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Best home remedy for cold and flu


best home remedy for cold and flu

Best Natural Remedies for Cold and Flu · 1. Honey · 2. Salt Water · 3. Ginger · 4. Garlic · 5. Last but not least, good old Vitamin C! Heal up with these natural DIY cold and flu remedies. preventing COVID-19 is good for stopping you from catching colds and the flu, too. Do natural flu remedies really work? · 10. Drink an antiviral brew for colds and flu · 11. Don't fight the fever · 12. Soothe body aches · 13. Warm.

: Best home remedy for cold and flu

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Best home remedy for cold and flu

Best home remedy for cold and flu -

Natural remedies: Can honey really help cure a cold?

Honey has been used by humans for thousands of years. Descriptions of its medicinal use are found in the Qur’an and the Bible, as well as in texts by Hippocrates, the Greek physician credited with devising the Hippocratic Oath and considered one of the fathers of early medicine.

An 8,000-year-old cave painting, discovered in Spain in 1924, depicts a man gathering honey from a beehive.

It’s now known that honey is antimicrobial. Studies have shown its effectiveness in fighting the Salmonella and E. coli bacteria, and a medical-grade honey is used to treat some wounds, thanks to its anti-inflammatory properties.

Can honey treat the common cold?

Honey is a home remedy usually offered to cold and flu sufferers, but the evidence for its effectiveness has only recently been systematically reviewed.

Scientists at the University of Oxford found that honey was ‘superior’ in soothing symptoms for those with a cold, flu or other upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). They reviewed 14 different studies, each comparing honey to another method of care for URTIs, such as cough suppressants, steroids and antibiotics.

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However, epidemiologist Gideon Meyerowitz-Katz questioned the quality of the studies included, and therefore the validity of the conclusion that honey could be better than usual care methods.

“Certainly the studies included were not the finest trials ever conducted,” says Dr Joseph Lee, one of the authors of the new study. “Ultimately that’s why we have called for more studies to be done. In clinical medicine, we have to decide what to do now, based on what is available.”

So, does this nullify the findings?

“It makes us less confident that honey is effective, but it doesn’t change the recommendation, given that the alternatives don’t work, or are harmful,” says Lee. “For example, we know that people end up taking antibiotics for URTIs.

“In fact, this is one of the biggest reasons for antibiotic consumption. Antibiotics can have side effects like diarrhoea and vomiting, rashes and allergic reactions. Worse still, it causes antimicrobial resistance that threatens the future of medicine.”

Honey consumption, on the other hand, has a good safety profile, says Lee. But honey is also an extremely variable product. It can contain 200 different substances, including different proteins, vitamins and minerals. Primarily, though, honey is sugar and water.

“My main point about the piece wasn’t necessarily the included studies,” says Meyerowitz-Katz, “but that it was a narrative review, which is technically more of a well-research opinion piece than evidence as such.”

Should I have honey if I have a cold?

It is well recognised that syrups, including honey, have a demulcent effect: relieving irritation by forming a cooling film around the throat. Over-the-counter cough medicines emulate this with added sugar, the sweet taste stimulating salivation and mucus secretions that soothe and lubricate the airway.

“It is the sweetness that is the common factor across honey, cough medicines and sore throat lozenges,” says Prof Ron Eccles, who ran the Common Cold Centre at Cardiff University for nearly 30 years. All three will be just as effective in treating cough and sore throat, but not other symptoms.

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“The most common and disturbing symptom of URTI in infants is fever, where honey has no benefit, but usual treatments – paracetamol and ibuprofen – are very effective,” says Eccles. “Another symptom of the common cold or flu is congestion, and honey will not unblock one’s nose.”

“Painkillers such as paracetamol, aspirin and ibuprofen would be my first treatment for colds and flu,” Eccles recommends, “followed by a hot, tasty drink.”

Visit the BBC’s Reality Check website at bit.ly/reality_check_ or follow them on Twitter @BBCRealityCheck

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Источник: https://www.sciencefocus.com/news/natural-remedies-could-honey-help-cure-a-cold/

Chicken soup, tea with honey: Do grandma's cold and flu remedies really work?


So you've got a cough, runny nose and low-grade fever. You're feeling achy, sluggish and generally miserable. You took a COVID-19 test and, thankfully, it's negative. Congratulations, you've got a case of the common cold!

There are more than 200 different virus strains out there that infect millions of people each year with the cold. While there's currently no way to treat or cure a cold, you can manage the symptoms.

"If someone could come up with a cure for the common cold, you'd be a billionaire," said Dr. Ben Bring, a family medicine specialist at OhioHealth Dublin Methodist Hospital.

People have been experimenting with homemade cold and flu remedies since the beginning of time. But how effective is grandma's chicken noodle soup, hot tea (or toddy) or herbal supplements at relieving your symptoms?

The Dispatch talked with two local health professionals to get their take on some common, at-home cold and flu remedies. Here's what they said:

Chicken noodle soup?

Turns out chicken soup isn't just good for the soul — it can also help relieve cold symptoms.

Bring said some research has been done to see just how effective a bowl of chicken noodle soup in treating the cold.

COVID-19 and flu: Possibility of a COVID and flu 'twindemic' depends on the actions of Ohioans

An October 2000 study published in the medical journal CHEST found that chicken soup might have anti-inflammatory effects, which could potentially ease symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections.

Colds are caused by viral infections that affect the upper respiratory system. The body responds with inflammation, which triggers white blood cells to migrate to the area.

As a side effect, bacteria-devouring white blood cells called neutrophils, stimulate the production of mucous, which may cause such typical cold symptoms as head congestion, coughs and sneezing.

This anti-inflammatory mechanism could theoretically have a medicinal effect, said Dr. Stephen Rennard, the study's author and a professor of medicine at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha.

But since the study was done in a laboratory and not in humans, and because researchers didn't isolate individual ingredients in the soup, Rennard cautioned that more research needs to be done to get a firm answer.

Even so, there are still plenty of benefits to eating a bowl of steaming soup to help your cold symptoms, Bring said. The broth is hydrating, the vegetables and proteins provide needed nutrients, and steam from the hot liquid can help open up airways.

