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South america map in spanish


south america map in spanish

The language situation in South and Central America may seem simple—Brazilians speak Portuguese, and the rest speaks Spanish, right? Not so fast. Dashboard. CCS_SAMPLE-COURSE-SPANISH-206-SPANISH-FOR-PROFESSIONS-BUSINESS-STEIN. south-america-physical-map.jpg. Skip To Content. About one in four Latin Americans self-identify as Afro-descendants today. They comprise a highly heterogeneous population and are unevenly.
south america map in spanish

South america map in spanish -

Afro-descendants in Latin America: Toward a Framework of Inclusion

One in four Latin Americans identify themselves as people of African descent. They are one of the largest, yet least visible minorities in the region, comprising over 133 million people, the majority living in Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, Mexico and Venezuela, according to World Bank report "Afro-descendants in Latin America: Toward a Framework of Inclusion".

They comprise a highly heterogeneous population and are unevenly distributed across the region, but share a common history of displacement and exclusion.

Despite significant gains over the past decade, Afro-descendants still are overrepresented among the poor and are underrepresented in decision-making positions, both in the private and the public sector.

The extent to which Latin America will be able to end extreme poverty and boost shared prosperity will therefore depend, to a very large degree, on the social inclusion of Afro-descendants.

The objective of this study is to deepen the region's empirical understanding of the drivers behind the persistent exclusion of the afro-descendants, as a first step to design appropriate solutions. The report proposes a framework to organize and think of the myriad options available to address their situations, based on the experience accumulated by the region and the data available.

Источник: https://www.worldbank.org/en/region/lac/brief/afro-descendants-in-latin-america

While teaching my students about Spanish speaking countries, I noticed that some students struggled with the geography part of the lesson. Some needed help remembering the names of the countries. I wanted to find a fun way to help, so I set out to find fun interactive resources I could use with my students.


I found some really neat resources.


Resource 1: Spanish Speaking Countries Setera Online Map Quiz Game.

My students had a ball playing this game and trying to beat each other's time score.


Resource 2: Spanish Speaking Countries Mapas Interactivos.

This interactive map allows students two options study or quiz mode.


Resource 3: Purpose Games Spanish Speaking Countries Online Interactive Map. Students are be able to see their score and keep track of remaining attempts.


I also wanted a fun way for students to remember and practice saying the names of the countries in Spanish. I found two catchy videos on YouTube.


Video 1: Rock The Countries-Central America. The Video includes the countries and capitals of Central America and the Caribbean.


Video 2: Rock The Countries-South America. The Video includes the countries and capitals of South America.

Video 3: The Central America Geography Song by Rocking the World. They also have some free activities to go with the video. The activities include maps, song lyrics, and a cloze activity. You can download the free activities here>>

Mapa Musical by Natalia Hernadez. It is a collaborative map on Padlet. You can add music videos, to illustrate the musical style of regions around the world.

Google Drive resources this was created by Melanie Borges Labendeira and shared by Claudia Shiell inside of the Tech for World Language Teachers Facebook group. It contains several no-prep resources you can use with your students. Some of the resources included are virtual field trips.

Bonus resource: The Taste Atlas website, is a world atlas of food and drinks, an encyclopedia of flavors. You can select a country and see what foods are popular in that region. This is great for cultural enrichment and research projects.

I want to hear from you which resource did you find the most useful?

Let us know your favorite inside our Free Facebook group Tech for World Language Teachers.

Источник: https://www.tech4worldlanguageteachers.com/blog/2019/8/20/spanish-speaking-countries-fun-interactive-resources

What Is Latin America? Definition and List of Countries

Latin America is a region of the world that spans two continents, North America (including Central America and the Caribbean) and South America. It includes19 sovereign nations and one non-independent territory, Puerto Rico. Most people in the region speak Spanish or Portuguese, although French, English, Dutch, and Kreyol are also spoken in parts of the Caribbean, Central America, and South America.

By and large, the countries in Latin America are still considered "developing" or "emerging" nations, with Brazil, Mexico, and Argentina comprising the largest economies. Latin America's population has a high proportion of mixed-race people due to its colonial history and encounters between Europeans, indigenous people, and Africans. In addition, its population is a result of an unprecedented history of transcontinental migration: after 1492, 60 million Europeans, 11 million Africans, and 5 million Asians arrived in the Americas.

Key Takeaways: What Is Latin America

  • Latin America spans two continents, North America (including Central America and the Caribbean) and South America.
  • Latin America includes 19sovereign nations and one dependent territory, Puerto Rico.
  • Most people in the region speak Spanish or Portuguese.

Latin America Definition

Latin America is a region that is difficult to define. It is sometimes considered a geographic region that includes the entire Caribbean, i.e., all Western Hemisphere countries south of the United States, regardless of language spoken. It is defined by others as a region where a Romance language (Spanish, Portuguese, or French) predominates, or as the countries with a history of Iberian (Spanish and Portuguese) colonialism.

The most limited definition, and the one utilized in this article, defines Latin America as countries where Spanish or Portuguese is currently the dominant language. Thus, not included are the islands of Haiti and the French Caribbean, the Anglophone Caribbean (including Jamaica and Trinidad), the mainland English-speaking countries of Belize and Guyana, and the Dutch-speaking countries of the hemisphere (Suriname, Aruba, and the Netherland Antilles).

Brief History

Before the arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1492, Latin America had been settled for millennia by a wide range of indigenous groups, some of whom (Aztecs, Mayans, Incas) boasted advanced civilizations. The Spanish were the first Europeans to arrive in the Americas, followed soon after by the Portuguese, who colonized Brazil. Landing first in the Caribbean, the Spanish soon expanded their explorations and conquest to Central America, Mexico, and South America.

