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financial aid independent

Independent vs. Dependent Status · Dependent: Your and your parents' information will be included. · Independent: Your information will be included along with. You're considered an independent student if: · You were born before Jan. · You're married. · You're working toward a master's or doctorate degree. The federal government strictly defines who is considered an independent student for financial aid purposes, regardless of whether you are claimed on your.

Financial aid independent -

Dependent or Independent?

Question Mark in a Ball

How you answer certain questions on the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) determines your dependency status.

  • Dependent students report their own and their parents’ information.
    • If your parents are divorced or separated, include the parent you lived with, lived with last, or lived with the most.
    • If the parent you lived with has remarried, you must also include your step-parent’s information.
  • Independent students report their own information, and if married, their spouse’s

The federal student aid programs are based on the concept that it is primarily your and your family’s responsibility to pay for your education. A dependent student is assumed to have the support of parents, so the parents’ information must be assessed along with the student’s, in order to get a full picture of the family’s financial strength. If you’re a dependent student, it doesn’t mean your parents are required to pay anything toward your education; this is just a way of looking at everyone in a consistent manner. Likewise, you may be financially independent from you parents, but still be a dependent student on the FAFSA.

If Parents’ Refuse to Provide Information

You can’t be considered independent of your parents just because they refuse to help you with this process. If you do not provide their information on the FAFSA form, the application will be considered “rejected” by the federal processor, and you might not be able to receive any federal student aid. You may qualify for a loan only, but this is the most you qualify for. The FAFSA instructions tell you what to do if you are in this situation. Learn more about how to fill out the FAFSA form when your parents aren’t supporting you and won’t provide their information.

Students who have no Contact with Parents

If you have no contact with your parents and don’t know where they live, or you’ve left home due to an abusive situation, fill out the FAFSA form and then immediately get in touch with us. Our staff can tell you what to do next. Learn more about how to fill out the FAFSA form if you have special circumstances that prevent you from providing parent information.

Last Updated March 18, 2021

Источник: https://www.bellevuecollege.edu/fa/applyold/dependency/

Financial Aid Office

Dependent students can be declared independent by the financial aid office if there are unusual or extenuating circumstances that would warrant such a change. Before the financial aid office will grant a dependency override the student must be able to provide third party testimony to justify the request for an override. This applies to federal aid eligibility only. To receive a dependency override for state aid students must contact HESC.

Extenuating Circumstances

Dependency overrides are most often granted in the case of parental abuse or abandonment where the parents can't be found or shouldn't be contacted. They are not granted simply because the student is self-supporting, the parent's do not claim the student as a dependent for income tax purposes, the parents refuse to provide information on the FAFSA or the parents refuse to contribute to the student's education.

In very limited situations a student who cannot provide parental information and does not meet the criteria for a dependency override may receive Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan funds at dependent undergraduate levels. Talk to an aid counselor in the financial aid office to determine whether you are able to qualify for this exception.

Requesting an Override 

Each college has its own policies and procedures for granting dependency overrides. At Buffalo State, students requesting a dependency override need to complete the Independence Appeal Form and supply all required documentation.

All decisions regarding such requests are at the discretion of the financial aid staff and cannot be appealed.  Students who have received overrides at other schools will be required to provide documentation to Buffalo State as well. In some cases, students granted dependency overrides by other schools will have their requests denied at Buffalo State.

Источник: https://financialaid.buffalostate.edu/dependency-and-overrides

Dependency & Risk of Homelessness

dependency

For financial aid, your status as dependent or independent is based on your answers to the dependency questions listed on the FAFSA. 

You are automatically independent if you are:

  • 24 years of age or older
  • Considered an orphan
  • A veteran
  • Married
  • A graduate student
  • Or have dependents

If you do not meet the criteria above, you may appeal to be treated as an independent student if there are special circumstances that make it difficult or impossible for you to provide parent income information on the FAFSA. Those reasons include, but are not limited to:

  • Circumstances that threaten your health or safety
  • Abandonment by parents
  • Custodial parent(s) is/are incarcerated
  • Both parents are deceased (and/or non-custodial parent is estranged)
  • You are in the legal custody of a family member or other adult

Being self-sufficient or your parent’s refusal to financially contribute or provide income information are not sufficient reasons for appealingto be treated as an independent student for financial aid. Please contact us if your parent is refusing to provide their information on the FAFSA or if you would like to submit an appeal and have questions.

All appeals are considered by the Dependency Appeals Committee within OSSA.

To appeal, please submit the following information in one PDF or word file using the document uploader tool. If your letters of support will come from other individuals, they can email their letters to [email protected] Please be sure they include your first and last name and PID number.