Soup can also provide needed emotional support during a cold, said Jenn Henning, a nurse practitioner with the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center's integrative medicine team, which uses both conventional and complementary –– like acupuncture, meditation and other non-traditional –– treatments and therapies to "heal the mind, body and spirit."

"I don't know if there's anything physically in soup that can cure your cold, but our mind plays a big role in any healing," Henning said. "If chicken noodle soup brings you comfort, then go for it."

Hot tea with honey?

Bring and Henning both said a cup of tea can be great in nursing a cold, especially when coupled with ingredients like honey, lemon or ginger. Each have their own benefits that can help people heal.

Sipping warm liquids like herbal teas, as well as drinking plenty of water, is a great way to stay hydrated when you're feeling sick. Hydration is Henning's No. 1 tip for treating cold symptoms.

"The more we drink, the more those mucus secretions thin out," Henning said, which helps us feel less congested. 

Flu in Ohio: It's time to get the flu shot, Columbus health officials say. Here's what to know

Teas such as chamomile and thyme also help ease bronchospasms and calm a cough, Henning said. 

Bring said there are multiple studies that have shown the health benefits of honey in treating cold symptoms. Honey has lots of antimicrobial and antibacterial properties, which can coat the throat and reduce severe cough symptoms. (Children under the age of one should not consume honey due to the risk of botulism.)

Adding a squeeze of lemon to your cup, Henning said, can help open the sinuses. And a few slices of ginger root, which has strong anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, have been found to soothe a cough and ease feelings of nausea. 

A splash of whiskey would turn your tea into a hot toddy, but is there any medicinal benefit to it? Bring and Henning don't suggest it.

For one, alcohol is dehydrating, which ultimately defeats the purpose of trying to stay hydrated. 

Plus, alcohol consumption has skyrocketed during the pandemic, bringing its own set of health problems. "It's hard to be a doctor and recommend alcohol as a cure," Bring said.

His recommendation: Make yourself a hot spicy toddy minus the bourbon.

Vitamin C, zinc and echinacea?

There's been mixed reviews as the whether or not upping your vitamin C and zinc intake at the onset of one's symptoms will reduce the length and severity of a cold.

Echinacea, an herb and root that indigenous peoples have used to treat infections, has also been known to boost the body's immune system and reduce inflammation.

Bring said he's seen studies on the benefits of all three. But he warns not to start popping supplements without talking to your doctor first. Supplements can have health benefits, but they aren't regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Bring said, and it's important to know what you're putting in your body.

Instead, Bring and Henning suggest buying foods that have the extra vitamins and nutrients you're seeking. 

Citrus fruits, strawberries and broccoli are rich in vitamin C, and potatoes, nuts, seeds and legumes are some good sources of zinc. Eating a colorful diet full of phytonutrients and antioxidants, Henning said, is helpful in healing the body.

"We say you should eat the rainbow, not the Skittles," she said.

Other flu flim-flam?

Bring and Henning said to steer clear of taking an antibiotic at first sight of cold symptoms. Since the common cold is caused by a virus as opposed to bacteria, an antibiotic will do you no good in fighting off your symptoms. 

If symptoms persist longer than 10 days, then Henning said you should visit a provider and see if you might have something other than a cold that an antibiotic could help.

There are plenty of othercold and flu remedies that have no medical consensus yet, they both said.

Henning said she's heard lots of patients say they avoid dairy products when they're sick because they can increase mucus production. While milk and other dairy products can make phlegm thicker and irritate the throat, Henning said it doesn't cause the body to make more phlegm.

It's also unclear whether garlic can relieve your cold symptoms. Bring said garlic contains antimicrobial properties that can be helpful in alleviating symptoms, and it certainly wouldn't hurt adding to your diet, there is insufficient clinical evidence to say it truly works. 

Related:How does COVID compare to the flu?

And in these COVID times, Bring said to avoid any "hoax cures" like Ivermectin that could do more harm than good.

Regardless of which cold and flu remedy you may choose Bring and Henning both say to remember to take care of yourself. Get some extra sleep, get your flu shot and a COVID-19 vaccine, and take it easy.

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Источник: https://www.dispatch.com/story/lifestyle/health-fitness/2021/11/03/cold-flu-season-do-chicken-soup-other-home-remedies-really-work/6172844001/

How to treat the common cold at home

Colds are very common. A visit to your health care provider's office is often not needed, and colds often get better in 3 to 4 days.

A type of germ called a virus causes most colds. There are many types of viruses that can cause a cold. Depending on what virus you have, your symptoms may vary.

Common symptoms of a cold include:

  • Fever (100°F [37.7°C] or higher) and chills
  • Headache, sore muscles, and fatigue
  • Cough
  • Nasal symptoms, such as stuffiness, runny nose, yellow or green snot, and sneezing
  • Sore throat

Mild symptoms of COVID-19 may be similar to those of the common cold. Always check with your health provider if you are at risk for COVID-19.

Treating your symptoms will not make your cold go away, but will help you feel better. Antibiotics are almost never needed to treat a common cold.

Acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) help lower fever and relieve muscle aches.

  • Do not use aspirin.
  • Check the label for the proper dose.
  • Call your provider if you need to take these medicines more than 4 times per day or for more than 2 or 3 days.

Over-the-counter (OTC) cold and cough medicines may help ease symptoms in adults and older children.

  • They are not recommended for children under age 6. Talk to your provider before giving your child OTC cold medicine, which can have serious side effects.
  • Coughing is your body's way of getting mucus out of your lungs. So use cough syrups only when your cough becomes too painful.
  • Throat lozenges or sprays for your sore throat.

Many cough and cold medicines you buy have more than one medicine inside. Read the labels carefully to make sure you do not take too much of any one medicine. If you take prescription medicines for another health problem, ask your provider which OTC cold medicines are safe for you.

Drink plenty of fluids, get enough sleep, and stay away from secondhand smoke.

Wheezing can be a common symptom of a cold if you have asthma.

  • Use your rescue inhaler as prescribed if you are wheezing.
  • See your provider immediately if it becomes hard to breathe.

Many home remedies are popular treatments for the common cold. These include vitamin C, zinc supplements, and echinacea.

Although not proven to be helpful, most home remedies are safe for most people.

