2.23," he said, smiling. "That, plus shipping, plus our margin? We'll be in the number-one spot." That meant when a shopper clicked Add to Cart on Amazon, Pharmapacks would get the sale.

Vagenas grinned. Then he tossed Tramunti a box of Vitamin Friends Iron Diet Supplement.

"He just gave me a crazy product right now," Tramunti said. He pointed to his screen: The vitamins already had 201 Amazon reviews. "If we can get this for under 10 bucks, it's a home run."

"We're getting it for 11 bucks," Vagenas said.

"OK, it's a double," he shot back. "But we're going to be number one on this product--and it's ranked 1,451 in all of personal care, number two in vitamins. This is crazy! This is bonkers!" Whatever you want to call it, within hours, Pharmapacks would be the number-one seller on Amazon for both of those products--a ranking it would hold for weeks.

"He's my special boy," beamed Vagenas.

The next time you buy some humdrum product on Amazon, pause for a moment and check the Other Sellers listed on the right side of the page. That lip balm? Thirteen vendors offer it. Those vitamins? Twenty. As you click and shop, a battle rages in that little box, fought every day by entrepreneurs like Vagenas and Tramunti on practically every one of Amazon's 410 million product pages.

This is the Amazon Marketplace, where anybody can sell just about anything right alongside Amazon's own wares. Unlike eBay, where each vendor maintains a separate listings page, Amazon tidily groups its Marketplace sellers by item, hiding away the inferior offers, to showcase the best deals up front. (In seller parlance, landing the number-one spot is called "getting the buy box.") What looks so clean on your screen obscures the messy and massive jungle of the Marketplace: There are now more than two million sellers on Amazon. While the Seattle-based giant still sells the most popular items on the site itself, Marketplace sellers now ship nearly half of the products--about two billion items each year, all told--and those sales are growing twice as fast as Amazon's, according to the consultancy ChannelAdvisor. The Marketplace started in 2000 selling used books. In 2016, it's a retail phenomenon as significant as any in the past 50 years--together these sellers ring up what ChannelAdvisor estimates to be $132 billion in sales each year. That's more than Walmart sold in 1997. Yet we know so little about who they are.

On 2015's Inc. 500 list of America's fastest-growing private companies, something stood out about the retailers. Nearly all of them, companies that were growing by 1,000 percent or more, had websites that looked a decade out of date. Like, a homepage. Maybe a few links to products. Why? That's because, these days, such retailers don't use their own sites much. They build their businesses on platforms--eBay, Walmart.com, Overstock, and especially Amazon.

Vagenas's company, Pharmapacks, notched $31.5 million in revenue in 2014, which made its three-year growth rate 3,035 percent, good enough to earn it the 115th spot on the Inc. 500. By the end of 2015, its annual revenue was $70 million. Vagenas proudly told me the company was on track to do $140 million to $160 million in revenue in 2016, the vast majority coming from those platforms (and around 40 percent from Amazon). While other platform retailers have identified a niche opportunity and capitalized--search Amazon for horse brushes or pickle ball paddles and you can buy from two other Inc. 500 entrepreneurs--Pharmapacks sells everyday stuff found in drugstores: This upstart has succeeded by selling what most every retailer in the world, Amazon included, already offers. How?

"Sex Toys, I'm Telling You!"

Pharmapacks operates out of a low-slung warehouse in the College Point section of Queens, New York. From there, you can see the new World Trade Center, but otherwise the glitz of Manhattan might as well be a thousand miles away. Planes take off and land practically overhead. (LaGuardia Airport is across a nearby inlet.) The closest neighbor is a vast parking lot jammed with Time Warner Cable vans.

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Pharmapacks' warehouse has a different name on the sign out front. Tramunti got the door, and Vagenas was waiting behind his desk, a wary look on his face. He's 34 and trim, and a slim gold chain was tucked beneath his plaid shirt.

"I Googled your picture to make sure you were actually from Inc.," he told me. Nothing personal, he said--but competitors always try to steal their secrets. One even sent a guy undercover to apply for a packing job, he added, staring at me for an extra beat. Then he cracked a smile.

Vagenas introduced me to his partners. Tramunti is an old buddy who grew up a few blocks from his house. Jimmy Mastronardi knows Tramunti and Vagenas from the neighborhood too. He once had a job in finance, so he's the CFO. Two other guys, Jonathan Webb and his business partner, Adam Berkowitz, joined recently. They are older, in their 40s. The younger guys busted their chops about their age. But really, everybody was busting chops about everything. Constantly.

"We're adding 4,000 makeup products, fragrances--" said Vagenas.

"And sex toys, I'm telling you!" Webb chimed in.

"Not under the Pharmapacks brand!"

"Call it Splash!"

"This guy--no shame," Vagenas sighed, a thought bubble reading, See what I gotta deal with? But the company was considering it. "I always joke our bread and butter is anal cream," Vagenas said. "Our top sellers are things nobody wants to buy at a store. But from there, people buy everything else."

All the while, more than a hundred workers, mostly women, stood at tables in the warehouse packing products into bubble-pack containers that looked like tiny space pods--Colgate toothpaste, Pantene shampoo. A man sat, an air gun in hand, inflating the containers nonstop. As soon as one crackled into shape, he grabbed the next, 15 times a minute. Psst-thwap. Psst-thwap.

Originally, Vagenas and Tramunti and another friend ran a pharmacy in the South Bronx. When they started selling health and beauty products online in 2011, they thought it could make a nifty side business. They rented a little warehouse on a leafy street six blocks from Vagenas's childhood home in Whitestone, Queens, and started spending half the day there. Mastronardi soon joined them to help run the numbers. As they hammered out kinks, they discovered that selling on a platform like Amazon was totally different from running their drugstore or even a standalone website. It was also a much bigger opportunity.

You could fill a book with all the differences, of course, but the big one was: They could sell whatever they wanted, at whatever price, for whatever period of time. A marketplace vendor doesn't worry about stocking a full line of shampoos, or whether certain soaps are always on sale. If they want to sell lotion one week and hairspray the next, they can do that.

Early on, the guys decided that it would be easiest to offer whatever their suppliers had in stock. They built each online listing, and had a developer code a script that scraped the suppliers' databases to enter each product's information. When a customer ordered something, they in turn would order it from the supplier, pick it up, and then pack and ship it. That's still the model, more or less, though nowadays they order in bulk using sales projections and need three trucks and a van to pick everything up. Inventory often stays in their warehouse only for a few hours before going right back out the door. The business is less like traditional merchandising than it is like a commodities trader from a bygone era, buying and selling well-known goods and turning a profit on each transaction.

Not that any of their family and friends knew the difference, at first. Their moms' friends would call asking the Pharmapacks guys to pick stuff up for them. "I'm like, Listen! There's a website!" said Vagenas.

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In the platform business, they learned, price is everything. Set a price too high, and Amazon buries it. Setting it too low is worse, earning the buy box and leading to thousands of orders flooding in--and a loss of money on every sale.

The conundrum fascinated Tramunti. He'd struggled with dyslexia in school, and like many with it, he'd developed an ability to memorize huge chunks of facts and figures to compensate--as he puts it, "we find workarounds." He began studying all their products, memorizing competitors' prices, watching as new items climbed the rankings. He toyed with different pricing strategies, figuring out formulas for how much they could charge for certain products and still get the sale. They started getting the buy box--and making money--more often.