The majority of Latin America gained independence from Spain between 1810 and 1825, with Brazil gaining independence from Portugal in 1825. Of Spain's two remaining colonies, Cuba gained its independence in 1898, at which time Spain ceded Puerto Rico to the U.S. in the Treaty of Paris that ended the Spanish-American War.

Latin American Countries

Latin America is divided up into several regions: North America, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean.

North America

Despite being the only North American country that is part of Latin America, Mexico is one of the region's largest and most important nations. Mexico is the largest source not only of Latin American immigrants, but of all immigrants to the U.S.

Central America

Central America is comprised of seven countries, six of which are Spanish-speaking.

Costa Rica is located between Nicaragua and Panama. It is one of the most stable countries in Central America, primarily because it has been able to capitalize on its rich topography for its ecotourism industry.

El Salvador is the smallest but most densely populated country in Central America. Along with Guatemala and Honduras, the country belongs to the maligned "Northern Triangle," known for its violence and crime that is in large part a result of the civil wars of the 1980s.

Central America's most populous country by far, as well as its most linguistically diverse, is Guatemala, known for the richness of its Mayan culture. Around 40% of the population speaks an indigenous language as their mother tongue.

Honduras borders Guatemala, Nicaragua, and El Salvador. It is sadly known as one of Latin America's poorest (66% of people live in poverty) and most violent countries.

Central America's largest country in terms of surface area is Nicaragua. It is also the poorestcountry in Central America and the second poorest in the region.

Panama, the southernmost country in Central America, has historically had a very close relationship with the U.S., particularly because of the history of the Panama Canal.

South America

South America is home to 12 independent nations, 10 of which are Spanish- or Portuguese-speaking.

Argentina is South America's second largest and third most populous country, after Brazil and Colombia. It's also Latin America's second biggest economy.

Bolivia is one of South America's highland countries, known for its mountainous geography. It has a relatively large indigenous population, specifically Aymara and Quechua speakers.

South America's largest country in both population and physical size, Brazil is also one of the world's most dominant economies. It covers almost half the land mass of South America and is home to the Amazon Rainforest.

Known for its prosperity relative to the rest of Latin America, Chile also has a whiter population with a smaller proportion of racially mixed people than most of the region.

Colombia is South America's second largest nation, and third largest in all of Latin America. The country is rich in natural resources, particularly petroleum, nickel, iron ore, natural gas, coal, and gold.

Although it is a medium-sized country within South America, Ecuador is the continent's most densely populated nation. It is located along the Earth's equator.

The small nation of Paraguay has a relatively homogenous population: most people are of mixed European and Guaraní (indigenous) ancestry.

Known for its ancient history and Incan Empire, Peru is the fourth most populous country in South America and the fifth in Latin America. It is known for its mountainous topography and relatively large indigenous population.

Uruguay is South America's third smallest country, and, like neighboring Argentina, has a population that is largely of European descent (88%).

With a long coastline on the northern border of South America, Venezuela has much in common culturally with its Caribbean neighbors. It is the birthplace of the "liberator" of South America, Simon Bolivar.

The Caribbean

The Caribbean is the sub-region with the most diverse history of European colonization: Spanish, French, English, Dutch, and Kreyol are all spoken. Only the Spanish-speaking countries will be discussed in this article.

The last Spanish colony to gain its independence, Cuba is the largest and most populous nation in the Caribbean. Like the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico, the indigenous population was virtually eliminated in Cuba, and the primary type of racial mixture was between Africans and Europeans.

The Dominican Republic comprises the eastern two-thirds of what Spanish colonizers named the island of Hispaniola, and it has historically had a tense relationship with the western third of the island, Haiti. Culturally and linguistically, the Dominican Republic has much in common with Cuba and Puerto Rico.

The small island of Puerto Rico is a commonwealth of the U.S., although there has been a consistent debate throughout the past century about whether to continue with this status or to pursue statehood or independence. Since 1917, Puerto Ricans have been granted automatic U.S. citizenship, yet they don't have the right to vote in presidential elections.

Sources

Источник: https://www.thoughtco.com/what-is-latin-america-4691831

Explorer Christopher Columbus sets foot on the American mainland for the first time, at the Paria Peninsula in present-day Venezuela. Thinking it an island, he christened it Isla Santa and claimed it for Spain.

Columbus was born in Genoa, Italy, in 1451. Little is known of his early life, but he worked as a seaman and then a sailing entrepreneur. He became obsessed with the possibility of pioneering a western sea route to Cathay (China), India, and the fabled gold and spice islands of Asia. At the time, Europeans knew no direct sea route to southern Asia, and the route via Egypt and the Red Sea was closed to Europeans by the Ottoman Empire, as were many land routes. Contrary to popular legend, educated Europeans of Columbus’ day did believe that the world was round, as argued by St. Isidore in the seventh century. However, Columbus, and most others, underestimated the world’s size, calculating that East Asia must lie approximately where North America sits on the globe (they did not yet know that the Pacific Ocean existed).

With only the Atlantic Ocean, he thought, lying between Europe and the riches of the East Indies, Columbus met with King John II of Portugal and tried to persuade him to back his “Enterprise of the Indies,” as he called his plan. He was rebuffed and went to Spain, where King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella also rejected him at least twice. However, after the Spanish conquest of the Moorish kingdom of Granada in January 1492, the Spanish monarchs, flush with victory, agreed to support his voyage.