  • Some remedies may cause side effects or allergic reactions.
  • Certain remedies may change the way other medicines work.
  • Talk to your provider before trying any herbs and supplements.

Wash your hands often. This is the best way to stop the spread of germs.

To wash your hands correctly:

  • Rub soap onto wet hands for 20 seconds. Make sure to get under your fingernails. Dry your hands with a clean paper towel and turn faucet off with paper towel.
  • You can also use alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Use a dime size amount and rub all over your hands until they are dry.

To further prevent colds:

  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cough or sneeze into a tissue or into the crook of your elbow and not into the air.

Try treating your cold at home first. Call your provider right away, or go to the emergency room, if you have:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Sudden chest pain or abdominal pain
  • Sudden dizziness
  • Acting strangely
  • Severe vomiting that does not go away

Also call your provider if:

  • You start acting strangely
  • Your symptoms get worse or do not improve after 7 to 10 days

Upper respiratory infection - home care; URI - home care

Cohen YZ. The common cold. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 58.

Lopez SMC, Williams JV. The common cold. In: Kliegman RM, St. Geme JW, Blum NJ, Shah SS, Tasker RC, Wilson KM, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 21st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 407.

Updated by: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

Browse the Encyclopedia

Источник: https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000466.htm

Here are the best ways to beat a cold virus if you’re feeling grim

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  • So you’ve got a cold – nothing you can do about it, right? From the truth about vitamin C to the power of your mood, here’s the latest science to help you get well soon

    At this time of year the common cold is, er, pretty common, and we’re all in the firing line. Most of us will have at least two colds this year – snotty ordeals that turn us into sniffling zombies clutching vials of Olbas Oil and saying things like, ‘My hair hurts.’

    There are 200 different types of the common cold virus. ‘When these viruses get into your nose, they irritate the lining, causing it to produce mucus to try to expel the bad stuff,’ says clinical scientist Professor Peter Openshaw. ‘The virus sticks to the cells in the nose then ruptures, travelling to the airways and other parts of the upper respiratory tract, including the throat.’

    So what can we do to protect ourselves? Well, as the saying goes, prevention is better than cure. ‘Alcohol-based hand sanitisers are more effective than you think,’ says Dr Adam Simon, GP and medical officer at Pushdoctor.co.uk. ‘Washing your hands regularly is always a good idea but be aware that antibacterial soaps don’t kill viruses and as such won’t prevent the spread of colds.’ Office martyrdom doesn’t help, either.

    ‘The best way to prevent a cold outbreak is for the person who has the virus to stay at home and rest.’ But there is another way to get ahead of the game in the face of all these airborne contagions – know your facts.

    Getty Images

    Is a cold the same as the flu?

    Colds and flu are both caused by viruses, but it’s quite difficult for doctors to determine which one we are suffering from. The term ‘influenza-like illness’ or ‘ILI’ is, in medical settings, also used for colds, especially when a fever is present. Both viruses attack the cells of the adenoids at the back of your throat, spreading to cells in the rest of the upper respiratory tract (ie, the nose, throat, pharynx and larynx).

    ‘If you have more severe symptoms, a fever of 39.5 and you’re aching all over, it’s more likely that you have got an influenza,’ says Sebastian Johnston, professor of respiratory medicine and allergy at Imperial College London. ‘But influenza only really happens during annual influenza epidemics – we normally have one every year [from October to May], they vary in severity and will last six to eight weeks in more highly populated parts of the country before spreading.’

    Currently, the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends the flu jab for pregnant women, health workers, people over 65 (or under five) and those with chronic health conditions. But it is available for everyone (ask your GP) and is the only reliable protection.

    Getty Images

    Does Vitamin C help prevent colds?

    Not so much. ‘Research shows that vitamin C is only really effective in the prevention of colds when the human body is under significant stress – for example in soldiers or long-distance runners,’ says Dr Ashton Harper, medical advisor for pharmaceutical company Protexin. Professor Openshaw agrees. ‘The vitamin C myth really doesn’t have a good scientific basis,’ he says. ‘There’s no harm in it, but it is not a cure.’

    In fact, much on offer at your local pharmacist will have a negligible effect. ‘There’s no good evidence, for example, that cough medicine works,’ says Dr Davina Deniszczyc, medical executive director at Nuffield Health. ‘But, interestingly, in clinical studies, placebos (sugar pills) work really well.’ Indeed, research from the University of Wisconsin found that when patients received a placebo pill that they believed contained echinacea, their illnesses were substantively shorter and less severe. So whatever your medicine of choice, if it’s safe and seems to work for you, stick with it.

    Can common colds be spread by kissing?

    Yes, but more than that, you don’t need to kiss or even touch a stranger to pick up the germs. ‘The virus particles of the common cold are spread through the small droplets of saliva in the air when someone with the infection coughs, sneezes or even laughs or talks,’ says GP Dr Sarah Brewer.

    ‘The particles are propelled at an estimated speed of around 100mph and can travel for many metres [recent research* shows that a single cough would fill about three quarters of a two-litre bottle with air containing 3,000 droplets of potentially infectious saliva]. They may then enter a nearby person’s body through the eyes, nose or mouth.’ In addition, germs from their hands linger long after they’ve gone, contaminating surfaces such as door handles, escalators and keyboards on which the virus is able to survive.

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    Is the number of colds you get down to genetics?

    Partly. ‘We all have what we call innate immune systems, which protect us against viruses we’ve never seen before,’ says Professor Johnston. ‘We also have acquired immunity, where our bodies “learn” from infections we’ve seen previously and have immunity to them [such as mumps or chickenpox].’ The number of colds we get depends on how strong both these immune systems are. ‘People vary depending on their genetic make-up and there are at least 40 genes found to control our immune defences,’ adds Professor Openshaw. ‘So you may simply be lucky or unlucky in terms of the pattern you’ve inherited.’

    Does being miserable make you more susceptible to the sniffles?

    This one’s actually true. ‘Maintaining a positive mental attitude can help prevent illness,’ says Justin Jones, national physiology manager at Nuffield Health. ‘This is because we release different hormones depending on our outlook. Thinking positively has been proven to release the immune-boosting hormone DHEA, while thinking negatively releases the immune-suppressing hormone cortisol.’ So being upbeat can help you stay healthy.

