Skip to content

Archives

San bernadino county west valley detention center rancho cucamonga ca


san bernadino county west valley detention center rancho cucamonga ca

Read the latest County News HERE · Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) · California Department of Public Health · San Bernardino. The West Valley Detention Center also known as the San Bernardino County Jail in. San Bernardino County West Valley Detention Center is located in Rancho Cucamonga CA, in the 91739-9662 Zipcode. This is in San Bernardino County CA.

Thematic video

San bernadino county west valley detention center rancho cucamonga ca -

Second inmate tests positive for coronavirus in San Bernardino County


A second inmate has tested positive for COVID-19 at the West Valley Detention Center in Rancho Cucamonga.

The San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department announced the case on Saturday, the same day that the county reported its highest single-day jump of coronavirus cases.

The inmate, whose name and other identifying details were not released, is in isolation and being provided with medical treatment. 

The first inmate who tested positive for coronavirus was announced on April 11, and also at the West Valley Detention Center. That facility, one of four operated by the department, is one of the largest in the state of California It has about 3,350 beds out of around 7,400 countywide. The county says it usually houses around 5,000 inmates.

Public information officer Jodi Miller said the department has also had 12 employees test positive during the pandemic, seven of whom have recovered and returned to work. 

In Riverside County, there are 4,992 total coronavirus cases, with 183 of them, or 3.6%, occurring in county jails. A total of 120 inmates have recovered. The county has about 3,700 total inmates.

So far, two inmates have died, according to Riverside County spokesperson Brooke Federico, despite a link on the county’s website available Saturday that says four inmates have died. 

Federico said that page would be updated on Sunday with the accurate figure. 

The two inmates died in late April. Edward Thomas Clark, 69, died on April 26 at San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital in Banning. 

Clark was tested for the coronavirus after medical staff determined on April 13 that he was suffering from flu-like symptoms. Test results came back positive for COVID-19 on April 14. His condition worsened and he was transferred to the hospital April 20, where he remained until his death. 

Salvador Jesus Garcia, 57, died on April 28.

He was booked on March 27 into the Cois M. Byrd Detention Facility in Murrieta on suspicion of domestic violence, according to jail records. Then he tested positive for the coronavirus on April 15 and was hospitalized until his death.

Investigators said Garcia appeared to have died from "complications from his pre-existing medical condition possibly exasperated by COVID-19."

Staff reporter Andrew John contributed to this report. Melissa Daniels covers business in the Coachella Valley. She can be reached at (760)-567-8458, [email protected], or on Twitter @melissamdaniels.

FacebookTwitterEmail

Источник: https://www.desertsun.com/story/news/2020/05/09/second-inmate-tests-positive-coronavirus-san-bernardino-county/3104526001/

Carry Out An Inmate Search of San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC)

If you’re trying to look up an inmate of San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC), then try one of two options, being:

  • Use the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) website
  • Contact them directly at 909-350-2476

To conduct your online search, or before making a call to the jail, it helps to have the following:

Inmate identification number

Be advised that an individual may be imprisoned immediately after being arrested, or transferred later on from a local center.

As an alternative (should the above methods not yield a successful search), you can attempt a California state prisoner search.

Mailing An Item To An Inmate of San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC)

Receiving a package or other mail from family and friends is permitted. Remember, when addressing any item, to write clearly the follwoing:

  • The full name of the inmate, along with the inmate ID
  • The full address: 9500 East Etiwanda Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, CA, 91739

If any item fails inspection, then it will be disposed of, unless there is a return address. Therefore, it’s essential to write your home address (or alternative return to sender address). For info on what items are permitted, we recommend calling the facility directly at 909-350-2476.

Sending Money To An Inmate of San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC)

Are you looking to send money to a prisoner San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC)? You can either:

  • Send money into an inmate’s commissary account, via money order, cashier, or check (Include the inmate’s full name and inmate ID on the back).
  • Go to the prison’s office when you next visit the inmate, and you will be able to deposit the money there.

And inmate can use a telephone for calls from 7:30 a.m. until 8:00 p.m. The maximum length of any call is 25 minutes, although this time is reduced to only 10 minutes during busier periods. The cost has to be covered by the receiver in its entirety.

Before visiting San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC). If you’re not sure that you’re on the approved visitors list then avoid disappointment by checking with the facility before leaving You can call them directly at 909-350-2476.

In order to visit, the following rules exist:

  • A previously convicted criminal may not visit
  • Presenting a valid ID is mandatory to be allowed entry
  • An adult has to be present if there is a visitor under the age of 17
  • All rules are to be complied with. Call the prison if you have any questions or doubts regarding visitor regulations.
Источник: https://www.inmate-search.online/california/county-jails/san-bernardino-county-west-valley-detention-center-wvdc

How to get to West Valley Detention Center in Rancho Cucamonga by Bus?

Public Transportation to West Valley Detention Center in Rancho Cucamonga

Wondering how to get to West Valley Detention Center in Rancho Cucamonga, United States? Moovit helps you find the best way to get to West Valley Detention Center with step-by-step directions from the nearest public transit station.

Moovit provides free maps and live directions to help you navigate through your city. View schedules, routes, timetables, and find out how long does it take to get to West Valley Detention Center in real time.

Looking for the nearest stop or station to West Valley Detention Center? Check out this list of stops closest to your destination: 4th St @ Barrington WB Ns; Rancho Cucamon.

You can get to West Valley Detention Center by Bus. These are the lines and routes that have stops nearby - Bus: 61

Want to see if there’s another route that gets you there at an earlier time? Moovit helps you find alternative routes or times. Get directions from and directions to West Valley Detention Center easily from the Moovit App or Website.

We make riding to West Valley Detention Center easy, which is why over 930 million users, including users in Rancho Cucamonga, trust Moovit as the best app for public transit. You don’t need to download an individual bus app or train app, Moovit is your all-in-one transit app that helps you find the best bus time or train time available.

For information on prices of Bus, costs and ride fares to West Valley Detention Center, please check the Moovit app.

Get to West Valley Detention Center with public transit and pay for the ride in the Moovit app. In addition to all info you may need for your trip to West Valley Detention Center, including live directions, real-time arrivals and fare prices, you can also buy public transit passes for your rides. No need for cash or paper tickets to get to West Valley Detention Center - everything you need is accessible in the app with a click of the button.

Источник: https://moovitapp.com/index/en/public_transit-West_Valley_Detention_Center-Los_Angeles_CA-site_53608969-302

San Bernardino County Inmate Search



To find out an inmate in San Bernardino County jail facilities, use San Bernardino County inmate locator.
Enter an inmate's booking number or name & DOB in the form below and submit to search.
You can obtain the inmate details like arrest information, bail, current housing facility and charges.
If you need any help, contact a jail facility to help you.