READ MORE: The Ships of Christopher Columbus Were Sleek, Fast—and Cramped

On August 3, 1492, Columbus set sail from Palos, Spain, with three small ships, the Santa María, the Pinta and the Niña. On October 12, the expedition sighted land, probably Watling Island in the Bahamas, and went ashore the same day, claiming it for Spain. Later that month, Columbus sighted Cuba, which he thought was mainland China, and in December the expedition landed on Hispaniola, which Columbus thought might be Japan. He established a small colony there with 39 of his men. The explorer returned to Spain with gold, spices, and “Indian” captives in March 1493 and was received with the highest honors by the Spanish court. He was given the title “admiral of the ocean sea,” and a second expedition was promptly organized. He was the first European to explore the Americas since the Vikings set up colonies in Greenland and Newfoundland in the 10th century.

Fitted out with a large fleet of 17 ships with 1,500 colonists aboard, Columbus set out from Cádiz in September 1493 on his second voyage to the New World. Landfall was made in the Lesser Antilles in November. Returning to Hispaniola, he found the men he left there slaughtered by the natives, and he founded a second colony. Sailing on, he explored Puerto Rico, Jamaica, and numerous smaller islands in the Caribbean. Columbus returned to Spain in June 1496 and was greeted less warmly, as the yield from the second voyage had fallen well short of its costs.

Isabella and Ferdinand, still greedy for the riches of the East, agreed to a smaller third voyage and instructed Columbus to find a strait to India. In May 1498, Columbus left Spain with six ships, three filled with colonists and three with provisions for the colony on Hispaniola. This time, he made landfall on Trinidad. He entered the Gulf of Paria in Venezuela and planted the Spanish flag in South America on August 1, 1498. He explored the Orinoco River of Venezuela and, given its scope, soon realized he had stumbled upon another continent. Columbus, a deeply religious man, decided after careful thought that Venezuela was the outer regions of the Garden of Eden.

Returning to Hispaniola, he found that conditions on the island had deteriorated under the rule of his brothers, Diego and Bartholomew. Columbus’ efforts to restore order were marked by brutality, and his rule came to be deeply resented by both the colonists and the native Taino chiefs. In 1500, Spanish chief justice Francisco de Bobadilla arrived at Hispaniola, sent by Isabella and Ferdinand to investigate complaints, and Columbus and his brothers were sent back to Spain in chains.

He was immediately released upon his return, and Ferdinand and Isabella agreed to finance a fourth voyage, in which he was to search for the earthly paradise and the realms of gold said to lie nearby. He was also to continue looking for a passage to India. In May 1502, Columbus left Cádiz on his fourth and final voyage to the New World. After returning to Hispaniola, against his patrons’ wishes, he explored the coast of Central America looking for a strait and for gold. Attempting to return to Hispaniola, his ships, in poor condition, had to be beached on Jamaica. Columbus and his men were marooned, but two of his captains succeed in canoeing the 450 miles to Hispaniola. Columbus was a castaway on Jamaica for a year before a rescue ship arrived.

In November 1504, Columbus returned to Spain. Queen Isabella, his chief patron, died less than three weeks later. Although Columbus enjoyed substantial revenue from Hispaniola gold during the last years of his life, he repeatedly attempted (unsuccessfully) to gain an audience with King Ferdinand, whom he felt owed him further redress. Columbus died in Valladolid on May 20, 1506, without realizing the scope of his achievement: He had discovered for Europe the "New World," whose riches over the next century would help make Spain the wealthiest and most powerful nation on earth.

READ MORE: Christopher Columbus: How The Explorer's Legend Grew—and Then Drew Fire

Источник: https://www.history.com

WikiLang/South America

South America includes 12 countries and two non-sovereign entities: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Falkland Islands (United Kingdom), French Guiana (France), Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay and Venezuela. Spanish is the official language in all South American countries except Brazil, Guyana, Suriname French Guiana and the Falkland Islands, and is spoken even in country that are not historically Spanish. Portugese is the official language in Brazil. Official languages in Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana are respectively English, Dutch and French. English is also spoken in the Falkland Islands.

Before colonization from European nations, South America was inhabited by several Aboriginal nations speaking a wide variety of languages from different language families, most of them being long forgotten now, but a lot are still known by few and are currently in danger of extinction. At the time of European contact, it is estimated that 1,500 languages were spoken in South America; only 350 of those languages are still spoken today. Quechua is the native language family with the most speakers.

The classification and studies of indigenous languages in South America is not very advanced compared to the classification of North American indigenous languages. As such, it is difficult to determine what languages are related to each other to develop proper language families.

List of indigenous languages[edit]

Extensive language families (more than 5 languages) of South America; dark spots are language isolates or quasi-isolates and grey spots are unclassified languages; Queucha, the language family with the most speakers, is not shown

This list only includes languages with living speakers.

  • Akawaio (Brazil, Guyana, Venezuela)
  • Arawak (French Guiana, Guyana, Suriname, Venezuela)
  • Arutani (Brazil, Venezuela)
  • Baniwa (Brazil, Venezuela)
  • Baré (Venezuela)
  • Barí (Colombia, Venezuela)
  • Carib (French Guinea, Guyana, Suriname, Venezuela)
  • Chaima (Venezuela)
  • Cuiba (Colombia, Venezuela)
  • Cumanagoto (Venezuela)
  • Curripaco (Brazil, Colombia, Venezuela)
  • E’ñapa Woromaipu (Venezuela)
  • To be completed...

Other languages[edit]

  • German, Colonia Tovar (Venezuela)
  • To be completed...