    Professor Openshaw agrees there’s some science behind this idea. ‘One of the last studies that was ever done at the Common Cold Research Unit in Salisbury before it closed showed that if people feel miserable and out of control in their lives then they are more likely to be infected by a standard dose of common cold virus.’ So chin up, and look on the bright side, you will be doing your nose a favour.

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    Cold remedies that actually work (according to the experts)

    Zinc lozenges

    A study by Helsinki University found zinc lozenges can shorten a cold by about four days. ‘Don’t exceed 100mg of elemental zinc per day,’ says lead author Dr Harri Hemila. Nature’s Way Zinc Lozenges (£2.93 for 60, Iherb.com)

    Probiotics

    It turns out that yoghurt is the best thing to eat for breakfast if you want to avoid catching the common cold, as yoghurts are probiotic foods. ‘The majority of our immune system is in our gut,’ says Dr Harper. ‘Probiotics have been shown to significantly reduce the severity of cold symptoms.’ Choose a high- quality multi-strain product such as Bio-Kult Advanced Formula Probiotics (£8.99 for 30, Bio-kult.com).

    Exercise

    ‘The last thing you will feel like doing when you have a cold is exercising, but a study has shown that going on a 45-minute walk when you don’t normally do much exercise boosts your immune system. The effect can last for up to three hours,’ says Dr Sohere Roked.

    Echinacea

    This one’s still up for debate, but recent research by Professor Johnston at the Royal Society of Medicine showed echinacea reduces (by about 50 per cent) recurrent respiratory tract infections. A Vogel Echinaforce Hot Drink (£9.99, Avogel.co.uk)

    Paracetamol

    ‘Nothing can prevent a cold, so it’s a matter of symptom relief,’ says Professor Johnston. A Southampton University study found paracetamol was superior to ibuprofen when it comes to treating colds. Paracetamol (39p for 16, Superdrug.com).

    Drink plenty of fluids

    ‘Drink plenty of fluids, as it’s easy to get dehydrated when you’re ill due to fluid loss caused by having a high temperature and increased nasal secretions,’ says Angela Chalmers.’

    Eat less sugar

    ‘Avoid sugar, as it competes with vitamin C, which is good for the immune system,’ says Alison Cullen. ‘If you have lots of sugar, you undermine your immune system.’

    Vitamin D

    ‘A lot of people are deficient in vitamin D in the UK and there’s evidence boosting it can help resistance to infection,’ says Professor Johnston. Research shows in order to activate an immune response, vitamin D must kick-start T cells in our body, which can attack and neutralise any threat. ImmiFlex (£13.39 for 30, Nutritioncentre.co.uk)

    *Study by Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Drink green tea

    ‘Try drinking green tea,’ says Alison Cullen. ‘It’s rich in many chemicals that have been shown to have health-protective properties.’

    Use vapour rub

    ‘Put vapour rub on the soles of your feet and wear socks on top,’ says Angela Chalmers. ‘Many people swear by this to help relieve a cough at night.’

    Incorporate beta glutens into your diet

    ‘Having beta glucans in your diet – found in baker’s yeast, oats, rye, barley, wheat and shiitake mushrooms – or in supplement form on a daily basis has been shown to reduce both bacterial infections and viruses. And, if taken when unwell, beta glucans can actually shorten the length of the illness,’ says Dr Sohere Roked. Check out our list of immune-boosting foods to add to your diet.

    Add lysine into your diet

    ‘Get plenty of lysine, an essential amino acid that works to boost the immune system and helps stimulate the body’s own antibodies to fight illness,’ says Dr Sohere Roked. ‘It’s found in plain yoghurt and skimmed milk, apricots, dried apples and mangos, and fish.’

    Stay cool

    ‘You could also try sleeping with the window open, as germs and viruses can breed more quickly in warm temperatures,’ says Angela Chalmers. ‘It’s a myth that cold weather causes a cold, and keeping fresh air circulating will help create a healthier sleeping environment.’

    Steam inhalation

    ‘Steam inhalation may sound old-fashioned, but it’s a powerful way to help clear mucus and soothe irritated airways,’ says Angela Chalmers.

    Sleep with an extra pillow

    ‘When you have a cold, sleep with an extra pillow, as this will help with the drainage of nasal passages,’ says Boots pharmacist Angela Chalmers.

    Use a warm compress

    ‘Try a warm compress,’ says Dr Laura Ginesi. ‘A hot flannel, wrung out and placed on your forehead and over the bridge of your nose, may help to relieve some of the pressure from blocked sinuses.’

    Get enough sleep

    ‘Try to get enough rest,’ says Dr Annabel Bentley. ‘It can help you get over the worst.’

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    Cold home remedies by Team Marie Claire

    Holly Rains, Digital Editor:

    ‘Satsumas (easy peelers) are my go to when I get a cold, or think I have one about to strike. It’s essentially Vitamin C but starving off a cold while feeling festive is better than chugging orange juice all day long.’

    Jenny Proudfoot, Features Editor:

    ‘As soon as I feel a cold coming on I go hard on the ginger. Ginger in my meals, ginger in my teas, any ginger sweets etc. It not only soothes a sore throat, but can kill rhinoviruses (the cause of most colds) and gives you a quick warm up.’

    Penny Goldstone, Fashion Editor:

    ‘I do fresh garlic and ginger in hot water, with a bit of lemon – I have that once a day when I’m feeling unwell. Garlic is great for colds, in fact I add garlic to all my dishes when I’m ill.’

    Katie Thomas, Senior Beauty Editor:

    ‘It’s vitamin C for me – I overdose on easy peelers when I sense a cold.’

    Ally Head, Health Editor:

    ‘Echinacea, throat sprays and Manuka honey, lemon and ginger with hot water are my go-to’s. As soon as I feel a cold coming on, I make sure to rotate the three to really nip it in the bud.’

    Lucy Abbersteen, Former Beauty Writer:

    ‘As soon as I feel a cold coming on, I take either Day or Night Nurse (depending on the time of day). It knocks my illness on the head immediately and when everyone was getting ill a couple of weeks ago, I credit that with my speedy recovery.’

