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td bank logo guidelines

There minimum requirements for borrowers are the following criteria: A personal credit score of at least 660; At least 24 months in business; At. Download the TD Bank logo in black and white which can be placed on various backgrounds while maintaining compliance with the visual identity guidelines. Find td bank logo stock images in HD and millions of other royalty-free stock photos, illustrations and vectors in the Shutterstock collection.

: Td bank logo guidelines

Td bank logo guidelines
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Td bank logo guidelines

Td bank logo guidelines -

Yodlee financial data aggregation platform. At the customer's request, TD will now transfer the customer's financial data to Envestnet

TD Registration Requirements

Prerequisites Prior to Registration

1) The TD mobile banking app installed on your phone

2) An active online banking profile on the TD website

*Please note that you must have Two Factor Authentication (2FA) permitted with your account. If you don’t, you will be prompted to permit this security step later in the registration process.

First Time Registration Identity Validation Steps

1) You may be prompted to answer one of the security questions you have already selected for your online banking. Please note that you may be prompted to answer a security question even if you have signed up for 2FA with TD previously

2) You will also be sent an authentication code via text message to the mobile phone number you’ve chosen to provide.

*If you are not registered for 2FA, you will be redirected to set up your mobile PIN verification for future use.

Mandatory Fields for Registration

First Name

Last Name

Date of Birth

Address

Primary mobile number

Registration Completion

1) Once you have a chance to review your basic personal information, you will be given the option to “Agree”, validating the accuracy of your information, or to “Cancel” and leave the registration process entirely.

2) You will be prompted to agree to TD’s Terms & Conditions.

3) From here, TD will verify your information. This process may take a few minutes.

You will be notified you when verification is complete. Please follow the on-screen prompts to navigate back to Verified.Me. You’re all set!

TD Support Line

1-866-222-3456
Источник: https://verified.me/td-registration-requirements/

Appendix D - TD Bank Financial Group

Headquartered in Toronto, with more than 2,300 locations and 74,000 employees worldwide, The Toronto-Dominion Bank and its subsidiaries are collectively known as TD Bank Financial Group (TD). TD Bank Financial Group is the sixth largest bank in North America by branches and serves more than 18 million customers in four key businesses, operating in a number of locations in key financial centres around the globe: Canadian Personal and Commercial Banking, including TD Canada Trust and TD Insurance; Wealth Management, including TD Waterhouse and an investment in TD Ameritrade; U.S. Personal and Commercial Banking, including TD Bank, America's Most Convenient Bank; and Wholesale Banking, including TD Securities. TD Bank Financial Group also ranks among the world's leading online financial services firms, with more than six million online customers.

TD is committed to building an inclusive environment where all employees and customers feel welcomed and respected. As part of its corporate diversity strategy, one of TD’s key priorities is to be recognized by the Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual and Transgender (LGBT) community as their bank of choice. TD views this community as an important part of its customer base. The International Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce estimates that Canada includes two million LGBT consumers with spending power of $100 billion.

Since 2007, TD has been working with external research partners to conduct multiple research studies and collect data on the LGBT customer segment. Different research tools have been used, including focus groups, interviews and surveys. Focus groups and interviews were useful in helping to identify and explore, in depth, issues of concern. Surveys help determine how widespread a particular issue or set of attributes might be in a community.

Why consider collecting data?

Various factors led TD to collect data about the LGBT community, including:

  • A desire to be recognized by the LGBT community as the bank of choice
  • A desire to better serve LGBT customers
  • A desire to better understand the attitudes and preferences, product and service needs of the LGBT community
  • A desire to identify meaningful community initiatives to support.

Goals of collecting data

The key goals of collecting data were to help TD:

  • Identify key issues of concern to the LGBT community
  • Measure the LGBT community’s awareness of Canada’s major banks and the likelihood of LGBT customers doing business with these banks
  • Determine which financial institution, if any, is the bank of choice in the LGBT community
  • Examine perceptions of the service received and the overall customer experience of the LGBT community when dealing with Canada’s major banks
  • Determine responses of community members to potential advertising campaigns.

Facing the challenges

TD faced the following challenges in planning the focus groups, interviews and surveys:

  • The difficulty of locating and encouraging the participation of LGBT persons – and doing so within budget and time constraints
    • for example, TD found that the LGBT population was fairly small (estimates are that 2% of the population identify as LGBT), and some members of the community are reluctant to identify themselves as LGBT
  • The need to make sure that research questions used in the focus groups, interviews and surveys were worded in an appropriate and sensitive way
  • A recognition that surveys tended to focus on people living in larger Canadian cities because of budget constraints and the fact that larger urban centres have larger LGBT communities. Research done in this way can over-represent individuals living in large urban centres, which must be kept in mind when interpreting results
  • Concerns about the use, privacy and confidentiality of the information being collected
  • The need to generate sufficient data to develop a strong business case to get buy-in from senior leaders and other stakeholders in the organization that would be responsible for playing a key role in decision-making, planning, communicating and implementing of the data collection initiatives.

Preparing for data collection initiative

To address the above challenges, before collecting data through focus groups, interviews and surveys, TD:

  • Launched a formal diversity strategy that was aligned with its corporate Guiding Principles, Leadership Profile and action-oriented plans which showed a serious commitment to creating and supporting an inclusive, equitable and welcoming organizational culture for employees, customers and clients
  • Made promoting and enhancing an inclusive environment for LGBT customers, clients and employees a Diversity Priority
  • Hired various external research partners based on their experience with the LGBT community and capacity to conduct the necessary range of quantitative and qualitative data collection approaches
  • Worked with an internal employee advisory committee including LGBT employees across all levels of TD, to get feedback on the challenges, provide advice on the recommended approach and inform decision-making
  • Engaged senior leaders across TD throughout the process to address decision-making, planning, communicating and implementing the data collection research projects
  • Worked in partnership with the research organization to set the appropriate number of surveys to allow for reliable results and conclusions
  • Paid careful attention to the wording of all survey questions, to make sure the language was appropriate and neutral, making changes along the way based on participants’ reactions/responses to key questions
  • As in all marketing research carried out by, or on behalf of, TD, potential participants were assured, up front, that: participation was voluntary; the research was to be conducted per the guidelines of the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA); and that their input would be dealt with in a strictly confidential manner. Details regarding data storage and access are not normally offered at this stage in the research process.

Administering the data collection initiative

Under the guidance of TD, an external research firm developed and programmed the survey instruments, posted them online and analyzed the results between October 2007 and October 2008. Respondents were members of an online panel, sent e-mail invitations by the researchers, and assured their responses would be confidential and anonymous.

Among most research surveys undertaken by financial service institutions, it is general practice to screen out people who work in financial Institutions. However, due to the small population size of the target market, occupation screening was not included here.

Each study included enough surveys to make sure that results are statistically reliable so that all observations and conclusions could be made with a high level of confidence.

The research firm conducted two studies using an online self-administered survey among Canadian adults aged 18 and older who identify as LGBT. The first study was done in the fall of 2007 and the second study was done in the spring of 2008. Approximately 550 people participated in each survey.

The survey research was designed to assess the following areas:

  • Ratings on several factors that help “drive” the brand:
    • Awareness of TD and other banks: When you think of companies that offer financial products and services, which bank comes to mind?
    • Likelihood to do business with TD and other banks: When you are in need of a new bank account or credit card, which bank would you choose?
    • Identifying bank of choice: If you had to choose a bank to do business with, which bank would you choose?
    • The ability of TD to resolve LGBT customer problems
    • Improvement opportunities
  • Financial goals and banking habits

Another research study was conducted to specifically assess perceptions of advertising and connect and communicate with members of the LGBT community. This study was set up in the context of an online study and involved 960 people viewing and assessing six different ads.

TD asked the following types of questions after showing a mock-up of an LGBT ad that might appear in a newspaper:

  • Did you see the ad and did it register with you?
  • Was there an association with TD?
  • Did viewers take away the right message -- that TD is a progressive bank dedicated to taking care of all Canadians?
  • Is the ad different from the ads of other financial Institutions?
  • How did the ad make you feel?
  • Was the ad relevant and believable?
  • Did the ad make you change your attitude towards TD?