  • One (1) personal statement from you providing more detail about your circumstance. Specifically, personal statements should speak to the nature of your relationship with your biological or adopted parents.
  • Two (2) letters of support from individuals with knowledge of your situation. These letters can come from custodian(s), a teacher, counselor, social worker,community member, or any other neutral party who is aware of your circumstances. These letters should not come from fellow students.

The appeals committee may request additional information or documentation to make a decision. Once a decision has been made, your FAFSA will be updated and you will be notified by email. 

If you are approved to be treated as an independent student, the renewal process is quite simple! You need to submit your FAFSA for the upcoming school year first. A renewal form link will be sent to you at the beginning of the spring semester for the following school year. 

If your situation has not changed, you do not need to provide parent information on the FAFSA. This will show your FAFSA as “rejected” initially, but submission of the renewal form will allow us to make the correction.

risk of homelessness

You may be considered independent if you are homeless or at risk of homelessness. In some cases, you may have received documentation from one or more of the following:

  • a school district homeless liaison,
  • a director of an emergency shelter or transitional housing program, 
  • or the director of a runaway or homeless youth basic center or transitional living program. 

If you do not have documentation from any of the individuals above, a financial aid administrator can also make the determination.

If you feel you may meet this criteria, you can view more information on the federal website, or reach out to our office.

FAQ's

You must have an approved Juvenile Petition for Emancipation from the NC court system  to meet the definition of an emancipated minor.  If you do not live in the custody of your parents and there is a special circumstance, you may want to consider submitting a dependency appeal.

In North Carolina, legal custody is defined as the right for a court appointed individual to make major decisions on your behalf. Guardianship extends this a little further, and allows a court-appointed guardian to make major decisions and manage your affairs, property, or estate. You can view more information on the NC Courts website.

If requested, youwill need to present documentation that shows legal guardianship. We  cannot accept legal custody documents as proof of legal guardianship.

As a first-year student, you can use documentation signed by a counselor or other homeless district liaison that indicates your status according to McKinney-Vento. In the following academic years, you can contact our office so that wecan make the determination.

You are considered homeless if you lack fixed, regular, and adequate housing. This includes living “on the street” as well as temporarily living with other people because you have nowhere else to go, living in substandard housing (no utilities), living in emergency or transitional shelters; or living in motels, camp grounds, cars, parks, abandoned buildings or any public or private place not designed for humans to live in. It can also include living in a dorm or apartment if youwould otherwise be homeless.

No. We treat your financial aid information as your own and parents are not able to receive information from our office if they have not been set up by you as a proxy. If your dependency appeal is approved, please check to make sure your parent is no longer assigned a PIN by which they can access information about your financial aid. 

Источник: https://studentaid.unc.edu/special-circumstances/dependency-and-risk-of-homelessness/

Dependent or Independent?

You may consider yourself independent because you don't receive support from your parents or you don't live in their home. You may even qualify as independent for income tax purposes, but the U.S. Department of Education has stricter standards for financial aid purposes.

In order to file your financial aid application as an independent student, you must meet one or more of the following criteria:

  • Age 24 by January 1 of the aid year
  • Veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces
  • Currently serving on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces for purposes other than training
  • Graduate or graduate/professional student
  • Married prior to filing and signing the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid)
  • Financially supporting legal dependents other than a spouse
  • Orphan, foster youth, or ward of the court
  • Emancipated minor or unaccompanied homeless youth

The online FAFSA will guide you through questions designed to determine whether you are dependent or independent. If you are independent it will allow you to skip the parent section. If you do not meet the criteria to be considered independent, you must file as a dependent student and provide information about your legal parent(s).

If your parents are divorced and your custodial parent (the parent you reside with most throughout the year) has remarried, your stepparent's information must be included as well, even if your parent and stepparent file separate tax forms, and even if they have an agreement not to assist each other's children with college expenses.

The only exception to the dependency rules at Michigan State is in very rare instances where it can be proven that there is a total breakdown in the relationship between student and parent(s). If you believe that this describes your situation, contact a financial aid advisor for advice on how to document your circumstances.

Filing incorrectly as independent when you're actually a dependent student can seriously delay the processing of your financial aid. If you have questions about your status, contact a financial aid advisor before filing your FAFSA.

Источник: https://finaid.msu.edu/depstat.asp

Dependent/Independent Applicant

The primary responsibility to pay for college-related expenses, according to the U.S. Department of Education, resides with the student and, if applicable, the student's parent(s). The U.S. Department of Education determines whether a student is considered "dependent" or "independent" upon his or her parent's (parents') for financial purposes.

If a student is considered dependent, the parent(s) must provide their financial information on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form. A student considered independent is under no obligation to provide his or her parent's (parents') financial information, according to federal statue.

The U.S. Department of Education determines if a student is considered dependent or independent for financial purposes according to their answer to the following questions. If a student can answer "yes" to one or more of these questions on the FAFSA form, a student can be considered as independent for financial aid purposes.