    Get well soon!

    Источник: https://www.marieclaire.co.uk/life/health-fitness/cold-remedies-296147

    Here are the cold and flu remedies that actually work

    Cold weather doesn’t literally make you sick, but the winter season does indeed make you more prone to catching a bad cold. Chilly conditions mean you spend more time indoors, where bacteria and viruses are more likely to linger in the air and on surfaces you touch, and the drop in temperature leaves your mucus membranes dry, irritated, and more vulnerable to infection.

    The holiday season can be particularly rough on the ol’ immune system, what with all the traveling and hanging out with far-flung relatives and their exotic germs. And let’s be honest, you’re probably not taking the best care of yourself either—drinking, eating lots of unhealthy food, staying up late.

    So if you’re sliding into the holiday season with a nasty cold in tow, you can bet you’re not alone. Here are some evidence-based tips for nipping that virus in the bud before it interferes with your holiday fun (or with the mountain of work you’re supposed to finish before the party starts).

    Actually take a break

    The simplest remedy is also the most effective, and probably the most disappointing. If you had time to rest, dammit, you wouldn’t be Googling around for quick cold remedies.

    But listen, friends: you’ve got to get some rest. Really.

    Aside from the fact that depriving yourself of sleep is going to make you feel generally crappy anyway, your immune system does some of its best work while you snooze. If you’re not getting enough shut-eye (for most adults, around 7-8 hours is the sweet spot) your body just isn’t going to do as good of a job at fighting off infections. Period.

    And if you wake up still feeling crummy, you should stay home from work if at all possible. One 2014 study found that a pathogen placed on a single doorknob could essentially infiltrate an entire office building within a matter of hours. Surfaces in the break room were particularly vulnerable to the spread of viruses.

    If you absolutely must go into the workplace (or to a family gathering for the holidays) bring some hand sanitizer with you. You usually want to avoid killing off the microbes that live on your skin. But if you’re exposing innocent bystanders to your cold or flu, the least you can do is give yourself a good Purell rubdown after any contact between your hands and your mucus-y bits.

    Avoid alcohol—or at least pick your poison carefully

    Fevers and mucus production leave you dehydrated, which is why it’s so important to flood your system with fluids when you’re ill. But excessive alcohol will dampen your immune system and dehydrate you, so don’t guzzle wine or beer just because ’tis the season.

    What you really want is a hot drink. Some research suggests that a hot cup of tea or lemon water will help decongest you with its steam. You can also try making a hot beverage heavy on turmeric. This spice definitely has some anti-inflammatory properties in cells in the lab, though it’s unclear just how well they translate into concrete results inside the human body. But even if your potion of choice doesn’t work as well as you might hope, studies show that the placebo effect of a hot beverage is nothing to sneeze at. If you feel cozy and comforted, you’ll feel better.

    That brings us to the one nip of alcohol you might be able to justify whilst suffering from the sniffles. The alcohol in a hot toddy—hot water, lemon, and honey spiked with spirits, usually whiskey—almost certainly doesn’t help you fight off the flu. But as long as you’re using a reasonable amount (a couple of tablespoons should do it), some doctors say the special ingredient won’t hurt. So if it makes you feel calmer and helps soothe you to sleep, go ahead and enjoy a “medicinal” cocktail.

    As for eggnog, well, the warning against overindulgence in alcohol still applies. But on the bright side, the idea that dairy makes you produce thick mucus has been pretty thoroughly debunked. A glass shouldn’t make your cold symptoms any worse.

    Speaking of hot, liquid comfort: soup can’t hurt

    There isn’t exactly concrete evidence that a bowl of chicken soup can make your cold shorter or less severe, but some studies do support its healing powers. It may have anti-inflammatory properties.

    And just like the hot teas and toddies mentioned above, soup has the ability to warm up your congested regions and potentially help dislodge some mucus in the process. It also surely carries a hefty placebo effect, since so many of us grow up associating the liquid gold with comfort and healing. As a final bonus, chicken soup (especially of the homemade variety) is a balanced, nutritious meal. Eating lots of fruits and veggies and other wholesome foodstuffs is an important part of getting well, so a bowl of chicken noodle is a good way to offset your diet of Christmas cookies and wine.

    Soup is definitely not going to do you any harm, and it may help bolster your body’s healing abilities on several fronts. It’s also a great place to sneak in a few cloves of garlic. Many people think garlic has such strong antimicrobial properties as to kill the viruses in your body. The evidence hasn’t really come to support that yet, so swallowing raw garlic isn’t worth it. But eating some garlicky soup? I mean, who cares if it does any good? That’s just delicious.

    Be kind to your mucus membranes

    Gargling salt water (roughly 1/4 to 1/2 a teaspoon in a glass of warm water) can soothe the inflammation in your throat, improving symptoms like cough, pain, and post-nasal drip. Some folks swear that gargling with (or drinking) apple cider vinegar is the way to go, but that acid isn’t going to kill off viruses for you, and it might actually irritate your delicate throat in the process. So stick with warm, salty water instead.

    Keeping everything moist with the help of a humidifier can also reduce irritation and potentially loosen mucus build-up. Warm steam can help too, though doctors warn that trying to use hot showers or pots of boiling water to loosen your gunk can actually just lead you to burn yourself.

    There’s no harm in a sinus rinse either, though you should make sure you’re using filtered water to avoid replacing your cold viruses with brain-eating amoebas. And keep in mind that if you obsessively rinse your sinuses multiple times a day, you’ll likely just end up irritating the tissues in your nose and making yourself feel crummier.

    Don’t run for the antibiotics

    When you get sick at an inconvenient time, it can be tempting to rush to urgent care and demand a microbe-murdering wonder drug. But please, please, please don’t try to get antibiotics just because you’re feeling under the weather.

    Chances are good you have a cold or flu, which can’t be treated with antibiotics. Antibiotics kill bacteria, but colds and flus are caused by viruses.

    If you’re really worried that you might have a sinus infection or strep throat (both of which are caused by bacteria) seek a doctor’s advice. But if your symptoms feel like a typical cold or flu, give yourself a few days to fight it off. Antibiotics won’t help, and they’ll throw all the microbes in your gut out of whack. Do you really want to take a useless medication that gives you diarrhea all through the holiday festivities? I hope not.