Key results

In the first online self-administered survey study, the final sample consisted of 63% gay, 27% lesbian, 11% bisexual and <1% transgender persons. In the second study, the final sample consisted of 43% gay, 18% lesbian, 39% bisexual and 2% transgender people.

For both online self-administered survey studies, analysis of results included:

  • Percentage results for each question asked
  • Comparison of results between gay vs. lesbian vs. bisexual sub-groups; the results from participants that self-identified as transgender were too small to draw a meaningful comparison
  • Comparison of results between the two study periods
  • Analysis showing what service elements had the most impact on bank preference.

While financial institutions have not in general had a strong presence within Canada’s LGBT community, TD believed that it was among the leaders. Both online surveys confirmed this. Among the findings were the following:

  • Overall, TD leads the pack with the LGBT community -- it is this community’s “Main Financial Institution”
  • A significant number of LGBT community members were unable to mention any financial institution as being “most involved in corporate funding support of the LGBT community”
  • There was an opportunity to make our advertising more motivating to members of the community.

Acting on the results

TD is committed to maintaining and enhancing its position as the bank of choice for the LGBT community. TD will apply (and in fact is already applying) the lessons learned to help in the following areas:

  • Developing advertising (both the creative images and the messages) across all channels that TD uses (in-branch posters and brochures, online and print advertisements)
  • Creating internal messaging for sales and service staff
  • Developing tailored product and service offerings to better serve the LGBT community
  • Selecting what community events to sponsor and/or take part in based on what’s important to the LGBT community. For example, TD contributes to the following initiatives in the LGBT community:
    • serving as a major sponsor and having dozens of employees get involved as volunteers during Toronto’s annual Pride Week celebration
    • sponsoring Pride events such as Célébrations LGBTA Montréal, Pride London, Kelowna Pride, Tri-Pride in Kitchener/Waterloo and Pride Edmonton
    • presenting sponsor for the Lesbian Gay Bi Trans Youth Line’s 10th annual Youth Line Community Youth Awards
    • participating in arts and culture events including: the London Lesbian Film Festival, Inside-Out Film Festival in Toronto, the Queer Film Festival in Vancouver, and Image+nation in Montreal
    • supporting Jer’s Vision, an Ottawa-based group that does anti-homophobia work in high schools
    • supporting other organizations including Casey House Hospice, SNAP! (a photography auction and competition organized by the AIDS Committee of Toronto), Art for Heart (an art auction in Toronto and Vancouver) and Maskarade, the masquerade ball fundraiser in Montreal spearheaded by the Farha Foundation
    • working with Vancouver’s St. Paul’s Hospital Foundation, in support of laboratory technology at the hospital’s world-renowned B.C. Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS
    • working with Women’s College Hospital and community health partners, launched an awareness campaign aimed towards women in same sex relationships to ensure they have regular Pap tests
  • Developing internal policies, practices and programs to continue to offer an inclusive environment where LGBT employees feel comfortable and welcome
  • Developing policies, practices and programs to raise awareness about LGBT issues across TD.

Additional insights from the research will continue to help TD’s ongoing development of marketing and business strategies and programs targeted to the LGBT community.

Results of the research were disseminated throughout the organization to decision-makers, advisory groups and committees both representative of the community and responsible for business areas.

Best practices

  • Be prepared for the cost implications of necessary pre-screening. With the small population size of the LGBT community and the difficulty in locating and identifying this group, pre-screening is necessary. Completing research with this audience is more expensive than research conducted with the general population.
  • Longer timeframes are needed to conduct the survey, compared to general research studies. Due to the challenge of locating individuals, a longer research period is needed to get the desired number of completed surveys. Any future research project should allow for more time to locate, identify and question this group, compared with the time needed to survey the general population.
  • Partnering with a third party research company enables objective and honest communication. This allows LGBT persons to provide their thoughts in an environment that is protected from outside influences (such as direct company-to-LGBT customer contact). The results gathered through a third-party research company can be completely anonymous.

Lessons learned

  • Comparing LGBT results to a general representative population is encouraged, to identify opportunities and risks unique to this customer segment
  • Partnership with a LGBT publication/organization that has a targeted customer list might help to broaden the target universe and dramatically increase research participation rates (by leveraging a vehicle the community trusts)
  • Creating an LGBT community research panel – comprised of members of the community across Canada – with a smaller group of individuals allows for ongoing dialogue
  • Holding focus groups where members can remain anonymous could offer benefits beyond the scope of any one survey.
Источник: http://www.ohrc.on.ca/en/count-me-collecting-human-rights-based-data/appendix-d-td-bank-financial-group

Toronto-Dominion Bank stock falls Friday, underperforms market

Canadian Company Close Updates

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Shares of Toronto-Dominion Bank TD, dropped 0.94% to C$95.59 Friday, in what proved to be an all-around down trading session for the Canadian market, with the S&P/TSX Composite Index GSPTSE, falling 0.62% to 20,633.27. The stock's fall snapped a two-day winning streak. Toronto-Dominion Bank closed C$1.16 below its 52-week high (C$96.75), which the company achieved on December 2nd. Trading volume of 4.2 M shares remained below its 50-day average volume of 5.8 M.

Editor's Note: This story was auto-generated by Automated Insights, an automation technology provider, using data from Dow Jones and FactSet. See our market data terms of use.

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Источник: https://www.marketwatch.com/story/toronto-dominion-bank-stock-falls-friday-underperforms-market-01638567372-a93ab5f347d8

Truist Small Business

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Then, some items (like depreciation of supplies) count as a net expense. So it’s possible for your business to have a net loss, but positive cash flow. Want a more accurate view of your business’s financials? Make sure you’re looking at operating cash flow.

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Contact your local Truist banker for more information on business solutions, or visit Truist.com.

Источник: https://www.truist.com/small-business

Toronto-Dominion Centre

Office complex in Toronto, Ontario, Canada

The Toronto-Dominion Centre, or TD Centre, is an office complex in the Financial District of downtown Toronto owned by Cadillac Fairview. It serves as the global headquarters for its anchor tenant, the Toronto-Dominion Bank, and provides office and retail space for many other businesses. The complex consists of six towers and a pavilion covered in bronze-tinted glass and black painted steel. Approximately 21,000 people work in the complex, making it the largest commercial office complex in Canada.[4]

The project was the inspiration of Allen Lambert, former President and Chairman of the Board of the Toronto-Dominion Bank. Sister-in-law Phyllis Lambert recommended Ludwig Mies van der Rohe as design consultant to the architects, John B. Parkin and Associates and Bregman + Hamann,[5] and the Fairview Corporation as the developer.[6] The towers were completed between 1967 and 1991. An additional building was built outside the campus and purchased in 1998. As Mies was given "virtually a free hand to create Toronto-Dominion Centre",[7] the complex, as a whole and in its details, is a classic example of his unique take on the International style[8] and represents the end evolution of Mies's North American period.[9]

Background[edit]

After the 1955 merger of the Bank of Toronto and the Dominion Bank solidified in 1962, the Toronto-Dominion bank directors decided to commission a new headquarters to demonstrate the bank's emergence as a reputable national institution.[6]Allen Lambert, past-President and Chairman of the Board of the Toronto-Dominion Bank, secured a cooperative partnership in the late 1950s with the Bronfman-owned developer, Fairview Corporation (now Cadillac Fairview);[10] this marked a first for the development process in Canada, in that a bank, rather than creating its head office alone, had aligned itself with real estate interests and the city to influence urban space.[11] The partnership was established as a 50-50 relationship, with the bank having the final say on the design of the complex and Phyllis Lambert—sister-in-law to Allen Lambert and a member of the Bronfman family—was called in as an advisor on the TD Centre competition. Gordon Bunshaft, then chief designer of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, was hired by the consortium.[6] His proposal called for exterior structural supports for the main office tower, which then necessitated piston-like slip joints at the roof level to deal with weather-related expansion and contraction of the structure. Phyllis Lambert objected to this submission, later stating in an interview that it "was a ridiculous proposal on many levels.... Even in a milder climate, it would have been problematic."[12] Bunshaft, due to his refusal to redesign, was relieved of his commission.[6]