Vagenas, a problem solver at heart, loved turning Tramunti's tricks into rules. He and the team had a developer code the tactics into algorithms, and baked them right into their proprietary software. Now the listings had optimal prices. Sales took off. They called the software the Master Brain.

The Pharmapacks guys love the Master Brain. They protect it the way a star pit master guards the recipe for his barbecue's rub. Or the way Pablo Escobar guarded the source of his ultrapure cocaine. Speaking of which: "You ever seen the movie Blow?" Tramunti asked me one day. He showed me the YouTube clip of the scene in which Johnny Depp, who plays the kingpin drug smuggler in the film, has his product tested by a black-market chemist--who goes gaga over its off-the-charts purity.

"That's us. We've got the Colombian cocaine of algorithms," a proud Tramunti declared.

And as it did with Depp's character in Blow, life got pretty crazy once the Master Brain's pricing kicked in. Orders poured in. Sales increased sixfold in a year. Neighbors began complaining about the never-ending stream of UPS and postal trucks. They were also unhappy about the warehouse packers who, in the absence of a decent-size company cafeteria or nearby restaurants, plopped down on their lawns each day to eat lunch.

Other marketplace sellers have algorithms. There are now companies that design pricing software for platform vendors: ChannelAdvisor, WisePricer. But that's all chump stuff when you have a Master Brain. "We can make listings in seconds," Tramunti boasted. "Everybody else has to do all this hoopala hoppala."

Because Even Mom Complains

Life as a Marketplace seller isn't all algorithms and cash. Vendors also need high customer-service ratings to get the buy box. Keeping them that way is a grind, especially when you sell almost 25,000 different products and ship 570,000 orders a month. People get emotional about personal-care products. Including Vagenas's mother, who called last summer to complain about her Coppertone suntan lotion. In July, it came with 10 percent extra. In August, it didn't.

"She was like, You basically robbed me," Vagenas said. "I'm like, Mom! It was a promo!"

As Pharmapacks' sales mushroomed, so did the complaints. Part of this was growing pains--it took a while to figure out how to fill so many orders fast without screwing up. But complainers are a naturally occurring species in e-commerce, and Pharmapacks now employs 16 customer-service reps, who field almost 200 concerns over the phone and by email every day. They write back to all customer inquiries within 24 hours--one of the key metrics Amazon tracks in its customer-service ratings. Two employees use a software program called Trustpilot to scroll through every 1-, 2-, and 3-star review the company receives and give each of them special attention. If a customer remains unsatisfied and won't change the low mark, the reps appeal to Amazon's Seller Support group--the judge, jury, and executioner in all customer-seller disputes--with detailed objections. Thanks to such micro-advocacy, Pharmapacks had more than 3,300 low ratings removed in 2015 alone. To put that into perspective, Pharmapacks products have been rated more than 280,000 times--and its Amazon rating is 4.9 stars.

"Our top sellers are things no one wants to buy at a store." Then those shoppers "buy everything else."

But Vagenas's desk is constantly cluttered with products that have caused problems. Each day, the Seller Support group takes down one or more Pharmapacks listings without warning because of customer complaints. One day it was a bottle of Dove Advanced Hair Series Quench Absolute Serum that was listed for fine hair but turned out to be for coarse hair. (The manufacturer changed the UPC code, Vagenas said.) Another day it was Cold-Eeze Cold Remedy lozenges. In each case, customer-service reps send Amazon copies of supplier invoices, product photos, and other documentation to get the item relisted, and Vagenas tries to identify the root of the problem and develop a protocol his staff can use to rapidly identify and solve similar problems in the future, so more products won't end up on his desk. But every time I visited, some new toiletry had taken the place of the others on his desk. Uneasy lies the head that wears the crown of 4.9 stars.

Ever heard the phrase "It fell off the back of a truck"?

No, not like that. Pharmapacks buys from the same established, law-abiding distributors that sell to national chains like Walmart, Costco, and CVS. But ask these distributors where they get the products, and some will give an answer as gruff and dismissive as the vehicular estrangement explanation above.

Pharmapacks has agreements with 16 suppliers. Some deal directly with manufacturers. Others get their goods in more circuitous ways. These tight-lipped suppliers are known by their critics as diverters. (They prefer "secondary market distributors.") They acquire deeply discounted goods through gray-market methods, such as buying deodorant from a company that ordered too much. But diverters don't discuss where they get their goods. Their lawyers will cheerfully tell you they don't have to.

When people discuss the rise of online marketplaces, they tend to focus on the tech companies that have made it possible for shoppers to find and purchase things in a matter of clicks. But that explains only the demand side of the equation. It doesn't explain the supply side--why all this product is available so cheaply and freely in the first place.

In 2014, a guy from Vagenas's regular pickup basketball game asked to introduce him to a guy his girlfriend had met, Jonathan Webb. He ran a similar business, called StocknGo. Vagenas grudgingly agreed. "I'm thinking, I don't know this fucking guy from a hole in the wall," he said. "I didn't want to bring him to the warehouse." He brought Webb to a tiny offsite office where Mastronardi ran the numbers.

Webb, like Vagenas, has little patience for nonsense. "He was like, 'What kind of shit is this?'" Vagenas remembered. "You guys doing $25 million out of this office?"

Vagenas showed him a UPS statement so he could see exactly what kind it was: The shipper was processing 21,000 Pharma­packs orders a week.

Webb and Vagenas connected right away. "Definitely don't record this," said Webb directly into my tape recorder. "But it was like love at first sight."

"Weird as that sounds, he's exactly right," Vagenas said. Webb had barely driven away when Vagenas called his cell phone to propose they work together.

Webb brought business and branding experience, since he'd previously run an ad agency. Webb also had a pertinent family connection. His wife's uncle was the CEO of a distributor based in Ronkonkoma, New York, called Quality King, which is widely regarded as the largest and most successful diverter in the world.

As the tech companies have disrupted retail online, Quality King has spent the past few decades disrupting retail behind the scenes--on trucks, on freighter ships, and through good old-fashioned American litigation. Take, for instance, the 1998 Supreme Court case involving Quality King and a fancy shampoo maker named L'Anza Research. To preserve its cachet, L'Anza made its U.S. distributors sell only to exclusive boutiques and salons at high prices. But L'Anza sold its shampoo more cheaply in Europe, where it was less known. So several tons of L'Anza shampoo intended for distribution in Malta ultimately ended up on a ship headed for Ronkonkoma, for Quality King to sell wherever. (You could say it fell off the back of a boat.) L'Anza sued, claiming a Copyright Act violation, but the Supreme Court ruled unanimously for Quality King: A company buying products on the open market can resell them as it sees fit.

Quality King has been named in more than 50 lawsuits because of its business practices, four times under the RICO Act, the racketeering statute designed to bring down organized crime bosses. Time and again, Quality King walks away, no matter the circumstances. There was the freighter full of Paul Mitchell products that went all the way to China, where much was resold and loaded onto another ship heading to the Netherlands before ending up in Ronkonkoma. There was the con woman who promised to distribute various product samples on college campuses and elsewhere, but sold much of it to the University of Quality King instead. She went to prison; Quality King was untouched.

"Other tech companies--I'm not saying they don't work hard," sighs one founder, "but do you see what we have to deal with?"