    What pills should I pop?

    Cold medicine won’t cure you, but it can alleviate your symptoms. So whatever brand or formula of medication seems to work for you is the best bet.

    Unfortunately, vitamin C doesn’t seem to do much, and neither does echinacea. But zinc lozenges may help you get better, if you start taking them regularly within 24 hours of your first symptoms. It’s not clear whether they actually help you fight off the virus or simply reduce inflammation in your throat. And zinc nasal swabs just seem to kill your sense of smell, so don’t try to get all fancy.

    Once you’re better, go get your damn flu shot

    Just do it.

    Rachel Feltman
    Источник: https://www.popsci.com/here-are-cold-and-flu-remedies-that-actually-work/

    How to treat the common cold at home

    Colds are very common. A visit to your health care provider's sears customer service number in spanish is often not needed, and colds often get better in 3 to 4 days.

    A type of germ called a virus causes most colds. There are many types of viruses that can cause a cold. Depending on what virus you have, your symptoms may vary.

    Common symptoms of a cold include:

    • Fever (100°F [37.7°C] or higher) and chills
    • Headache, sore muscles, and fatigue
    • Cough
    • Nasal symptoms, such as stuffiness, runny nose, yellow or green snot, and sneezing
    • Sore throat

    Mild symptoms of COVID-19 may be similar to those of the common cold. Always check with your health provider if you are at risk for COVID-19.

    Treating your symptoms will not make your cold go away, but will help you feel better. Antibiotics are almost never needed to treat a common cold.

    Acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) help lower fever and relieve muscle aches.

    • Do not use aspirin.
    • Check the label for the proper dose.
    • Call your provider if you need to take these medicines more than 4 best home remedy for cold and flu per day or for more than 2 or 3 days.

    Over-the-counter (OTC) cold and cough medicines may help ease symptoms in adults and older children.

    • They are not recommended for children under age 6. Talk to your provider before giving your child OTC cold medicine, which can have serious side effects.
    • Coughing is your body's way of getting mucus out of your lungs. So use cough syrups only when your cough becomes too painful.
    • Throat lozenges or sprays for your sore throat.

    Many cough and cold medicines you buy have more than one medicine inside. Read the labels carefully to make sure you do not take too much of any one medicine. If you take prescription medicines for another health problem, ask your provider which OTC cold medicines are safe for you.

    Drink plenty of fluids, get enough sleep, and stay away from secondhand smoke.

    Wheezing can be a common symptom of a cold if you have asthma.

    • Use your rescue inhaler as prescribed if you are wheezing.
    • See your provider immediately if it becomes hard to breathe.

    Many home remedies are popular treatments for the common cold. These include vitamin C, zinc supplements, and echinacea.

    Although not proven to be helpful, most home remedies are safe for most people.

    • Some remedies may cause side effects or allergic reactions.
    • Certain remedies may change the way other medicines work.
    • Talk to your provider before trying any herbs and supplements.

    Wash your hands often. This is the best way to stop the spread of germs.

    To wash your hands correctly:

    • Rub soap onto wet hands for 20 seconds. Make sure to get under your fingernails. Dry your hands with a clean paper towel and turn faucet off with paper towel.
    • You can also use alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Use a dime size amount and rub all over your hands until they are dry.

    To further prevent colds:

    • Stay home when you are sick.
    • Cough or sneeze into a tissue or into the crook of your elbow and not into the air.

    Try treating your cold at home first. Call your provider right away, or go to the emergency room, if you have:

    • Difficulty breathing
    • Sudden chest pain or abdominal pain
    • Sudden dizziness
    • Acting strangely
    • Severe vomiting that does not go away

    Also call your provider if:

    • You start acting strangely
    • Your symptoms get worse or do not improve after 7 to 10 days

    Upper respiratory infection - home care; URI - home care

    Cohen YZ. The common cold. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 58.

    Lopez SMC, Williams JV. The common cold. In: Kliegman RM, St. Geme JW, Blum NJ, Shah SS, Tasker RC, Wilson KM, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 21st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 407.

    Updated by: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Clinical Best home remedy for cold and flu Professor, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David M letter design, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

    Browse the Encyclopedia

    Источник: https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000466.htm

    Chicken soup, tea with honey: Do grandma's best home remedy for cold and flu and flu remedies really work?


    So you've got a cough, runny nose and low-grade fever. You're feeling achy, sluggish and generally miserable. You took a COVID-19 test and, thankfully, it's negative. Congratulations, you've got a case of the common cold!

    There are more than 200 different virus strains out there that infect millions of people each year with the cold. While there's currently no way to treat or cure a cold, you can manage the symptoms.

    "If someone could come up with a cure for the common cold, you'd be a billionaire," said Dr. Ben Bring, a family medicine specialist at OhioHealth Dublin Methodist Hospital.

    People have been experimenting with homemade cold and flu remedies since the beginning of time. But how effective is grandma's chicken noodle soup, hot tea (or toddy) or herbal supplements at relieving your symptoms?

    The Dispatch talked with two local health professionals to get their take on some common, at-home cold and flu remedies. Here's what they said:

    Chicken noodle soup?

    Turns out chicken soup isn't just good for the soul — it can also help relieve cold symptoms.

    Bring said some research has been done to see just how effective a bowl of chicken noodle soup in treating the cold.

    COVID-19 and flu: Possibility of a COVID and flu 'twindemic' depends on the actions of Ohioans

    An October 2000 study published in the medical journal CHEST found that chicken soup might have anti-inflammatory effects, which could potentially ease symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections.

    Colds are caused by viral infections that affect the upper respiratory system. The body responds with inflammation, which triggers white blood cells to migrate to the area.

    As best home remedy for cold and flu side effect, bacteria-devouring white blood cells called neutrophils, stimulate the production of mucous, which may cause such typical cold symptoms as head congestion, coughs and sneezing.

    This anti-inflammatory mechanism could theoretically have a medicinal effect, said Dr. Stephen Rennard, the study's author and a professor of medicine at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha.