This left John Parkin, the local architect who would have worked with the American Bunshaft, to design Toronto-Dominion Centre. His firm put forward a model showing a 100-storey, all-concrete tower—to be the largest in the Commonwealth—standing over a plaza with a sunken courtyard containing a circular banking pavilion.[13] It was at this point that Phyllis Lambert insisted that Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (whom she knew from having been the director of planning on his Seagram Building) be called for an interview.[6] Mies was unimpressed by Parkin's concept and wondered why one would design a building to be entered through its basement. With this, the Parkin proposal was scrapped[13] and Allen Lambert was convinced to bring Mies on board. Though he was technically commissioned as the design consultant to the local architects (who were still John B. Parkin and Associates, but partnered with Bregman + Hamann Architects), the project was essentially Mies's design in its entirety, demonstrating all the key characteristics of the architect's unique style.[9]

The choice of Mies and his design gave the project the added significance of being a symbol of Toronto's emergence as a major city.[9][14] It also marked Mies's last major work before his death in 1969.[6] This followed the precedent set by the previous incarnation of the Toronto-Dominion Bank: the Bank of Toronto's 1862 office at Wellington and Church Streets had been designed by William Kauffman and its 1913 Beaux-Arts headquarters were conceived by Carrère and Hastings. Both firms were the most renowned and respected architects of their times.[7]

History[edit]

Construction[edit]

Bayand Wellington Street in 1966. Nearly all the buildings were later demolished to make way for Exchange Place.

The development of the TD Centre required Fairview to acquire a full city block of downtown Toronto, except for some frontages on Bay Street and at the corner of King and York Streets.[10] Among notable losses from the subsequent demolition were the Rossin House Hotel, which dated to the 1850s and was once one of the city's preeminent hotels. The Carrère and Hastings Bank of Toronto headquarters, at the south west corner of King and Bay Streets, was also razed despite protests urging that the Beaux-Arts building be incorporated into the new centre. Fairview officials brushed these aside and said that it "did not fit in".[10] Elements of the old edifice can still be found as relics in Guild Park and Gardens, in Scarborough.

The first structure completed was the Toronto-Dominion Bank Tower (now the TD Bank Tower) in 1967. Though the complex remained unfinished, the official opening took place on 16 May of that year to coincide with the Canadian Centennial celebrations, with Princess Alexandra, The Honourable Lady Ogilvy, presiding, accompanied by her husband, Sir Angus Ogilvy.[15]

At 222.8 m (731 ft), the tower was the tallest building in Canada when completed. The completion of the banking pavilion and the Royal Trust Tower (now the TD North Tower) followed in 1968 and 1969, respectively. The Commercial Union Tower (now the TD West Tower) was added in 1974 and was the first on the site not conceived by Mies in his plan. It was followed by the IBM Tower (now the TD South Tower), built south of Wellington Street across from the original campus in 1985. The 23-storey building at 95 Wellington Street was completed in 1987 and contains 330,000 sq ft (31,000 m2). Cadillac Fairview acquired it in 1998 and incorporated it into Toronto-Dominion Centre.[6] Finally with little available space left on or near the block, the final building—the Ernst & Young Tower (now 222 Bay Street)—was in 1992 constructed over the existing 1930s Toronto Stock Exchange.

1960s–2000[edit]

Downtown Toronto skyline in 1970, dominated by the first two towers

From November 27–30, 1967, the 54th floor of the newly finished Toronto-Dominion Bank Tower was the venue of the centennial year Confederation of Tomorrow conference, a summit of provincial premiers (except for W.A.C. Bennett) convened by Ontario Premier John Robarts. It was an unsuccessful attempt to achieve provincial agreement for amendments to the constitution of Canada proposed by Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson.[14][15][16][17]

In 1993, Garry Hoy, a 39-year-old lawyer of Holden Day Wilson, fell 24 floors to his death after repeatedly charging a window while attempting to demonstrate its strength to a group of visiting law students.[18]

21st century[edit]

The original three buildings and the plazas of Toronto–Dominion Centre were together recognized as a part of Ontario's built heritage in 2005, when an Ontario Heritage Trust plaque was unveiled by Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, his wife, Sophie, Countess of Wessex, and former Lieutenant Governor of Ontario Lincoln Alexander.[6][8] The complex has been designated under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act since 2003. The designation notes "The Toronto-Dominion Centre is an outstanding example of the International Style of architecture." The concrete foundations, the load-bearing black-painted steel frames, the bronze-tinted glass curtain walls with mullions and a grid of exposed and painted steel I-beams, the revolving doors at the bases and, on the towers, the pilotis, are noted architectural features on the exterior of the buildings. Inside, "the interior finishes (granite, marble, travertine, and oak) and custom-built fittings in the Banking Pavilion, in the lobbies of the Toronto-Dominion Bank Tower and the Royal Trust Tower" are recognized heritage attributes.[19]

In 2007, the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada declared the TD Centre a masterpiece of the twentieth century.[20]

In May 2017, to mark the 50th anniversary of the complex and Canada’s 150th birthday, the buildings became the canvas of an art exhibition by Montreal artist Aude Moreau in which the buildings were used as a canvas to spell out “LESS IS MORE OR,” a take on Mies van der Rohe’s famous expression. While this type of installation had been done elsewhere, this was the largest undertaking of its kind in the world.[21][22][23]

Site[edit]

As with the Seagram Building and a number of Mies's subsequent projects, the Toronto-Dominion Centre follows the theme of the darkly coloured, steel and glass edifice set in an open plaza, itself surrounded by a dense and erratic, pre-existing urban fabric. The TD Centre, however, comprises a collection of structures spread across a granite plinth, all regulated in three dimensions and from the largest scale to the smallest, by a mathematically ordered, 1.5 m2 (16 sq ft) grid.[24]

Towers at Exchange Place are offset from one another, allowing people moving across its courtyard to have a "sliding view" of the area. Scotia Plazais visible in the background.

Three structures were conceived: a low banking pavilion anchoring the site at the corner of King and Bay Streets, the main tower in the centre of the site, and another tower in the northwest corner, each structure offset to the adjacent by one bay of the governing grid, allowing views to 'slide' open or closed as an observer moves across the court. The rectilinear pattern of Saint-Jean granite pavers follows the grid, serving to organize and unify the complex, and the plaza's surface material extends through the glass lobbies of the towers and the banking pavilion, blurring the distinction between interior and exterior space. The remaining voids between the buildings create space for the plaza and lawn.

Phyllis Lambert wrote of the centre and the arrangement of its elements within the site:

With the Toronto-Dominion Centre, Mies realized an architecture of movement, and yet at the same time, through proportional relations among parts and whole, and through the restrained use of fine materials, this is also an architecture of repose. The light as it moves across the building surfaces, playing the mullions like stringed instruments, and the orchestration of the various buildings are together paradigmatically symphonic.[25]

More towers were added over the ensuing decades, outside the periphery of the original site—as they were not part of Mies's master plan for the TD Centre—but still positioned close enough, and in such locations, as to visually impact the sense of space within areas of the centre, forming Miesian western and southern walls to the lawn and a tall eastern flank to the plaza.