Watch our video to help you determine whether you are an independent or dependent applicant.

Depending on your circumstances, you may be able to appeal your financial aid dependency status.

  • Were you age 24 before Jan. 1 of the financial aid award year? For the 2019-2020 financial aid award year, a student must be born prior to Jan 1, 1996 to be considered an independent by age.
  • As of the filing date of the FAFSA, were you married?
  • At the beginning of the award year, will the student be seeking a master's or doctorate degree?
  • Are you currently serving on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces for purposes other than training?
  • Are you a veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces?
  • Do you have biological or adoptive children who receive more than half of their support from you?
  • Do you have dependents (other than your biological/adoptive children or spouse) who currently live with you now and who receive more than half of their support from you through June 30 of the award year?
  • At anytime since you turned age 13, were both your parents deceased, were you in foster care or were you a dependent or ward of the court?
  • Are you, or were you an emancipated minor as determined by a court in your state of legal residence at the time you received the determination?
  • Are you, or were you in legal guardianship as determined by a court in your state of legal residence at the time you received the determination?
  • At any time on or after July 1, 2018, did your high school or school district homeless liaison determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or were self-supporting and at risk of being homeless?
  • At any time on or after July 1, 2018, did the director of an emergency shelter or transitional housing program funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless?
  • At any time on or after July 1, 2018, did the director of a runaway or homeless youth basic center or transitional living program determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or were self-supporting and at risk of being homeless?
Источник: https://www.unlv.edu/finaid/checklist/before-applicant

Dependency Status and Override

The financial information reported on the FAFSA will be used to determine need for financial aid, the type of need-based student aid, and if eligible, the amount of financial aid a student will receive. Students will need to determine whose information to report on the FAFSA - theirs alone, if they are an independent student; theirs and their spouse’s, if an independent and married student; or theirs and their parents’, if a dependent student.

The answers to dependency questions on the FAFSA determine whether students are considered dependent or independent.

Dependent students must report their parents’ income and assets on the FAFSA as well as their own. Parents of dependent students are expected to contribute toward the cost of their college education. Federal student aid programs are based on the concept that a dependent student’s parents have the primary responsibility for paying for their child’s education.

If you are an undergraduate student and the Department of Education has determined you to be considered independent for any reason other than your age, The Catholic University of America will select your aid application for dependency and federal verification. Your aid application will not be processed until you provide third-party documentation to substantiate your “yes” response to any FAFSA dependency question.

Dependency Override

Dependent students must report their parents’ income and assets on the FAFSA as well as their own. Parents of dependent students are expected to contribute toward the cost of their college education. Federal student aid programs are based on the concept that a dependent student’s parents have the primary responsibility for paying for their child’s education.

Sometimes extraordinary circumstances make it impossible for a student who does not meet the definition of independent to obtain his or her parents' financial information. In extremely rare cases, The Catholic University of America may authorize a Dependency Override. If the university grants a Dependency Override, the student can apply for aid in the same manner as an independent student, using only the student's income and asset information.

The Catholic University of America will only consider documented cases of child abuse or the current and continuing incarceration/institutionalization of the custodial parent as being extraordinary circumstances.

Note: In most cases the non-custodial parent would than become the custodial parent.

The Catholic University of America will not grant a Dependency Override when the sole basis for the request is that parents do not claim the student on income tax return, parents do not wish to provide income and tax information, parents simply do not wish to contribute to educational expenses or the student is self-supporting.

Students who wish to apply for a Dependency Override must submit the following documentation:

  • A letter of explanation, written by the student, explaining the extraordinary family circumstances that led to the student leaving the parent household. The letter must include information on the student’s means of support since leaving the parent household.
  • Letters (on letterhead) from three professionals detailing their first-hand knowledge verifying the family circumstances as described by the student. Professionals may include guidance counselors, clergy members, teachers, doctors, family counselors, mental health professionals and law enforcement personnel. The letters must include the professional’s name, job title and contact information. In most cases, court documents will be requested.
  • Copies of the student's federal income tax return transcripts for the current and preceding year.
The letter of explanation requesting a Dependency Override along with all required documentation should be sent to the Office of Student Financial Assistance. The Office of Student Financial Assistance will respond in writing within 10 business days of receiving all documentation.
Источник: https://financial-aid.catholic.edu/policies/dependency-status-and-override.html
financial aid independent

Financial Aid Office

Dependent students can be declared independent by the financial aid office if there are unusual or extenuating circumstances that would warrant such a change. Before the financial aid office will grant a dependency override the student must be able to provide third party testimony to justify the request for an override. This applies to federal aid eligibility only. To receive a dependency override for state aid students must contact HESC.