And courts continue to rule that, so long as the goods are authentic and the buyers come by them honestly, they can resell them as they please. One frustrated lawyer for brand owners, writing in a legal handbook, referred to the company as the "ever-innocent Quality King." Precedents like these mean that if market­place sellers find a product for less, they can buy it, list it on Amazon, and get the buy box until they sell out, and there's not much brands can do about it.

In June 2014, Webb and Vagenas teamed up, with Webb and Berkowitz taking an equity position in the company. Quality King is now a supplier, although Vagenas and Webb stress it is only one of Pharmapacks' four major distributors and not its largest--it buys more from suppliers Kinray and H.D. Smith, for example.

But it's easy to see the influence. "We constantly get bombarded by manufacturers saying they want us to take their products off our websites," said Webb. "Before I met these guys, they stopped selling products. They didn't know any better. Now we have a team of attorneys."

The same way the Pharmapacks guys won't divulge the inner workings of their algorithm, they won't tell manufacturers who their suppliers are, to keep them from snooping up the chain. "We don't have to tell brands anything, and we don't want to," said Vagenas. "And, hypothetically, say a distributor cuts us off from a particular item. We'll just go find it somewhere else," said Webb. "You know who it works out for?" asked Vagenas. "The consumer. The consumer's no longer getting gouged."

"It's Like Blood Diamond!"

With all the pieces in place, Pharmapacks' growth continues to skyrocket. Vagenas just signed a lease on a new, 142,000-square-foot headquarters. Late last year, the company installed robotics and conveyor belts to help package goods, and it can now prepare 50 orders per minute. They are in talks with the grocery-deliverer Fresh Direct, to sell and fulfill orders for health and beauty products on its site. The company is already doing the same for Walmart.com. It is also working with two of its distributors--naturally, Vagenas won't say who--to bring a white-label version of its site to mom-and-pop brick-and-mortar drugstores, so that pharmacies like Vagenas and Tramunti's old one in the Bronx can deliver goods as fast as the big guys. After growing up on Amazon's platform, Pharmapacks is concentrating on its own.

Still, on a recent afternoon, Tramunti was hard at work, sifting through delisted items, checking and uploading each one using the Master Brain. "It's tedious, it's hard, it's a real grind," he said, checking boxes on his computer. "Other tech companies--I'm not saying they don't work hard, but do you see the amount of shit we have to deal with? It's not sexy. It's like Blood Diamond! This is our Sierra Leone!" He cracked a wry smile, knowing, as always, that if he ever slips up, two million other sellers are out there, ready to do whatever they can to beat him to the buy box.

-- Additional reporting by Will Yakowicz

EXPLORE MORE Inc. 5000 COMPANIES
From the March 2016 issue of Inc. magazine
Источник: https://www.inc.com/magazine/201603/burt-helm/pharmapacks-amazon-warehouse.html

9 Things You Need to Know Before Selling on Amazon in 2019

September 19, 2018

9 Things You Need to Know Before Selling on Amazon in 2019

TL;DR: A Quick Summary of the 9 Things You Need to Know


We know you're busy, which is why we've summarized the most important parts of the article in the bullet points below. If you want to learn more, check out the full article for more details!
  • The "Buy Box" is the box on a product detail page where customers can begin the purchasing process by adding items to their shopping carts. It's a coveted position chosen by Amazon, and can mean lots of sales. (Ready to start ranking in those sales? Try a 14-day free trial!)

    • Competitive pricing, competitive offers, a history as an Amazon merchant and more seller reviews can all help you get a position in the Buy Box.
  • Fulfillment by Amazon is a program where you send your items for sale to one of the many Amazon fulfillment centers to be stocked. Customers buy those products from you, and Amazon will ship them. It differs from dropshipping in that you must provide the items to Amazon for sale - Amazon will not provide products for you. (If you're more interested in dropshipping, read this awesome beginner's guide to dropshipping.)

  • These are the types of merchants that perform particularly well on Amazon:

    • Merchants selling unique-to-them products.
    • Merchants who sell hobby or niche products.
    • Merchants selling refurbished or used products.
  • Why should I associate one of my products with an Amazon product that's already listed?
    * Products can be listed only once in the Amazon catalog, so if you make a duplicate listing it will be deleted.

  • Why can’t I use certain shipping methods at first?
    * Certain shipping methods — such as two-day shipping — have to be earned by new merchants.

  • Why aren’t I being compensated correctly for shipping?
    * Amazon determines how much they think it should cost to ship a product based on a number of factors.

  • How can I increase the number of reviews on my Seller account?
    * When selling on Amazon, reviews are critical. Providing a great product and shopping experience is a great place to start, but you can also follow-up with customers to increase your number of Amazon seller reviews.

  • Are there any policies I should look over before I start selling on Amazon?
    * Yes. Click here to be taken to the section of this article describing Amazon's selling, shipping, and other important policies.


Want to read this post in its entirety? Great. To make sure your products are primed for success on Amazon (pun intended), here's a detailed look at the nine most important things you should know before getting started as an Amazon merchant.

How to Sell Products on Amazon

Before setting up your own Amazon store, it's worth taking the time to cover the basics of selling things on Amazon. Even if you're familiar with Amazon as a shopper, the way it works for sellers is quite different. Take a quick peek behind the curtain and learn about the most valuable listing positions on Amazon, how to get your product shipped out of Amazon's warehouses, and some costly pitfalls to avoid.

1. What is the Buy Box, and how does Amazon decide who gets it?

When browsing on Amazon, customers will navigate to a product’s main page and click on the “offers” links below the product description (as indicated by the red circle on the screenshot below) to see a list of available sellers.

Amazon product listing screenshot


However, Amazon also gives merchants the ability to compete for the coveted “Buy Box” – the CTA button in that familiar shade of yellow. $56 billion of Amazon's $64 billion in sales are made via the Buy Box - that's 90% of total sales volume, so it's imperative for any aspiring Amazon merchant to understand what the buy box is and how it works.

Amazon buy box screenshot

This is the Buy Box, which drives 90% of sales.

The Buy Box is the box on a product detail page where customers can begin the purchasing process by adding items to their shopping carts. Rather than looking through a list of available merchants, the Buy Box allows customers to quickly purchase a product from the Featured Seller - the business Amazon has chosen to receive the bulk of sales.

Because a key feature of the Amazon platform is that multiple sellers can offer the same product, becoming the featured seller who wins the Buy Box is very difficult. In fact, it’s pretty unrealistic to think that your site is ever going to get ranked high enough to become the featured seller. (Don't worry - there are plenty of other ways for small businesses to make money on Amazon even if you can't get a Buy Box. Just keep reading this article!)

In order to be eligible for the buy box, you must meet the following four criteria:

  • Make sure you have a Professional Seller Account.
    Only Professional Plan sellers are eligible for the Buy Box, so if you want to make money you've got to spend money - in this case, about $40 a month. Click here for more information about Amazon's selling plans and prices.

  • Know the difference between the Buy Box and the Buy Used Box.

There are separate Buy Boxes for new and used products. Used products are not eligible to be featured in the Buy Box, and new products are not eligible to be featured in the Buy Used Box.

Amazon Buy Used Box Screenshot

The Buy Box vs. the Used Buy Box.