    But since the study was done in a laboratory and not in humans, and because researchers didn't isolate individual ingredients in the soup, Rennard cautioned that more research needs to be done to get a firm answer.

    Even so, there are still plenty of benefits to eating a bowl of steaming soup to help your cold symptoms, Bring said. The broth is hydrating, the vegetables and proteins provide needed nutrients, and steam from the hot liquid can help open up airways.

    Soup can also provide needed emotional support during a cold, said Jenn Henning, a nurse practitioner with the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center's integrative medicine team, which uses both best home remedy for cold and flu and complementary –– like acupuncture, meditation and other non-traditional –– treatments and therapies to "heal the mind, body and spirit."

    "I don't know if there's anything physically in soup that can cure your cold, but our mind plays a big role in any healing," Henning said. "If chicken noodle soup brings you comfort, then go for it."

    Hot tea with honey?

    Bring and Henning both said a cup of tea can be great in nursing a cold, especially when coupled with ingredients like honey, lemon or ginger. Each have their own benefits that can help people heal.

    Sipping warm liquids like herbal teas, as well as drinking plenty of water, is a great way to stay hydrated when you're feeling sick. Hydration is Henning's No. 1 tip for treating cold symptoms.

    "The more we drink, best home remedy for cold and flu more those mucus secretions thin out," Henning said, which helps us feel less congested. 

    Flu in Ohio: It's time to get the flu shot, Columbus health officials say. Here's what to know

    Teas such as chamomile and thyme also help ease bronchospasms and calm a cough, Henning said. 

    Bring said there are multiple studies that have shown the health benefits of honey in treating cold symptoms. Honey has lots of antimicrobial and antibacterial properties, which can coat the throat and reduce severe cough symptoms. (Children under the age of one should not consume honey due to the risk of botulism.)

    Adding a squeeze best home remedy for cold and flu lemon to your cup, Henning said, can help open the sinuses. And a few slices of ginger root, which has strong anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, have been found to soothe a cough and ease feelings of nausea. 

    A splash of whiskey would turn your tea into a hot toddy, but is there any medicinal benefit to it? Bring and Henning don't suggest it.

    For one, alcohol is dehydrating, which ultimately defeats the purpose of trying to stay hydrated. 

    Plus, alcohol consumption has skyrocketed during the pandemic, bringing its own set of health problems. "It's hard to be a doctor and recommend alcohol as a cure," Bring said.

    His recommendation: Make yourself a hot spicy toddy minus the bourbon.

    Vitamin C, zinc and echinacea?

    There's been mixed reviews as the whether or not upping your vitamin C and zinc intake at the onset of one's symptoms will reduce the length and severity of a cold.

    Echinacea, an herb and root that indigenous peoples have used to treat infections, has also been known to boost the body's immune system and reduce inflammation.

    Bring said he's seen studies on the benefits of all three. But he warns not to start popping supplements without talking to your doctor first. Supplements can have health benefits, but they aren't regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Bring said, and it's important to know what you're putting in your body.

    Instead, Bring and Henning suggest buying foods that have the extra vitamins and nutrients you're seeking. 

    Citrus fruits, strawberries and broccoli are rich in vitamin C, and potatoes, nuts, seeds and legumes are some good sources of zinc. Eating a colorful diet full of phytonutrients and antioxidants, Henning said, is helpful in healing the body.

    "We say you should eat the rainbow, not the Skittles," she said.

    Other flu flim-flam?

    Bring and Henning said to steer clear of taking an antibiotic at first sight of cold symptoms. Since the common cold is caused by a virus as opposed to bacteria, an antibiotic will do you no good in fighting off your symptoms. 

    If symptoms persist longer than 10 days, then Henning said you should visit a provider and see if you might have something other than a cold that an antibiotic could help.

    There are plenty of othercold and flu remedies that have no medical consensus yet, they both said.

    Henning said she's heard lots of patients say they avoid dairy products when they're sick because they can increase mucus production. While milk and other dairy products can make phlegm thicker and irritate the throat, Henning said it doesn't cause the body to make more phlegm.

    It's also unclear whether garlic can relieve your cold symptoms. Bring said garlic contains antimicrobial properties that can be helpful tarrant county college blackboard alleviating symptoms, and it certainly wouldn't hurt adding to your diet, there is insufficient clinical evidence to say it truly works. 

    Related:How does COVID compare to the flu?

    And in these COVID times, Bring said to avoid any "hoax cures" like Ivermectin that could do more harm than good.

    Regardless of which cold and flu remedy you may choose Bring and Henning both say to remember to take care of yourself. Get some extra sleep, get your flu shot and a COVID-19 vaccine, and take it easy.

    [email protected]

    @sheridan120

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    Источник: https://www.dispatch.com/story/lifestyle/health-fitness/2021/11/03/cold-flu-season-do-chicken-soup-other-home-remedies-really-work/6172844001/

    At-Home Remedies to Help You Kick the Common Cold

    At-Home Cold Remedies

    Hydrate wisely.

    It’s important to drink liquids throughout the day, but especially when you’re dealing with a cold. A small study published in CHEST found that hot liquids may help more than cold liquids when it comes to loosening mucus. Start your day with a warm and soothing cup of Theraflu (in the form of Hot Liquid Powder) for powerful symptom relief. Try to avoid alcohol and caffeinated drinks like coffee and soda, as these drinks can worsen your dehydration over time.1

    Make some chicken soup.

    A separate study published in CHEST found that chicken soup in particular is the comfort food td bank broad and jackson philadelphia for helping alleviate cold wifi hotspot for home. That’s because homemade chicken soup can slow down white blood cell movement, so they stay concentrated in the area of infection in the body, helping it to recover more quickly. The warm liquid in the soup can also help relieve congestion. Vegan or vegetarian? Try swapping out the chicken for tofu and using a vegetable-based broth as your base. 

    Increase your vitamin C.

    Research published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews found while daily vitamin C intake can’t prevent a cold, increasing your vitamin C intake at the onset of common cold symptoms may help treat it, especially for those experiencing physical stress — such as athletes and people living in very cold climates. There are many foods that have high vitamin C levels aside from oranges, such as peppers, guava, kiwi, broccoli, and kale.