Extenuating Circumstances

Dependency overrides are most often granted in the case of parental abuse or abandonment where the parents can't be found or shouldn't be contacted. They are not granted simply because the student is self-supporting, the parent's do not claim the student as a dependent for income tax purposes, the parents refuse to provide information on the FAFSA or the parents refuse to contribute to the student's education.

In very limited situations a student who cannot provide parental information and does not meet the criteria for a dependency override may receive Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan funds at dependent undergraduate levels. Talk to an aid counselor in the financial aid office to determine whether you are able to qualify for this exception.

Requesting an Override 

Each college has its own policies and procedures for granting dependency overrides. At Buffalo State, students requesting a dependency override need to complete the Independence Appeal Form and supply all required documentation.

All decisions regarding such requests are at the discretion of the financial aid staff and cannot be appealed.  Students who have received overrides at other schools will be required to provide documentation to Buffalo State as well. In some cases, students granted dependency overrides by other schools will have their requests denied at Buffalo State.

Источник: financial aid independent

Dependent or Independent?

You may consider yourself independent because you don't receive support from your parents or you don't live in their home. Financial aid independent may even qualify as independent for income tax purposes, but the U.S. Department of Education has stricter standards for financial aid purposes.

In order to file your financial aid application as an independent student, you must meet one or more of the following criteria:

  • Age 24 by January 1 of the aid year
  • Veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces
  • Currently serving on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces for purposes other than training
  • Graduate or graduate/professional student
  • Married prior to filing and signing the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid)
  • Financially supporting legal dependents other than a spouse
  • Orphan, foster youth, or ward of the court
  • Emancipated minor or unaccompanied homeless youth

The online FAFSA will guide you through questions designed to determine whether you are dependent or independent. If you are independent it will allow you to skip the parent section. If you do not meet the criteria to be considered independent, you must file as a dependent student and provide information about your legal parent(s).

If your parents are divorced and your custodial parent (the parent you reside with most throughout the year) has remarried, your stepparent's information must be included as well, even if your parent and stepparent file separate tax forms, and even if they have an agreement not to assist each other's children with college expenses.

The only exception to the dependency rules at Michigan State is in very rare instances where it can be proven that there is a total breakdown in the relationship between student and parent(s). If you believe that this describes your situation, contact a financial aid advisor for advice on how to document your circumstances.

Filing incorrectly as independent when you're actually a dependent student can seriously delay the processing of your financial aid. If you have questions about your status, contact a financial aid advisor before filing your FAFSA.

Источник: https://finaid.msu.edu/depstat.asp

Dependent/Independent Status

Are you an independent or a dependent student?


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When applying for financial aid, you are considered either dependent or independent. Students considered dependent on their parents are required financial aid independent submit financial information about their family.

You are automatically considered independent if you are 24 or older as of December 31 within the academic year. If you are under 24, you will be considered independent if you are:

  • A graduate usaa mobile app deposit limit professional student.
  • Married.
  • A student with legal dependents other than a spouse.
  • A veteran of U.S. Armed Forces.
  • An active duty member of the U.S. armed forces (not for training purposes)
  • An orphan, ward of court or in foster care at any time age 13 or older.
  • In legal guardianship or emancipated minor status as of the date of application pokemon ex cards worth money 18 if a Minnesota resident or the age defined as being an financial aid independent in your state).
  • Determined to be an unaccompanied homeless youth anytime within the past year.
  • Classified by your financial aid administrator as independent because of unusual circumstances.

Appeals

If you think you should be independent because of unusual circumstances, even though you normally would be considered dependent, talk to the financial aid administrator at the school you're attending or wish to attend. The aid administrator can change your status to independent if he or she believes your status warrants it. That decision is based on his or her judgment and is final.

Источник: https://www.ohe.state.mn.us/mPg.cfm?pageID=195

Frequently Asked Questions

Undergraduate

General/Application Process Questions

Am I assigned a job by the work-study office?

No. You will review job openings and apply as you would for any other job. The application process will give you an opportunity to develop your resume, which you will include with your application, along with a cover letter. The employer is also likely to ask financial aid independent to attend an in person interview. The employer chooses how students apply and the employer does the hiring through the referral process.

DO I HAVE TO APPLY FOR FINANCIAL AID EVERY YEAR?

Yes. Your financial situation must be reassessed each year.

How Do I Apply for A Federal Student Loan?

Federal Loans (Direct Subsidized Loan, Direct Unsubsidized Loan and PLUS Loan) require that a FAFSA be completed every academic year for which the borrower is interested in receiving loans. Once UCLA Financial Aid and Scholarships receives your FAFSA information from the federal processor, we will determine your eligibility for different types of federal loans available.

A Financial Aid Notification (FAN) will be made available on MyUCLA to let you know what loans have been offered. You will need to accept the loan(s) offered on your FAN so that we may send the certification of your loan eligibility to the Department of Education. Before the loans are funded, you will also need to complete a promissory note for the loan(s) you are planning to borrow. Refer to the loan guides available on our Forms and Publications page for more detailed loan application information.