If you're selling used products on Amazon, make sure to factor the Buy Used Box into your strategy. The overall sales volume of the Buy Used Box doesn't match that of the Buy Box, but lower competition can make it much easier for small merchants to obtain valuable product positioning.

  • Make sure your item is in stock.
    If your item is out of stock, you will immediately lose your Buy Box spot to another seller who DOES have that item in stock. If you ever get a Buy Box spot, make sure to ensure that you've always got an adequate supply. While you can get your Buy Box spot back after you've restocked your inventory, it's never 100% certain. Plus, the loss of sales due to the loss of a Buy Box is punishment enough, so make sure supply meets demand!

  • Check your Buy Box eligibility within your Amazon Seller Central account.
    Even if you've met all of the requirements above, you still must be an Amazon merchant with at least 2 to 6 months of sales history as well as a high level of sales performance. (Sorry - we did warn you that the Buy Box is hard to get!)

Your eligibility information is shown in your Amazon Seller Central account. To view it, follow these steps:

  • Within Amazon Celler Central, click the Inventory tab and navigate to Manage Inventory
  • Look for a field labelled "Buy Box Eligible" within the Column Display section
  • Select "Show When Available" from the drop-down menu to sort products by which are Buy Box eligible. If you see a "Yes" within the Buy Box Eligible field for a product, you are eligible to win the Buy Box for that product.

2. How does Amazon determine the order of the Merchant Offers List?

Even if you never win the Boy Box listing, you can still make money selling on Amazon by selling through the Merchant Offers List. Many of the things Amazon values fall in line with ecommerce best practices, so it’s in your best interest to be doing these things anyway.

A number of factors affect where a merchant appears in the Offers List, including:

  • Competitive pricing. This includes not only the product cost, but shipping costs as well. Many shoppers expect to see low prices while browsing Amazon, so be prepared to price competitively to beat the competition.

  • Competing offers. Generally, the more sellers there are, the harder it is to climb to the top. Finding products with fewer competing merchants can make it easier to get your product featured in competitive spots - maybe even the Buy Box. Being the first to pick up on trends can mean that you find popular products before they're popular, and set up a history as a high-performing seller before the market is oversaturated with competitors.

  • How much history the merchant has on Amazon as a seller. Merchants who have long, positive selling histories with Amazon have better chances of obtaining one of the top spots. Making sure that you address negative reviews and other customer service issues quickly and effectively is critical to ensuring that you maintain a positive sales history - too many unhappy customers and you'll be exiled to the bottom of the merchant list.

  • How many Seller reviews the merchant has on Amazon. Selling on Amazon is all about the reviews. Amazon seller reviews have a huge impact in driving sales, and can really end up making or breaking your business. Focus on encouraging buyers to leave reviews for your products, and make sure to address negative reviews quickly and effectively.

As a general rule of thumb, the most effective solution is to ensure that any transactions you receive through Amazon run as smoothly as possible. That means delivering your product in a timely manner and communicating with your customers along the way. However, if you’re looking to break into the market a little quicker, here are two shortcuts that can help:

  • Start by selling a low-competition item to boost your seller ranking. This will increase the probability that the offer will show higher for more competitive products. When selling low-competition items, look for products that have few reviews and focus on becoming the seller with the most positive reviews for that product. Building up the total number of reviews on your Amazon Seller account will increase your legitimacy as a seller, and will help you break into higher-competition niches.

  • Try offering a very competitive price on a popular product. This draws in bargain shoppers and can increase your seller ranking. You can check out Amazon's "Most Wished For" list to see the most popular items by industry if you need some inspiration.

3. What is Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA)?

Fulfillment by Amazon is a program where you send your merchandise to one of the many Amazon fulfillment centers to be stocked; then customers buy products from you, and Amazon ships them. This sort of arrangement allows you to focus on other aspects of running your business while Amazon handles many facets of shipping and customer service.

Other benefits include extending the reach of your products to Amazon Prime members, and gaining an extra push towards winning the Buy Box, even if your products have a bit of a higher price. With Volusion, merchants have the ability to set up different shipping options including dropshipping, which allows flexibility to try using FBA. You can learn more about Fulfillment by Amazon here.

4. What types of merchants tend to benefit the most from selling products on Amazon?

Three kinds of merchants tend to perform particularly well on Amazon:

  • Merchants selling unique-to-them products. Companies who produce their own products, such as a company that designs its own jewelry. Since their products are unique, they face less competition from other merchants selling identical items, and have more flexibility over their prices.

  • Merchants who sell hobby or niche products. Amazon generally won't start fulfilling or carrying hobby or niche products, so there's less of a risk you'd have to compete with Amazon itself.

  • Merchants selling refurbished or used products. Amazon has a huge market for these products, as they attract shoppers whose main concern is price and don’t mind waiting on shipping. It is worth noting, however, that used products cannot win the regular Buy Box spot - only the Used Buy Box, which drives fewer sales.

That said, the benefit of owning your store’s URL and custom ecommerce website cannot be overstated; this gives an extra level of credibility and authority, and visitors are more likely to remember you versus someone else. Many merchants who achieve popularity on Amazon still find it essential to have control over their own ecommerce website and branding. This allows them to achieve a fully independent store presence and market to large audiences outside of Amazon through other marketing channels.

5. Why should I associate one of my products with an Amazon product that's already listed?

Products are only allowed to be listed once in the Amazon catalog, so creating a second product detail page for an existing product will result in your listing being removed. By matching your product to the product detail page that already exists, your offer has a chance to be seen.

6. Why can’t I use certain shipping methods at first?

Amazon doesn’t allow new merchants to offer certain shipping methods right off the bat, such as two-day shipping. These shipping methods have to be earned by establishing a history of reliable shipping at the slower shipping speeds. Offering your products through FBA is a way to bypass this, as FBA products are automatically eligible for Prime Free Two-Day Shipping.

7. Why aren’t I being compensated correctly for shipping?

Amazon determines how much they think it should cost to ship a product based on the merchant’s origin, the customer’s address and the given weight of the product. However, oftentimes the amount of money that Amazon reimburses merchants for shipping won't match the actual shipping cost. Making sure that your item weight and dimensions are listed correctly will help make these shipping estimates as accurate as possible. However, it may still be necessary to factor this into your pricing decisions - sometimes, you'll need to increase the price of a product to offset Amazon's too-low pricing estimates. If you're having problems making a profit after shipping costs, you're probably pricing too cheaply.

8. How can I increase the number of reviews on my Seller account?

When selling on Amazon, reviews should be one of your biggest priorities. Shoppers look at both the quality and quantity of reviews, so it's important to encourage buyers to leave a good review for your product (just don't get too pushy!) Please note that merchants are forbidden from soliciting or paying for Seller Account reviews. Any sellers who engage in these practices risk having their accounts suspended. Your best bet is to give customers a great shopping experience (including aspects like product price, clear and informative customer communication and shipping reliability) so they want to vouch for you on their own. If your business is losing sales due to a lack of Amazon reviews, we have some advice to help you out.

9. Are there any policies I should look over before I start selling on Amazon?

Here are some policies you may want to review before selling on Amazon:

When deciding to sell on Amazon, the best advice we have is to know your business, and know what you're getting into. A new Amazon integration means a lot of new opportunities. By doing your homework and focusing on your business' needs, you'll be taking your online success to the next level in no time. If you're interested in checking out what Volusion can offer with Amazon integration, click the button below to start your free trial today!