San Bernardino County Jail Facilities
Adelanto Detention Center
Address: 9438 Commerce Way, Adelanto CA 92301, Phone: (760) 530-9300
Central Detention Center
Address: 630 East Rialto Avenue, San Bernardino, CA 92415, Phone: (909) 386-0969
Glen Helen Rehabilitation Center
Address: 18000 Institution Road, Devore, CA 92407, Phone: (909) 473-2699
West Valley Detention Center
Address: 9500 Etiwanda Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91739, Phone: (909) 350-2476

San Bernardino County CA Bail Bonds
To get someone out of San Bernardino County jail, call a bail bondsman.
Bail Hotline Bail Bonds (909) 544-4322
Absolute Bail Bonds (909) 888-7007

County inmate search in California

Источник: http://www.inmatesearchcalifornia.org/San_Bernardino_County.html

A Barstow man died after half a year in jail with no trial. Now his family plans to sue San Bernardino County for 'justice.'


A 29-year-old Barstow man was going on seven months of confinement without a trial when he died in one of California's biggest county jails for reasons that remain murky.

Now, family members are preparing to file a lawsuit in December with high-profile legal backing. Their targets are San Bernardino County, its sheriff's department and the Rancho Cucamonga-based West Valley Detention Center.

Their allegation: The law-enforcement system killed Isaiah Hernandez-Sanchez by depriving him "of his rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution, including his right to adequate conditions of confinement and necessary medical care," according to a claim for damages that the family's attorney filed in San Bernardino County on Wednesday.

Later that day, family and friends organized at West Valley to protest at the site of Hernandez-Sanchez's death. They displayed a variety of old photos and donned signs with phrases such as "Justice 4 Isaiah" and "West Valley killed my brother!"

In a separate move on Wednesday, a county judge dismissed all charges — to which Hernandez-Sanchez had pleaded not guilty — posthumously under California's "interest of justice" provision, according to court records.

The family's claim adds another chapter to the case.

Hernandez-Sanchez's mother, Cynthia, and a guardian acting on behalf of his two young daughters, Andrea Baker, are the named claimants. Representing them is Ed Lyman, an attorney at The Cochran Firm, which is based in Los Angeles and named after late founder Johnnie Cochran.

The claim accuses the county, sheriff's department and jail of denying Hernandez-Sanchez his prescribed diabetes and mental-illness medications, obstructing his communication with family, and allowing guards to target him with abuse, mockery and neglect.

The family argues that county authorities knew — or at least, had a legal obligation to know — this alleged treatment "would result, and did result, in the loss of his life."

By enabling such treatment, it continues, the family now faces "substantial economic and noneconomic damages," such as "loss of support, loss of past and future earnings," costly expenses and emotional suffering.

San Bernardino County and the sheriff's department declined to comment on "this pending litigation" for this story.

To sue the government in California, Lyman said one first has to file a claim with the relevant county and wait 45 days from that time.

"Once the County rejects our claim, we will file a civil rights action in federal court to hold the sheriff's department and its officials accountable for killing Isaiah," Lyman told the Daily Press.

'He looked like an old man'

Barstow Police Department arrested Hernandez-Sanchez on March 4.

Lyman said the arrest resulted from an "altercation" Hernandez-Sanchez had while "suffering from symptoms of high blood sugar" with his younger sister, Emma, who called Barstow Police.

Hernandez-Sanchez's older sister, Erica, said she asked one of the officers why he was carrying a shotgun upon their arrival, according to Lyman. "My brother is just mentally ill," she said.

The officers arrested Hernandez-Sanchez after they found him "hiding in his bed, under the covers, crying," according to Lyman. Erica says she explained to them that her brother was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and multiple mental illnesses that required a few medications, but the officers "brushed her off."

Erica called the Barstow Police station later that night to reiterate her concerns and asked to bring his medication in, but she said the station rejected her offer.

Barstow Police declined to comment for this story.

She then learned Barstow Police had transferred Hernandez-Sanchez to the High Desert Detention Center in Adelanto, placing him into sheriff's department custody.

On the day of his arrest, according to court records, the county District Attorney's Office filed two felony charges against Hernandez-Sanchez for "criminal threats."

California law says threatening "death or great bodily injury to another person" is a felony "even if there is no intent of actually carrying it out," so long as it causes a person "to be in sustained fear for his or her own safety or for his or her immediate family's safety."

This felony is punishable by no more than one year in a county jail or state prison, the law states.

The DA's office sought an enhancement of the punishment in Hernandez-Sanchez's case to what would likely be a sentence of between 25 years and life in prison with a conviction. Court records show that the county alleged he had violated California’s "Three Strikes" law, which says anyone with two "violent" or "serious" felony convictions on their record must face a 25-year to life sentence for any additional felonies they go on to accrue.

Aside from the charges issued last March, the Daily Press could not identify any felony convictions or charges against Hernandez-Sanchez in San Bernardino County Superior Court's electronic records database. It is possible such records exist in a different jurisdiction.

County records do show that Hernandez-Sanchez's mother, Cynthia, obtained a two-year restraining order against him in 2016 over domestic violence-related concerns that did not involve children. No felonies appear to have been involved in that case, however, and Cynthia is now one of the claimants seeking accountability for her son's death.

For the first week after Hernandez-Sanchez's arrest, his mother and older sister said they "repeatedly called" High Desert Detention Center and asked to bring his medications in, but they said they were rejected and told "their brother was fine and would be taken care of."

A week into his detainment, Hernandez-Sanchez "called to inform his family he had been transferred to the West Valley Detention Center," Lyman said.

West Valley is one of the largest county-level jails in California, according to its website. It has a payroll of more than 600 employees and books between 50,000 and 60,000 people each year.

For half a year from that point, the family said it called West Valley "on an almost daily basis" to reiterate their medication concerns. In response, "staffers purported to have checked up on Isaiah and reported that he was healthy and doing fine," Lyman said.

Hernandez-Sanchez painted a different picture when speaking directly with his family. He said the jail was not providing him his medications, causing him to face untreated diabetes symptoms such as:

  • An inability to keep food down without vomiting on himself
  • An inability to control his bladder, leading him to soil his pants and bed
  • Developing an untreated infection on his foot, and struggling to walk.

"The guards would ridicule him for peeing on himself and the bed," according to Erica, Hernandez-Sanchez's older sister.

She said she last saw Hernandez-Sanchez at a Sept. 7 hearing. She "could hardly recognize him."

"My brother was pale. His eyes were glazed over. He had lost weight. He looked like an old man," she said in a statement shared by Lyman. "But the Deputy kept pushing him along."

Hernandez-Sanchez told his family the jail denied him a wheelchair upon requests, adding that he "had to borrow a cellmate's wheelchair just to get to the phones."

His family members said their final call with Hernandez-Sanchez came on Sept. 13, two days before his death. He said, in slurred words, that "this was the last time he could ever call" given the difficulty he faced reaching the phones. They then said their goodbyes.

'Constantly shielded'

Hernandez-Sanchez first appeared in court on March 8. He pleaded not guilty to the felony charges and asked the court to deny the county's request for a "Three Strikes" enhancement.

Judge Joseph Widman set a $200,000 bail for him in response, according to court records. The family said it could not afford such a cost.