NOTE: First time student borrowers at UCLA are also required to complete a Financial aid independent Management Session with Student Loan Services, before their loans can be disbursed. The DMS can be completed on the web at www.loans.ucla.edu.

HOW DO I APPLY FOR FINANCIAL AID?

If you are a US citizen or permanent resident you must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at studentaid.gov. The priority filing deadline for University Grant, Federal Perkins Loan and Federal Work-Study consideration is March 2 each year for the upcoming year. If you are a continuing applicant, you financial aid independent be able to obx car show 2019 and complete a renewal FAFSA on the web if you know your FAFSA user name and password. If you are unable to access the renewal application you can complete a new FAFSA on the web.

If you are not a US Citizen, but graduate from a California High School, you may be eligible to complete a DREAM Act Application. The Dream Application websitecan provide you with more information on determining whether your are eligible

How Do I Consolidate My Loan?

You apply for a Direct Consolidation Loan through Studentaid.gov. This process offers both electronic and paper options. You can complete the electronic application, as explained below or you can download and print a paper application from StudentLoans.gov for submission by U.S. mail.

Once you sign in to Studentaid.gov using your personal identifiers and Federal Student Aid PIN, you will be able to electronically complete the Federal Direct Consolidation Loan Application and Promissory Note. The electronic application on StudentLoans.gov consists of the green dot customer service number five steps:

1. Choose Loans & Servicer
2. Repayment Plan Selection
3. Terms & Conditions
4. Borrower & Reference Information
5. Review & Sign

After you submit your application electronically via Studentaid.gov or by mailing a paper application, the consolidation servicer selected will complete the actions required to consolidate your eligible loans. The consolidation servicer will be your point of contact for any questions you may have related to your consolidation application.

It is critical that you continue making payments, if required, to the holders or servicers of the loans you want to consolidate until your consolidation servicer informs you that the underlying loans have been paid off.

General/Application Process Questions

What is an FSA ID?

An FSA ID is a username and password that you must use to log in to certain U.S. Department of Education (ED) websites. Your FSA ID identifies you as someone who has the right to access your own personal information on ED websites such as the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®) at fafsa.gov.

Your FSA ID is used to sign legally binding documents electronically. It has the same legal status as a written signature. Don't give your FSA ID to anyone—not even to someone helping you fill out the FAFSA. Sharing your FSA ID could put you at risk of identity theft

If you are a parent of a dependent student, you will need your own FSA ID if you want to sign your child's FAFSA electronically. If you have more than one child attending college, you can use the same FSA ID to sign all applications. Please note: Each FSA ID user must have a unique e-mail address.

Your FSA ID is used to sign legally binding documents electronically. It has the same legal status as a written signature. Don't give your FSA ID to anyone—not even to someone helping you fill out the FAFSA. Sharing your FSA ID could put you at risk of identity theft

What Happened to the Federal Student Aid Pin?

The FSA ID replaces the Federal Student Aid PIN. If you already have a PIN, you can link your information to your new FSA ID by entering your PIN while registering for your FSA ID. (This will save you time when registering for your FSA ID.) However, a PIN is not required to create an FSA ID.

Do I have to apply for financial aid every year?

Yes. Your financial situation must be reassessed each year.

How do I apply for financial aid?

You must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at www.fafsa.gov. Priority filing deadline for University Grant, Federal Perkins Loan and Federal Work-Study consideration is March 2 each year for the upcoming year. If you are a continuing applicant, you will be able to access and complete a renewal FAFSA on the web if you know your FAFSA user name and password. If you are unable to access the renewal application you can complete a new FAFSA on the web or via paper (paper applications are available at the Service Counter).

If you are not a US Citizen, but graduate from a California High School, you may be eligible to complete a DREAM Act Application. Click here for more information regarding the DREAM Act Application.

What is the deadline to apply for financial aid?

Applications for the upcoming academic year become available on October 1 each year and should be filed by the March 2 priority deadline. Applications submitted after this date will be considered late and limit your eligibility to federal aid (Pell Grant, Federal Stafford and Parent Loans) only.

My parents don't provide me with financial support. Can I apply as an “Independent” student?

In order to be considered independent for financial aid purposes you must meet one of the following criteria:

• You must turn 24 before January 1 of the academic year that you are applying for.

• Be a Graduate/Professional student.

• Be married.

• Have children who receive more than half of their support from you.

• Have dependents (other than your children/spouse) that live with you and receive more than half of their support from you.

• Be an orphan or ward/dependent of the court.

• Be a veteran of the United States Armed Forces.

• You are or were an emancipated minor as determined by a court in your state of legal residence.