Extinct languages[edit]

  • Baniva
  • To be completed...
Источник: https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/WikiLang/South_America

Spanish speaking countries

Spanish or Castillan is a Romance language that originated in the Iberian Peninsula of Europe. It is widely used around the world and especially in America.

Its origin is from Vulgar Roman that was brought by the Roman beginning 210 BC. The first document with traces of Spanish is from around the 9th century and the first systematic use was in the Kingdom of Castile in the 13th century.

Its worldwide extension is linked to the Spanish colonial Empire. There are in total 21 countries where Spanish is the official language. They are all located in the Americas, except Spain and Equatorial Guinea.

World map of countries with Spanish as official language

Table of contents

Spanish speaking countries (official language)

Spanish is the Official language of 21 countries:

Other Spanish speaking countries (common but not official language)

Further, there are some countries where Spanish is commonly used, but it is not an official language:

Spanish speakers in the world

In 2019, there are around 483 million Spanish native speakers around the world, which make it the second most important native language after Mandarin (Chinese). And around 580 million people can speak Spanish around the world which make it the 3rd spoken language in the world after Mandarin and English.

World map of Spanish speaking countries

World map of countries with Spanish as official language
world map with the percentage of people speaking Spanish

Spanish speaking countries in Europe

Map of the countries in Europe with Spanish as official language
Map of Europe with the percentage of people speaking Spanish for each country
CountrySpanish speakers% of the total population
Andorra54,90965%
Austria280,3934%
Belgium446,9775%
Bulgaria130,7502%
Cyprus13,2082%
Czech Republic90,1241%
Denmark182,4504%
Estonia9,4571%
Finland133,2003%
France6,685,90114%
Germany2,576,3664%
Hungary83,2061%
Ireland140,8804%
Italy5,704,86311%
Latvia13,9431%
Lithuania28,2971%
Luxembourg24,2946%
Malta3,3541%
Netherlands668,5995%
Norway103,3092%
Poland324,1371%
Portugal808,09110%
Romania912,3375%
Russia23,3200.02%
Slovakia45,5001%
Slovenia52,7913%
Spain(Official language)46,383,38198%
Sweden467,4746%
Switzerland165,2022.18%
Turkey13,4800.02%
United Kingdom3,110,8806%

Spanish speaking countries in Africa

Map of the countries in Africa with Spanish as official language
Map of Africa with the percentage of people speaking Spanish for each country
CountrySpanish speakers% of the total population
Algeria223,4220.66%
Benin412,5154.12%
Cameroon63,5600.29%
Egypt3,500< 0.01%
Equatorial Guinea (Official language)918,00090.5%
Gabon167,41010,83%
Ivory Coast341,0731.60%
Morocco1,664,82310%
Namibia38700.14%
Senegal205,0001.59%

Spanish speaking countries in Asia

Map of the countries in Asia with Spanish as official language
Map of Asia with the percentage of people speaking Spanish for each country
CountrySpanish speakers% of the total population
China30,000< 0,01%
India9,750< 0,01%
Israel175,2312.46%
Japan167,5140.13%
Philippines3,016,7732,97%

Spanish speaking countries in North America

Map of the countries in North America with Spanish as official language
Map of North America with the percentage of people speaking Spanish for each country
CountrySpanish speakers% of the total population
Belize195,59752.8%
Canada736,6532.13%
Costa Rica(Official language)4,851,25699.2%
Cuba(Official language)11,187,20999.8%
Dominican Republic(Official language)10,302,22099.6%
El Salvador(Official language)6,745,45699.7%
Guatemala(Official language)15,599,54286.4%
Honduras(Official language)9,039,28798.7%
Jamaica8,0000.30%
Mexico(Official language)125,875,40298.5%
Nicaragua(Official language)6,218,321100%
Panama(Official language)3,504,43993.1%
Trinidad and Tobago65,8865%
United States56,817,62017.37%

Spanish speaking countries in South America

Map of the countries in South America with Spanish as official language
Map of South America with the percentage of people speaking Spanish for each country
CountrySpanish speakers% of the total population
Argentina(Official language)45,104,50299.4%
Bolivia(Official language)10,182,33687.9%
Brazil6,056,0182.86%
Chile(Official language)19,322,10299.3%
Colombia(Official language)49,969,44599.2%
Ecuador(Official language)16,845,73298.1%
Paraguay(Official language)4,946,32268.2%
Peru(Official language)29,541,92286.6%
Uruguay(Official language)3,441,94098.9%
Venezuela(Official language)32,214,15898.8%

Spanish speaking countries in Oceania

Map of the countries in Oceania with Spanish as official language
Map of Oceania with the percentage of people speaking Spanish for each country

Recommended books

sources:

wikipedia

El español: una lengua viva – Informe 2019 (PDF) (Report). Instituto Cervantes. 2019

Explore and interact with our maps
make a map
Источник: https://worldinmaps.com/spanish-speaking-countries/

Spanish Language Physical/Political Map of South America

This Spanish language map of South America features political and physical maps. The double sided classroom map is entirely in Spanish and features a political map on one side and a physical on the other. Perfect for Spanish language classes and international studies.

The political map is brightly colored with countries shown in contrasting colors; major cities, countries,  and capitals are labeled. On the reverse side a physical map that features topographic relief shading and ocean bathymetry identifies rivers, mountain ranges, plains, valleys, and peninsulas.

Printed on durable non-tear vinyl and mounted on a pull-down spring roller with a metal backboard. Features a washable markable surface. Spring roller assembly can be flipped to display either map.

Dimensions: 54" x 38"

Questions about the Spanish Language Physical/Political Map of South America?