Pavilion[edit]

The banking pavilion from across Bay Street looking west

The banking pavilion is a double-height structure housing the main branch of the bank. It contains fifteen 22.9 m2 (246 sq ft) modules within a single interior space,[24] with smaller areas inside the pavilion cordoned off using counters and cabinets, all built with the typical rich materials of Mies's palette—marble, English oak, and granite.[9] The roof of the building is made of deep steel I-sections, each beam supported on only one steel I-section column at each end, all combined to create a waffle-grid ceiling resting on a row of corresponding, equally spaced columns around the periphery. This structure was both a further development on the post office pavilion of the Federal Center in Chicago—which has less expressed columns and a second level balcony—and a precursor to the Neue Nationalgalerie completed in Berlin in 1968—which had a similar roof supported on only eight large steel columns. The TD Centre pavilion was described by The Globe and Mail as "among the best spaces Mies ever made".[26]

The banking pavilion's living roof was installed as part of Cadillac Fairview's goal of having the entire complex LEED-certified by 2013. It is intended to help protect the building from solar-heat gain, reduce storm runoff, and contributes to air quality.[27][28][29]

TD Conference Centre[edit]

The lower level of the TD Conference Centre

The area below the Pavilion serves as the TD Bank Conference Centre, completed in 2018.[30][31]

The space was originally home to a 690-seat Famous Players movie theatre, which would prove to be one of the most fertile palettes for Mies’s minimalist aesthetic.[clarification needed] The first screenings were Wait Until Dark and Reflections in a Golden Eye. The cinema was used for gala events such as the Canadian Film Awards, now the Canadian Screen Awards, and the Toronto International Film Festival. The theatre operated for approximately one decade until, in 1978, the space was repurposed in light of the proliferation of multiplexes throughout the city. The space was used for offices and storage until its eventual transformation into a conference centre.[32][33][34]

Public space[edit]

The Pastureby Joe Fafardon display at the complex's public square

Between the towers are two large expanses, collectively known as Oscar Peterson Place. The northern space contains a more formal tract of granite[clarification needed], while the southern space contains the lawn and features The Pasture, a sculpture by Saskatchewan artist Joe Fafard, who died in early 2019.[35][36] In addition to serving as sanctuaries for building occupants, the plazas have hosted events spanning music, athletics, entertainment and fundraising.[37][38] The plazas were the first examples of privately-provided large-scale public outdoor spaces within the urban core of Toronto.[39] The space was named as part of the Toronto Legacy Project; Montreal-born jazz legend Oscar Peterson was on-hand for the ceremony.[40]

Towers[edit]

The height of each of Mies's two towers is proportioned to its width and depth.[24] All, save for 95 Wellington Street West, are of a similar construction and appearance: the frame is of structural steel, including the core (containing elevators, stairs, washrooms, and other service spaces), and floor plates are of concrete poured on steel deck. The lobby is a double-height space on the ground floor, articulated by large sheets of plate glass held back from the exterior column line, providing for an overhang around the perimeter of the building, behind which the travertine-clad elevator cores are the only elements to touch the ground plane. Above the lobby, the building envelope is curtain wall made of bronze coloured glass in a matte-black painted steel frame, with exposed I-sections attached to the vertical mullions and structural columns;[6] the modules of this curtain wall are 1.5 m (4.9 ft) by 2.7 m (8.9 ft), thereby conforming to the overall site template.

The former Toronto Stock Exchange building built into the base of 222 Bay Street

The north side of the TD Bank Tower’s 54th floor houses the TD Bank corporate offices. The interior of this space was also designed by Mies and included his signature broad planes of rich, unadorned wood panelling, freestanding cabinets as partitions, wood slab desks, and some of his furniture pieces, such as the Barcelona chair, Barcelona ottoman, and Brno chair. Adjacent to the main boardroom at the northeast corner of the floor plate and the Thompson Room at the northwest corner, service areas are concealed within the wood panelled walls behind secret panels.

The south side of the 54th floor houses Canoe, an Oliver & Bonacini restaurant.[citation needed]

The 55th floor of the TD Bank Tower is now leased office space, but was originally a large public indoor observation platform. This promontory allowed uninterrupted views of the development of the downtown core that the TD Centre had itself helped to spark, as well as Lake Ontario to the south. The floor was repurposed to office space when the CN Tower was completed in 1976, offering a viewing height of 447 metres (1,467 ft).[32]

222 Bay Street contains in its base the former Toronto Stock Exchange building, built in 1937. The new edifice deviates from the strict Miesian aesthetic of all the previous towers to accommodate the Art Deco facade of the older building within its own. This tower is linked to the TD Bank Tower at the ground floor and by a two-level pedestrian bridge at the sixth and seventh floors.

Technical details[edit]

Underground concourse[edit]

Further information: PATH (Toronto)

The underground concourse's black aluminum signs mandated by Mies

The shopping concourse was seamlessly integrated beneath the towers — the first such mall in Canada — and was the genesis of Toronto's PATH system. Extending into this area was Mies's strict design sense; it was fitted in the same black aluminum and travertine as the main lobbies above. To maintain the clean and ordered aesthetic of the environment, Mies stipulated, with the backing of Phyllis and Alan Lambert, that the storefronts consist only of the glass panels and black aluminium that he specified. Even signage graphics were restricted to only white backlit letters within a black aluminium panel and only in the specific font that Mies had designed for the TD Centre. Renovations to the mall, beginning in the late 1990s, caused some controversy within the architectural community as building management, under pressure from retail tenants seeking greater visibility, relaxed the strict design guidelines and allowed more individual signage. Ceilings were also renovated from the original flat drywall planes with recessed lights to coffered ceilings.[43]

Occupants[edit]

The Toronto-Dominion Bank serves as the anchor tenant of the office complex.

TD Gallery of Inuit Art[edit]

The TD Gallery of Inuit Art is a permanent gallery located in the southern half of the TD South Tower lobby. It is open to the public, free, through a partnership between TD Bank, the world’s largest collector of Inuit art, and Cadillac Fairview, the property owner in whose lobby space the gallery is hosted.[44][45]

The bank’s association with Inuit art can be traced to the Northwest Territories, where branch manager Allen Lambert oversaw its Yellowknife operation from 1946-47. The branch was a two-room log cabin, with Lambert working in the front and living in the back. Lambert developed a keen interest in the art being produced by local artists. Twenty years later, as Chairman of the Toronto-Dominion Bank, he launched a Centennial project that would establish the bank as a strong ally in providing Inuit art with exposure within the organization and beyond.[44]

Design Exchange[edit]

Main article: Design Exchange

Design Exchange's main entrance

The easternmost tower, 222 Bay Street, contains in its base the historic Toronto Stock Exchange building, built in 1937. Since 1994, it has been home to the Design Exchange (‘DX'), Canada’s only museum dedicated to "design excellence". The genesis of the Design Exchange was a citizen movement seeking a centre that would celebrate the role of design in society. The group worked with the city for several years to bring the concept to fruition and, in 1994, the Design Exchange was officially opened by Prime Minister Jean Chrétien.[46]

Design Exchange has mounted hundreds of exhibitions, seminars, lectures, conferences and educational programs related to the role of design in culture, industry, and business. In 2017, DX launched a 10-day festival called Expo for Design, Innovation & Technology (EDIT), in partnership with the United Nations Development Programme.[47]

Branding system and signage[edit]

The TD Centre represents one of commercial real estate’s most comprehensive branding systems. Sans Copperplate Gothic was Mies’s signature font, as he believed it reflected the calmness and order of the architecture, and he decreed that it be used universally throughout the TD Centre. To this day, the font is used not just on exterior signs and wayfinding, but also for such communications as artwork captions, fire hose cases and designated smoking areas.[43]

Originally, the branding system extended to the stores in the underground shopping mall, such that all of the storefronts displayed their names in an identical font in white against black. However, in the late 1990s, under pressure from retail tenants seeking greater visibility, building management relaxed its requirements and allowed stores to customize their signage to their individual brands. This caused some controversy within the design and architecture community.[43]

There was further controversy in 2015 when TD Bank insisted on affixing its green-and-white logo atop two of the towers. Although these signs contravene Mies’s strict minimalist vision, the city could not and did not officially oppose the move because the two towers in question were built after Mies’s death and are not designated as historic.[48]

Programs[edit]

The boardroom on the 54th floor of TD Centre. The room is sometimes exhibited as a part of the annual Doors Open Torontoevent

The TD Centre often participates in the annual Doors Open Toronto, providing visitors with behind-the-scenes access to various parts of the property. The 54th floor executive office space is often showcased but, for 2019, the focus was the recently completed conference centre.[49]

Environment[edit]