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Related TopicsThird-Party Selling

About Adam Kirsch

Adam Kirsch is the Shopping Feeds team lead. When he isn't at work or spending time with his wife and dog, Adam can be found watching baseball, the most data-driven of professional sports.

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Источник: https://www.volusion.com/blog/selling-on-amazon-review/

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

You're reading Entrepreneur United States, an international franchise of Entrepreneur Media.

From the first item sold online in 1995 to becoming the largest online retailer, the growth of Amazon has transformed how we do business and how we shop. The typical ecommerce company needs its own website to draw in customers, sell products, ship orders and provide support. A seller listing products in the Amazon Marketplace, on the other hand, accesses both an array of Amazon services to facilitate sales and its mass supply of users. 

In the U.S. alone, 150 million users made Amazon the most popular shopping app by a landslide, and small and medium-sized U.S. businesses on Amazon sell more than 4000 items per minute. But, while it opens doors to opportunities for everyone, not everyone finds success on the other side. Libraries of books exist to teach you not only how to sell, but also how to make money on Amazon. If you’re thinking about getting into bed with Amazon, here are few things you should know.  

1. Amazon has a lot of fees

Amazon needs to make money like any other business. For every income opportunity offered, expect there to be something in it for Amazon too. Their Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA) program, for example, gets your product to more customers, but setup, receiving and storage can cost hundreds, or even thousands, of dollars in fees. Find out exactly what Amazon will charge to get your products to your customers before you sign up so that you can recalculate your profit margins rather than being surprised by them down the road.

Related: What Comes Next for Ecommerce and Digital Retail?

2. Competition is fierce

With 1.5 million active sellers and counting, competition is inevitable on Amazon. It’s essential that you make an effort to stand out. Take your unique seller information and research the Amazon Marketplace to find your niche. If you’re building a brand, file for trademarks on your brand name and notify the Amazon Brand Registry to protect it. If you want volume, get ready for a price war, but still, standing out from your competitors can give you that extra advantage to come out on top. 

3. FBA always wins

The Fulfillment By Amazon (FBA) program lets you store your product in bulk at Amazon fulfillment centers, where they handle shipping your orders for you. As a perk, your product is listed as Prime Eligible, accessing a pool of more engaged shoppers. Your order volume will skyrocket, but at a cost. The FBA fees bring down your margins. So, while you may end up preferring to fulfill orders yourself and make more money, you can never compete with your own FBA listing. This can take away your independence as a seller, so consider it carefully before you sign up.

4. All buyers like a unique selling point

When the process of purchasing provides a better experience for your customers, even on Amazon, this unique selling point (USP) can determine if they shop with you or a competitor. Whether it's a witty product description, free bonus or better warranty, something in your selling point should make your customers love buying your products. Read reviews or ask for customer feedback, then use this insight to figure out why people choose your products. Embrace this USP as part of your brand.

Related: What Is the Secret of Amazon's Huge Success? Jeff Bezos

5. Amazon is global

Your customers are anywhere your product is needed, so think beyond the borders of your own country. No matter where you are, Amazon can ship your products anywhere, which means there are places where you could be selling, but aren’t. You have the ability to access more consumers and bring in more sales, so do the work and research potential international markets to make the most of what Amazon has to offer. 

6. Listing doesn't guarantee a sale

Amazon makes it easy for anyone to list a product, and anyone, in theory, can find it, but Amazon is huge, and listing a product doesn’t mean it will sell. Don’t expect to go from zero to hero just by creating an account and listing your product. Use the tools mentioned above to research the search and sales volume of your competition. Optimize your listing. Run ads through Amazon’s advertising platform. Sales will come from the efforts you put into making them.

Related: 4 Pillars of the New Ecommerce Frontier Entrepreneurs Need to Embrace

7. Opportunity abounds on Amazon

Even given all the hoops you have to jump through, the biggest benefit of selling on Amazon is that it really does offer amazing opportunities for anyone willing to put in the work. If the margins and competition don’t drive you crazy, the volume, scale and resources available are unmatched. It might be the perfect marketplace for your products, but with so many options, tools and services available, take the time to research them all to find what fits best for you.

Not every ecommerce business lists on Amazon, and not every Amazon seller has his or her own ecommerce site. Both are viable options for conducting businesses online, but stay alert to new opportunities for growth that come with emerging technologies. If the first 30 years of Amazon have taught us anything, it should be to pay attention to the new ways of doing business because the next one might be exactly what your business needs to thrive.

Ruslan Fazlyev

Written By

Ruslan Fazlyev

Entrepreneur Leadership Network Contributor

Ruslan Fazlyev is the founder and CEO of Ecwid, a freemium ecommerce platform powering millions of merchants, and the founder of X-Cart, a leading PHP ecommerce solution.

Источник: https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/381659

eBay vs. Amazon: What's the Difference?

eBay vs. Amazon: An Overview

Whether you list things while at home in your pajamas, have money sent directly to you, or drop packages off in the mail, using eBay or Amazon is easier than the yard sales of yesteryear. But which major e-commerce site is best? It might help to understand how each of these companies makes money.

Key Takeaways

  • eBay has made selling on its site easier over the years by implementing a simpler structure for calculating the fee for products sold.
  • Amazon’s fee structure is a bit more complicated, having variable referral and closing fees, with the latter being based on the product's weight.
  • Listing on Amazon allows buyers to purchase right from the Amazon website and sellers can even have Amazon fulfill the order if they choose to have it stored at one of the Amazon warehouses.
  • eBay offers more customized listings, as well as the ability to have eBay employees put together listings for sellers.
  • Getting paid from Amazon as a seller involves having money deposited directly into your bank account, while eBay still uses PayPal for the most part. In addition, customers pay you directly.

eBay

eBay has snapped up quite a few companies since it first launched in 1995, including PayPal, Kijiji, and StubHub, and had 159 million active buyers as of the second quarter of 2021.

So how does eBay make money? First, and most importantly, is PayPal. PayPal was spun off from eBay in 2017. The money transfer/payment website is enormously profitable for eBay and makes up almost half of the company's revenue. PayPal fees can easily cut into a seller's margins with a 2.9% + $0.30 fee for each sale. But let's focus on the part of eBay that's comparable to Amazon—the Marketplace. Back in its heyday, the eBay Marketplace would charge users an insertion fee based on the item's starting bid and a final value fee when the item is sold. Today, every seller on eBay gets several free listings.

For example, If you have an eBay store, according to the website, you'll receive more zero insertion fee listings per month, unlike those sellers who do not have an eBay store subscription. However, eBay still charges a final value fee. However, the last value fee calculations have been simplified, and these days, eBay is charging a flat final value fee of 10% of the sale price (for most items).

For power sellers, eBay offers subscription packages that give sellers several free listings for a monthly fee, a lower insertion fee for sellers who go over their allotment, and a less-simplified but lower range of final value fees. With the Marketplace, sellers can upgrade their listings (better placement in the search results, more pictures, etc.) or list their items at a fixed price. Fixed price listings are subject to the same fees as auction listings.

Amazon

Amazon has an even more complex fee structure than eBay. The company offers two options for sellers: they can either list as Individuals or as Professionals. For Individuals, Amazon charges $0.99 per item to list along with a referral fee that ranges from 8%–45% depending on the item’s listing category.