World Maps Online is here to help you with all of your map needs. If you need help finding the right product, we're happy to answer questions you have. Give us a call during normal business hours at 877-884-2402 or click here to send us a message.

Источник: https://www.worldmapsonline.com/spanish-language-physical-political-map-of-south-america/

Spanish speaking countries

Spanish or Castillan is a Romance language that originated in the Iberian Peninsula of Europe. It is widely used around the world and especially in America.

Its origin is from Vulgar Roman that was brought by the Roman beginning 210 BC. The first document with traces of Spanish is from around the 9th century and the first systematic use was in the Kingdom of Castile in the 13th century.

Its worldwide extension is linked to the Spanish colonial Empire. There are in total 21 countries where Spanish is the official language. They are all located in the Americas, except Spain and Equatorial Guinea.

World map of countries with Spanish as official language

Table of contents

Spanish speaking countries (official language)

Spanish is the Official language of 21 countries:

Other Spanish speaking countries (common but not official language)

Further, there are some countries where Spanish is commonly used, but it is not an official language:

Spanish speakers in the world

In 2019, there are around 483 million Spanish native speakers around the world, which make it the second most important native language after Mandarin (Chinese). And around 580 million people can speak Spanish around the world which make it the 3rd spoken language in the world after Mandarin and English.

World map of Spanish speaking countries

World map of countries with Spanish as official language
world map with the percentage of people speaking Spanish

Spanish speaking countries in Europe

Map of the countries in Europe with Spanish as official language
Map of Europe with the percentage of people speaking Spanish for each country
CountrySpanish speakers% of the total population
Andorra54,90965%
Austria280,3934%
Belgium446,9775%
Bulgaria130,7502%
Cyprus13,2082%
Czech Republic90,1241%
Denmark182,4504%
Estonia9,4571%
Finland133,2003%
France6,685,90114%
Germany2,576,3664%
Hungary83,2061%
Ireland140,8804%
Italy5,704,86311%
Latvia13,9431%
Lithuania28,2971%
Luxembourg24,2946%
Malta3,3541%
Netherlands668,5995%
Norway103,3092%
Poland324,1371%
Portugal808,09110%
Romania912,3375%
Russia23,3200.02%
Slovakia45,5001%
Slovenia52,7913%
Spain(Official language)46,383,38198%
Sweden467,4746%
Switzerland165,2022.18%
Turkey13,4800.02%
United Kingdom3,110,8806%

Spanish speaking countries in Africa

Map of the countries in Africa with Spanish as official language
Map of Africa with the percentage of people speaking Spanish for each country
CountrySpanish speakers% of the total population
Algeria223,4220.66%
Benin412,5154.12%
Cameroon63,5600.29%
Egypt3,500< 0.01%
Equatorial Guinea (Official language)918,00090.5%
Gabon167,41010,83%
Ivory Coast341,0731.60%
Morocco1,664,82310%
Namibia38700.14%
Senegal205,0001.59%

Spanish speaking countries in Asia

Map of the countries in Asia with Spanish as official language
Map of Asia with the percentage of people speaking Spanish for each country
CountrySpanish speakers% of the total population
China30,000< 0,01%
India9,750< 0,01%
Israel175,2312.46%
Japan167,5140.13%
Philippines3,016,7732,97%

Spanish speaking countries in North America

Map of the countries in North America with Spanish as official language
Map of North America with the percentage of people speaking Spanish for each country
CountrySpanish speakers% of the total population
Belize195,59752.8%
Canada736,6532.13%
Costa Rica(Official language)4,851,25699.2%
Cuba(Official language)11,187,20999.8%
Dominican Republic(Official language)10,302,22099.6%
El Salvador(Official language)6,745,45699.7%
Guatemala(Official language)15,599,54286.4%
Honduras(Official language)9,039,28798.7%
Jamaica8,0000.30%
Mexico(Official language)125,875,40298.5%
Nicaragua(Official language)6,218,321100%
Panama(Official language)3,504,43993.1%
Trinidad and Tobago65,8865%
United States56,817,62017.37%

Spanish speaking countries in South America

Map of the countries in South America with Spanish as official language
Map of South America with the percentage of people speaking Spanish for each country
CountrySpanish speakers% of the total population
Argentina(Official language)45,104,50299.4%
Bolivia(Official language)10,182,33687.9%
Brazil6,056,0182.86%
Chile(Official language)19,322,10299.3%
Colombia(Official language)49,969,44599.2%
Ecuador(Official language)16,845,73298.1%
Paraguay(Official language)4,946,32268.2%
Peru(Official language)29,541,92286.6%
Uruguay(Official language)3,441,94098.9%
Venezuela(Official language)32,214,15898.8%

Spanish speaking countries in Oceania

Map of the countries in Oceania with Spanish as official language
Map of Oceania with the percentage of people speaking Spanish for each country

Recommended books

sources:

wikipedia

El español: una lengua viva – Informe 2019 (PDF) (Report). Instituto Cervantes. 2019

Explore and interact with our maps
make a map
Источник: https://worldinmaps.com/spanish-speaking-countries/

What Is Latin America? Definition and List of Countries

Latin America is a region of the world that spans two continents, North America (including Central America and the Caribbean) and South America. It includes19 sovereign nations and one non-independent territory, Puerto Rico. Most people in the region speak Spanish or Portuguese, although French, English, Dutch, and Kreyol are also spoken in parts of the Caribbean, Central America, and South America.