The TD Centre has developed one of the most comprehensive environmental programs in the Canadian real estate industry, “promoting sweeping sustainability initiatives across the complex.”[28] In 2004, the TD Centre was one of the founding sponsors of the Enwave Deep Lake Cooling System, which significantly reduces the need for air conditioning during the summer months.[50][51][52] In 2009, a living roof consisting of 11,000 grass plants was installed atop the 22,000 ft² banking pavilion through a partnership with TD Bank. The planter boxes maintain the 1.5m² grid pattern of the pavilion’s ceiling below, allowing the roof to also give new life to Mies’s original vision.[27][28][29] The property has a waste diversion rate of 84%, almost double the industry average.[53] It has reduced its annual carbon footprint by over 50%, from 12over 50,000 tCO2e in 2008 to 19,500 tCO2e in 2018.[53] It has reduced irrigation water usage by 60% through a wireless Nano-Climate system.[54] It was an early adopter of daytime cleaning, which led to reduced energy usage and improved quality of life for the complex’s 180 cleaning staff.[54] By 2015, all six towers were certified to LEED EB: O&M Platinum and BOMA BEST (three Gold, three Platinum). In 2017, the 222 Bay Street Tower received WELL gold-level certification, the first existing building in North America to do so. Also in 2017, the TD Centre was the first existing building in Canada to achieve Platinum under the Wired standard. The TD Centre has been publishing an annual sustainability report since 2013.[55][51][52]

In popular culture[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^Toronto-Dominion Centre at Emporis
  2. ^"Toronto-Dominion Centre". SkyscraperPage.
  3. ^Toronto-Dominion Centre at Structurae
  4. ^Kucharsky, Danny (10 August 2017). "Toronto-Dominion Centre on top of its game at 50". Real Estate News Exchange. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  5. ^"Toronto-Dominion Centre". B + H Architects. Retrieved 2013-07-21.
  6. ^ abcdefghi"Toronto-Dominion Centre"(PDF). Ontario Heritage Foundation. 2005. Archived from the original(PDF) on June 15, 2011. Retrieved 2008-12-10.
  7. ^ abKilbourn, William; Bruce M. Litteljohn; William Dendy, Photographer (1986). Toronto Observed: Its Architecture, Patrons and History. Toronto: Oxford University Press. p. 277. ISBN .
  8. ^ ab"HRH The Earl of Wessex unveils provincial plaque celebrating the Toronto-Dominion Centre" (Press release). Queen's Printer for Ontario. Archived from the original on 2011-09-27. Retrieved 2011-09-08.
  9. ^ abcdHume, Christopher (28 May 2007). "When Mies's towers scraped the sky". Toronto Star.
  10. ^ abcSewell, John (January 1, 1993). The Shape of the City: Toronto Struggles with Modern Planning. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. p. 122. ISBN .
  11. ^Hall, Roger; William Westfall; Laurel Sefton MacDowell (July 25, 1996). Patterns of the Past: Interpreting Ontario's History: a Collection of Historical Articles Published on the Occasion of the Centenary of the Ontario Historical Society. Toronto: Dundurn Press Ltd. p. 194. ISBN .
  12. ^Stoffman; p. 34
  13. ^ ab"Toronto-Dominion Centre, Toronto". Galinsky. Retrieved 2008-12-10.
  14. ^ abBell, Bruce; Elan Penn, Photographer (2006). Toronto: A Pictorial Celebration. Toronto: Sterling. pp. 74-79. ISBN .
  15. ^ abKolber, Leo; L. Ian MacDonald (October 27, 2003). Leo: A Life. Montreal: McGill-Queen's Press. p. 56. ISBN .
  16. ^"Confederation of Toronto Conference". Montreal Gazette. 1 December 1967. Retrieved 30 January 2016.
  17. ^Lessons from Canada's Centennial and Other Celebrations for Planning for Toronto's Participation in Canada 150! A Toronto Strategy for Canada's 150th in 2017(PDF), City of Toronto, August 2014, p. 14, retrieved 30 January 2015
  18. ^Demara, Bruce (10 July 1993). "Corporate Lawyer Plunges 24 Floors to Death". Toronto Star. p. A4. Retrieved 2011-09-08 – via DairyLand.com.
  19. ^Bryden, P. E. (2013). A Justifiable Obsession': Conservative Ontario's Relations with Ottawa, 1943-1985. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. pp. 152–178. ISBN . Retrieved 30 January 2016.
  20. ^"Mies van der Rohe in Toronto + Berlin :: The Most Beautiful Pavilions". designKULTUR. 2010-06-09. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  21. ^Landau, Jack (5 September 2017). "LESS IS MORE OR: TD Centre Installation Lit Long Weekend Sky". Urban Toronto. Retrieved 2019-12-16.
  22. ^"Brand Capital – TD Centre Sustainability". Cadillac Fairview. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  23. ^Kerr, Jaren (4 September 2017). "TD Centre marks 50th anniversary with minimalist message in the sky". Toronto Star. Retrieved 2019-12-16.
  24. ^ abcKalman, Harold (1994). A History of Canadian Architecture. 2. Toronto: Oxford University Press. p. 802. ISBN .
  25. ^Lambert, Phyllis (2001). Mies in America. Montréal: Canadian Centre for Architecture, Whitney Museum of American Art, Harry N. Abrams. p. 419. ISBN .
  26. ^The Globe and Mail; 4 November 2002.
  27. ^ ab"Living Roof Planned for Toronto-Dominion Centre: TD Bank Group and Toronto-Dominion Centre Partner on Green Initiative". Business Insider (Press release). 8 September 2011. Archived from the original on 31 March 2012. Retrieved 2011-09-08.
  28. ^ abcAtchison, Chris (May 11, 2018). "The greening of Bay Street's modernist masterpiece". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2019-12-15.
  29. ^ abRochon, Lisa (April 30, 2018). "TD Centre's 'living roof' like a farm in the city". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2019-12-15.
  30. ^"TD Bank Conference Centre". kubik. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  31. ^"Doors Open Buildings". City of Toronto. 2018-04-30. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  32. ^ abRochon, Lisa (April 12, 2018). "Master of the minimal". The Globe and Mail. Toronto. Retrieved 2019-12-15.
  33. ^"Cdn Architect on Mies' TD Centre Cinema". UrbanToronto. 11 August 2006. Retrieved 2019-12-16.
  34. ^Jesse (7 February 2006). "Gone But Forgotten: TD Centre Cinema". The Telekino Times-Picayune. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  35. ^Kupferman, Steve (9 June 2010). "Ask Torontoist: What's Happening With the TD Centre Cows?". Torontoist. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  36. ^Lederman, Marsha (19 March 2019). "Saskatchewan sculptor Joe Fafard's work inspired generations of visual artists". Retrieved 2019-12-16.
  37. ^"New Leaf Jason Allison returns a hit at Tennis Legends Challenge at..."Getty Images. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  38. ^"720 pound Emanuel Yarbrough (Guinness World Record as the heaviest athlete) warms up for his sumo match at the TD Centre". Getty Images. Archived from the original on 2019-05-06. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  39. ^Berkovitz, Pauline (19 October 2017). "The Toronto-Dominion Centre 50 years later: "God is in the details"". Now. Retrieved 2019-12-16.
  40. ^"Heritage Toronto - Plaques and Markers Program". City of Toronto. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  41. ^ abcdefTD Centre Tower RenamingArchived 2013-04-11 at archive.today
  42. ^"Leasing". Cadillac Fairview. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  43. ^ abcMicallef, Shawn (14 July 2017). "50 years on, TD Centre still stands out: Micallef". Toronto Star. Retrieved 2019-12-16.
  44. ^ abRibkoff, Natalie. "A Collection Carved in Stone"(PDF). TD Canada Trust. Retrieved 2019-12-16.
  45. ^"Rough Guides - Toronto Dominion Gallery of Inuit Art". Rough Guides. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  46. ^"Home". Design Exchange. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  47. ^Hague, Matthew (12 November 2017). "Six highlights of Toronto's upcoming EDIT design festival". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2019-12-16.
  48. ^Bozikovic, Alex (14 May 2018). "New TD Centre signage reflects a time when brands trump architectural vision". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2019-12-16.
  49. ^"Doors Open Toronto". City of Toronto. 2017-08-16. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  50. ^Kimos, Andrew (27 October 2011). "Toronto's Deep Lake Water Cooling System". Buildipedia. Retrieved 2019-12-16.
  51. ^ ab"Deep Lake Water Cooling System". Acciona. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  52. ^ abSpears, John (29 January 2013). "Enwave looks to expand deep lake water cooling". Toronto Star. Retrieved 2019-12-16.
  53. ^ abTDC Sustainability Report 2013(PDF). =Cadillac Fairview. November 2013. Retrieved 2019-12-16.
  54. ^ ab"TDC Sustainability Report 2015"(PDF). Cadillac Fairview. March 2016. Retrieved 2019-12-16.
  55. ^"TD Centre Sustainability". Cadillac Fairview. Retrieved 2019-12-16.
  56. ^"Filming Locations for American Psycho (2000), in Toronto, Ontario". The Worldwide Guide to Movie Locations. Retrieved 2019-05-06.
  57. ^"Reel Toronto: Half Baked". Torontoist. 12 February 2008. Retrieved 2019-05-06.