The first in a slew of pretrial hearings occurred on March 16, but Hernandez-Sanchez was not present for his defense that day. Instead, authorities kept him at West Valley "in quarantine until to be determined for the health and safety of all involved," according to court records.

A public defender attended the March 16 hearing on Hernandez-Sanchez's behalf. A few weeks later, the Barstow resident retained private attorneys Melvin Betnun and Roger Chien, who were relieved June 30. The defense then returned to a different public defender.

Proceedings were suspended at least twice — on May 10 and Aug. 2 — when the court declared doubt about Hernandez-Sanchez's mental health potentially invalidating the county's prosecution.

But the court ended both suspensions by declaring him mentally competent and finding good cause to continue the proceedings, first on June 7 and then on Aug. 30.

Roughly two weeks after that second reinstatement of proceedings, Hernandez-Sanchez died.

The sheriff's department announced his death on Sept. 20, five days after it reportedly occurred. It said deputies responded to "a possible medical emergency" and found Hernandez-Sanchez "unresponsive on his bunk" in West Valley at about 10:40 a.m. Sept. 15.

Hernandez-Sanchez was later pronounced dead at a local hospital, according to the department, which did not identify the hospital.

The sheriff's Specialized Investigations Division took over the death investigation soon after it occurred. An autopsy to determine the cause of his death was conducted by the county Coroner's Division, which is part of the sheriff's department.

The family said sheriff's Det. Cory Drost and Sgt. Joseph Steers informed them of Hernandez-Sanchez's death at their home a day later, on Sept. 16.

The officers "were accompanied by a supposed supervisor from the West Valley Detention Center who interrogated the family about what medications Isaiah was treated with," Lyman said. But the officers told the family a toxicology report was still in the works and shared little detail on how Hernandez-Sanchez perished.

Family members said that last week, on Oct. 7, they spoke again with Steers. Hernandez-Sanchez's mother, Cynthia, alleges that the sergeant "told me that he knows we have a lawyer and he's not threatened."

The claim filed by the family does not blame specific individuals for his death.

Rather, it accuses an unlimited number of "unknown individuals" — including deputies; directors; independent contractors and third parties performing services for the county; the sheriff's department and West Valley.

Lyman told the Daily Press the county coroner has not provided him or the family any autopsy results, "and I doubt they will." He added that attempts by public officials to delay or hide documentation of in-custody deaths are a broader problem.

Lyman referenced another in-custody death at West Valley this year that he is currently fighting in federal court, saying he requested documents under the California Public Records Act six months ago and still has not received a response in that case.

"This information is constantly shielded from these families and the public at-large, so we have attorneys working at the county level that are breaking the law too," Lyman said. "I think a lot of the time, people forget who they work for."

Charlie McGee covers the city of Barstow and its surrounding communities for the Daily Press. He is also a Report for America corps member with the GroundTruth Project, an independent, nonpartisan, nonprofit news organization dedicated to supporting the next generation of journalists in the U.S. and around the world. McGee may be reached at 760-955-5341 or [email protected] Follow him on Twitter @bycharliemcgee.

FacebookTwitterEmail

Источник: https://www.vvdailypress.com/story/news/courts/2021/10/15/barstow-man-died-half-a-year-in-jail-no-trial-family-plans-to-sue-san-bernardino-county/8443321002/

San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) Inmate Locator / Search Information

San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) is a Medium-Security Jail. The location of this prison is 9500 East Etiwanda Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, California, 91739. It houses the inmates above 18 years of age. This Jail is administrated and operated by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) .


San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) Inmate Locator and Search Information

Note: You should contact the administration department of the state of the California for further details and clarification.


How to Locate an Inmate in San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) - California?

If you want to search an inmate currently kept at the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) of the California state. You can use the following ways to enquire about your inmate.

  1. You may find it quite handy to visit the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) inmate search web page where you an find a way to enquire about your inmate.

  2. Visit the web page California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) authority of the California if you don't find enough information around.

  3. Visit the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) web page where you may find enough information on how to locate your inmate.

  4. You can directly call to the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) telephone number 909-350-2476 909-463-7563. Often, this method provides the latest and quick information about an inmate.

    TIP: Don't forget to keep the inmate and your information in hand before you make a call. Continue reading for details.

  5. You can send an e-mail to the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) e-mail address [email protected] But, this may take a long to respond. May be 3-5 days or more. Sometimes, e-mail sever don't response as properly and your e-mail may bounce or you will never get a response.

  6. When you contact any administration department keep information of your inmate in hand. This information includes Full Name, Age, Gender, Date of Birth, and Inmate ID.

    You should also keep your personal information in hand like your ID Card, Driving Licence, etc. These types of information are always asked when you contact any department.

  7. Visit California state wide web page for complete details. This web page contains a complete directory list of all prisons, jails, and facilities in the California state and lot of related information about how to search an inmate.


How to Send a Mail or Package or Photo in the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) - California?

Inmates incarcerated in the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) as usually allowed to receive items with restrictions and prior approval for security reasons. They are allowed to receive magazines, newspapers, books, and other printed material only from approved vendors. The largest vendor in this category is Amazon.com .

Things to consider while sending books or magazines:

  1. Inmate Name and ID number along with complete address must be affixed on each book and magazine
  2. Magazines or books should be in new condition and soft covered. Hardcover or spiral bound is most probably not accepted
  3. Try to get the paperback edition of the book if available
  4. Sending more than 3 books may result in refusal
  5. Try to send books or magazines through USPS
  6. Inmate can't receive books or magazines in solitary

Only new items are allowed and they must not be hardcover or spiral bound for security measures. The printed material should not contain any abusive language, hate speech, and nudity, or violent content. An example of prohibited content is High Times magazines, Playboy, etc.

Things to consider while sending photographs:

  1. Print the name and ID number of the inmate on the backside of the photo
  2. Try to keep the size of the photo not larger than 4"x6"
  3. Nudity, violence, map or sexually suggestive content is strictly forbidden
  4. Don't send more than 5 photos or, to be safe, 3 photos

Things to consider while sending Holiday or Birthday card:

Holiday and birthday cards share the same rule with other mail or package. They should not contain any electronic or popup/out material. Nudity or sexually suggestive cards are forbidden. Cards should not have glitter, stickers, etc. on them. All cards are viewed before they reach the inmate.

You are required to send Mail or Package to address mentioned below. If you are sending mail or package the first time and you don't have any past experience, it is a good idea to contact the prison department on 909-350-2476 909-463-7563 first. There might be a change in rules for sending mail or package. You can also enquire about the list of prohibited goods, etc.

Inmate Full Name and ID

San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC)

9500 East Etiwanda Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, California, 91739

NOTE: You must get approval from the prison administration before sending a package.

Prohibited Mail Rules:

  1. Don't write personal that a third person is not allowed
  2. Crayon, glitter, glue, marker, lipstick, and stickers are strictly prohibited on paper content
  3. Never use paper clips or staples
  4. Scented or perfumed or fragrance paper are not allowed
  5. Any map or drawing in mail papers will be refused as it is a security risk

Note: All material is scanned and read by staff and if they find any suspicious material, they will reject it and ban you for sending further mail.