By and large, the countries in Latin America are still considered "developing" or "emerging" nations, with Brazil, Mexico, and Argentina comprising the largest economies. Latin America's population has a high proportion of mixed-race people due to its colonial history and encounters between Europeans, indigenous people, and Africans. In addition, its population is a result of an unprecedented history of transcontinental migration: after 1492, 60 million Europeans, 11 million Africans, and 5 million Asians arrived in the Americas.

Key Takeaways: What Is Latin America

  • Latin America spans two continents, North America (including Central America and the Caribbean) and South America.
  • Latin America includes 19sovereign nations and one dependent territory, Puerto Rico.
  • Most people in the region speak Spanish or Portuguese.

Latin America Definition

Latin America is a region that is difficult to define. It is sometimes considered a geographic region that includes the entire Caribbean, i.e., all Western Hemisphere countries south of the United States, regardless of language spoken. It is defined by others as a region where a Romance language (Spanish, Portuguese, or French) predominates, or as the countries with a history of Iberian (Spanish and Portuguese) colonialism.

The most limited definition, and the one utilized in this article, defines Latin America as countries where Spanish or Portuguese is currently the dominant language. Thus, not included are the islands of Haiti and the French Caribbean, the Anglophone Caribbean (including Jamaica and Trinidad), the mainland English-speaking countries of Belize and Guyana, and the Dutch-speaking countries of the hemisphere (Suriname, Aruba, and the Netherland Antilles).

Brief History

Before the arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1492, Latin America had been settled for millennia by a wide range of indigenous groups, some of whom (Aztecs, Mayans, Incas) boasted advanced civilizations. The Spanish were the first Europeans to arrive in the Americas, followed soon after by the Portuguese, who colonized Brazil. Landing first in the Caribbean, the Spanish soon expanded their explorations and conquest to Central America, Mexico, and South America.

The majority of Latin America gained independence from Spain between 1810 and 1825, with Brazil gaining independence from Portugal in 1825. Of Spain's two remaining colonies, Cuba gained its independence in 1898, at which time Spain ceded Puerto Rico to the U.S. in the Treaty of Paris that ended the Spanish-American War.

Latin American Countries

Latin America is divided up into several regions: North America, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean.

North America

Despite being the only North American country that is part of Latin America, Mexico is one of the region's largest and most important nations. Mexico is the largest source not only of Latin American immigrants, but of all immigrants to the U.S.

Central America

Central America is comprised of seven countries, six of which are Spanish-speaking.

Costa Rica is located between Nicaragua and Panama. It is one of the most stable countries in Central America, primarily because it has been able to capitalize on its rich topography for its ecotourism industry.

El Salvador is the smallest but most densely populated country in Central America. Along with Guatemala and Honduras, the country belongs to the maligned "Northern Triangle," known for its violence and crime that is in large part a result of the civil wars of the 1980s.

Central America's most populous country by far, as well as its most linguistically diverse, is Guatemala, known for the richness of its Mayan culture. Around 40% of the population speaks an indigenous language as their mother tongue.

Honduras borders Guatemala, Nicaragua, and El Salvador. It is sadly known as one of South america map in spanish America's poorest (66% of people live in poverty) and most violent countries.

Central America's largest country in terms of surface area is Nicaragua. It is also the poorestcountry in Central America and the second poorest in the region.

Panama, the southernmost country in Central America, has historically had a very close relationship with the U.S., particularly because of the history of the Panama Canal.

South America

South America is home discover online banking bonus 12 independent nations, 10 of which are Spanish- or Portuguese-speaking.

Argentina is South America's second largest and third most populous country, after Brazil and Colombia. It's also Latin America's second biggest economy.

Bolivia is one of South America's highland countries, known for its mountainous geography. It has a relatively large indigenous population, specifically Aymara and Quechua speakers.

South America's largest country in both population and physical size, Brazil is also one of the world's most dominant economies. It covers almost half the land mass of South America and is home to the Amazon Rainforest.

Known compare online high interest savings accounts its prosperity relative to the rest of Latin America, Chile also has a whiter population with a smaller proportion of racially mixed people than most of the region.

Colombia is South America's second largest nation, and third largest in all of Latin America. The country is rich in natural resources, particularly petroleum, nickel, iron ore, natural gas, coal, and gold.

Although it is a medium-sized country within South America, Ecuador is the continent's most densely populated nation. It is located along the Earth's equator.

The small nation of Paraguay has a relatively homogenous population: most people are of mixed European and Guaraní (indigenous) ancestry.

Known for its ancient history and Incan Empire, Peru is the fourth most populous country in South America and the fifth in Latin America. It is known for its mountainous topography and relatively large indigenous population.

Uruguay is South America's third smallest country, and, like neighboring Argentina, has a population south america map in spanish is largely of European descent (88%).

With a long coastline on the northern border of South America, Venezuela has much in common culturally with its Caribbean neighbors. It is the birthplace of the "liberator" of South America, Simon Bolivar.

The Caribbean

The Caribbean is the sub-region south america map in spanish the most diverse history of European colonization: Spanish, French, English, Dutch, and Kreyol are all spoken. Only the Spanish-speaking countries will be discussed in this article.

The last Spanish colony to gain its independence, Cuba is the largest and most populous nation in the Caribbean. Like the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico, the indigenous population was virtually eliminated in Cuba, and the primary type of racial mixture was between Africans and Europeans.

The Dominican Republic comprises the eastern two-thirds of what Spanish colonizers named the island of Hispaniola, and it has historically had a tense relationship with the western third of the island, Haiti. Culturally and linguistically, the Dominican Republic has much in common with Cuba and Puerto Rico.