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toronto-Dominion_Centre
Yodlee. "Our relationship with TD is vital for empowering customers to make intelligent financial decisions, while also benefitting from greater connectivity and security across their accounts."

"We know that our customers are interacting with us through digital channels more than ever before and we are focused on helping meet their needs however they choose to bank," says Franklin Garrigues, VP, Digital Channels, TD. "This agreement supports our goal of offering our customers a secure and confident experience when they are accessing digital services that are outside their bank."

About TD Bank Group 

The Toronto-Dominion Bank and its subsidiaries are collectively known as TD Bank Group ("TD" or the "Bank"). TD is the fifth largest bank in North America by assets and serves more than 26 million customers in three key businesses operating in a number of locations in financial centres around the globe: Canadian Retail, including TD Canada Trust, TD Auto Finance Canada, TD Wealth (Canada), TD Direct Www mysynchrony com home locations, and TD Insurance; U.S. Retail, including TD Bank, America's Most Convenient Bank®, TD Auto Finance U.S., TD Wealth (U.S.), and an investment in The Charles Schwab Corporation; and Wholesale Banking, including TD Securities. TD also ranks among the world's leading online financial services firms, with more than 15 million active online and mobile customers. TD had CDN$1.7 trillion in assets on July 31, 2021. The Toronto-Dominion Bank trades under the symbol "TD" on the Toronto and New York Stock Exchanges.

About Envestnet

Envestnet refers to the family of operating subsidiaries of the public holding company, Envestnet, Inc. (NYSE: ENV). Envestnet is transforming the way financial advice and wellness are delivered. Our mission is to empower advisors and financial service providers with innovative technology, solutions and intelligence to make financial wellness a reality for everyone. Nearly 108,000 advisors and more than 6,000 companies including: 17 of the 20 largest U.S. banks, 46 of the 50 largest wealth management and brokerage firms, over 500 of the largest RIAs and hundreds of FinTech companies, leverage Envestnet technology and services that help drive better outcomes for enterprises, advisors and their clients.

For more information on Envestnet

Appendix D - TD Bank Financial Group

Headquartered in Toronto, with more than 2,300 locations and 74,000 employees worldwide, The Toronto-Dominion Bank and its subsidiaries are collectively known as TD Bank Financial Group (TD). TD Bank Financial Group is the sixth largest bank in North America by branches and serves more than 18 million customers in four key businesses, operating in a number of locations in key financial centres around the globe: Canadian Personal and Commercial Banking, including TD Canada Trust and TD Insurance; Wealth Management, including TD Waterhouse and an investment in TD Ameritrade; U.S. Personal and Commercial Banking, including TD Bank, America's Most Convenient Bank; and Wholesale Banking, including TD Securities. TD Bank Financial Group also ranks among the world's leading online financial services firms, with more than six million online customers.

TD is committed to building an inclusive environment where all employees and customers feel welcomed and respected. As part of its corporate diversity strategy, one of TD’s key priorities is to be recognized by the Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual and Transgender (LGBT) community as their bank of choice. TD views this community as an important part of its customer base. The International Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce estimates that Canada includes two million LGBT consumers with spending power of $100 billion.

Since 2007, TD has been working with external research partners to conduct multiple research studies and collect data on the LGBT customer segment. Different research tools have been used, including focus groups, interviews and surveys. Focus groups and interviews were useful in helping to identify and explore, in depth, issues of concern. Surveys help determine how widespread a particular issue or set of attributes might be in a community.

Why consider collecting data?

Various factors led TD to collect data about the LGBT community, including:

  • A desire to be recognized by the LGBT community as the bank of choice
  • A desire to better serve LGBT customers
  • A desire to better understand the attitudes and preferences, product and service needs of the LGBT community
  • A desire to identify meaningful community initiatives to support.

Goals of collecting data

The key goals of collecting data were to help TD:

  • Identify key issues of concern to the LGBT community
  • Measure the LGBT community’s awareness of Canada’s major banks and the likelihood of LGBT customers doing business with these banks
  • Determine which financial institution, if any, is the bank of choice in the LGBT community
  • Examine perceptions of the service received and the overall customer experience of the LGBT community when dealing with Canada’s major banks
  • Determine responses of community members to potential advertising campaigns.

Facing the challenges

TD faced the following challenges in planning the focus groups, interviews and surveys:

  • The difficulty of locating and encouraging the participation of LGBT persons – and doing so within budget and time constraints
    • for example, TD found that the LGBT population was fairly small (estimates are that 2% of the population identify td bank logo guidelines LGBT), and some members of the community are reluctant to identify themselves as LGBT
  • The need to make sure that research questions used in the focus groups, interviews and surveys were worded in an appropriate and sensitive way
  • A recognition that surveys tended to focus on people living in larger Canadian cities because of budget constraints and the fact that larger urban centres have larger LGBT communities. Research done in this mb financial salaries can over-represent individuals living in large urban centres, which must be kept in mind when interpreting results
  • Concerns about the use, privacy and confidentiality of the information being collected
  • The need to generate sufficient data to develop a strong business case to get buy-in from senior leaders and other stakeholders in the organization that would be responsible for playing a key role in decision-making, planning, communicating and implementing of the data collection initiatives.

Preparing for data collection initiative

To address the above challenges, before collecting data through focus groups, interviews and surveys, TD:

  • Launched a formal diversity strategy that was aligned with its corporate Guiding Principles, Leadership Profile and action-oriented plans which showed a serious commitment to creating and supporting an inclusive, equitable and welcoming organizational culture for employees, customers and clients
  • Made promoting and enhancing an inclusive environment for LGBT customers, clients and employees a Diversity Priority
  • Hired various external research partners based on their experience with the LGBT community and capacity to full auto glock bb gun the necessary range of quantitative and qualitative data collection approaches
  • Worked with an internal employee advisory committee including LGBT employees across all levels of TD, to get feedback on the challenges, provide advice northwest furniture bank the recommended approach and inform decision-making
  • Engaged senior leaders across TD throughout the process to address decision-making, planning, communicating and implementing the data collection research projects
  • Worked in partnership with the research organization to set the appropriate number of surveys to allow for reliable results and conclusions
  • Paid careful attention to the wording of all survey questions, to make sure the language was appropriate and neutral, making changes along the way based on participants’ reactions/responses to key questions
  • As in all marketing research carried out by, or on behalf of, TD, potential participants were assured, up front, that: participation was voluntary; the research was to be conducted per the guidelines of the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA); and that their input would be dealt with in a strictly confidential manner. Details regarding data storage and access are not normally offered at this stage in the research process.

Administering the data collection initiative

Under the guidance of TD, an external research firm developed and programmed the survey instruments, posted them online and analyzed the results between October 2007 and October 2008. Respondents were members of an online panel, sent e-mail invitations by the researchers, and assured their responses would be confidential and anonymous.

Among most research surveys undertaken by financial service institutions, it is general practice to screen out people who work in financial Institutions. However, due to the small population size of the target market, occupation screening was not included here.

Each study included enough surveys to make sure that results are statistically reliable so that all observations and conclusions could be made with a high level of confidence.

The research firm conducted two studies using an online self-administered survey among Canadian adults aged 18 and older who identify as LGBT. The first study was done in the fall of 2007 and the second study was done in the routing number 103113357 chime of 2008. Approximately 550 people participated in each survey.