How to Send Money in the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) - California?

Inmates of the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) can receive money in different ways. They can receive money via following allowed ways in their commissary account upon approval:

  1. Cashier
  2. Money orders
  3. Cheque
  4. Online transfer

Don't forget to write the full name and ID of your inmate when you a send money order or cheque. You can also deposit cash at the prison administration office or counter if the inmate has the approval of a money deposit.

When you send money or funds to your inmate, first you have to find out what type of online transfer service is supported by the prison or institute in which your inmate is incarcerated. This type of information can easily find out by visiting/navigating to the institution San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) web page link. You can also contact at prison telephone number 909-350-2476 909-463-7563.

You should pay very close attention to the rules of the facility or institution where the inmate is incarcerated. Sometimes they require money senders are on the inmate's visitation list. Some institutes or correctional facilities have a deposit limit, like $200-300 at a time. In federal prisons and correctional facilities, there is no such limit.

Popular Online Money Transfer Firms for San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC)

There are some of the money transfer firms being used by various facilities.

  1. MoneyGram
  2. JPay
  3. OffenderConnect or ConnectNetWork
  4. AccessCorrections
  5. JailATM
  6. WesternUnion
  7. TouchPayOnline
  8. TigerCommissary
  9. SmartDeposit

JPay, WesternUnion, and MoneyGram are by far the oldest and most trusted money transfer companies.

This is to be noted that you must verify which company can send money to your inmate before sending funds. If your inmate asks you to deposit money into the account of a friend, be careful as this is a sign of illegal activity. If the department finds such activity your inmate and you might possibly be banned from sending and receiving money.

Some authority departments may impose a limit of a maximum $200 of sending money at any time so it is a more accurate way to confirm your limit.

Who can access the money of your inmate you send?

An inmate with fines or restitution could be a hassle to commissary/accept as true with account garnishment. If the inmate has those monetary obligations, they'll be extracted from the inmate’s bank account. It could be a percent or the whole amount counting on the scenario.

We suggest inmates who are going into their bid touch the counselor and make an association in advance. In case you pass in understanding they are taking 20-25% of all deposits is higher than have them take all of it and you discover in the commissary line while the account is zero.


How to Make a Phone Call in the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) - California?

Calling an inmate in the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) is quite straight forward. There are some rules before you call the inmate.

  1. One should not be banned due to any reason from San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC).
  2. The inmate is in an allowed list whom someone outside the facility can call.
  3. Generally, calling time is 7:30 AM to 7:00 PM but sometimes it is changed due to certain circumstances. It is better to confirm it before you call.
  4. Calling time duration is maximum of 30 minutes and in rush hours or certain occasions, it is reduced to 10 or 15 minutes.

Visitation Rules of the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) - California

Visiting the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) of California has some common rules defined by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). Some facilities have their own rules according to a certain circumstance. San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) is on a rotating visiting schedule.

General visitation rules:

  1. Generally, the visitor is allowed to once a month
  2. Visiting person must not be prior a felon
  3. Must have a photo Government ID such as driving license, ID card, military ID or passport
  4. A legal guardian with proof is required for children below 16 years of age. A birth certificate or any identification for the proof of the age of the minors is required.

Visitors are scanned and searched with metal detectors and scanner when they enter the facility or prison. There bags and cars are also searched for extra security. The visitor may be denied if he/she found with illegal things such as narcotics, prohibited material such as sexually suggestive papers or violence content.

Visitation dress:

  1. Religious dress like burkas, yamakas will be searched
  2. Clothing that matches the inmate dress or staff is not allowed
  3. Dress with a lot of metals buttons or hidden button not allowed
  4. No transparent, skirts, strapless dress
  5. Hair extensions such as wigs are prohibited
  6. No hats, sunglasses, gloves, excessive jewelry and tight clothing
  7. No sexually exposed clothing

You should always bring some extra clothing with you and leave them in your car. Change your cloth in case of any rejection of your dress.


Visitation Timing and Schedule of the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) - California

Monday 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM 12:30 PM to 4:00 PM
Tuesday 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM 12:30 PM to 4:00 PM
Wednesday 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM 12:30 PM to 4:00 PM
Thursday 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM 12:30 PM to 4:00 PM
Friday 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM 12:30 PM to 4:00 PM 5:30 PM to 9:00 PM
Saturday 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM 12:30 PM to 4:00 PM 5:30 PM to 9:00 PM
Sunday 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM 12:30 PM to 4:00 PM 5:30 PM to 9:00 PM

Note: The Administration department of the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) might have changed timing or visitation rules. It is advised that you must contact them before you visit.


GEO Location Map and Direction of the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) - California

Below is a GEO location map and direction of the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) - 9500 East Etiwanda Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, California, 91739.

You can click on any area of the map to enlarge it and zoom out the exact location and direction of your interest.


Other Jails, Prisons and Facilities, You Might Interested

You might interested in the following list of prisons, jails and other facilities in the state of California.


Record ID: 1682


This web page was last updated on Nov 22, 2021. If you find any error, please contact us.

Источник: https://prisonal.org/california/county-jail/san-bernardino-county-west-valley-detention-center-wvdc-inmate-locator
san bernadino county west valley detention center rancho cucamonga ca

bank of eastman magnolia state bank first baptist church lexington tn How to get to West Valley Detention Center in Rancho Cucamonga by Bus?

Public Transportation to West Valley Detention Center in Rancho Cucamonga

Wondering how to get to West Valley Detention Center in Rancho Cucamonga, United States? Moovit helps you find the best way to get to West Valley Detention Center with step-by-step directions from the nearest public transit station.

Moovit provides free maps and live directions to help you navigate through your city. View schedules, routes, timetables, and find out how long does it take to get to West Valley Detention Center in real time.

Looking for the nearest stop or station to West Valley Detention Center? Check out this list of stops closest to your destination: san bernadino county west valley detention center rancho cucamonga ca 4th St @ Barrington WB Ns; Rancho Cucamon.

You can get to West Valley Detention Center by Bus. These are the lines and routes that have stops nearby - Bus: 61

Want to see if there’s another route that gets you there at an earlier time? Moovit helps you find alternative routes or times. Get directions from and directions to West Valley Detention Center easily from the Moovit App or Website.

We make riding to West Valley Detention Center easy, which is why over 930 million users, including users in Rancho Cucamonga, trust Moovit as the best app for public transit. You don’t need to download an individual bus app or train app, Moovit is your all-in-one transit app that helps you find the best bus time or train time available.

For information on prices of Bus, costs and ride fares to West Valley Detention Center, please check the Moovit app.

Get to West Valley Detention Center with public transit and pay for the ride in the Moovit app. In addition to all info you may need for your trip to West Valley Detention Center, including live directions, real-time arrivals and fare prices, you can also buy public transit passes for your rides. No need for cash or paper tickets to get to West Valley Detention Center - everything you need is accessible in the app with a click of the button.

Источник: https://moovitapp.com/index/en/public_transit-West_Valley_Detention_Center-Los_Angeles_CA-site_53608969-302

A Barstow man died after half a year in jail with no trial. Now his family plans to sue San Discover online banking bonus County for 'justice.'