The small island of Puerto Rico is a commonwealth jennifer holliday discography the U.S., although there has been a consistent debate throughout the past century about whether to continue with this status or to pursue statehood or independence. Since 1917, Puerto Ricans have been granted automatic U.S. citizenship, yet they don't have the right to vote in presidential elections.

Sources

Источник: https://www.thoughtco.com/what-is-latin-america-4691831

WikiLang/South America

South America includes 12 countries and two non-sovereign entities: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Falkland Islands (United Kingdom), French Guiana (France), Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay and Venezuela. Spanish is the official language in all South American countries except Brazil, Guyana, Suriname French Guiana and the Falkland Islands, and is spoken even in country that are not historically Spanish. Portugese is the official language in Brazil. Official languages in Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana are respectively English, Dutch and French. English is also spoken in the Falkland Islands.

Before colonization from European nations, South America was inhabited by several Aboriginal nations speaking a wide variety of languages from different language families, most of them being long forgotten now, but a lot are still known by few and are currently in danger of extinction. At the time of European contact, it is estimated that 1,500 languages were spoken in South America; only 350 of those languages are still spoken today. Quechua is the native language family with the most speakers.

The classification and studies of indigenous languages in South America is not very advanced compared to the classification of North American indigenous languages. As such, it is difficult to determine what languages are related to each other to develop proper language families.

List of indigenous languages[edit]

Extensive language families (more than 5 languages) of South America; dark spots are language isolates or quasi-isolates and grey spots are unclassified languages; Queucha, the language family with the most speakers, is not shown

This list only includes languages with living speakers.

  • Akawaio (Brazil, Guyana, Venezuela)
  • Arawak (French Guiana, Guyana, Suriname, Venezuela)
  • Arutani (Brazil, Venezuela)
  • Baniwa (Brazil, Venezuela)
  • Baré (Venezuela)
  • Barí (Colombia, Venezuela)
  • Carib (French Guinea, Guyana, Suriname, Venezuela)
  • Chaima (Venezuela)
  • Cuiba can you sell gift cards for cash, Venezuela)
  • Cumanagoto (Venezuela)
  • Curripaco (Brazil, Colombia, Venezuela)
  • E’ñapa Woromaipu (Venezuela)
  • To be completed.

Other languages[edit]

  • German, Colonia Tovar (Venezuela)
  • To be completed.

Extinct languages[edit]

  • Baniva
  • To be completed.
Источник: https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/WikiLang/South_America

Latin America Population 2021

Latin America is a group of countries from the Americas, comprised of countries scattered across North America, South America, Central South america map in spanish and the Caribbean. The countries are characterized by their use of the Romance languages Spanish, French, Creole and Portuguese. Latin America is one of the most urbanized regions in the world, with the majority of residents living in cities. Made up of 20 countries and 13 dependencies, the estimated population of the area in 2016 is over 626 million.

Latin America is made up of a total of 33 countries and south america map in spanish spread across the Americas. The total area of what is defined as Latin America stretches across 7.142 million square miles, or 19.197 million square kilometers. While official numbers are difficult to come by, as different regions hold their official censuses during different years, 2015 estimates put the population of Latin America at 626,741,000.

A broad definition of Latin America is that all of the Americas south of the US are included, which includes Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico and other areas located in South America and the Caribbean. The region is considered to be one south america map in spanish the most diverse in the world, as it is home to a blend of races, ethnicities and ethnic groups. The primary languages spoken throughout Latin America include French, Spanish, Portuguese, Creole or variants of these languages, although Spanish and Portuguese are the predominant languages. About ninety percent of people in Latin America are Christians, with about 69% identifying Catholicism as their religion of choice.

Most Populous Countries in Latin America

With an overall population of 626 million spread across just 33 countries and dependencies, it only makes sense that some of these countries have massive populations that add to this total number. The top five most populous countries in Latin America according to July 2015 estimates include:

  • Brazil: 204,259,812
  • Mexico: 121,736,809
  • Colombia: 46,736,728
  • Argentina: 43,431,886
  • Peru: 30,444,999

In terms of area, Brazil is not just the most populous country but it is the largest by area, measuring over 8.5 million square kilometers. Despite being the 2nd most populous country, Mexico is just ranked 3rd by area, while Argentina (which has the 4th largest population) is the 2nd largest country by area.

Least Populous Countries in Latin America

While the most populated country in Latin America, Brazil, has an astounding population of over 200 million, there are also regions that have smaller populations, with the smallest population registered under 10,000 residents. The five countries or dependencies with the lowest population include:

  • Saint Barthelemy: 7,237
  • Saint Martin: 31,754
  • French Guiana: 269,000
  • Martinique: 396,000
  • Guadeloupe: 468,000

Despite having the smallest population, Saint Barthelemy is the most densely populated in Latin America, as it covers just 53.2 square kilometers.

Largest Cities in Latin America

With a total population so large, it is no surprise that some of the largest metropolitan cities in the world are located in Latin America. Mexico City, Mexico, and Sau Paolo, Brazil, have nearly identical populations, which makes sense as Mexico and Brazil are two of the largest and most populous countries in the region. The third most populous city, Buenos Aires, Argentina, is ranked third by a long shot -- it has over 7 million fewer people than 2nd-ranked Sao Paulo. The five most populous metropolitan areas in Latin America are:

  • Mexico City, Mexico: 20,976,700
  • Sao Paulo, Brazil: 20,847,500
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina: 13,381,800
  • Rio De Janeiro, Brazil: 12,460,200
  • Lima, Peru: 10,674,100

Population Growth of Latin America

The 2016 population of over 626 million people may seem south america map in spanish a lot of people, but recent events show that people are beginning to leave the countries that make up Latin America for a number of reasons. A slowdown in the economies of Brazil, Venezuela and other large, populous areas has slowed down the growth rate of Latin America. Recent economic and social crises have led many experts to worry about future growth. The economic downturn of the countries that make up this area led to millions of people being stricken by poverty, and another one million added to the region's unemployed residents. Policymakers are pushing for reforms that would help turn around these economies that are in crisis and to help pull residents out of poverty and make Latin America thriving again.