The survey research was designed to assess the following areas:

  • Ratings on several factors that help “drive” the brand:
    • Awareness of TD and other banks: When you think of companies that offer financial products and services, which bank comes to mind?
    • Likelihood to do business with TD and other banks: When you are in need of a new bank account or credit card, which bank would you choose?
    • Identifying bank of choice: If you had to choose a bank to do business with, which bank would you choose?
    • The ability of TD to resolve LGBT customer problems
    • Improvement opportunities
  • Financial goals and banking habits

Another research study was conducted to specifically assess perceptions of advertising and connect and communicate with members of the LGBT community. This study was set up in the context of an online study and involved 960 people viewing and assessing six different ads.

TD asked the following types of questions after showing a mock-up of an LGBT ad that might appear in a newspaper:

  • Did you see the ad and did it register with you?
  • Was there an association with TD?
  • Did viewers take away the right message -- that TD is a progressive bank dedicated td bank logo guidelines taking care of all Canadians?
  • Is the ad different from the ads of other financial Institutions?
  • How did the ad make you feel?
  • Was the ad relevant and believable?
  • Did the ad make you change your attitude towards TD?

Key results

In the first online self-administered survey study, the final sample consisted of 63% gay, 27% lesbian, 11% bisexual and <1% transgender persons. In the second study, the final sample consisted of 43% gay, 18% lesbian, 39% bisexual and 2% transgender people.

For both online self-administered survey studies, analysis of results included:

  • Percentage results for each question asked
  • Comparison of results between gay vs. lesbian vs. bisexual sub-groups; the results from participants that self-identified as transgender were too small to draw a meaningful comparison
  • Comparison of results between the two study periods
  • Analysis showing what service elements had the most impact on bank preference.

While financial institutions have not in general had a strong presence within Canada’s LGBT community, TD believed that it was among the leaders. Both online surveys confirmed this. Among the findings were the following:

  • Overall, TD leads the pack with the LGBT community -- it is this community’s “Main Financial Institution”
  • A significant number of LGBT community members were unable to mention any financial institution as being “most involved in corporate funding support of the LGBT community”
  • There was an opportunity to make our advertising more motivating to members of the community.

Acting on the results

TD is committed to maintaining and enhancing its position as the bank of choice for the LGBT community. TD will apply (and in fact is already applying) the lessons learned to help in the following areas:

  • Developing advertising (both the creative images and the messages) across all channels that TD uses (in-branch posters and brochures, online and print advertisements)
  • Creating internal messaging for sales and service staff
  • Developing tailored product and service offerings to better serve the LGBT community
  • Selecting what community events to sponsor and/or take part in based on what’s important to the LGBT community. For example, TD contributes to the following initiatives in the LGBT community:
    • serving as a major sponsor and having dozens of employees get involved as volunteers during Toronto’s annual Pride Week celebration
    • sponsoring Pride events such as Célébrations LGBTA Montréal, Pride London, Kelowna Pride, Tri-Pride in Kitchener/Waterloo and Pride Edmonton
    • presenting sponsor for the Lesbian Gay Bi Trans Youth Line’s 10th annual Youth Line Community Youth Awards
    • participating in arts and culture events including: the London Lesbian Film Festival, Inside-Out Film Festival in Toronto, the Queer Film Festival in Vancouver, and Image+nation in Montreal
    • supporting Jer’s Vision, an Ottawa-based group that does anti-homophobia work in high schools
    • supporting other organizations including Casey House Hospice, SNAP! (a photography auction and competition organized by the AIDS Committee of Toronto), Art for Heart (an art auction in Toronto and Vancouver) and Maskarade, the masquerade ball fundraiser in Montreal spearheaded by the Farha Foundation
    • working with Vancouver’s St. Paul’s Hospital Foundation, in support of laboratory technology at the hospital’s world-renowned B.C. Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS
    • working with Women’s College Hospital and community health partners, launched an awareness campaign aimed towards women in same sex relationships to ensure they have regular Pap tests
  • Developing internal policies, practices and programs to continue to offer an inclusive environment where LGBT employees feel comfortable and welcome
  • Developing policies, practices and programs to raise awareness about LGBT issues across TD.

Additional insights from the research will continue to help TD’s ongoing development of marketing and business strategies and programs targeted to the LGBT community.

Results of the research were disseminated throughout the organization to decision-makers, advisory groups and committees both representative of the community and responsible for business areas.

Best practices

  • Be prepared for the cost implications of necessary pre-screening. With the small population size of the LGBT community and the difficulty in locating and identifying this group, pre-screening is necessary. Completing research with this audience is more expensive than research conducted td bank logo guidelines the general population.
  • Longer timeframes are needed to conduct the survey, compared to general research studies. Due to the challenge of locating individuals, a longer research period is needed to get the desired number of completed surveys. Any future research project should allow for more time to locate, identify and question td bank logo guidelines group, compared with the time needed to survey the general population.
  • Partnering with a third party research company enables objective and honest communication. This allows LGBT persons to provide their thoughts in an environment that is protected from outside influences (such as direct company-to-LGBT customer contact). The results gathered through a third-party research company can be completely anonymous.

Lessons learned

  • Comparing LGBT results to a general representative population is encouraged, to identify opportunities and risks unique to this customer segment
  • Partnership with a LGBT publication/organization that has a targeted customer list might help to broaden the target universe and dramatically increase research participation rates (by leveraging a vehicle the community trusts)
  • Creating an LGBT community research panel – comprised of members of the community across Canada – with a smaller group of individuals allows for ongoing dialogue
  • Holding focus groups where members can remain anonymous could offer benefits beyond the scope of any one survey.
Источник: http://www.ohrc.on.ca/en/count-me-collecting-human-rights-based-data/appendix-d-td-bank-financial-group
Yodlee today announced a data access agreement to address the needs of an increasingly digital customer base. This North American agreement signifies the alignment between TD and Envestnet

Stadium Guide

Alcohol Management

Any guest in the possession of alcoholic beverages on the premises may be requested to produce proper ID upon request to a Smart Serve certified staff of TD Place. Any guest who produces false identification or who passes alcohol to a minor may be evicted and possibly subject to charges.

  • • Guest may not purchase more than 2 citizen com app beverages at a time.
  • • Alcohol of any kind may not be brought into or removed from TD Place
  • • Any guest who is determined to be deliberately concealing alcohol while entering TD Place may be denied access to the building
  • • A person exhibiting visible signs of impairment may not be permitted into the stadium and may be removed from TD Place. This includes guests who exhibit behaviour that distracts, inconveniences or otherwise interferes with other guest’s enjoyment of the event
  • • Last call: (Times may vary at the discretion of the venue)
      • – REDBLACKS – beginning of the fourth quarter
      • – 67’s – at 10 minute mark in the third period
      • – BlackJacks – beginning of the fourth quarter
      • – Atlético – at 70 minute mark
  • •No refunds will be offered for confiscated alcoholic beverages. Guests who are denied entry or removed for any violation of facility rules will not be issued a refund for the event.

Cashless policy

In an effort to reduce points of contact between individuals at our venue, TD Place will be going entirely cashless. Debit and Credit cards will be accepted at all points of sale.

Digital tickets

Our ticket delivery has gone mobile and can be easily stored on your mobile device. All tickets will be purchased and scanned using our mobile ticketing software. This is a vital tool in our contact tracing efforts (if needed). Once the ticket is purchased, you will be able to download the skeleton key in hindi download ticket into your mobile device’s wallet (e.g. Apple Wallet, Google Pay) and can be easily accessed when arriving at the gate. Click here to learn how to download your digital tickets before the event/game.

Guest Info Hub

All you need to know during the game days at TD Stadium at TD Place. Click here and access it.

Allergies and Dietary Requirements

Those with allergies or unique dietary requirements are to contact the event services team [email protected] prior to attending an event in order to receive written approval for any food they may be bringing into the event.

TD Place does not have products and areas free from nut products and as a result, we recommend that guests and staff with nut allergies exercise extreme caution when attending/work an event.

**Please note that gluten-free buns are only available at the BBQ and not all concessions.

Animals

Animals are not permitted in TD Place with the exception of service animals.

Contact Info

TD Place
1015 Bank Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1S 3W7
Main Office: 613-232-6767
Tickets and Sales Team: 613-232-6767 Ext 1

Banners and Signs

Banners and signs must not interfere with the view td bank logo guidelines other guests. They cannot be of distasteful nature or content, nor can they advertise a logo or product. Signs may not be attached to any surface or obstruct permanent signage.