On top of that, there is a variable closing fee which, for BMDV (books, media, DVD, and video) items, is not variable at all, at a fixed $1.80 per item. Other products are charged a variable closing fee that is calculated by the item’s weight.

Sellers can list their items in 20-30 different categories (depending on whether they are selling as Individuals or as Professionals), and for BMDV sellers, have set shipping rates set and collected by Amazon. These fixed shipping rates are great for buyers who know that, when purchasing BMDV items on Amazon, the total price can be easily calculated without searching for individual sellers’ shipping rates.

Amazon allows those selling products already listed on the site to list their product simply by entering the item’s UPC or SKU number. This process cuts down on the time a seller needs to prepare a listing because the relevant information has already been input by Amazon employees. Payment is completed by periodic bank transfers to the seller’s account, and sellers are protected by Amazon’s Fraud Protection service.

Both companies offer seller protection services as well as the ability to directly contact a buyer if an issue arises. Both companies also offer tutorials and customer support for sellers who are just starting out.

Key Differences

eBay, the original auction site, used to have complicated and expensive selling fees. Since streamlining their fees, the structure looks simple and easy to understand. Amazon, by comparison, can be confusing and frustrating to navigate. Sample calculations would be helpful to compare the two sites. Still, with multi-tiered pricing structures and closing fees, which vary by item category, item weight, and buyer payment option, any examples could be construed as cherry-picking or biased towards one company or the other.

Amazon has a few advantages over eBay. For starters, the site does an excellent job of making a buyer feel that they are buying directly from Amazon. Seller’s items are listed alongside Amazon’s. Purchases can be made using “1-click buying,” Unlike eBay and PayPal, buyers can complete their payment without leaving the Amazon site. With Fulfillment by Amazon, sellers can even have their items stored and shipped directly from Amazon’s warehouses.

On the other hand, a seller might prefer to use eBay to customize and personalize their listings. With the ability to post catchy full-color ads within a listing, it might be more appealing and more likely to result in a sale than Amazon’s neutral listings.

How to Get Paid

Amazon has a multi-step procedure to set up a seller’s account. Users are automatically signed up for a Professional account and Fulfillment by Amazon. Account information is input based on a user’s existing account (if any). Finally, there’s a section for Tax Identity Information.

For eBay sellers, the process is simple—open an eBay account (or use an existing one) and start selling. Getting money into a bank account is a bit more complicated. Amazon users get paid via a direct deposit to their bank account, whereas eBay users (usually) get paid through PayPal.

Advantages and Disadvantages of Selling on eBay

Selling on eBay can be an easy way to earn money off of things you no longer use (gently loved toys or in-the-box collectible items, for example) or a way to sell what you make (Halloween costumes and Christmas decorations). Most shoppers and sellers are familiar with eBay, and its search engine makes it simple to find what you need on its platform.

There are, however, disadvantages to using eBay versus other online selling platforms. First, you will have to pay eBay fees for using its platform, you have limited control over how items are sold, and you may end up with payment issues if customers don't pay you.

Pros
  • eBay has a global reach.

  • Setting up an eBay account is pretty straight forward.

  • Selling on eBay is one way to make money on the side.

Cons
  • You have to pay fees, and those fee structures may change over time.

  • You have to compete with similar sellers.

  • You may run the risk of not ending up paid for your items, if a customer doesn't pay.

Advantages and Disadvantages of Selling on Amazon

Amazon is a behemoth, and it reaches millions of potential customers, which provides online sellers with the potential of high traffic. Amazon is a well-known online shopping platform, and once you learn to tag your products, they may show up in recommended lists.

Amazon will also store your products in their massive warehouses if running a small business via Amazon. This can be a significant advantage over using your garage or paying for storage for your products. Amazon Prime shoppers are more likely to do the bulk of their shopping on Amazon, and if you can reach that audience, you will likely pull in more sales.

Like eBay, the fees are a downside, you don't get any interaction with your customers (unlike eBay), and your products and your business are enveloped within Amazon, so you don't get the opportunity to grow a brand.

Pros
  • Amazon reaches millions of potential customers.

  • Amazon is beloved and trusted by online shoppers.

  • Your products (when tagged) can show up under Amazon's recommended products.

Cons
  • Amazon doesn't allow you to grow your own brand.

  • Your products may not have strong visibility in a digital ocean of products.

  • Amazon has high fees.

Which is Safer, Amazon or eBay?

E-commerce can be a risky business, but overall, Amazon may have more safeguards in place because you don't have to interact with your customers. Amazon handles the payments to the seller. However, both Amazon and eBay have many safeguards in place to protect their sellers and customers.

Is eBay or Amazon Bigger?

Amazon has more potential customers than eBay, and it offers more products than eBay.

How Many Sellers Are on eBay vs. Amazon?

There are approximately 7 million U.S. sellers on eBay. Amazon has approximately 6 million global sellers.

How Many People Shop on eBay vs. Amazon?

There are around 182 million global eBay customers. Amazon has over 300 million active users around the world.

The Bottom Line

Whether selling through eBay or Amazon, the key is research. Given the different pricing schemes associated with each company, an item that might be cheaply sold on Amazon could demand high fees from eBay. But the higher price could be justified for the customer service received and a specific audience reached. Both sites offer pros and cons for sellers, but if you want to create a brand, eBay may be a better option. If you want built-in storage for your products, Amazon may be the right fit.

Источник: https://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/052615/ebay-vs-amazon-business-model.asp

Amazon Buyers Can Find Your Home Address In 30 Seconds? How to Keep Your Personal Information Safe

Ok, I hope I have your attention on this.  

It’s super important for any Amazon seller to know what’s going on. Before I get into how buyers can do that, and how you can protect your private information, let’s talk about an announcement Amazon made just this morning. 

In their news section of seller central, many sellers saw the following title; “Advance notice: Business name and address to be displayed on the seller profile page starting September 1, 2020”

That obviously got my attention. Let’s break down the announcement piece by piece.  

Beginning on September 1, 2020, we will display a seller’s business name and address on their Amazon.com Seller Profile page. For individuals, we will display the individual name and address.”

Ok, for those who don’t know, the seller profile page is what buyers see if they click on the Sold By Store name:

amazon seller profile page

That brings you to this page:

amazon seller information

Now, as you can see, there is no private information listed here. However, this is the page that Amazon is going to start putting your seller’s business name and address on. Actually, if you were someone who WANTED your business name and address on here, you can CHOOSE to display it now. In seller central, you go to Settings, Info & Policies, then select profile. At the bottom of that page you’ll see a toggle for “business address.”  

Business address

I assume this toggle will go away on September 1, and you will not have the ability to hide or unhide it. Anyway, let’s continue dissecting this letter from Amazon. THIS is where it gets crazy. 

This is consistent with Seller Profile pages across Amazon stores in Europe, Japan, and Mexico.”

Say Whaaaaaaaaaaaaat? They are saying that AT THIS MOMENT, addresses are showing up for Mexico, Europe and Japan? Maybe that’s old news to you, but I think the majority of us did not know that this was happening. In addition, this is NOT something you can hide. If you go into the “Your Info & Policies” in your Amazon Mexico seller central account, there is no toggle to turn off the address.  