Estimates for the area remain optimistic as far as population growth, with an estimated 2020 population of 665 million. Only time will tell how close Latin America will get to that number over the next few years.

Источник: https://worldpopulationreview.com/continents/latin-america-population

About the collection

Our Latin American collection is the largest in the UK. It spans the 16th century through to the present day, covering Mexico, the Caribbean, Central and South America. Researchers will find sources on European conquest and colonialism, the Catholic Church in the Americas, slavery and abolition, independence movements, and contemporary economy, politics and society.

What is available online?

Readers have access to the Library’s e-resource collections including official statistical databases, Hispanic American Periodical Index Handbook of Latin American Studies and Latin American digitised newspapers 1805-1922,

Researchers will find Latin American-related digital collections through th Endangered Archives Programme website.

You will find images and links to full text copies of printed materials related to Latin America in the British Library’s Flickr account

Researchers can also search for images through our Online Gallery, including the online exhibit on 19th-century movements for independence from Spain; and through our collaborative project with the Institute for Latin American Studies: Liberalism in the Americas.

What is bank of eastman magnolia state bank in our Reading Rooms?

Researchers will find Latin American related materials in all formats across the British Library. Our manuscripts are particularly strong on European Conquest, colonialism, indigenous languages, slavery, and, to a lesser degree, independence south america map in spanish. Our printed collection is strong in the early printing of Latin America, religious materials, natural history and 19th- and 20th-century literature, travelogues and political writings.  We continue to collect contemporary publishing in most fields. Of note is the collection of mainly 19th-century pamphlets, formed by the political journalist Luis López Domínguez (1810-1898) and our collection of Partido dos Trabalhadores pamphlets.

We hold a wide range of Latin American newspapers, mostly from the 19th and early south america map in spanish century. While many are short runs they often cover key periods (such as independence or the abolition of santander mortgage customer services contact number in the history of Latin America. Our maps collection includes some of the earliest representation by Europeans of the Americas as well as maps of colonial expansion, border conflicts, and trade routes. The Bauzá maps collection contains hundreds of maps and statistical texts related to Latin America from the 18th and early 19th century.

We collect contemporary government official publications and statistics from Latin America, as well as the most recent academic publications in the humanities from the region. In addition to photobooks (for example, Sebastião Salgado) we hold a small but significant collection of photographs and illustrations from Latin America. These are predominantly of 19th-century archaeological sites. In the sound archive you can find interviews, music and natural history recordings from and about Latin America.

Published guides to the British Library Latin American Collection

Short-title catalogue of Spanish-American books printed before 1601 now in the British Museum, ed. H. Thomas (1944)

A guide to Latin American and Caribbean census material, a bibliography and union list, ed. C. Travis (British Library, 1990). (Lists census material held in the British Library and elsewhere.)

British union catalogue of Latin Americana (UK, 1967-1988). (Includes British Library acquisitions of materials published in Latin America, covering all forms of printed material.) For consultation in card form at the Institute of Latin American Studies, 35 Tavistock Square, London WC1H 9EZ, and published on microfiche by the South america map in spanish Documentation Company, Netherlands.

Источник: https://www.bl.uk/collection-guides/latin-american-collections

While teaching my students about Spanish speaking countries, I noticed that some students struggled with the geography part of the lesson. Some needed help remembering the names of the countries. I wanted to find a fun way to help, so I set out to find fun interactive resources I could use with my students.


I found some really neat resources.


Resource 1: Spanish Speaking Countries Setera Online Map Quiz Game.

My students had a ball playing this game and trying to beat each other's time score.


Resource 2: Spanish Speaking Countries Mapas Interactivos.

This interactive map allows students two options study or quiz mode.


Resource 3: Purpose Games Spanish Speaking Countries Online Interactive Map. Students are be able to see their score and keep track of remaining attempts.


I also wanted a fun way for students to remember and practice saying the names of the countries in Spanish. I found two catchy videos on YouTube.


Video 1: Rock The Countries-Central America. The Video includes the countries and capitals of Central America and the Caribbean.


Video 2: Rock The Countries-South America. The Video includes the countries and capitals of South America.

Video 3: The Central America Geography Song by Rocking the World. They also have some free activities to go with the video. The activities include maps, song lyrics, and a cloze activity. You can download the free activities here>>

Mapa Musical by Natalia Hernadez. It is a collaborative map on Padlet. You can add music videos, to illustrate the musical style of regions around the world.

Google Drive resources this was created by Melanie Borges Labendeira and shared by Claudia Shiell inside of the Tech for World Language Teachers Facebook group. It contains several no-prep resources south america map in spanish can use with your students. Some of the resources included are virtual field trips.

Bonus resource: The Taste Atlas website, is a world atlas of food and drinks, an encyclopedia of flavors. You can select a country and see what foods are popular in that region. This is great for cultural enrichment and research projects.

I want to hear from you which resource did you find the most useful?

Let us know your favorite inside our Free Facebook group Tech for World Language Teachers.

Источник: https://www.tech4worldlanguageteachers.com/blog/2019/8/20/spanish-speaking-countries-fun-interactive-resources

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Spanish Speaking Countries of South America 1
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