Bags

All bags will be inspected upon entry, please amazon prime tv app to the prohibited item section before you come to the venue.
Clear bags are highly encouraged and guests with a clear bag will be permitted to enter via our Express Lanes, providing a quicker entry experience.

Electronic Devices

Electronic devices (laptops, battery packs, tablets, tablet cases, etc.) are permitted subject to inspection prior to entry and at the discretion of TD Place and/or local and national security agencies. Mobile phones are td bank logo guidelines not subject to inspection.

Electronic devices are subject to demonstration that they are operational and not compromised, however, no personal information or data will be accessed by TD Place in the process.

Fan Code Of Conduct

TD Place is committed to providing a safe, comfortable, and enjoyable sports & entertainment experience for all guests, staff, athletes, officials, and performers.

It is an expectation all guests follow the below code of conduct. Failure to comply with any portion of this may subject the offending guest to ejection from the Stadium without refund or compensation, revocation of season tickets, trespass to property notice/fine, and potential legal action. This conduct includes:

  • • Guests shall respect each village bank and trust rolling meadows as well as TD Place employees, athletes, officials, and performers;
  • • Guests shall be treated in a consistent, professional, and courteous manner;
  • • Guests shall not engage in violence, fighting, threatening, taunting, physical or verbal harassment, or any other dangerous or disruptive behaviour;
  • • Guests shall not make offensive or obscene remarks or gestures;
  • • Guests shall not throw objects of any kind;
  • • Guests shall consume alcoholic beverages in a responsible manner;
  • • Guests shall not provide alcohol to a minor or possess alcohol not purchased in the venue;
  • • Guests shall sit only in their ticketed seat and shall present their ticket if requested by venue representatives;
  • • Guests shall not enter or attempt to enter, disrupt, or interfere with the field of play or any other restricted venue areas;
  • • Guests shall td bank logo guidelines from smoking (including e-cigarettes or vapourizers);
  • • Guests shall comply with all operational and emergency response procedures as directed by venue representatives; and
  • • TD Place reserves the right to restrict prohibited items from entering the venue (as per Prohibited Items List), and may confiscate or require items to be kept outside the venue.

All guests entering TD Place are subject to inspection by pat-down and/or magnetometer (metal detecting equipment). All bags are subject to search prior to entering the venue and must comply with the TD Place bag policy.

Fan Health Promise

ACCORDING TO OTTAWA PUBLIC HEALTH, AN INHERENT RISK OF EXPOSURE TO COVID-19 EXISTS IN ANY PUBLIC PLACE WHERE PEOPLE ARE PRESENT. COVID-19 IS AN EXTREMELY CONTAGIOUS DISEASE THAT CAN LEAD TO SEVERE ILLNESS AND DEATH. ALL GUESTS SHOULD EVALUATE THEIR RISK IN DETERMINING WHETHER TO ATTEND AN EVENT WHERE THEY MAY HAVE AN INCREASED RISK OF EXPOSURE.

Guests agree that they will not attend an event if any one of the following is true on event day:

    • • Within the prior 14 days, they have tested positive for, or been exposed to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19.
    • • Within the prior 48 hours, they have experienced symptoms of COVID-19 identified here by Ottawa Public Health.
    • • Within the prior 14 days, they have traveled outside of Canada (does not apply to fully vaccinated individuals).

Guests must follow all venue policies, including the Stadium Guide, and posted instructions while in the venue and on the venue grounds.

Feedback, Questions, and Comments

Fan Info Line: 1-844-FAN-INFO (326-4636)
Fan Info Email: [email protected]

During events, guests can text us at 613-777-6759. We recommend they include their section, row and seat number if they require assistance. Standard messaging rates apply.

Food and Beverage

Outside food and beverage are not permitted in TD Place. Some exceptions do apply, (allergies, dietary requirements, birthdays, etc.), however, Guest Relations should be advised prior to enter the facility. **Please note that gluten-free buns are only available at the BBQ and not all concessions.

Game Balls

Any game football accidentally making its way into the stands must be returned immediately to a TD Place representative.

Getting Here

Your event ticket at TD Place gets you free transit service starting three hours before the event, during the event, and for 3 hours after the game on all OC Transpo and STO routes. OC Transpo service on Bank Street will be enhanced during game days for an easy connection from downtown. In citi credit card customer service in india, special OC Transpo and STO routes will be in place providing direct service to TD Place from across Ottawa and Gatineau. **Please note that STO routes are NOT free for some TD Place events.

Guests are also encouraged to ride their bikes using the scenic multi-use pathways along the Rideau Canal, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. During REDBLACKS games we offer free, secure bike parking is provided on-site. For more information, and to find out what transportation services are available for your event, please visit TDPlace.ca or call 1-844-FAN-INFO (326-4636).

Nursing Mothers

Nursing mothers are welcomed to breastfeed their children wherever they feel comfortable. Those requesting a more private location may contact Guest Relations at the Information Booth to arrange a location.

Prohibited Items:

  • • Professional Cameras (Only Point and Click Cameras permitted)
  • • Laser pens or laser products of td bank logo guidelines type
  • • Weapons of any type including knives
  • • Fireworks, incendiary devices, or any other flame making device
  • • Air horns, whistles, or mechanical noisemakers
  • • Powered megaphones
  • • Alcohol, drug or any illegal substances
  • • Outside Food or Beverage (empty refillable water bottles or water bottles discover online banking bonus have not been opened are permitted)
  • • Poles or sticks
  • • Projectiles
  • • Inappropriate signs of banners

TD Place reserves the right to refuse entry to any guest in possession of a prohibited item. Any items surrendered by guests prior to entry will be donated or destroyed and not returned. Illegal items will be confiscated and turned over to the police.

Restricted items:

  • • Umbrellas (may not be opened inside The Stadium)
  • • Electronic Devices (subject to demonstration they are operational)
  • • Flag poles (must be flexible or retractable)
  • • Large bags/containers

Venue Management may restrict any item from entering TD Place that it deems at its discretion to be a security or safety risk.

Security

TD Place Public Safety and Security monitors the venue and Lansdowne site 24/7/365. In addition, event security is present at all events to ensure guest comfort and safety.

Base Security Number: 613-690-0517

Smoking

The TD Place stadium/arena complex is a no-smoking facility. Smoking or vaping of tobacco products or cannabis is not permitted on its entrance stairways or within its gates, including all seating areas, indoor and outdoor concourses, offices and changing areas.

Outside the stadium on the broader Lansdowne property, smoking is permitted in the commercial district, which features multiple shops and discover online banking bonus along Marché Way and Exhibition Way, and a Cineplex theatre complex.  Smokers are advised that City of Ottawa By-laws prohibit smoking or vaping within 9-meters of a restaurant patio space.

Lansdowne is also home to a public park, play structures, a sport court and other amenities on the eastern quadrant of the property. This area is bound by the same regulations that apply to all parks in the city.  Smoking is not permitted at any time and if visitors are bothered by a smoker in the park area they can report the incident to Ottawa By-law by calling 3-1-1.

Visitors to Lansdowne are advised that if a smoker is violating the 9-meter rule and disrupting their enjoyment of a meal on a patio, they should inform their server or the restaurant manager.

Strollers

Strollers are permitted into the venue, however, must be checked in at one of the Guest Relations Information Booths.

Lost & Found

Lost something at an event inside TD Place? Misplaced something around Lansdowne Park? Please email us: [email protected]

Or try calling us directly using this phone # (613-690-0500).

Tickets

To buy tickets to upcoming events at TD Place visit the ONLINE BOX OFFICE, call 613-232-6767 or 1-877-489-2849.

Our ticket delivery has gone mobile and can be easily stored on your mobile device. All tickets will be purchased and scanned using our mobile ticketing software. This is a vital tool in our contact tracing efforts (if needed). Once the ticket is purchased, you will be able to download your ticket into your mobile device’s wallet (e.g. Apple Wallet, Google Pay) and can be easily accessed when arriving at the gate. Click here to learn more about digital tickets.

Select the link to view our Ticketing Terms and Conditions.

Источник: https://www.tdplace.ca/stadium-guide/
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