Now, maybe you are saying, that doesn’t concern you because you don’t sell in Amazon Mexico. Doesn’t matter! If you sell in the USA, this information shows up. Let’s go back to that Forest Heal seller profile page, and let me show you what ANY buyer can do right now. 

amazon seller information

All I did from that US profile page, is add a .mx after the .com and pressed enter. It took me directly to the Forest Heal Mexico profile page, even though they are not selling on Amazon Mexico. Why does this matter? Well watch what ELSE shows up on this Mexico profile page!

amazon seller page

Yup. Right there for all the world to see is the company name and address. Now, this is one of Sean Chang’s companies. He’s the one who was on the Serious Sellers Podcast recently and helps Korean companies sell in the USA. He did not put his personal name on the account, he put the business name. He also has the business address here for his 3PL service. So he’s ok with his information being here publicly, he even makes that public on his own website.

However, what about the rest of you? Do you have your Amazon account listed in your own name? Do you have your home address registered with Amazon? If so, the whole world can see where you live. More on this later. Let’s continue on with Amazon’s letter. 

Why are we making this change?

Over the years, we have developed many ways for sellers to share more about their business, including through features like the Seller Profile page, Store pages for brand owners, and Handmade Maker Profile pages.”

These features help customers learn more about the businesses of a seller and the products that they are selling. We are making this change to ensure there is a consistent baseline of seller information to help customers make informed shopping decisions.”

Ok, well, I guess that is understandable to a point. However, I know many sellers I have talked to who don’t understand why the business name and address are vital for customers to know in order to make shopping decisions. 

Now, here’s more from the letter. 

Can I share more information to help customers beyond my business name and address? Yes, you are welcome to add additional information about your business and products that you think would be helpful to customers.”

However, remember that you should not include an email address in order to prevent spam and abuse. We ask customers and sellers to use our Buyer-Seller Messaging system to communicate electronically.”

Now at first this confused me. I had previously asked Amazon in a case, “where is this additional information supposed to go if you are only showing the address? Can I put this additional information in place of the address?” I’m not sure they understood my question. They said that, no, I HAVE to put the company address there. Later, I figured it out on my own. I had completely forgotten about another section that we have available to us.  

Do you guys remember the screenshot above of the profile for Forest Heal? Here it is again zoomed into the top

amazon seller

Now, does that marketing text sound familiar to you? It’s actually the default for every seller profile page. However, you can change this information and add up to 10,000 characters of your own copy to put here! 

To do that, in Amazon Seller Central, go to Settings, then “Your Info & Policies,” and select Profile. At the very top, you will have a big text area to type your business/marketing copy into.

amazon seller profile

It updates quickly. I just updated the Project X account, and within 1 minute it was live on the website:

amazon seller account

So what are the takeaways from this?  

Well, if you are someone who has your personal name and info attached to your Amazon account, you probably should take action IMMEDIATELY to change that if you do not want buyers to be able to see where you live. 

You could create an LLC or business if you want to take your personal name off of your account. Once you have the new name, you can change that by going to Settings in Seller Central, then select Account Info, then find the “Legal Entity.” You will probably have to go through the tax interview process again.

If you do not want your home address listed, you should get a mail box that you can use as your business mailing address such as mbe.it.

It’s not suggested to just put a random address as your business address.  Although I was not asked by Amazon for any verification when I changed the “business address” (which will instantly change the displayed address on the seller profile), I made sure to choose an address that was tied to the business.

99.9% of Amazon buyers probably do not know how to find your address with this Amazon Mexico method, but remember, as of September 1, it’s going to be visible across the board so you might as well get a jump on this now. 

As a side note, if there is a seller who has hijacked your listing, or you want to see if a competitor is based out of China, USA, Europe, etc, this is just another way you can see some information on the competition. Sellers cannot just hide behind a storefront name anymore that can be changed any time. So, in that sense, maybe this is a net positive move by Amazon. 

Anyway, let me know in the comments below if you knew about this or not, and what you are doing about it or have possibly already done about it. If you think that this will help sellers in your community please share this using one of the buttons below.   

Stay safe guys!

Bradley Sutton

Bradley Sutton

Director Of Training & Chief Evangelist at Helium 10

Bradley is the Director of Training and Chief Evangelist at Helium 10.He is also the host of the most listened to podcast in the world for Amazon Sellers, the Serious Sellers Podcast.

He has been involved in e-commerce for over 20 years, and before joining Helium 10, launched over 400 products as a consultant for Amazon Sellers. In order to keep his knowledge fresh and relevant, he launched his own brands on Amazon, and in the last 2 years has launched over 30 products that gross over one million dollars a year.

He believes in the motto of "your net worth is your network" and so you will see him at many Amazon seller events worldwide. Make sure to say hello!

Bradley Sutton

Latest posts by Bradley Sutton (see all)

Источник: https://www.helium10.com/blog/keep-your-amazon-personal-information-safe/

The Amazon FBA Business: Is it Enough in 2021?

Several years ago, Amazon FBA businesses were the quick shortcut to being a millionaire and moving to the Bahamas. Everyone and their mother had an online business — starting an Amazon business was a profitable means of easy income!

In 2021, that just isn’t true. Now the market is oversaturated with private brands or scam artists trying to make a buck. Prime customers’ expectations have only increased, along with shipping costs, fulfillment fees, and the other expenses of running an Amazon FBA business. 

US trade wars with China haven’t helped. With the world’s most affordable manufacturing, China used to be the best place to source FBA products. Now many sellers are turning to manufacturers in the United States and facing higher prices as a result. 

CHAPTER I What Types of Amazon FBA Business Exist?

Amazon FBA is selling on Amazon — except Amazon takes care of the details. You send your products to Amazon, they handle picking, packing, and shipping, customer support, return processing, and more.  

There are three main types of Amazon FBA selling: private label, retail arbitrage, and wholesale. Let’s take a look at each. 

Private Label

Private labelers choose the products they sell. After a fair bit of market research, they contact domestic or international manufacturers with their product ideas to supply their products in bulk. 

Private label sellers create their own brand on Amazon, which is often the hardest part. They build a storefront, product listings, social media accounts, etc.

Retail Arbitrage

Retail arbitrage is buying discounted products at retail stores and then reselling them for a good profit margin. In retail arbitrage, you don’t need to create a unique brand because you’re reselling other brands’ products. 

In recent years, Amazon has cracked down on sellers who own products sold. This left many sellers to wonder – is retail arbitrage a dying art? We answer that question in our article:

Is Retail Arbitrage on Amazon Dead?

Amazon is gating more brands than ever, which means less opportunity for retail arbitrage sellers. We’re testing this out for ourselves.

Mar 09, 2021Seller Labs

Wholesale

Similar to retail arbitrage, wholesale sellers buy branded products without needing to create their own private label. The difference is that wholesalers buy items sold in bulk, so they usually work with manufacturers directly. 

In addition, wholesalers don’t create new product listings, they simply add their offer to an existing product listing.

What About Dropshipping?

Amazon Dropshipping is similar to Amazon FBA, except sellers don’t store inventory in Amazon fulfillment centers. Instead, the supplier fulfills orders on behalf of the seller as customers buy products.

If you have a trustworthy and affordable manufacturer, dropshipping is a lucrative alternative to an Amazon FBA business. With eCommerce dropshipping, you only buy what you sell, and the supplier ships your products, so you can avoid FBA fulfillment fees.  