A 29-year-old Barstow man was going on seven months of confinement without a trial when he died in one of California's biggest county jails for reasons that remain murky.

Now, family members are preparing to file a lawsuit in December with high-profile legal backing. Their targets are San Bernardino County, its sheriff's department and the Rancho Cucamonga-based West Valley Detention Center.

Their allegation: The law-enforcement system killed Isaiah Hernandez-Sanchez by depriving him "of his rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution, including his right to adequate conditions of confinement and necessary medical care," according to a claim for damages that the family's attorney filed in San Bernardino County on Wednesday.

Later that day, family and friends organized at West Valley to protest at the site of Hernandez-Sanchez's death. They displayed a variety of old photos and donned signs with phrases such as "Justice 4 Isaiah" and "West Valley killed my brother!"

In a separate move on Wednesday, a county judge dismissed all charges — to which Hernandez-Sanchez had pleaded not guilty — posthumously under California's "interest of justice" provision, according to court records.

The family's claim adds another chapter to the case.

Hernandez-Sanchez's mother, Cynthia, and a guardian acting on behalf of his two young daughters, Andrea Baker, are the named claimants. Representing them is Ed Lyman, an attorney at The Cochran Firm, which is based in Los Angeles and named after late founder Johnnie Cochran.

The claim accuses the county, sheriff's department and jail of denying Hernandez-Sanchez his prescribed diabetes and mental-illness medications, obstructing his communication with family, and allowing guards to target him with abuse, mockery and neglect.

The family argues that county authorities knew — or at least, had a legal obligation to know — this alleged treatment "would result, and did result, in the loss of his life."

By enabling such treatment, it continues, the family now faces "substantial economic and noneconomic damages," such as "loss of support, loss of past and future earnings," costly expenses and emotional suffering.

San Bernardino County and the sheriff's department declined to comment on "this pending litigation" for this story.

To sue the government in California, Lyman said one first has to file a claim with the relevant county and wait 45 days from that time.

"Once the County rejects our claim, we will file a civil rights action in federal court to hold the sheriff's department and its officials accountable for killing Isaiah," Lyman told the Daily Press.

'He looked like an old man'

Barstow Police Department arrested Hernandez-Sanchez on March 4.

Lyman said the arrest resulted from an "altercation" Hernandez-Sanchez had while "suffering from symptoms of high blood sugar" with his younger sister, Emma, who called Barstow Police.

Hernandez-Sanchez's older sister, Erica, said she asked one of the officers why he was carrying a shotgun upon their arrival, according to Lyman. "My brother is just mentally ill," she said.

The officers arrested Hernandez-Sanchez after they found him "hiding in his bed, under the covers, crying," according to Lyman. Erica says she explained to them that her brother was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and multiple mental illnesses that required a few medications, but the officers "brushed her off."

Erica called the Barstow Police san bernadino county west valley detention center rancho cucamonga ca later that night to reiterate her concerns and asked to bring his medication in, but she said the station rejected her offer.

Barstow Police declined to comment for this story.

She then learned Barstow Police had transferred Hernandez-Sanchez to the High Desert Detention Center in Adelanto, placing him into sheriff's department custody.

On the day of his arrest, according to court records, the county District Attorney's Office filed two felony charges against Hernandez-Sanchez for "criminal threats."

California law says threatening "death or great bodily injury to another person" is a felony "even if there is no intent of actually carrying it out," so long as it causes a person "to be in sustained fear for his or her own safety or for his or her immediate family's safety."

This felony is punishable by no more than one year in a county jail or state prison, the law states.

The DA's office sought an enhancement of the punishment in Hernandez-Sanchez's case to what would likely be a sentence of between 25 years and life in prison with a conviction. Court records show san bernadino county west valley detention center rancho cucamonga ca the county alleged he had violated California’s "Three Strikes" law, which says anyone with two "violent" or "serious" felony convictions dollar bank personal login their record must face a 25-year to life sentence for any additional felonies they go on to accrue.

Aside from the charges issued last March, the Daily Press could not identify any felony convictions or charges against Hernandez-Sanchez in San Bernardino County Superior Court's electronic records database. It is possible such records exist in a different jurisdiction.

County san bernadino county west valley detention center rancho cucamonga ca do show that Hernandez-Sanchez's mother, Cynthia, obtained a two-year restraining order against him in 2016 over domestic violence-related concerns that did not involve children. No felonies appear to have been involved in that case, however, and Cynthia is now one of the claimants seeking accountability for her son's death.

For the first week after Hernandez-Sanchez's arrest, his mother and older sister said they "repeatedly called" High Desert Detention Center and asked to bring his medications in, but they said they were rejected and told "their brother was fine and would be taken care of."

A week into his detainment, Hernandez-Sanchez "called to inform his family he had been transferred to the West Valley Detention Center," Lyman said.

West Valley is one of the largest county-level jails in California, according to its website. It has a payroll of more than 600 employees and books between 50,000 and 60,000 people each year.

For half a year from that point, the family said it called West Valley "on an almost daily basis" to reiterate their medication concerns. In response, "staffers purported to have checked up on Isaiah and reported that he was healthy and doing fine," Lyman said.

Hernandez-Sanchez painted a different picture when speaking directly with his family. He said the jail was not providing him his medications, causing him to face untreated diabetes symptoms such as:

  • An inability first national bank severna park keep food down without vomiting on himself
  • An inability to control his bladder, leading him to soil his pants and bed
  • Developing an untreated infection on his foot, and struggling to walk.

"The guards would ridicule him for peeing on himself and the bed," according to Erica, Hernandez-Sanchez's older sister.

She said she last saw Hernandez-Sanchez at a Sept. 7 hearing. She "could hardly recognize him."

"My brother was pale. His eyes were glazed over. He had lost weight. He looked like an old man," she said in a statement shared by Lyman. "But the Deputy kept pushing him along."

Hernandez-Sanchez told his family the jail denied him a wheelchair upon requests, adding that he "had to borrow a cellmate's wheelchair just to get to the phones."

His family members said their final call with Hernandez-Sanchez came on Sept. 13, two days before his death. He said, in slurred words, that "this was the last time he could ever call" given the difficulty he faced reaching the phones. They then said their goodbyes.

'Constantly shielded'

Hernandez-Sanchez first appeared in court on March 8. He pleaded not guilty to the felony charges and asked the court to deny the county's request for a "Three Strikes" enhancement.

Judge Joseph Widman set a $200,000 bail for him in response, according to court records. The family said it could not afford such a cost.

The first in a slew of pretrial hearings occurred on March 16, but Hernandez-Sanchez was not present for his defense that day. Instead, authorities kept him at West Valley "in quarantine until to be determined for the health and safety of all involved," according to court records.

A public defender attended the March 16 hearing on Hernandez-Sanchez's behalf. A few weeks later, the Barstow resident retained private attorneys Melvin Betnun and Roger Chien, who were relieved June 30. The defense then returned to a different public defender.