• You are or were in legal guardianship as determined by a court in your state of legal residence.

• If your high school or school district homeless liaison determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless in the year before you apply for financial aid.

• If a director of an emergency shelter or transitional housing program funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless in the year before you apply for financial aid.

• If a director of a runaway or homeless youth basic center or transitional living program determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or were self-supporting and at risk of being homeless in the year before you apply for financial aid.

If you do not meet any of the criteria listed above, but can document extreme family circumstances that prevent you from obtaining your parents information/support, you may file an Independent Appeal Form with the Financial Aid and Scholarships office for a possible reevaluation of your status.

My parents are divorced. Whose information do I provide on the FAFSA?

Provide information for the parent you lived with more during the past twelve months. If financial aid independent did not live with one parent more than the other, give answers about the parent who provided more financial support during the last twelve months, or during the most recent year that you actually received from a parent. If this parent is remarried as of today, answer the questions about that parent and the person whom your parent married (your step-parent).

My parents live in another country. Do I need to report their information on the FAFSA?

Yes. Report their financial data in U.S. dollars. Use the exchange rate at the time you complete the FAFSA form.

How can I make corrections to my FAFSA?

If you filed electronically you can use your PIN to correct your application on the web at www.fafsa.gov.

If you filed a paper application you must use the Student Aid Report (SAR) to make corrections. If you need to request a copy of your SAR, call 1-800-4FEDAID.

How do I get a copy of my Student Aid Report (SAR)?

If you filed electronically you may print a copy of your SAR off the web, using your PIN. If you completed a paper application you need to call 1-800-4FEDAID to obtain a free copy of your SAR.

I want to apply for financial aid, but I or my parents haven't completed their Federal Tax Returns yet. Should I wait to file my FAFSA?

In order for you to be considered for all types of financial aid you must submit your FAFSA before the priority filing deadline of March 2. You can provide estimated financial information on your application. Once you and/or your parents file the federal tax returns you will need to access your FAFSA data and update it with information from the tax returns.

I am expecting to receive outside assistance (scholarships, fellowships, loans, etc.) How will these affect my financial aid?

Because UCLA meets 100% of your demonstrated need with a combination of grant, scholarship, work-study, and subsidized/unsubsidized student and Parent loan sources, the receipt of aid from outside sources does make an adjustment to your aid necessary. In order that these awards can help a student as much as possible, it is our policy to replace a student's self-help (loan and work awards) first. If the amount of outside aid received exceeds the amount of loan and work in your package, grants are then reduced.

Any delay in reporting this information to the Financial Aid and Scholarships office may result in you receiving financial aid in excess of your eligibility, which will necessitate that you be billed for funds already received.

I received a better financial aid award from first national bank severna park university. Will UCLA match the other school's award?

UCLA does not "negotiate" their financial aid awards in response to offers from other universities. If the other school has information about your family's financial situation that you did not share with us, or if you have reason to believe we have made an error in our evaluation, please contact us to discuss a possible reevaluation.

Will I receive the same financial aid package each year I attend UCLA?

Your eligibility for financial aid is evaluated annually based on the current year FAFSA information. If your family circumstances remain relatively unchanged, you can expect to receive a similar financial aid package from one year to the next. Cal Grants are not available to students who are fifth year seniors.

What is a W9?

Form W-9 is used in the United States income tax system by a third party who must file an information return with the Internal Revenue Service. It requests the name, address, and taxpayer identification information of a taxpayer

Use Form W-9 to provide your correct Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) to the person who is required to file an information return with the IRS to report, for example:

  • Income paid to you.
  • Real estate transactions.
  • Mortgage interest you paid.
  • Acquisition or abandonment of secured property.
  • Cancellation of debt.
  • Contributions you made to an IRA.
Источник: https://financialaid.ucla.edu/faq-and-links/general-application-process

Independent Student

What Is an Independent Student?

An independent student doesn't have to provide their parents' personal or financial information on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Neither the government nor the schools the student applies to will consider the parents' financial resources in financial aid decisions. Only the student's financial resources will count toward the ability to pay for college.

Key Takeaways

  • Being classified as a dependent or independent student matters for college financial aid.
  • The vast majority of undergraduates do not qualify as independent students.
  • The federal government, colleges, and universities all expect parents to contribute financially to their children's higher education.
  • Under a few circumstances that demonstrate true independence or financial hardship, independent student status may apply.

Qualifying as an Independent Student

An independent student must meet at least one of the following 10 criteria:

  1. You are age 24 or older by Jan. 1 of the school year for which you are requesting financial aid.
  2. You are married or separated but not divorced.
  3. You are pursuing a graduate or professional degree.
  4. You have children and provide more than half of their financial support.
  5. You have dependents (other than a child or spouse) who live with you and receive more than half of their financial support from you.
  6. You are serving on active duty (not training) in the U.S. armed forces.
  7. You are a veteran of the U.S. armed forces.
  8. At any point after you turned 13, both of your parents were deceased, you were in foster care, or you were in a court's care.
  9. You are an emancipated minor or in a court-appointed legal guardianship.
  10. You are an unaccompanied youth who is homeless or at risk of being homeless.