CHAPTER II Amazon FBA Vs. Amazon FBM

If you’re new to Amazon, you should first learn how to sell on Amazon in general before expanding to FBA. Once you’ve launched a new product, then consider your fulfillment options.  

If you’re already an Amazon seller, you’re familiar with the terms Fulfillment by Merchant (FBM) and Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA). What you may not realize is that you don’t have to choose between the two! 

Many merchants with Professional seller accounts use the different fulfillment methods simultaneously. FBM and FBA each offer unique benefits. Here’s a rundown of both. 

Fulfilled by Merchant

FBM sellers control the customer experience from start to finish. They can access their inventory at any time, and they choose how to fulfill products. 

FBM generally costs less for bigger items. Amazon’s fees are based on size and weight.

Seller-Fulfilled Prime allows FBM sellers to access Prime without paying additional fees.

FBM sellers can display the Prime badge as long as they have a Professional Plan.

If FBM sellers are willing to shop around, they can access lower shipping costs than what Amazon charges.

Fulfilled by Amazon

Amazon takes care of customer service and shipping. Because Amazon ships your products, what you lose in control, you gain in convenience. 

FBA is a better fit for low-priced, small items where packing and shipping costs may cut into margins. 

The Buy Box almost always goes to an FBA Seller.

Conversions are generally higher from FBA sellers because of brand loyalty. 

Amazon fulfillment simplifies shipping, leaving you more free time to grow your business. 

Before you commit to either fulfillment method, you should understand the costs associated with each. The fees for FBA are notoriously complicated and vary based on the parcel size, product categories, etc. Read up on all the types of Amazon seller fees for more information. 

Amazon Seller Fees: The Ultimate Guide

How much does it cost to sell on Amazon? It depends. Amazon seller fees vary by the category of product, how much you sell, etc.

Oct 07, 2020Ashley KochansAmazon FBA

CHAPTER III Starting an Amazon FBA Business

Because of the huge influx of third-party sellers to the Amazon marketplace, FBA just isn’t what it used to be. In order to stay competitive and be profitable, you need to optimize your performance. Use these 7 tips to be the best seller you can be. 

1. Leverage FBA’s Shipping Programs 

Once you’ve sourced a product, how do you ship it? There are a couple of programs that are only available to Amazon FBA sellers. Take advantage of the following programs to potentially avoid monthly storage fees:

2. Get the Buy Box 

Possibly the biggest advantage of FBA is the likelihood that you’ll win the Buy Box. To oversimplify, you can get the Buy Box by being a top-notch seller.

How exactly? Well, we wrote the guide on it. 

The Amazon Buy Box: How to Win It

The Amazon Buy Box is special real estate on a product page. The offer featured there accounts for over 90% of purchases on Amazon!

May 25, 2021Travis Tomlinsonamazon seller tools

3. Secure a Badge On Your Product Listing 

Some badges provide an instant visibility boost. You’ll want to get one of these badges to get more traffic, and therefore, conversions. 

The two most popular badges are “Amazon’s Choice” and “Best Seller”. What’s the difference? 

Amazon’s ChoiceBest Seller
Amazon’s Choice is keyword-based. Best SellerThe Best Seller Badge is sales-based. 
A product will receive an Amazon’s Choice badge for a particular search term when it has sold the most products on that search term’s results page.  Best SellerA product will receive the Best Seller Badge in a particular category when it has sold the most products in that category.
Products with Amazon’s Choice will match with customers’ queries in voice search. Best SellerBestsellers perform well in search and are also highly visible to shoppers who browse.

4. Apply for Reimbursement & Avoid Unnecessary Fees 

Amazon handles millions of shipments each day — mistakes are bound to happen. Human error varies from miscalculated weight fees to product returns that were never received. 

If you catch one of these mistakes, you’re eligible for FBA reimbursement, so check seller central regularly for opportunities. While you’re in the nitty-gritty, look for chances to optimize your FBA inventory management as a whole. 

Amazon will regularly charge you for things like long-term storage fees. If you pay attention, you can avoid these unnecessary costs. Remember, you’re in the business of selling products, not storing them. 

5. Don’t Sell Against the Brand

Amazon isn’t just the world’s largest online marketplace, it also owns several private labels. In addition to household names like Amazon Fresh and Amazon Basics, Amazon owns products under various names.  

Pro Tip:

If you plan on selling a product that is a direct competitor to Amazon, don’t. 

Keep an eye out when Amazon is in a niche you’d like to compete in. Amazon is known for pushing out competitors with lower prices and manipulated rankings.

In fact, Amazon recently came under fire for antitrust investigations in Europe. Whether it’s legal or not, you vs. Amazon is not a battle you’re likely going to win.

Instead, test products for Amazon FBA by selling a small amount first, before committing to a large amount of product. Or, you can sell a variation of the product that Amazon sells.

6. Build a Brand

Amazon has favored brands over resellers for a couple of years now. In fact, registered brand owners are eligible for special privileges with Amazon Brand Registry.  

Getting Started with Amazon Brand Registry

Amazon Brand Registry may be confusing to new sellers. If you own a trademarked brand, you are eligible for these protections & benefits.

Jul 23, 2019Seller LabsAmazon FBA

Building a brand means researching your buyer persona(s), making relationships with influencers, developing a brand voice, etc. Don’t skimp on this step in the beginning. Having a well-defined brand statement will make your future marketing decisions a whole lot clearer.  

For example, our partners at 5Strands know exactly what their target audience expects of them. Their water test kit helps keep families’ pets and children safe from Blue-Green Algae. Their brand loves animals, and that decision helps them optimize their product listings and photos!

7. Use Amazon Marketing Services (AMS)

Amazon Marketing is an intimidating topic for newcomers. From Attribution, Demand Side Platform (DSP), and Posts, to Sponsored Brands, Products, and Display, AMS’s options for marketing are widely varied.

If you’re new to advertising on Amazon, get started on Sponsored Products. If you’re already an expert, then read our full guide on the best Amazon Marketing Strategy. 

CHAPTER IV Is Amazon FBA a Viable Business Option in 2021?

There is a lot of evidence that Amazon is a profitable company. Last year, Amazon surpassed $1 trillion in market value. A single share of Amazon stock costs more than $3,000. The company owns half of the U.S. eCommerce market. Impressive statistics. 

What these dazzling numbers don’t tell you is whether you can make a profit on Amazon. There are some great Amazon FBA resources that will help you answer that question, but consider the numbers.

This year, over a million sellers joined Amazon. Globally, the platform hosts 9.7 million sellers. It is simply an overcrowded market.

Pro-Tip

Diversification will set your FBA business apart from the million other sellers on the marketplace.

 In March 2020, sellers got the FBA rug pulled out from under them. Overnight, Amazon announced that it would prioritize essential goods only. We all learned the value of diverse revenue streams after that. 

Relying on one means of fulfillment, or even one platform, simply isn’t enough to succeed in 2021. The overwhelming majority of shoppers expect to see a uniform shopping experience across multiple platforms. 

An Amazon FBA business is an amazing addition to your seller toolkit, but it shouldn’t be your only tool. If you’re not also selling on your own website, social media channels, and brick-and-mortar locations, you’re leaving money on the table.

Want to sell on multiple channels?

Seller Labs PRO will help you sell on Amazon, but our partners at X-Cart can help you expand your business.

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Источник: https://www.sellerlabs.com/blog/amazon-fba-business
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