Proceedings were suspended at least twice — on May 10 and Aug. 2 — when the court declared doubt about Hernandez-Sanchez's mental health potentially invalidating the county's prosecution.

But the court ended both suspensions by declaring him mentally competent and finding good cause to continue the proceedings, first on June 7 and then on Aug. 30.

Roughly two weeks after that second reinstatement of proceedings, Hernandez-Sanchez died.

The sheriff's department announced his death on Sept. 20, five days after it reportedly occurred. It said deputies responded to "a possible medical emergency" and found Hernandez-Sanchez "unresponsive on his bunk" in West Valley at about 10:40 a.m. Sept. 15.

Hernandez-Sanchez was later pronounced dead at a local hospital, according to the department, which did not identify the hospital.

The sheriff's Specialized Investigations Division took over the death investigation soon after it occurred. An autopsy to determine the cause of his death was conducted by the county Coroner's Division, which is part of the sheriff's department.

The family said sheriff's Det. Cory Drost and Sgt. Joseph Steers informed them of Hernandez-Sanchez's death at their home a day later, on Sept. 16.

The officers "were accompanied by a supposed supervisor from the West Valley Detention Center who interrogated the family about what medications Isaiah was treated with," Lyman said. But the officers told the family a toxicology report was san bernadino county west valley detention center rancho cucamonga ca in the works and shared little detail on how Hernandez-Sanchez perished.

Family members said that last week, on Oct. 7, they spoke again with Steers. Hernandez-Sanchez's mother, Cynthia, alleges that the sergeant "told me that he knows we have a lawyer and he's not threatened."

The claim filed by the family does not blame specific individuals for his death.

Rather, it accuses an unlimited number of "unknown individuals" — including deputies; directors; independent contractors and third parties performing services for the county; the sheriff's department and West Valley.

Lyman told the Daily Press the county coroner has not provided him or the family any autopsy results, "and I doubt they will." He added that attempts by public officials to delay or hide documentation of in-custody deaths are a broader problem.

Lyman referenced another in-custody death at West Valley this year that he is currently fighting in federal court, saying he requested documents under the California Public Records Act six months ago and still has not received a response in that case.

"This information is constantly shielded from these families and the public at-large, so we have attorneys working at the county level that are breaking the law too," Lyman said. "I think a lot of the time, people forget who they work for."

Charlie McGee covers the city of Barstow and its surrounding communities for the Daily Press. He is also a Report for America corps member with the GroundTruth Project, an independent, nonpartisan, nonprofit news organization dedicated to supporting the next generation of journalists in the U.S. and around the world. McGee may be reached at 760-955-5341 or [email protected] San bernadino county west valley detention center rancho cucamonga ca him on Twitter @bycharliemcgee.

FacebookTwitterEmail

Источник: https://www.vvdailypress.com/story/news/courts/2021/10/15/barstow-man-died-half-a-year-in-jail-no-trial-family-plans-to-sue-san-bernardino-county/8443321002/

San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) San bernadino county west valley detention center rancho cucamonga ca Locator / Search Information

San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) is a Medium-Security Jail. The location of this prison is 9500 East Etiwanda Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, California, 91739. It houses the inmates above 18 years of age. This Jail is administrated and operated by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR).


San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) Inmate Locator and Search Information

Note: You should contact the administration department of the state of the California for further details and clarification.


How to Locate an Inmate in San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) - California?

If you want to search an inmate currently kept at the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) of the California state. You can use the following ways to enquire about your inmate.

  1. You may find it quite handy to visit the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) inmate search web page where you an find a way to enquire about your inmate.

  2. Visit the web page California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) authority of the California if you don't find enough information around.

  3. Visit the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) web page where you may find enough information on how to locate your inmate.

  4. You can directly call to the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) telephone number 909-350-2476 909-463-7563. Often, this method provides the latest and quick information about an inmate.

    TIP: Don't forget to keep the inmate and your information in hand before you make a call. Continue reading for details.

  5. You can send an e-mail to the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) e-mail address [email protected] But, this may take a long to respond. May be 3-5 days or more. Sometimes, e-mail sever don't response as properly and your e-mail may bounce or you will never get a response.

  6. When you contact any administration department keep information of your inmate in hand. This information includes Full Name, Age, Gender, Date of Birth, and Inmate ID.

    You should also keep your personal information in hand like your ID Card, Driving Licence, etc. These types of information are always asked when you contact any department.

  7. Visit California state wide web page for complete details. This web page contains a complete directory list of all prisons, jails, and facilities in the California state and lot of related information about how to search an inmate.


How to Send a Mail or Package or Photo in the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) - California?

Inmates incarcerated in the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) as usually allowed to receive items with restrictions and prior approval for security reasons. They are allowed to receive magazines, newspapers, books, and other printed material only from approved vendors. The largest vendor in this category is Amazon.com.

Things to consider while sending books or magazines:

  1. Inmate Name and ID number along with complete address must be affixed on each book and magazine
  2. Magazines or books should be in new condition and soft covered. Hardcover or spiral bound is most probably not accepted
  3. Try to get the paperback edition of the book if available
  4. Sending more than 3 books may result in refusal
  5. Try to send books or magazines through USPS
  6. Inmate can't receive books or magazines in solitary

Only new items are allowed and they must not be hardcover or spiral bound for security measures. The printed material should not contain any abusive language, hate speech, and nudity, or violent content. An example of prohibited content is High Times magazines, Playboy, etc.

Things to consider while sending photographs:

  1. Print the name and ID number of the inmate on the backside of the photo
  2. Try to keep the size of the photo not larger than 4"x6"
  3. Nudity, violence, map or sexually suggestive content is strictly forbidden
  4. Don't send more than 5 photos or, to be safe, 3 photos

Things to consider while sending Holiday or Birthday card:

Holiday and birthday cards share the same rule with other mail or package. They should not contain any electronic or popup/out material. Nudity or sexually suggestive cards are forbidden. Cards should not have glitter, stickers, etc. on them. All cards are viewed before they reach the inmate.

You are required to send Mail or Package to address mentioned below. If you are sending mail or package the first time and you don't have any past experience, it is a good idea to contact the prison department on 909-350-2476 909-463-7563 first. There might be a change in rules for sending mail or package. You can also enquire about the list of prohibited goods, etc.

Inmate Full Name and ID

San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC)

9500 East Etiwanda Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, California, 91739

NOTE: You must get approval from the prison administration before sending a package.

Prohibited Mail Rules:

  1. Don't write personal that a third person is not allowed
  2. Crayon, glitter, glue, marker, lipstick, and stickers are strictly prohibited on paper content
  3. Never use paper clips or staples
  4. Scented or perfumed or fragrance paper are not allowed
  5. Any map or drawing in mail papers will be refused as it is a security risk

Note: All material is scanned and read by staff and if they find any suspicious material, they will reject it and ban you for sending further mail.


How to Send Money in the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) - California?