However, meeting at least one of these criteria does not mean you are automatically an independent student. You'll find the questions related to these criteria in Chapter 2, Step 3, beginning on page 30 of the Application and Verification guide section of the 2021-2022 Federal Student Aid Handbook.

Should you become an emancipated minor?

Though this might seem like an opportune loophole to get more financial aid (see criterion number 9, above), becoming an emancipated minor usually requires one of three major steps, depending on state law:

  1. Getting married
  2. Joining the military
  3. Getting the court's permission

Getting married and joining the military are both significant life decisions that have legal, financial, and life-and-death implications. And getting the court's permission requires that a judge find that emancipation is in the minor's best interest. None of these choices should be taken lightly.

Examples of an Independent Student

Qualify as an independent student isn't easy, but the three examples below illustrate circumstances that would likely qualify under the 10 criteria listed earlier.

Javier grew up on the Florida coast with his mom. His dad has never been in his life, and his aunts and uncles live in Puerto Rico. During the summer when Javi was 15, a Category 4 hurricane hit, and his mom drowned in her car. Since then, Javi has been living in the youth shelter at his friend's church. Javi would be considered an unaccompanied homeless youth, and the church pastor who oversees the shelter would be able to attest to his circumstances.

Kim is a sophomore in college. She is 21 and has been engaged to her high school sweetheart, TJ, for the past year. He is also 21 and a sophomore. They decide to get married during the summer between their sophomore and junior years. When they apply for financial aid for their senior years, they will be considered independent students.

Marcel and his girlfriend had a son when he was 16. His girlfriend left him and Marcel has been raising his son on his own ever since. Marcel's mom watches her grandson while Marcel finishes high school during the day and works part time, but Marcel pays for all of his son's clothes, food, medical bills, and other needs. He also helps his mom pay the rent.

None of these things will make someone an independent student:

  • Having a parent who is unwilling to contribute to the cost of college
  • Having a parent who does not claim their child as a dependent on their tax return
  • Not living in a parent's home or relying on them financially

Professional Judgment

For circumstances that don't fit neatly into the FAFSA's boxes, there's something called professional judgment. This is a legal standard that allows a college or university's financial aid administrator to decide that a student can be considered independent based on special circumstances even though the FAFSA definition would consider them a dependent student. Professional judgment may result in a student receiving enough aid for college when they otherwise would not. Such decisions vary by school and are final.

Financial Aid for Independent Students

The maximum amount of Federal Direct Loans a student is eligible for is partly based on dependency status. Dependent students, for example, can borrow up to $5,500 for freshman year, and their parents can borrow more in PLUS loans. Independent students aren't expected to rely on parents to help them pay for college, so they can borrow more in Federal Direct Loans. A freshman can borrow up to $9,500, for example. Dependent students whose parents are not eligible for PLUS loans can also borrow up to this amount.

Parents can borrow up to the full cost of attendance minus all other financial aid but must have acceptable credit to qualify. Thus, a student without financial assistance from a parent might still be at a disadvantage in paying for school even with the higher federal student loan limit. An independent student will need to rely more on financial aid awards from the school, income from work, or cheaper tuition.

What's the Difference Between Federal and Private Student Loans?

If you apply for financial aid when going to college, you will likely need to take out a loan to pay for at least part of your education. The two types of loans available, federal and private, are distinct.

Federal student loans and federal parent loans are funded by the federal government. Terms and conditions are set by law and include benefits (such as fixed interest rates and income-driven repayment plans). They do not require a credit check.

Private student loans are nonfederal loans extended by a bank, credit union, private lender, or school. Because they don't offer the benefits of federal loans, private student loans are generally more expensive. They generally do require credit checks.

If Your Parents Refuse to Help Pay for College, Can You Claim Status as an Independent Student?

No. The Department of Education specifically disallows independent student status for a student whose parents refuse to help finance their child's college education. However, there could be other factors that make it possible for you to receive independent status. These include:

  • Abuse within the family
  • Abandonment by parents
  • Incarceration or hospitalization of parents
  • Parents deemed physically or mentally incapable
  • Unsuitable parents (for example, you have been removed and placed in foster care)

How Much Can I Borrow for a Student Loan?

If you are an undergraduate student, the federal government limits the amount you can borrow in Direct federal student loans to between $5,500 and $12,500 per year, depending on your year in school and student dependency status.

If you are a professional/graduate student, the annual maximum you can borrow in Direct Unsubsidized Loans is $20,500.