    Add some honey to your hot beverage.

    Honey has been shown best home remedy for cold and flu have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties, and studies suggest certain kinds of honey may even act as a cough suppressant for some people. Add some honey to your favourite herbal tea or to a glass of warm water with lemon for a tasty and effective at-home remedy. The warm liquid will also help loosen your mucus and decrease congestion. Keep in mind that honey should never be given to young children.2

    Gargle salt water.

    Take some time best home remedy for cold and flu or after brushing your teeth to gargle one teaspoon of salt dissolved in a glass of water. Research published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that making your own salt water gargle at home can prevent upper respiratory tract infections, including colds, and can alleviate symptoms like  a sore throat and nasal congestion in those who are experiencing cold symptoms.

    Try meditation.

    Managing your stress levels is one of the best ways to boost your immune system and potentially shorten the duration of your cold symptoms. One of our favorite ways to reduce stress levels is through meditation. A 2012 study by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health found that regular meditation may reduce the duration and severity of the common cold. The study group that meditated regularly found that they had shorter and less severe colds during the cold and flu season than the control group.

    If you are interested in trying meditation, we suggest keeping these four common features of meditation in mind: find a quiet place without any distractions, anchor your attention on something (your breath, a mantra, your physical sensations, etc.), take a non-judgemental stance towards your thoughts, and find a comfortable position that you can maintain throughout your session.3

    Keep the air around you moist.

    Dry air is known to exacerbate colds, so try getting a humidifier or vaporizer to add some moisture to your room and help loosen up congestion. Just be sure to clean the humidifier regularly to prevent any counterproductive buildup of bacteria.1

    Источник: https://www.theraflu.com/treating-cold-flu/at-home-cold-remedies/
  • Understanding a Common Cold Virus. National Institutes of Health (NIH). Published May 22, 2015. Accessed June 12, 2020. https://www.nih.gov/news-events/nih-research-matters/understanding-common-cold-virus

  • Home Remedies: Self-help for sinusitis. https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/. Accessed June 16, 2020. https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/home-remedies-self-help-for-sinusitis/

  • In-Depth Reports - Penn State Hershey Restaurants in rockford mi Center - Sinusitis - Penn State Hershey Medical Center. Accessed June 16, 2020. http://pennstatehershey.adam.com/content.aspx?productid=10&pid=10&gid=000062

  • How does drinking hot liquids help a cold or the flu? Accessed June 16, 2020. https://www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/qa/how-does-drinking-hot-liquids-help-a-cold-or-the-flu

  • Besedovsky L, Lange T, Born J. Sleep and immune function. Pflüg Arch - Eur J Physiol. 2012;463(1):121-137. doi:10.1007/s00424-011-1044-0

  • Can a neti pot relieve your cold and sinus symptoms? Mayo Clinic. Accessed June 12, 2020. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/common-cold/expert-answers/neti-pot/faq-20058305

  • Does Gargling Wlth Salt Water Ease a Sore Throat? WebMD. Accessed June 12, 2020. https://www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/features/does-gargling-wlth-salt-water-ease-a-sore-throat

  • How to Use a Humidifier for Sinus the Right Way Everyday Health. EverydayHealth.com. Accessed June 16, 2020. https://www.everydayhealth.com/ear-nose-throat/humidifier-for-sinusitis.aspx

  • 6 Ways to Sleep Soundly When You Have a Cold, a Cough, or the Flu. Sleep.org. Accessed June 13, 2020. https://www.sleep.org/articles/6-ways-sleep-off-cold/

  • Foods To Boost the Immune System. Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. Accessed June 17, 2020. https://www.pcrm.org/news/blog/foods-boost-immune-system

  • Miller LG. Herbal Medicinals: Selected Clinical Considerations Focusing on Known or Potential Drug-Herb Interactions. Arch Intern Med. 1998;158(20):2200-2211. doi:10.1001/archinte.158.20.2200

  • Sandjo LP, Zingue S, Dos Santos Nascimento MV, et al. Cytotoxicity, antiprotozoal, and anti-inflammatory activities of eight curry powders and comparison of their UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS chemical profiles. J Sci Food Agric. 2019;99(6):2987-2997. doi:10.1002/jsfa.9512

  • Common Colds: Protect Yourself and Others. CDC.gov. https://www.cdc.gov/features/rhinoviruses/index.html. Accessed June 26, 2020.

  • Источник: https://vicks.com/en-us/treatments/how-to-treat-a-cold/how-to-get-rid-of-a-cold

    10 Doctor-Approved Natural Cold Remedies

    Although earlier studies found echinacea to be ineffective, this review focused on more variables, such as the effect of echinacea alone or with other supplements. “There are constituents in echinacea that definitely bolster the immune system,” says Lynne Shinto, N.D., MPH, a naturopathic physician and associate professor at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland. How to use it: “Use it for prevention,” Shinto says. “Once you have the cold or flu, it doesn’t help.” Take it for three weeks, then stop for one week; repeat the cycle during cold and flu season, she advises. But echinacea isn’t Shinto’s preferred cold prevention method: That’s vitamin C. 3. Vitamin C
    What it is:Foundin many fruits and vegetables (such as oranges, red peppers and broccoli), vitamin C has long been thought to reduce risk of illness. A 2007 review by the Cochrane Collaboration, a nonprofit organization that analyzes health care studies, found that vitamin C taken after a cold had started didn’t make a difference: The cold lasted as long and was as severe. But if taken both before and during a cold, it shortened the viral illness’s duration in adults by 8%. “Vitamin C is believed to support the immune system by gobbling up free radicals [organic molecules linked to aging and tissue damage] so the immune system can do its job,” Pescatore says.How to use it: From November-March (prime cold season), take 500 milligrams of vitamin C six times a day for a total of 3,000 mg daily, Pescatore advises. When you feel a cold coming on, pump up your intake to 500 mg every hour for 24 hours. The powdered drink Emergen-C is Shinto’s pick. Each packet has 1,000 mg of vitamin C, plus electrolytes. Drink 2-3 packets daily over the course of the cold or flu, she says.

    Источник: https://www.everydayhealth.com/lung-respiratory/cold-flu/10-doctor-approved-natural-cold-remedies/
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