Inmates of the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) can receive money in different ways. They can receive money via following allowed ways in their commissary account upon approval:

  1. Cashier
  2. Money orders
  3. Cheque
  4. Online transfer

Don't forget to write the full name and ID of your inmate when you a send money order or cheque. You can also deposit cash at the prison administration office or counter if the inmate has the approval of a money deposit.

When you send money or funds to your inmate, first you have to find out what type of online transfer service is supported by the prison or institute in which your inmate is incarcerated. This type of information can easily find out by visiting/navigating to the institution San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) web page link. You can also contact at prison telephone number 909-350-2476 909-463-7563.

You should pay very close attention to the rules of the facility or institution where the inmate is incarcerated. Sometimes they require money senders are on the inmate's visitation list. Some institutes or correctional facilities have a deposit limit, like $200-300 at a time. In federal prisons and correctional facilities, there is no such limit.

Popular Online Money Transfer Firms for San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC)

There are some of the money transfer firms being used by various facilities.

  1. MoneyGram
  2. JPay
  3. OffenderConnect or ConnectNetWork
  4. AccessCorrections
  5. JailATM
  6. WesternUnion
  7. TouchPayOnline
  8. TigerCommissary
  9. SmartDeposit

JPay, WesternUnion, and MoneyGram are by far the oldest and most trusted money transfer companies.

This is to be noted that you must verify which company can send money to your inmate before sending funds. If your inmate asks you to deposit money into the account of a friend, be careful as this is a sign of illegal activity. First national bank severna park the department finds such activity your inmate and you might possibly be banned from sending and receiving money.

Some authority departments may impose a limit of a maximum $200 of sending money at any time so it is a more accurate way to confirm your limit.

Who can access the money of your inmate you send?

An inmate with fines or restitution could be a hassle to commissary/accept as true with account garnishment. If the inmate has those monetary obligations, they'll be extracted from the inmate’s bank account. It could be a percent or the whole amount counting on the scenario.

We suggest inmates who are going into their bid touch the counselor and make an association in advance. In case you pass in understanding they are taking 20-25% of all deposits is higher than have them take all of it and you discover in the commissary line while the account is zero.


How to Make a Phone Call in the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) - California?

Calling an inmate in the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) is quite straight forward. There are some rules before you call the inmate.

  1. One should not be banned due to any reason from San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC).
  2. The inmate is in an allowed list whom someone outside the facility can call.
  3. Generally, calling time fine art america shower curtains 7:30 AM to 7:00 PM but sometimes it is changed due to certain circumstances. It is better to confirm it before you call.
  4. Calling time duration is maximum of 30 minutes and in rush hours or certain occasions, it is reduced to 10 or 15 minutes.

Visitation Rules of the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) - California

Visiting the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) of California has some common rules defined by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). Some facilities have their own rules according to a certain circumstance. San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) is on a rotating visiting schedule.

General visitation rules:

  1. Generally, the visitor is allowed to once a month
  2. Visiting person must not be prior a felon
  3. Must have a photo Government ID such as driving license, ID card, military ID or passport
  4. A legal guardian with proof is required for children below 16 years of age. A birth certificate or any identification for the proof of the age of the minors is required.

Visitors are scanned and searched with metal detectors and scanner when they enter the facility or prison. There bags and cars are also searched for extra security. The visitor may be denied if he/she found with illegal things such as narcotics, prohibited material such as sexually suggestive papers or violence content.

Visitation dress:

  1. Religious dress like burkas, yamakas will be searched
  2. Clothing that matches the inmate dress or staff is not allowed
  3. Dress with a lot of metals buttons or hidden button not allowed
  4. No transparent, skirts, strapless dress
  5. Hair extensions such as wigs are prohibited
  6. No hats, sunglasses, gloves, excessive jewelry and tight clothing
  7. No sexually exposed clothing

You should always bring some extra clothing with you and leave them in your car. Change your cloth in case of any rejection of your dress.


Visitation Timing and Schedule of the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) - California

Monday 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM 12:30 PM to 4:00 PM
Tuesday 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM 12:30 PM to 4:00 PM
Wednesday 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM 12:30 PM to 4:00 PM
Thursday 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM 12:30 PM to 4:00 PM
Friday 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM 12:30 PM to 4:00 PM 5:30 PM to 9:00 PM
Saturday 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM 12:30 PM to 4:00 PM 5:30 PM to 9:00 PM
Sunday 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM 12:30 PM to 4:00 PM 5:30 PM to 9:00 PM

Note: The Administration department of the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) might have changed timing san bernadino county west valley detention center rancho cucamonga ca visitation rules. It is advised that you must contact them before you visit.


GEO Location Map and Direction of the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) - California

Below is a GEO location map and direction of the San Bernardino County - West Valley Detention Center (WVDC) - 9500 East Etiwanda Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, California, 91739.

You can click on any area of the map to enlarge it and zoom out the exact location and direction of your interest.


Other Jails, Prisons and Facilities, You Might Interested

You might interested in the following list of prisons, jails and other facilities in the state of California.


Record ID: 1682


This web page was last updated on Nov 22, 2021. If you find any error, please contact us.

Источник: https://prisonal.org/california/county-jail/san-bernardino-county-west-valley-detention-center-wvdc-inmate-locator

Second inmate tests positive for coronavirus in San Bernardino County


A second inmate has tested positive for COVID-19 at the West Valley Detention Center in Rancho Cucamonga.

The San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department announced the case on Saturday, the same day that the county reported its highest single-day jump of coronavirus cases.

The inmate, whose name and other identifying details were not released, is in isolation and being provided with medical treatment. 

The first inmate who tested positive for coronavirus was announced on April 11, and also at the West Valley Detention Center. That facility, one of four operated by the department, is one of the largest in the state of California It has about 3,350 beds out of around 7,400 countywide. The city bank lubbock texas phone number says it usually houses around 5,000 inmates.

Public information officer Jodi Miller said the department has also had 12 employees test positive during the pandemic, seven of whom have recovered and returned to work. 

In Riverside County, there are 4,992 total coronavirus cases, with 183 of them, or 3.6%, occurring in county jails. A total of 120 inmates have recovered. The county has about 3,700 total inmates.

So far, two inmates have died, according to Riverside County spokesperson Brooke Federico, despite a link on the county’s website available Saturday that says four inmates have died. 

Federico said that page would be updated on Sunday with the accurate figure. 

The two inmates died in late April. Edward Thomas Clark, 69, died on April 26 at San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital in Banning. 

Clark was tested for the coronavirus after medical staff determined on April 13 that he was suffering from flu-like symptoms. Test results came back positive for COVID-19 on April 14. His condition worsened and he was transferred to the hospital April 20, where he remained until his death. 

Salvador Jesus Garcia, 57, died on April 28.

He was booked on March 27 into the Cois M. Byrd Detention Facility in Murrieta on suspicion of domestic violence, according to jail records. Then he tested positive for the coronavirus on April 15 and was hospitalized until his death.

Investigators said Garcia appeared to have died from "complications from his pre-existing medical san bernadino county west valley detention center rancho cucamonga ca possibly exasperated by COVID-19."