Parents and graduate students can also borrow up to the cost of attendance minus financial aid received in Direct PLUS Loans.

There is no limit to the amount you can borrow in private student loans other than the limit imposed by the lender based on your or your parents' creditworthiness.

The Bottom Line

Qualifying for independent student status may result in more financial aid for college. But qualifying is far more difficult than it might sound. It's not enough to have parents who refuse to provide financial support for college. Living alone and supporting oneself financially also won't classify a student as independent. This status is reserved for truly unusual and challenging circumstances that require extra financial aid from the government and the school for college to be feasible.

Источник: https://www.investopedia.com/independent-student-4800753

Dependency & Risk of Homelessness

dependency

For financial aid, your status as dependent or independent is based on your answers to the dependency questions listed on the FAFSA. 

You are automatically independent if you are:

  • 24 years of age or older
  • Considered an orphan
  • A veteran
  • Married
  • A graduate student
  • Or have dependents

If you do not meet the criteria above, you may appeal to be treated as an independent student if there are special circumstances that make it difficult or impossible for you to provide parent income information on the FAFSA. Those reasons include, but are not limited to:

  • Circumstances that threaten your health or safety
  • Abandonment by parents
  • Custodial parent(s) is/are incarcerated
  • Both parents are deceased (and/or non-custodial parent is estranged)
  • You are in the legal custody of a family member or other adult

Being self-sufficient or your parent’s refusal to financially contribute or provide income information are not sufficient reasons for appealingto be treated as an independent student for financial aid. Please contact us if your parent is refusing to provide their information on the FAFSA or if you would like to submit an appeal and have questions.

All appeals are considered by the Dependency Appeals Committee within OSSA.

To appeal, please submit the following information in one PDF or word file using the document uploader tool. If your letters of support will come from other individuals, they can email their letters to [email protected] Please be sure they include your first and last name and PID number.

  • One (1) personal statement from you providing more detail about your circumstance. Specifically, personal statements should speak to the nature of your relationship with your biological or adopted parents.
  • Two (2) letters of support from individuals with knowledge of your situation. These letters can come from custodian(s), a teacher, counselor, social worker,community member, or any other neutral party who is aware of your circumstances. These letters should not come from fellow students.

The appeals committee may request additional information or documentation to make a decision. Once a decision has been made, your FAFSA will be updated and you will the skeleton key in hindi download notified by email. 

If you are approved to be treated as an independent student, the renewal process is quite simple! You need to submit your FAFSA for the upcoming school year first. A renewal form link will be sent to you at the beginning of the spring semester for the following school year. 

If your situation has not changed, you do not need to provide parent information on the FAFSA. This will show your FAFSA as “rejected” initially, but submission of the renewal form will allow us to make the correction.

risk of homelessness

You may be considered independent if you are homeless or at risk of homelessness. In some cases, you may have received documentation from one or more of the following:

  • a school district homeless liaison,
  • a director of an emergency shelter or transitional housing program, 
  • or the director of a runaway or homeless youth basic center or transitional living program. 

If you do not have documentation from any of the individuals above, a financial aid administrator can also make the determination.

If you feel you may meet this criteria, you can view more information on the federal website, or reach out to our office.

FAQ's

You must have an approved Juvenile Petition for Emancipation from the NC court system  to meet the definition of an emancipated minor.  If you do not live in the custody of your parents and there is a special circumstance, you may want to consider submitting a dependency appeal.

In North Carolina, legal custody is defined as the right for a court appointed individual to make major decisions on your behalf. Guardianship extends this a little further, and allows a court-appointed guardian to make major decisions and manage your affairs, property, or estate. You can view more information on the NC Courts website.

If requested, youwill need to present documentation that shows legal guardianship. We  cannot accept legal custody documents as proof financial aid independent legal guardianship.

As a first-year student, you can amazon customer service chat transcript documentation signed by a counselor or other homeless district liaison that indicates your status according to McKinney-Vento. In the following academic years, you can contact our financial aid independent that wecan make the determination.

You are considered homeless if you lack fixed, regular, and adequate housing. This includes living “on the street” as well as temporarily financial aid independent with other people because you have nowhere else to go, living in substandard housing (no utilities), living in emergency or transitional shelters; or living in motels, camp grounds, cars, parks, abandoned buildings or any public or private place not designed for humans to live in. It can also include living in a dorm or apartment if youwould otherwise be homeless.

No. We treat your financial aid information as your own and parents are not able to receive information from our office if they have not been set up by you as a proxy. If your dependency appeal is approved, please check to make sure your parent is no longer assigned a PIN by which they can access information about your financial aid. 

Источник: https://studentaid.unc.edu/special-circumstances/dependency-and-risk-of-homelessness/
financial aid independent
financial aid independent

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