Staff reporter Andrew John contributed to this report. Melissa Daniels covers business in the Coachella Valley. She can be reached at (760)-567-8458, [email protected], or on Twitter @melissamdaniels.

FacebookTwitterEmail

Источник: https://www.desertsun.com/story/news/2020/05/09/second-inmate-tests-positive-coronavirus-san-bernardino-county/3104526001/

West Valley Detention Center in Rancho Cucamonga, California

Popularity:#1 of 2 Jails & Prisons in Rancho Cucamonga#16 of 29 Jails & Prisons in San Bernardino County#256 of 580 Jails & Prisons in California#3,817 in Jails & Prisons

West Valley Detention Center Contact Information

Address, Phone Number, and Fax Number for West Valley Detention Center, a Jail & Prison, at Etiwanda Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga CA.

Name
West Valley Detention Center
Address
9500 Etiwanda Avenue
Rancho Cucamonga, California, 91739
Phone
909-887-0364
Fax
909-382-7660
Website
cms.sbcounty.gov

West Valley Detention Center Details

Type
County Facility
Security Level
Maximum Security
Inmate Capacity
3,347

Map of West Valley Detention Center in Rancho Cucamonga, California

View map of West Valley Detention Center, and get driving directions from your location .


Related Public Records Searches

Find Inmate Records and Jail Records related to West Valley Detention Center.

Jails & Prisons Nearby

Find 6 Jails & Prisons within 10.8 miles of West Valley Detention Center.

External Links

Find 7 external resources related to West Valley Detention Center.

About the West Valley Detention Center

The West Valley Detention Center, located in Rancho Cucamonga, CA, is a secure facility that houses inmates. The inmates may be awaiting trial or sentencing, or they may be serving a sentence after being convicted of a crime. Jails and Prisons maintain records on inmates, including arrest records, sentencing records, court documents, and other criminal records. West Valley Detention Center makes these records available to the public.

You may contact Jails & Prisons for questions about:
  • Locating Rancho Cucamonga inmates
  • Conducting a background check
  • Searching for criminal records
  • Contacting an inmate
  • Jail and Prison visiting hours

Jails & Prisons near Rancho Cucamonga

Источник: https://www.countyoffice.org/west-valley-detention-center-rancho-cucamonga-ca-ff5/

The death of an inmate earlier this week at San Bernardino County’s West Valley Detention Center marked the ninth at the Rancho Cucamonga jail in the past year, a sheriff’s spokeswoman said Tuesday.

All of the deaths were related to inmate medical issues, sheriff’s spokeswoman Jodi Miller said.

“To date, nine medical related deaths per year is below average for correction facilities of similar size and function,” Miller said. She said there also was one medically related inmate death this year at the Central Detention Center in San Bernardino.

Shaun Greene, 39, of Glendora, lost consciousness and slipped out of his wheelchair while eating lunch in the medical housing unit at West Valley shortly after noon Sunday. He was taken to Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Fontana, where he died an hour later, according to the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department.

Although Greene’s cause of death has yet to be determined and an autopsy and toxicology are pending, the death appears related to medical issues, Miller said.

“There is nothing to suggest anything other than it was a medical,” Miller said Tuesday in an e-mail. She said the law precluded her from disclosing Greene’s medical conditions.

Greene, who was arrested by Fontana police Dec. 4 on suspicion of assault with a firearm, terrorist threats, and being under the influence of a controlled substance, suffered several pre-existing medical conditions. He was first taken to Arrowhead Regional Medical Center in Colton for two days to be examined by doctors due to his medical conditions, then booked into the jail’s medical housing unit Dec. 6, Miller said.

“He was being monitored, seeing medical staff, and receiving treatment for his known medical conditions while in custody,” Miller said.

Greene’s death reignited concerns over the quality of medical, mental health and dental treatment inmates are receiving at the jail.

In February, the Berkeley-based prisoner advocacy legal center Prison Law Office filed a class action lawsuit against San Bernardino County on behalf of two inmates, George Topete and Zachery Shovey, alleging treatment for the roughly 6,000 inmates at West Valley and the county’s three other jails is so “deficient that it is harming the people it aims to serve.”

The other three jails include the Central Detention Center, the Glen Helen Rehabilitation Center in Devore, and the High Desert Detention Center in Adelanto.

The federal san bernadino county west valley detention center rancho cucamonga ca was refiled Nov. 18 in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, dropping Topete and Shovey as the flagstar webmail login and adding four new ones: Rahshun Turner, Monique Lewis, Jaime Jaramillo and Joshua Mills. A hearing is scheduled for Jan. 23, when the judge will rule on a motion requesting class-action certification, said Donald Specter, an attorney and director of the Prison Law Office.

Topete and Shovey were dropped from the lawsuit because they are no longer in custody, Specter said Tuesday.

In its answer to the allegations filed Dec. 5 in federal court, the county denied all the first national bank severna park, and stated it is implementing a kiosk system in the jails that will permit inmates to request health services directly and electronically.

Specter said he will be meeting with sheriff’s officials next week to continue talks about improving inmate conditions at county jails, conditions that have prompted more than six federal lawsuits. The talks have spanned two years. And while some progress has been made and the county has been cooperative, Specter said things have progressed too slowly.

“I’m very frustrated with the pace of negotiations,” Specter said.

Regarding the recent death of Greene and the eight other medically related, in-custody deaths at the jail this year, Specter said he didn’t have enough information to comment.

“It’s worth looking into, certainly,” he said.

Sheriff John McMahon has stood by the treatment inmates receive at the jails, calling it “high quality” and blaming prison realignment for the issues regarding inmate housing and care. It has forced the county to pour millions of dollars into security upgrades and additional law enforcement, medical and mental health staff.

Miller said there is a comprehensive review done of each in-custody death to ensure policy and procedures were followed.

“Since realignment, inmates remain in county jail for longer period of times,” Miller said, adding that inmates are now older and serving longer stints in jail. Some are ill or chronically ill.

“Prior to realignment, inmates were spending an average of one year in the custody of county jail,” she said.

San Bernardino County is not the first to be sued by the Prison Law Office due to its jail conditions. It has also sued Fresno and Riverside counties in the past five years with similar allegations. Those cases have since been settled.

In Riverside County, four people have died in Sheriff’s Department custody in 2016, Assistant Sheriff Jerry Gutierrez said. The coroner has determined causes of death in two of the cases. Both causes were natural, Gutierrez said.

There were 11 in-custody deaths in 2015: five accidental (such as ingesting drugs to hide them), two suicides, two homicides and two natural, Gutierrez said. Medically related deaths would fit into the “natural” category, he said.

The Riverside County Sheriff’s Department began having t mobile one military plan or nurses perform medical screenings about 2015 and is now beginning mental health screenings, Gutierrez ally auto contact customer service. There are also signs at the jails that warn inmates about the dangers of ingesting drugs.

Staff writer Brian Rokos contributed to this report.

Contact the writer:[email protected]@SBCountyNow on Twitter

Источник: https://www.pe.com/2016/12/13/nine-prisoners-have-died-at-rancho-cucamonga-jail-in-past-year/

Posted in App

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *