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ALL I WANT FOR CHRISTMAS IS YOU ROCK LYRICS
 Mississippi Clarion Ledger

Mississippi State has a fair chance to spring an upset of Texas A&M on Saturday in College Station.

Both teams are coming off losses, but it's the Aggies' offense that is struggling most. After an injury to Week 1 starting quarterback Haynes King, Zach Calzada has been underwhelming under center. Texas A&M has scored 10 points in each of the team's first two games against Power 5 competition.

Here's how you can watch Saturday's game.

How to watch Mississippi State, Texas A&M football

Location:  Kyle Field, College Station, Texas

Game time:  6 p.m. A&m football, Saturday, Oct. 2

TV:  SEC Network

SEC Network broadcasters are scheduled to be Tom Hart (play-by-play), Jordan Rodgers (analyst) and Cole Cubelic (sideline reporter).

On DirecTV, SEC Network a&m football channel 611. On Dish, SEC Network is channel 404.

Online live stream: ESPN.com/watch

Radio broadcast:  Hailstate.com/watch

More Mississippi State football news

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Источник: https://www.clarionledger.com/story/sports/college/mississippi-state/2021/10/02/mississippi-state-bulldogs-football-texas-a-m-how-to-watch-tv-live-stream/5953821001/

Concerns follow first Texas A&M home football game of the season

BRAZOS COUNTY — It was a full stadium this weekend, as nearly 100,000 people attended Texas A&M's first home football game of the season.

As much as people were glad to be back in the stands enjoying the game, an attendance like that still brings up health concerns.

Katherine Montalvo was one of tens of thousands who attended the first home game where Texas A&M took on Kent State.

"It actually was really packed. We were kind of standing like shoulder to shoulder," Montalvo said.

She wasn't the only one concerned about how packed Kyle Field was.

"I was kind of nervous just because everyone was so close, and it was very compact," Jodi Blount, a junior at Texas A&M.

Both Blount and Montalvo thought about COVID when they were at the game.

"I definitely was. It was definitely in the back of my head," Blount said.

"A bit actually. Once I was actually there, sitting in the stadium, I thought there would be more distancing but there wasn't," Montalvo said.

Massive events like this have been called super spreader events as the country still tries to mitigate the number of COVID cases.

Even though these two students did have concerns, Grad student, David Coyle doesn't carry the same worry.

"You just try to enjoy it like it is and I mean there were a lot of people in there but A&m football not too worried about it, but I am vaccinated too so," Coyle said.

All three students said being vaccinated made them feel more comfortable attending the game.

Montalvo even took a COVID test just in case san jose dmv drive test reviews she considers attending the next home game.

"I am going to see how I am with my test results and then if I am positive maybe not," Montalvo said.

The next home game is September 18, against the University of New Mexico.

Источник: https://www.kxxv.com/brazos/concerns-follow-first-texas-a-m-home-football-game-of-the-season

How to watch Mississippi State football vs. Texas A&M Aggies on TV, live stream


Nick Gray  

LSU football hosts Texas A&M in Ed Orgeron's last home game: Live updates, score


LSU football hosts No. 14 Texas A&M in Ed Orgeron’s final game at Tiger Stadium on Saturday night. Follow along here for live updates, analysis and scores.

The Tigers (5-6, 2-5 SEC) must beat the Aggies (8-3, 4-3) at 6 p.m. on ESPN to become bowl eligible. The last time LSU failed to reach bowl eligibility was 1999.

Texas A&M is coached by Jimbo Fisher, the former LSU offensive coordinator who was a candidate for the head-coaching job in 2015 and 2016.

Last week, LSU beat Louisiana-Monroe 27-14 in Death Valley. Texas A&M beat Prairie View A&M 52-3 at Kyle Field.  

END OF AN ERA: Ed Orgeron reflects on his tenure as LSU football coach 

SCOUTING REPORT: LSU hosts Texas A&M in Ed Orgeron's last game in Death Valley 

COACHING SEARCH:Why Scott Woodward needs more than money to fill vacancy

Adam Hunsucker covers LSU for the USA TODAY Network. Email him at [email protected] or follow him on Twitter @adam_hunsucker. Enjoy Adam’s work?  Consider a digital subscription for unlimited access.

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Источник: https://www.theadvertiser.com/story/sports/college/lsu/2021/11/27/lsu-football-texas-am-aggies-live-updates-score-ed-orgeron-sec/8683409002/

LSU Football vs. Texas A&M Set For Primetime in Tiger Stadium

BATON ROUGE – LSU’s Nov. 27 football matchup against Texas A&M will kickoff at 6 p.m. CT on ESPN, it was announced Monday by the Southeastern Conference and its network television partners.

Tickets to the final two games of the 2021 regular season are available at LSUtix.net.

SEC Football Network Television Selections
Games on Nov. 25-27, 2021

TIME – GAME, NETWORK

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25
6:30 p.m. CT – Ole Miss at Mississippi State, ESPN

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26
2:30 p.m. CT – Missouri at Arkansas, CBS

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27
11 a.m. CT – Florida State at Florida, ESPN
11 a.m. CT – Georgia at Georgia Tech, ABC
2:30 p.m. CT – Alabama at Auburn, CBS
2:45 p.m. CT – Vanderbilt at Tennessee, SEC Network
6 p.m. CT – Texas A&M at LSU, ESPN
6:30 p.m. CT – Clemson at South Carolina, SEC Network
TBD * – Kentucky at Louisville

* Network and time to be determined after games of November 20

Источник: https://lsusports.net/news/2021/11/15/lsu-football-vs-texas-am-set-for-primetime-in-tiger-stadium/

Florida A&M football casts large recruiting net across the state, nationally to build upon its success


Tis the season for recruiting.

With the schedule of games now complete, the 100% focus of Florida A&M football is directed at reloading with another potent signing class for 2022.

The driving force carries through National Signing Day on Wednesday, Feb. 2.

FAMU has a lot of momentum from its run in 2021.

This fall included a 9-3 record and a berth in the FCS playoffs. It went 7-1 in the debut season of SWAC competition. 

The Rattlers have nine athletes on usps office open today All-SWAC teams and the Defensive Player of the Year in Isaiah Land.

Media coverage of the program reached unprecedented levels with the A&m football docuseries Why Not Us: FAMU A&m football are the main talking points head coach Willie Simmons and his staff a&m football use when speaking with prospects over the coming weeks.

"We want to build on the momentum from this season. The only way to continue to push this program forward is to continue to bring quality student-athletes into the fold," Simmons said.

FAMU featured top-tier signing classes from the COVID period of 2020 and the traditional recruitment of 2021. These Rattlers played a major role in the team's success this year. 

The targets on the bulletin board once again feature four and five-star star high school players. There are also a handful of collegiate student-athletes who entered the transfer portal.

"We have a lot of interest from transfers, junior college and high schools. The transfer portal has really changed the way we look at recruiting," Simmons said.

"It's about identifying the right type of young man, not just a four or five-star young man. We're looking forward to seeing what type of class we can put together." 

Depth has been a strong point for the Rattlers under Simmons.

Players frequently rotate on and off the field during games beyond injury replacements.

The staff will keep this strategy intact when surveying the recruiting trail.

Offensive needs

FAMU currently has five quarterbacks set to return in 2022.

Rasean McKay was the starter this year.

However, backups Junior Muratovic and Cameron Sapp took snaps in games.

Muratovic played in the starting role versus Fort Valley State.

With this texas a&m football roster the most important position on the field, FAMU will explore all options when scouting athletes and reviewing film.

MORE RATTLERS FOOTBALL

More FAMU Football: Florida A&M All-American safety Markquese Bell preps to make ringing sounds in the NFL

More FAMU Football: Divine 9: Florida A&M features nine players on All-SWAC list, Land named Defensive Santander online savings account login of the Year

More FAMU Football: FAMU final report card: Rattlers earn honor roll status with high marks across the field in 2021

Running back Bishop Bonnett suited up for the last time in 2021.

Terrell Jennings and Jaylen McCloud ran with him in the three-man setup. They'll be back in the fold in 2022.

Waiting in the background looking to earn significant playing time is local product De'Andre Francis of Rickards High School.

Running backs coach Shane Tucker has a watchful eye on some speedsters to sign. 

He wants to google com co jp йЃ•гЃ„ to FAMU's 1,910 rushing total for next fall. The Rattlers ranked 43rd nationally and fourth in the SWAC.

Key subtractions green dot moneypak refund check the offensive line are Keenan Forbes, Jay Jackson-Williams and Jalen Spady.

Forbes and Jackson-Williams we're All-SWAC selections.

There isn't a significant drop-off from the starters to the reserves on the line. However, these three fill big holes more than their bulky weight.

The signees on the offensive line are arguably the most important issue for FAMU this offseason.

FAMU wide receivers will miss the presence of Chad Hunter. 

Although pnc financial services group pittsburgh suffered his share of injuries, his voice and leadership skills brought everyone to attention.

Xavier Smith has another year of eligibility and is expected to return next year.

Jah'Marae Sheread and David Manigo will also be prime options in the passing game.

Miami native Jelani Berassa is the wide receivers coach. He has deep ties throughout South Florida. 

Berassa added Jermaine Hawkins, a rising star from Miami, last season. 

He'll surely bring in more elite players from the area - either from high school, junior college or transfers from four-year schools.

More thunder for the Dark Cloud Defense 

FAMU's defense was the clear-cut strength of the program during the historic ride of 2021.

The unit will have to replace notables such as defensive lineman Savion Williams, linebacker Derrick Mayweather and safeties Antwan Collier and Markquese Bell.

Quality players are waiting to get their shine. However, upgrading the depth is a need, not a want.

Interior linemen, linebacker and safety rank at the top of the wishing list for the Rattlers.  

Recruitment coverage map

Florida is the starting point and finish line for all recruiting.

The Rattlers will cast their net from the Panhandle to the Florida Keys.

Simmons firmly believes in sealing a blanket in the Big Bend.

FAMU's current roster already has local players from schools such as Florida High, Leon High, Godby, Rickards, Wakulla and Gadsden County.

"Being a product of the Big Bend, I know how rich the talent is here," Simmons said.

"I think it's important for any program to start their recruiting in their home base. That's the best way to get fans in the seats. It also build pride because they grew up knowing about the Rattlers."

MORE RATTLERS COVERAGE

More FAMU Athletics: FAMU volleyball falls to No. 16 Florida in opening round of NCAA Tourney

More FAMU Athletics: What we learned: Randolph nets 21 to pace Florida A&M to 76-63 win vs. Fort Valley State

More FAMU Athletics: VIDEO: FAMU men's basketball postgame press conference vs. Fort Valley State

More FAMU Athletics: FAMU to face No. 16 overall seed Florida in NCAA volleyball tournament

After taking care of the home state, next on the map is Georgia.

The Rattlers always search for talent from metro Atlanta, middle and south Georgia.

FAMU's card my yard discount in the SWAC opens the door to better scout states such as Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas.

Transfers from junior colleges and four-year institutions will come from various states.

FAMU is now a welcoming destination for players from Power 5 conferences. This trend should continue this offseason.

There is also strong interest from transfers at other Black colleges seeking to become Rattlers.

Follow FAMU beat writer Rory Sharrock on Twitter @married2game1.

Never miss a story: Subscribe to the Tallahassee Democrat using the link at the top of the page.

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Источник: https://www.tallahassee.com/story/sports/college/famu/2021/12/03/florida-a-m-football-casts-large-recruiting-net-across-state-nationally-build-upon-its-success/8784528002/

Isaiah Land highlights SWAC honors for Florida A&M football

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. georgia power business pay bill — Florida A&M football has nine players named to the All-SWAC Teams, and Isaiah Land was named the Defensive Player of the Year. The Rattlers tied with Jackson State for the most players on the All-SWAC Teams.

Isaiah Land - Linebacker - Defensive Player of the Year / All-SWAC First Team Defense

Isaiah Land is one of the best players in the nation as he is one of 25 players named a Buck Buchanan Award Finalist.

Land leads the nation with 25.5 tackles for loss and 19 sacks. Land has added three forced fumbles, two pass breakups, and one fumble recovery.

Land was named week 4 BOXTOROW Player of the Week after a three-sack performance vs. Alabama State. Then he was named week 5 SWAC Defensive Player of the Week who founded mission san jose setting a Rattlers' record five sacks versus South Carolina State. Land earned another SWAC Defensive Player of the Week in week eight after recording six tackles, 4.5 tackles for loss, and 1.5 sacks in a win at Mississippi Valley State.

Land recorded a sack or tackles for loss in ten of the 11 games this season and recorded two or more sacks in five games and did the same for tackles for loss in six games.

Bishop Bonnett - Running Back - All-SWAC First Team Offense

Bishop Bonnett has a&m football one of the best backs in the nation all season long. Bonnett currently ranks 20th in the nation in rushing and leads the SWAC with 955 yards. Bonnett is also 11th in yards per carry while leading the SWAC. Bonnett eclipsed the 100-yard mark five different times, including a season-high 166 yards in a thrilling win at Alabama A&M, in which he had the game-winning 80-yard touchdown run.

Bonnett adds 89-yards in the receiving game to give him 1,044 all-purpose good for fourth-best in the league and has six total touchdowns.

Keenan Forbes - Offensive Line - All-SWAC First Team Offense

Keenan Forbes has played at an elite level all season long, finishing the season with 92 knockdowns and allowed only one sack.

Forbes and the rest of the offensive line allowed only 14 sacks, which was #1 in the conference and the 18th in the country. They also led the way a&m football the conference's leading rusher Bishop Bonnett.

Markquese Bell - Safety - All-SWAC First Team Defense

Markquese Bell is one of the best players in the nation as he is one of 25 players named a Buck Buchanan Award Finalist.

Bell led the Rattlers with 79 tackles (4th most in SWAC), adding 6.5 tackles for loss, four forced fumbles, two sacks, one interception, and one pass breakup.

Bell ranks eighth in the nation in forced fumbles

Bell was named the week 3 SWAC Defensive Player of the Week and Reese's Senior Bowl Defensive Player of the Week after a 15 tackle, sack, and forced fumble performance at USF.

BJ Bohler - Cornerback - All-SWAC First Team Defense

BJ Bohler has been one of the best corners in the nation as he's ranked 20th in the nation in pass breakups and 22nd in the nation in interceptions (2nd in SWAC).

Bohler is also the Rattlers' second-leading tackler with 46 tackles.

Bohler had the most significant impact on the field in the 2021 Florida Blue Florida Classic as he was named the game's MVP. He had an interception in the first quarter, in which the Rattlers scored on the next play. Late in the third quarter, he forced a fumble, recovered it, and returned it 56-yards for a touchdown. Bohler added four tackles and a pass breakup as the Rattlers defeated the Wildcats 46-21. Bohler's performance in the A&m football Classic earned him the week 12 SWAC Defensive Player of the Week.

Jose Romo-Martinez - Kicker - All-SWAC First Team Specialist

Jose Romo-Martinez had the best punting average in the SWAC, averaging 42.91 yards per punt. Romo-Martinez had eight punts of 50+ yards, pinned opponents inside the 20 11 times, and forced 13 fair catches.

Romo-Martinez had a season-long 64-yard punt. Romo-Martinez was named SWAC Special Teams Player of the Week in weeks five and ten.

Jay Jackson-Williams - Offensive Line - All-SWAC Second Team Offense

Jay Jackson-Williams (LT) had the second most knockdowns for the Rattlers with 49.

Jay Jackson-Williams and the rest of the offensive line allowed only 14 sacks, which was #1 in the conference and the 18th in the country. They also led the way for the conference's leading rusher Bishop Bonnett.

Jackson-Williams played 724 snaps.

Savion Williams - Defensive Line - All-SWAC Second Team Defense

Savion Williams made his season debut in the fifth game of the season and wreaked havoc in every game since picking up 23 tackles, nine tackles for loss, 4.5 sacks, and a safety.

Williams averaged 1.29 tackles for loss per game, which was good for the fifth-best in the SWAC. The same goes for his .64 sacks per game.

Deonte Williams - Defensive Line - All-SWAC Second Team Defense

Deonte Williams often found himself in the backfield as he finished the season with seven tackles for loss and four sacks. Williams added two forced fumbles and a fumble recovery on the season.

After a two-sack, forced fumble, and fumble recovery performance, Williams earned week 2 SWAC Defensive Player of the Week.

- All stats are post Bethune-Cookman at the time of league voting

Full SWAC Honors

Offensive Player of the Year

Aqeel Glass- Alabama A&M

Defensive Player of the Year

Isaiah Land- Florida A&M

Newcomer of the Year

James Houston- Jackson State

Freshman of the Year

Shedeur Sanders- Jackson State

Coach of the Year

Deion Sanders- Jackson State

All-SWAC First Team Offense

Quarterback: Aqeel Glass- Alabama A&M

Running Back: Bishop Bonnett- Florida A&M

Running Back: Gary Quarles- Alabama A&M

Offensive Lineman: Keenan Forbes- Florida A&M

Offensive Lineman: Dallas Black- Southern

Offensive Lineman: Mark Evans II- Arkansas-Pine Bluff

Offensive Lineman: Johnathan Bishop- Southern

Offensive Lineman: Drake Centers- Texas Southern

Wide Receiver: Abdul-Fatai Ibrahim- Alabama A&M

Wide Receiver: Odieu Hilaire- Alabama A&M

Tight End: Kemari Averett- Bethune-Cookman

All-SWAC First Team Defense 

Defensive Lineman: James Houston- Jackson State

Defensive Lineman: Jason Dumas- Prairie View A&M

Defensive Lineman: Sundiata Anderson- Grambling State

Defensive Lineman: Antwan Owens- Jackson State

Linebacker: Isaiah Land- Florida A&M

Linebacker: Untareo Johnson- Bethune-Cookman

Linebacker: Aubrey Miller- Jackson State

Defensive Back: Markquese Bell- Florida A&M

Defensive Back: Drake Cheatum- Prairie View A&M

Defensive Back: BJ Bohler- Florida A&M

Defensive Back: Omari Hill-Robinson- Bethune-Cookman

All-SWAC First Team Specialist

Place Kicker: Jose Romo-Martinez- Florida A&M

Punter: Josh Sanchez- Arkansas-Pine Bluff

Return Specialist: Isaiah Bolden- Jackson State

All-SWAC Second Team Offense

Quarterback: Shedeur Sanders- Jackson State

Running Back: Caleb Johnson- Mississippi Valley State

Running Back: Niko Duffey- Alcorn State

Offensive Lineman: Tony Gray- Jackson State

Offensive Lineman: Ja'Tyre Carter- Southern

Offensive Lineman: Danny Garza- Prairie View A&M

Offensive Lineman: Jay Jackson-Williams- Florida A&M

Offensive Lineman: Robert Alston- Alabama State

Wide Receiver: Keith Corbin- Jackson State

Wide Receiver: Dee Anderson- Alabama A&M

Tight End: Jyrin Johnson- Texas Southern

All-SWAC Second Team Defense 

Defensive Lineman: Ronnie Thomas- Mississippi Valley State

Defensive Lineman: Savion Williams- Florida A&M

Defensive Lineman: Michael Badejo- Texas United southern bank pembroke ky Lineman: Deonte Williams- Florida A&M

Linebacker: Monroe Beard III- Arkansas-Pine Bluff

Linebacker: Keonte Hampton- Jackson State

Linebacker: Tarik Cooper- Texas Southern

Defensive Back: Irshaad Davis- Alabama State

Defensive Back: Keonte' Daniels- Mississippi Valley State

Defensive Back: Darius Campbell- Prairie View A&M

Defensive Back: Shilo Sanders- Jackson State

All-SWAC Second Team Specialist

Place Kicker: Garrett Urban- Grambling State

Punter: Garrett Urban- Grambling State

Return Specialist: Darnell Deas- Bethune-Cookmam

Источник: https://www.wtxl.com/sports/college-sports/famu/isaiah-land-highlights-swac-honors-for-florida-a-m-football
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 Mississippi Clarion Ledger

Mississippi State has a fair chance to spring an upset of Texas A&M on Saturday in College Station.

Both teams are coming off losses, but it's the Aggies' offense that is struggling most. After an injury to Week 1 starting quarterback Haynes King, Zach Calzada has been underwhelming under center. Texas A&M has scored 10 points in each of the team's first two games against Power 5 competition.

Here's how you can watch Saturday's game.

How to watch Mississippi State, Texas A&M football

Location:  Kyle Field, College Station, Texas

Game time:  6 p.m. CT, Saturday, Oct. 2

TV:  SEC Network

SEC Network broadcasters are scheduled to be Tom Hart (play-by-play), Jordan Rodgers (analyst) and Cole Cubelic (sideline reporter).

On DirecTV, SEC Network is channel 611. On Dish, SEC Network is channel 404.

Online live stream: ESPN.com/watch

Radio broadcast:  Hailstate.com/watch

More Mississippi State football news

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Источник: https://www.clarionledger.com/story/sports/college/mississippi-state/2021/10/02/mississippi-state-bulldogs-football-texas-a-m-how-to-watch-tv-live-stream/5953821001/

The Texas A&M Aggies finished their season with a record of 8-4 after a tough loss to the LSU Tigers. Texas A&M came in with high expectations to reach either the playoff or another New Year’s Six Bowl at the beginning of the year. Instead, the Aggies will have to compete in either the Citrus Bowl, Gator Bowl, or Texas Bowl to end the season. Texas A&M finished 4-4 in SEC play, and that was primarily due to the inconsistent play by different position groups on both sides of the ball. Here are the regular season grades for each position group on the Aggies.

Offense

Quarterbacks

Redshirt freshman Haynes King entered the year as the starting quarterback for Texas A&M. The projection of the Aggies’ season quickly changed when King suffered a leg injury against the Colorado Buffaloes. Zach Calzada took over for King, and Calzada’s play was erratic for most of the season; he showed his big-game capability in Texas A&M’s win over Alabama, but he also had off days against worse teams like Arkansas and Mississippi State. Now, Calzada and King will likely again battle for the starting job next year.     

Grade: C+

Running Backs

This position group was by far the most productive group for the Aggies all season. Isaiah Spiller and Devon Achane each finished with over 900 rushing yards in the regular season; both Spiller and Achane are projected to be first round draft picks. Texas A&M also features talented, young running backs who will be the future for the Aggies in the backfield: including Amari Daniels, and LJ Johnson Jr. If there’s anyone Jimbo Fisher can depend on, it’s his running backs.

Grade: A

Wide Receivers

The Aggies’ wide receivers did not get much action this year primarily because the rest of the offense is littered with talent. Calzada’s primary receiver this season was Ainias Smith, and he finished with six receiving touchdowns and over 500 receiving yards. Smith will be a great slot option for any NFL team as he enters the draft. There are a lot of young receivers–Demond Demas, Moose Muhammad III, and Chase Lane–who will be utilized more in Texas A&M’s offense next season.

Grade: B-

Tight Ends

Jalen Wydermyer was Texas A&M’s primary tight end this year, and he led the Aggies in receiving with 515 yards and four touchdowns. He will be another first-round draft pick for the Aggies next April. Wydermyer was the best tight end in the SEC this season, but Max Wright will have to take Wydermyer’s role next year. Regardless, Fisher will find a way to get Wright involved in the passing game. 

Grade: A-

Offensive Line

Earlier in the season, Texas A&M’s offensive line struggled mightily with protecting Calzada and facilitating the running game. However, the Aggies’ offensive line improved since the Alabama game with the replacement of a transfer and two freshmen. Kenyon Green is probably the best player on Texas A&M’s offense, and he will be a big loss for the Aggies next year. The offensive line’s progress over the season shows promise that the line will be more consistent in 2022.  

Grade: B+

Defense

Secondary

While Texas A&M’s secondary did put up a lot of numbers on the stat sheet, the defensive backs and safeties were rather disappointing for the Aggies’ defense this season. Antonio Johnson, Demani Richardson, and Leon O’ Neal Jr. were said to be the cornerstone of the Aggies’ defense back in August; however, they did struggle when matched up with top receivers from teams like Alabama, Ole Miss, and even LSU. There are other young players in the secondary including Tyreek Chappell and Jaylon Jones who will get more time next year with the departure of O’Neal Jr. to the draft. Expect Mike Elko to have Texas A&M’s secondary at an elite level in September of 2022. 

Grade: B

Linebackers

Texas A&M’s defense was expected to be one of the top defenses in the SEC this season, and the linebacker core did meet those expectations. Aaron Hansford led the Aggies on defense with 89 total tackles, two fumble returns, and one fumble return for a touchdown. Edgerrin Cooper also came up big with 65 total tackles, an interception, and a forced fumble. Cooper is just a freshman, and he is booming with confidence as he will likely be a top pick in the 2023 NFL Draft. The linebackers were one of the most effective groups on Texas A&M’s squad this year. 

Grade: A-

Defensive Line

DeMarvin Leal was a force on the Aggies’ defensive front in the regular season, finishing with 8.5 sacks and a forced fumble. Jayden Peevy also had a great year with 43 total tackles, two sacks, and an interception. Both Leal and Peevy will not be on the team in 2022, so young stars such as McKinnley Jackson and Shemar Turner will need to step up to the plate. Overall, Texas A&M’s defensive front was pretty effective in getting to the quarterback and limiting the running game during the regular season. 

Grade: B+

Concluding Thoughts

While most of Texas A&M’s position groups played well during the regular season, inconsistent performance paired with unreliable quarterback play has led the Aggies to a record of 8-4 this year. Now, Texas A&M will await likely either the Gator or Texas Bowl, and Jimbo Fisher could improve his bowl record to 4-0 with the Aggies. Nonetheless, the Texas A&M Aggies will need their position groups to perform at a higher level in 2022 for Texas A&M to win its first SEC Championship.  

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Источник: https://lastwordonsports.com/collegefootball/2021/12/03/texas-am-regular-season-grades/

LSU Football vs. Texas A&M Set For Primetime in Tiger Stadium

BATON ROUGE – LSU’s Nov. 27 football matchup against Texas A&M will kickoff at 6 p.m. CT on ESPN, it was announced Monday by the Southeastern Conference and its network television partners.

Tickets to the final two games of the 2021 regular season are available at LSUtix.net.

SEC Football Network Television Selections
Games on Nov. 25-27, 2021

TIME – GAME, NETWORK

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25
6:30 p.m. CT – Ole Miss at Mississippi State, ESPN

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26
2:30 p.m. CT – Missouri at Arkansas, CBS

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27
11 a.m. CT – Florida State at Florida, ESPN
11 a.m. CT – Georgia at Georgia Tech, ABC
2:30 p.m. CT – Alabama at Auburn, CBS
2:45 p.m. CT – Vanderbilt at Tennessee, SEC Network
6 p.m. CT – Texas A&M at LSU, ESPN
6:30 p.m. CT – Clemson at South Carolina, SEC Network
TBD * – Kentucky at Louisville

* Network and time to be determined after games of November 20

Источник: https://lsusports.net/news/2021/11/15/lsu-football-vs-texas-am-set-for-primetime-in-tiger-stadium/

How to watch Mississippi State football vs. Texas A&M Aggies on TV, live stream


Nick Gray  

Texas A&M football: Final thoughts (and a prediction) vs. LSU

It’s the final game of the 2021 regular season and Texas A&M travels to Baton Rouge for a Saturday night in Tiger Stadium.

Historically, that’s been a nightmare. The Aggies are 10-26-1 all-time vs. LSU at Tiger Stadium. In recent years, Texas A&M has struggled to even be competitive against the Tigers in Death Valley. They’ve lost the past 4 meetings at Tiger Stadium and haven’t won there since 1994.

But this year doesn’t fit into that old scenario. This year is different. This year the Aggies continue to trend upward while the Tigers have completely lost their will and their way as well as their head coach.

A loss on Saturday would mark the end of the Ed Orgeron era at LSU, an era that saw the Tigers reach great heights. An era that included a meteoric rise to perhaps the greatest college football team of all-time in 2019, only to see the bottom drop out just as quickly. LSU is 10-11 since winning it all just 2 short years ago.

Can the Aggies help LSU pack Orgeron’s bags for good on Saturday? Yes, they can, but it all comes down to how well they can run the football. And that’s the unknown. That’s what’s giving the oddsmakers reason to make the No. 14 Aggies (8-3) just a 6-point favorite over the 5-6 Tigers, and further holding down the over/under point total to a very low 45.5.

Which LSU defense will we see on Saturday; the one that held Alabama to 6 total yards rushing, or the one that gave up 330 to Kentucky?

The Aggies are averaging 173 rushing yards per game this season. They’ve gone over the 200-yard mark on 5 occasions, including a 285-yard game in the victory over Alabama and 237 in a loss to Ole Miss.

Junior Isaiah Spiller is 3rd in the SEC in rushing and needs just 16 yards on Saturday to reach 1,000 for the season. He’s also 34 yards away from becoming the 7th Aggie all-time to rush for 3,000 yards in a career.

Sophomore Devon Achane has been a scoring machine as of late with multiple touchdowns in the last 2 games. He has 4 multiple touchdown games this season and 6 in his career. He leads the SEC and ranks 3rd nationally (minimum 100 rushing attempts) with a 7.3-yard average per carry this season.

Those two will be the difference-makers Saturday.

Already in 3 games this season, Spiller and Achane reached the 100-yard mark in the same game. It’s been since 1990 that the Aggies had 4 games in which 2 backs each ran for 100 yards.

One thing we can be fairly sure of is that neither quarterback will win the game. Neither has shown the ability to put the team on his shoulders and carry it.

As up-and-down as LSU’s Max Johnson has been, he is still statistically slightly better than Texas A&M’s Zach Calzada. Johnson does have 4 300-yard passing games this season, granted only 1 of those was against SEC competition – 325 vs. Auburn – but Calzada has yet to throw for 300 yards. But he hasn’t needed to for the most part because of the Aggies’ lethal rushing game.

Jimbo Fisher has been smart enough to rely on the run game and not force Calzada to go out and win games. Orgeron has put more pressure on Johnson’s shoulders, asking him to carry the bulk of the offense. It’s a big reason the Tigers are below .500 this season.

Johnson is 11th in the SEC with a 60.6 completion percentage. Calzada is 12th at 56.0. Johnson is 10th in the conference with 6 interceptions. Calzada is 14th with 9. Johnson is 9th in the league with a 143.55 QB rating. Calzada is 12th at 121.3.

Both are sophomores. Both are still learning their craft at this level. Both were 2nd-stringers coming into the season. Both were thrust into the limelight because of injuries to the starting quarterback. Not much was expected of either coming into the season and in that regard neither have disappointed.

Prediction: Texas A&M 24, LSU 10

Источник: https://www.saturdaydownsouth.com/tamu-football/texas-am-football-final-thoughts-and-a-prediction-vs-lsu/

Texas A&M Aggies football

Program representing Texas A&M University in American football

"Wreckin Crew" redirects here. For other uses, see The Wrecking Crew.

The Texas A&M Aggies football program represents Texas A&M University in the sport of American football. The Aggies compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Western Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC).[3] Texas A&M football claims three national titles and 18 conference titles. The team plays all home games at the newly redeveloped Kyle Field, a 102,733-person capacity outdoor stadium on the university campus. Jimbo Fisher is the team's head coach.

History

See also: List of Texas A&M Aggies football seasons

Early history (1894–1933)

Texas A&M first fielded a football team in 1894, under the direction of head coach F. Dudley Perkins.[4] The team compiled a 1–1 record.[4]W. A. Murray served as A&M's head coach from 1899 to 1901, compiling a record of 7–8–1.[5] From 1902 to 1904, J. E. Platt served as A&M's head coach, his teams compiling a record of 18–5–3.[5] From 1909 to 1914, A&M compiled a 38–8–4 record under head coach Charley Moran.[6] Moran's 1909 team finished undefeated, and all but one of Moran's other seasons the Aggies only lost one game each year.[5] Under head coach Edwin Harlan, the Aggies compiled a record of 12–5 in two seasons and joined the Southwest Conference.[7][8]

Dana X. Bible became Texas A&M's head coach in 1919, leaving LSU, and under his tutelage the Aggies compiled a record of 72–19–9 in ten seasons.[9] Bible's 1919 Texas A&M Aggies football team, which was undefeated, untied, and outscored its opposition 275–0, was retroactively named a national champion by the Billingsley Report and the National Championship Foundation. In the 1922 Dixie Classic, Bible made his most visible and lasting impression in his A&M career when he began the Twelfth Man Tradition. Bible had a roster of only eighteen players, who had to play both offense and defense against the heavily favored Centre College. He lost three players to injuries early in the game, but the Aggies took the lead. Fearing more injuries and a possibility of having to forfeit the game for lack of men, Bible called upon a reserve halfback, E. King Gill, who was in the press box running stats for the team, to suit up and be ready if needed. The Aggies wouldn't need Gill's help to win, but since then A&M students stand throughout football games to show their willingness to play if needed.[10] Bible departed the Aggies after the 1928 season to accept the Nebraska head coaching position.[10] After Bible's departure, A&M brought in Matty Bell from TCU to lead the Aggies football program.[11] Under Bell's tutelage, the Aggies compiled a record of 24–21–3.[11] However, the Aggies did not play up to the standards set by Dana Bible's tenure, and Bell had left for SMU after five seasons.[11]

Homer Norton era (1934–1947)

Homer Norton was hired away from Centenary to replace Bell in 1934.[12] A&M enjoyed great successes under Norton. The 1939 Texas A&M team went 11–0, beating Tulane in the Sugar Bowl, and was named a national champion.[13] Norton's record at Texas A&M was 82–53–9, giving him the second most wins of any coach in Texas A&M Aggies football history.[13] Among the many stars that Norton developed were John Kimbrough and Joe Routt.[12] Norton was fired in 1947 when his team went 3–6–1 and lost to archrival University of Texas for the eighth straight year.[14]

Harry Stiteler era (1948–1950)

In December 1947, Harry Stiteler was promoted from running backs coach to head coach for the Texas A&M football team following the firing of Homer Norton.[15] In Stiteler's first season as head coach, the Aggies failed to win a game, accumulating a record of 0–9–1.[16] For the 1949 season, the Aggies won only one game and had a record of 1–8–1.[17] Despite the poor record in his first two seasons, Stiteler developed a reputation as a good recruiter. In 1950, Stiteler turned the program around with a 7–4 record, including impressive wins over Arkansas (42–13) and SMU (25–20) and a 40–20 win over Georgia in the Presidential Cup Bowl at Baltimore.[18] The 1950 team had the best record of any Texas A&M football team in the first decade after World War II (1945–1954).[19]

In December 1950, Stiteler reported that he had been attacked and beaten by a stranger near the Shamrock Hotel in Houston, where Stiteler had been scheduled to address a group of Texas A&M alumni.[20] Stiteler tried to downplay the incident, but the press reported Stiteler declined to provide details to the police and that there were conflicting versions as to what had happened. The San Antonio Light reported the incident under a banner headline, "MYSTERY SHROUDS STITELER BEATING."[21] In March 1951, Stiteler admitted that he had misrepresented the facts concerning the assault. He reported that he had known his attacker and "the affair was a personal one."[20] Embarrassed, Stiteler submitted his letter of resignation to the President of Texas A&M upon revealing the true facts concerning "my affair in Houston."[20] Following the resignation, the members of the football team issued a statement in support of their former coach:

"We believe that whatever happened to Mr. Stiteler was a personal matter and it should have remained that. A lot of us boys came to A. and M. in 1948 not because A. and M. had won games but simply because of Harry Stiteler and his character. He has never ceased to set us that same example in the years we have played and worked for him."[22]

In three years as the head coach at Texas A&M, Stiteler compiled a record of 8–21–2.[23]

Raymond George era (1951–1953)

Raymond George, previously USC's defensive line coach, was hired as the 17th head coach of the Texas A&M Aggies after the Stiteler scandal.[24] He served as head coach for three seasons, from 1951 to 1953, during which time the Aggies produced a total record of 12–14–4.[25][26] Among A&M's notable wins during this time period were victories over Bud Wilkinson's Oklahoma Sooners, Henry Russell Sanders' UCLA Bruins and Bear Bryant's Kentucky Wildcats. George resigned as the Aggies head coach following the 1953 season.[24]

Bear Bryant era (1954–1957)

Legendary coach Bear Bryant arrived in College Station after successful head coaching tenures at Maryland and Kentucky, signing a contract worth $15,000 per year.[27]

The Aggies suffered through a grueling 1–9 record in Bryant's first season, which began with the infamous training camp in Junction, Texas, during which time many Aggie football players quit the team.[28] The "survivors" were given the name "Junction Boys."[28] Two years later, Bryant led the team to the Southwest Conference championship with a 34–21 victory over Texas in Austin.[29] The following year, star running back John David Crow won the Heisman Trophy and the Aggies were in title contention until they lost to Rice Owls.[30][31]

Bryant attempted to integrate the all-white Texas A&M squad. "We'll be the last football team in the Southwest Conference to integrate," he was told by a Texas A&M official. "Well," Bryant replied, "then that's where we're going to finish in football."[32] After the 1957 season, having compiled an overall 25–14–2 record at A&M, Bryant left for Alabama, his alma mater, where he would cement his legacy as one of the greatest, if not the greatest, college football coach of all-time.[33]

Jim Myers era (1958–1961)

A&M next turned to Iowa State head coach Jim Myers for its head coaching position. Under Myers, the Aggies struggled mightily, compiling a 12–24–4 record.[35] The Aggies failed to win more than four games in a single season. The fallout that ensued from fans, boosters and the administration led Myers to join Tom Landry's Dallas Cowboys staff as an assistant coach.

Hank Foldberg era (1962–1964)

Hank Foldberg was hired as the Aggies head coach after Myers' departure, and brought with him high hopes that Aggie success would return.[36] However, the struggles remained, in the form of a 6–23–1 record in three seasons.[37] Foldberg was replaced after the 1964 season.

Gene Stallings era (1965–1971)

Fresh off helping Bear Bryant and Alabama win the 1964 national title as an assistant coach, Gene Stallings, one of the "Junction Boys", was named the head coach of his alma mater at the age of 29.[38]

The Aggies struggles persisted under Stallings. Texas A&M compiled a record of 27–45–1 in Stallings' seven seasons.[39] However, the Aggies won the Southwest Conference in 1967, Stallings' only winning season at A&M.[40] At the end of that season, A&M beat Alabama in the Cotton Bowl.[40] He was fired at A&M following the 1971 season, but, like his mentor Bryant, would go on to become Alabama's head coach in the 1990s and solidify a Hall of Fame career there.[38]

Emory Bellard era (1972–1978)

Texas offensive coordinator Emory Bellard became the Aggies' head coach in 1972 and brought with him the wishbone offense.[41] In his seven years at Texas A&M, he finished with a record of 48–27 and three top-15 finishes.[42]

Acting as his own offensive coordinator, Bellard hired former high school football coaches to assist him as backfield coaches.[42] Bellard's first two seasons at Texas A&M were difficult, as his Aggies finished 3–8 and 5–6, respectively.[42] In 1974, with a pair of his own recruiting classes suited to run the wishbone formation, the Aggies went 8–3,[43] then followed it up with two 10–2 seasons,[44][45] including a pair of wins over Texas and three consecutive bowl game appearances. After starting the 1978 season 4–0, Bellard resigned mid-season after two consecutive losses: 33–0 to Houston and 24–6 to Baylor.[46]

Tom Wilson era (1978–1981)

Tom Wilson was promoted from offensive coordinator to head coach of the Aggies following Bellard's resignation.[47] The Aggies enjoyed moderate success under Wilson's tutelage, compiling a record of 21–19 and an Independence Bowl victory in 1981.[48] However, the mediocrity did not sit well with the administration, and Wilson was fired after the 1981 season.[49]

Jackie Sherrill era (1982–1988)

On January 19, 1982, Jackie Sherrill was hired away from Pittsburgh by A&M as the replacement for Tom Wilson, signing a record six-year contract over $1.7 million.[50] Sherrill was the head coach of the Texas A&M Aggies for seven seasons, from 1982 to 1988.[51]

While head coach at A&M, Sherrill started the tradition of the "12th Man Kickoff Team", this tradition is still observed by A&M today only in a significantly scaled back form, including a single walk-on rather than an entire return team unit.[52] In Sherrill's seven seasons, A&M compiled a 52–28–1 record.[51] A&M also won three consecutive Southwest Conference championships during Sherrill's tenure, in 1985, 1986 and 1987.[51] As a result, the Aggies played in the Cotton Bowl Classic at the end of each season, defeating Auburn 36–16 on January 1, 1986[53] and Notre Dame 35–10 on January 1, 1988,[54] and losing to Ohio State 28–12 on January 1, 1987.[55] He is also one of the few coaches to leave Texas A&M with a winning record against the Longhorns, winning his last five against Texas after losing his first two. However, he only won two out of seven games versus Texas A&M's other conference rival, Arkansas, in that same time span.

In 1988, Texas A&M was put under probation by the NCAA for a period of two years. Violations included improper employment, extra benefits, unethical conduct and lack of institutional control.[56][57] Sherrill was not personally found guilty of any infractions. However, in December 1988, Sherrill resigned.[58]

R. C. Slocum era (1989–2002)

In December 1988, R.C. Slocum was promoted from defensive coordinator and named head coach of the Aggies.[59]

During Slocum's 14 years as head coach, the Aggies compiled a record of 123–47–2, making Slocum the winningest coach in Texas A&M history.[59] During his career, Slocum never had a losing season and won four conference championships, including the Big 12 (the Southwest Conference was renamed in 1996) title in 1998 and two Big 12 South Championships, 1997 1998.[60] Additionally, he led the Aggies to become the first school in the Southwest Conference history to post three consecutive perfect conference seasons and actually went four consecutive seasons without a conference loss. Slocum reached 100 wins faster than any other active coach.

A&M's Kyle Field become one of the hardest places for opponents to play during Slocum's tenure, losing only 12 games at home in 14 years. For over a year, A&M held the longest home-winning streak in the nation, losing in 1989 and not again until late in 1995. In the 1990s, A&M lost only four times at Kyle Field. Slocum was named SWC Coach of the Year three times during his tenure as head coach. A&M's "Wrecking Crew" defense led the Southwest Conference in four statistical categories from 1991 through 1993 and led the nation in total defense in 1991. Over 50 Texas A&M players were drafted into the NFL during Slocum's career as head coach.[61]

Slocum inherited an Aggie football program that had just finished 7–5 and under severe NCAA sanctions, and cleaned it up quickly. He was quoted in 2002 as saying "I wouldn't trade winning another game or two for my reputation as a person. I've said from day one I'm going to do things the way I think they should be done. There were those who said, `If you don't cheat, you're pretty naive. You can't win that way.' Well, we're going to find out. That's the way we're going to do it. I can walk away and look myself in the mirror and say, 'We did it the right way.'[62]

After 14 years as head coach of the Aggies, Slocum was asked to resign in 2002 following only the second non-winning season of his career.[59] He immediately assumed a position as special adviser to Texas A&M president Robert Gates.[63]

Dennis Franchione era (2003–2007)

A&M turned to Alabama head coach Dennis Franchione to replace the ousted Slocum.[64] Franchione brought the majority of his coaching staff from the Crimson Tide for the 2003 season. Franchione signed a contract that was set to pay him a yearly salary of $1.7 million through 2010.[65]

The Aggies finished the 2003 season with a 4–8 record, including a nationally televised 77–0 loss to Oklahoma, the worst loss in A&M's history.[66] The season also marked the first losing season for the Aggies after 21 years. In the 2004 season, Franchione attempted the rebuilding process as the team improved to a 7–5 record, and a 5–3 record in conference play, including a 35–34 overtime loss to unranked Baylor, ending a 13-game winning streak the Aggies had over Baylor and a 32–25 overtime win over the then No. 25 Texas Tech at Kyle Field, snapping a 3-game skid to the Red Raiders.[67] The Aggies ended up advancing to the Cotton Bowl Classic to play No. 17 Tennessee, but lost 38–7.[68] Following the bowl game, A&M officials extended Franchione's contract through 2012 and raised his salary to $2 million.[65] In June 2005, prior to the 2005 season, Franchione donated $1 million to the A&M athletic department. The donation went toward the construction of an indoor practice facility, which is now located adjacent to Kyle Field.[69]

In the 2005 season, Franchione's Aggies, who were ranked 17th in the preseasonAP Poll, regressed to a 5–6 record.[70] The 2005 Aggie defense ranked 107th nationally (out of 119 NCAA Division I-A teams) and allowed 443.8 yards per game. This prompted Franchione to dismiss defensive coordinatorCarl Torbush. Franchione then hired former Western Michigan head coach Gary Darnell to replace Torbush.[71]

In the 2006 season, the Aggies again rebounded under Franchione, posting a 9–3 regular season record that included Franchione's first win over rival Texas.[72] The 9–3 record also marked the most wins for A&M since 1998. However, in that season's Oklahoma game, which ESPN's College GameDay visited, Franchione was criticized by fans for making a field goal call with 3:28 left in the game. The 18th-ranked Sooners ended up defeating the 21st-ranked Aggies, 17–16.[65] In the postseason, the Aggies faced 20th-ranked California in the Holiday Bowl and lost 45–10.[73]

During the 2007 season, Franchione was discovered selling a secret email newsletter, which violated two NCAA rules and one of the Big 12's "Principles and Standards of Sportsmanship".[74] After the Aggies' 34–17 loss to unranked Miami in September 2007, Franchione's coaching abilities were questioned.[75][76][77][78][79][80] Several news outlets reported that Franchione would not return for the 2008 season. After Franchione led the Aggies to a 38–30 victory over 13th-ranked Texas, he announced his resignation.[81] Defensive coordinator Gary Darnell was named the interim head coach. Darnell led the Aggies to a 24–17 defeat at the hands of Penn State in the Alamo Bowl.[82]

Mike Sherman era (2008–2011)

Mike Sherman was hired away from his post as offensive coordinator of the NFL's Houston Texans to replace Franchione.[83] Sherman signed a 7-year contract that at the time paid him $1.8 million annually.[84] Sherman abandoned the zone read option offense run by Franchione and his coaching staff, and installed a pro-style system.[85][86] A&M used a balanced offense run primarily out of the pro-style formations.[87][88] Sherman's quarterbacks at A&M were Stephen McGee and Ryan Tannehill, both of whom would go on to be drafted into the NFL.[89]

After two straight losing seasons, the Aggies started the 2010 season 3–3 but won their final six games and earn a share of the Big 12 South Division title.[90] No. 18 Texas A&M went on to play No. 11 LSU in the Cotton Bowl. Texas A&M lost 41–24 to end the season at 9–4.[91][92] After the 2010 season, A&M signed Sherman a contract extension through the 2015 season.[93] His salary was raised to $2.2 million.[94]

In 2011, the Aggies began as a top 10 ranked team, but fell out of the polls after losing four games, three of which had double-digit half-time leads.[95] Three of those four losses were to teams later ranked among the top ten in the nation. On November 19, 2011, the Aggies defeated Kansas 61–7 and became bowl-eligible for a third straight season.[96] Five days later, on November 24, 2011, they would lose at home to Texas by a score of 27–25 on a last-second field goal,[97] in what would be the last game of the rivalry for the foreseeable future, as the Aggies were to join the SEC beginning in 2012.[98] It was the Aggies' sixth loss of the season, and the fifth in which they held a second-half lead of two or more scores.[95] Sherman was fired by Texas A&M on December 1, 2011.[99] The Aggies compiled a record of 25–25 during Sherman's four-year tenure.[100]

Kevin Sumlin era (2012–2017)

On December 13, 2011, A&M hired Houston head coach Kevin Sumlin as the program's 28th head football coach.[101] Sumlin was the first African American head coach in Texas A&M football history.[102]

In 2012, Sumlin led the Aggies to an 11–2 record, including victories over then-No. 1 Alabama, and No. 11 Oklahoma in the AT&T Cotton Bowl.[103] Starting quarterback Johnny Manziel won the Heisman Trophy.[104] The Aggies finished the 2012 season ranked in the top 5 of both the Coaches Poll and the AP Poll.[105] Texas A&M also led the SEC in total offense, total scoring offense, total rushing yds, and led the nation in third down conversion percentage.[106] Kevin Sumlin and the Texas A&M Aggies became the first SEC team in history to amass over 7,000 yds in total offense.[107] Sumlin's 2013 Aggies, led by Manziel, finished with a 9–4 record, which included a victory over Duke in the Chick-fil-A Bowl.[108][109] On November 30, 2013, A&M signed Sumlin to a six-year, $30 million contract extension.[110][111]

For the 2014 season, the Aggies came out strong to begin the season, winning their first 5 games before stumbling mid-season to three top 10-ranked teams, including a 59–0 loss to No. 7 ranked Alabama.[112] The Aggies finished the season 8–5 overall and 3–5 in SEC play.[113] With the Liberty Bowl victory over West Virginia, the Aggies won four straight bowl games for the first time in program history. After the season, which was marred by defensive struggles,[114] Sumlin dismissed his defensive coordinator, Mark Snyder,[115] and replaced him with John Chavis.[116] In 2015, A&M again finished 8–5.[117] The season was marked by a strong start with struggles to close the season. A&M finished the season with a loss to Louisville in the Music City Bowl.[118]

Sumlin led the Aggies to a third consecutive 8–5 mark in 2016.[119] The season was again marked a strong start with another late-season collapse, as A&M began the season 6–0, but losing four of its final five games. Texas A&M finished the 2016 season with a loss to Kansas State in the Texas Bowl.[120]

Sumlin started off the 2017 season by surrendering a 34-point lead to UCLA. Sumlin was fired from the position on November 26, 2017 after his team finished 7–5. Sumlin finished 51–26 at A&M and with a 25–23 record in the SEC. Despite A&M football's struggles during the Sumlin era, the program was recognized by Forbes in August 2018 as the most valuable in the country, based on average revenue and profit figures from the 2014–16 seasons.[121]

Jimbo Fisher era (2018–present)

On December 4, 2017, Florida State head coach Jimbo Fisher was formally introduced as the Aggies head coach.[122] A splashy hire, Fisher arrived in College Station after a very successful eight-year run at FSU, leading the Seminoles to three Atlantic Coast Conference championships, six ten-win seasons, the 2013 national championship and coached Heisman Trophy winning quarterback Jameis Winston.[123] A&M signed Fisher to a 10-year contract worth a total base salary of $75 million, the most lucrative contract in terms of guaranteed money signed by a newly hired head coach in college football history.[124]

During his first season, Fisher led the Aggies to an 8–4 record. The season included a notable seven-overtime victory over then-No. 7 LSU. The combined 146 points scored during the game broke the NCAA FBS record for the most points scored in a game, the most points scored in a losing effort (72 by LSU), and tied the record for the most overtimes along with multiple school records for both sides.[125]

Conference affiliations

Championships

National championships

Texas A&M has been selected national champions in three seasons from NCAA-designated major selectors.[126]: 111–112  Texas A&M claims all three championships.[127]: 45–47 

The 1919 team finished 10–0–0 and was not scored upon, earning a retroactive national title by ten selectors, including the Billingsley Report and National Championship Foundation. Other systems retroactively award the 1919 National Championship to either Notre Dame or Harvard.[128][129] The 1927 team finished 8–0–1, with a tie against TCU in Fort Worth, Texas, earning a retroactive national title awarded by the Sagarin Rating and the Sagarin ELO-Chess. In 1939, the undefeated Aggies were voted No. 1 by the AP Poll shortly after its inception along with No. 1 in 8 of the 12 other major polls, after the 1939 season.

Season Coach Selectors Record Bowl Opponent Result
1919Dana X. BibleBillingsley, National Championship Foundation10–0
1927Sagarin, Sagarin ELO-Chess8–0–1
1939Homer H. NortonAssociated Press, Berryman, Billingsley, Boand, CFRA, DeVold, Dunkel, Helms, Houlgate, NCF, Poling, Sagarin, Williamson11–0SugarTulaneW 14–13

Conference championships

The Aggies have won 18 conference championships;.[citation needed] The first 17 were Southwest Conference championships, and the most recent was the Big 12 Championships won in 1998.

† Co-champions

Division championships

The Aggies were previously members of the Big 12 South between its inception in 1996 and the dissolution of conference divisions within the Big 12 in 2011. The Aggies joined the SEC as members of the SEC West starting in 2012.

† Co-champions

Bowl games

Texas A&M has participated in 42 bowl games.[130] The Aggies have a bowl record of 20–22 (.476). During their 81 years in the Southwest Conference, the Aggies went 12–10 (.545) in bowl games, winning their AP National Championship in 1939. During their 16 years in the Big 12 Conference, the Aggies went 2–9 (.182) in bowl games. Since joining the Southeastern Conference in 2012, the Aggies have gone 6–3 (.667) in bowl games.[131]

Rivalries

LSU

Main article: LSU–Texas A&M football rivalry

Texas A&M and LSU were both members of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association from 1903 to 1908 and 1912–1914 and are both members of the SEC. The Aggies first played the Tigers in College Station in 1899, winning 52–0. The Tigers are the Aggies' seventh-oldest collegiate-football rival. Last played in 1995, the Aggies and Tigers then faced off in the 2011 Cotton Bowl Classic. The series resumed in 2012, when the Aggies joined the SEC. Starting in 2014, the Aggies became LSU's final regular season opponent. LSU leads the series 33–21–3 through the 2018 season.[132]

Over the life of the series, the Aggies have claimed the largest margin of victory with a 63–9 final score in 1914 (the Aggies also have the next two largest margins of victory with the 52–0 win in 1899 and 47–0 win in 1922). The Aggies have shut-out the Tigers 7 times (including the Aggies' non-university recognized National Championship Season of 1917 when they did not surrender a point during 8 games, and beat the Tigers 27–0). The Tigers have shut-out the Aggies 9 times (including the Tigers' non-university recognized National Championship season of 1908, when they beat the Aggies 26–0, and the Tigers' non-university recognized National Championship season of 1962, when they beat the Aggies 21–0). Add to those totals the game in which the Aggies and Tigers shut each other out 0–0 in 1920. The Tigers hold the series' longest winning streak of 7 games from 2011 to 2017. The 1960 winning streak was part of a 10-game unbeaten streak for the Tigers from 1960 to 1969 which included a 7–7 tie in 1966. From 1945 to 1973 was the most dominant span by either team in the series history. LSU was 17–3–1 vs Texas A&M during this span.[132]

Arkansas

Main article: Arkansas–Texas A&M football rivalry

The Aggies first played the Razorbacks in 1903. From 1934 to 1991, the two teams played annually as Southwest Conference members. In 1991, however, Arkansas left the Southwest Conference to join the Southeastern Conference. Arkansas leads the all-time series 41–30–3.

On March 10, 2008, officials from both schools announced the revival of the series, which recommenced on October 3, 2009. The game is played at Cowboys Stadium, which was initially expected to hold about 80,000 fans. The game is dubbed "The Southwest Classic", which pays homage to both schools' past relationship to the Southwest Conference. The initial agreement between the two schools allows the game to be played for at least 10 years, followed by five consecutive four-year rollover options, allowing the game to be played for a total of 30 consecutive seasons.[133][134][135]

Once the Aggies joined the SEC, the agreement with Cowboys Stadium came to an end because the SEC does not allow its members to entertain potential recruits at neutral-site games. However, the SEC has removed this recruiting rule, and the Aggies and Razorbacks will again move the rivalry to AT&T Stadium in 2014. (cf. Georgia and Florida, which play at a neutral site, do not intend to entertain recruits at that site.) The agreement is expected to last at least 11 seasons, or through the 2024 football season.

Over the life of the series, the Aggies have shut out the Razorbacks 10 times, and been shut out 9 times. The Aggies hold the largest margin of victory with a 58–10 win in College Station on September 29, 2012 (the Aggies also hold the second-largest margin of victory with a 41–0 win in College Station in 1942). The Razorbacks hold the longest winning streak in the series of 9 games from 1958 to 1966.

Texas

Main article: Texas–Texas A&M football rivalry

See also: State Farm Lone Star Showdown

The Texas-Texas A&M rivalry dates back to 1894. It is the longest-running rivalry for both teams. It ranks as the third most-played rivalry in Division I-A college football,[136] and the most-played intrastate rivalry. Most of the series' lopsided victories occurred prior to A&M's transition from an all-male and all-white military school, and the rivalry has been fairly even since. Until the rivalry ended in 2012, the two teams played each other every year since 1894 with the exception of six seasons [1895 (when the Aggies did not field a team), 1896, 1897, 1913, and 1914]. During some seasons, the Aggies and Longhorns played each other twice.

In an attempt to generate more attention for the rivalry in sports other than football, in 2004 the two schools started the Lone Star Showdown,[137] a trial two-year program. Essentially, each time the two schools meet in a sport, the winner of the matchup gets a point. At the end of the year, the school with the most points wins the series and receives the Lone Star Showdown trophy.

Aspects of the rivalry include:

  • Each school mentions the other in its fight song (Texas with "and it's goodbye to A&M" in Texas Fight,[138] and the Aggies singing "Goodbye to Texas University, so long to the orange and the white" as the opening line of the second verse of the Aggie War Hymn),[139] and "saw Varsity's horns off" about Texas in the chorus.
  • The football series between the two universities is the third longest running rivalry in all of college football.[140] Since 1900, the last regular season football game is usually reserved for their matchup.[141]
  • Each school has elaborate pre-game preparations for the annual football clash, including the Aggie Bonfire[142] and the Hex Rally.[143]
  • Texas has a unique lighting scheme for the UT Tower after wins over Texas A&M.[144]
  • In the past, mischief has preceded the annual game, such as the "kidnapping" of Bevo.[145][146]

Though the Longhorns lead the series overall (76–37–5), the series has been much closer since 1965 (when Texas A&M dropped compulsory participation in the Corps of Cadets). Since that time, the Aggies have accumulated 20 wins to 27 losses. During the last 40 meetings (from 1972—when the NCAA introduced scholarship limitations—to the present), the series is nearly even at 19–21. The Aggies' best years in recent times were from 1984 to 1994 when they won 10 out of 11 games, losing only in 1990 by one point.

Over the life of the series, the Aggies have shut out the Longhorns 13 times, and have been shut out 27 times (including scoreless ties in 1902, 1907, and 1921). However, since 1961, neither team has been shut out. The Aggies and Longhorns have never had a game decided in overtime. The Longhorns hold the largest margin of victory with a 48–0 win in Austin on October 22, 1898 (the second meeting in the series). The Longhorns also hold the series' longest winning streak of 10 games from 1957 to 1966. In addition, the Longhorns had an 11-game unbeaten streak from 1940 to 1950 that included a 14–14 tie in 1948.

In the 75 meetings since 1936 when the Associated Press College Poll began, the Aggies and Longhorns have faced each other 59 times when one or both teams have been ranked (the Aggies have been ranked 25 times, whereas the Longhorns have been ranked 44 times). In those 59 meetings, the lower-ranked or unranked team has won 11 times (the Aggies did it six times—1951, 1979, 1984, 1999, 2006, and 2007; the Longhorns did it five times—1941, 1955, 1957, 1974, and 1998).

Baylor

Main article: Battle of the Brazos

The Aggies first played the Baylor Bears in 1899, and competed with them annually since 1945.[147] It is the Aggies' eighth-oldest collegiate-football rivalry, and their third most played behind TCU and Texas. The rivalry is nicknamed the Battle of the Brazos, a term coined after the Brazos River, which flows by the two schools which are only 90 miles (145 km) apart. Texas A&M leads the series 68–31–9.[148] The Aggies' 68 wins against the Bears is the highest number of wins that the Aggies have accumulated against any team. From 1960 to 1990 the rivalry was very competitive as A&M won 16 times, Baylor won 13 times, and 2 games ended in ties; while many of the games were decided by 7 points or less.

Over the life of the series, the Aggies have shutout the Bears 29 times (including scoreless ties in 1903, 1923, 1932, and 1936). The Bears have shutout the Aggies 11 times (including those same scoreless ties). The Aggies hold the largest margin of victory with a 73–10 win in College Station on October 11, 2003, as well as the second-largest margin of victory with a 53–0 win in College Station in 1912. The Aggies hold the longest winning streak in the series of 13 games from 1991 to 2003. That winning streak is also part of an 18-game unbeaten streak for the Aggies from 1986 to 2003 (the Aggies and Bears played to a 20–20 tie in 1990).

As with the Texas Longhorns rivalry, the Baylor rivalry was put on hold after the 2011 season with the Aggies decision to leave the Big 12 Conference. When A&M announced its decision to leave the Big 12 and join the SEC in 2011, then-Baylor president Kenneth Starr filed suit in federal court in an attempt to block A&M from moving. Eventually the lawsuit was dropped, and soon thereafter, Missouri announced it was joining A&M in departing the Big 12 for the SEC.

Texas Tech

Main article: Texas A&M–Texas Tech football rivalry

The Aggies first played the Red Raiders in 1927. The Aggies lead the all-time series 37–32–1.[149]

Over the life of the series, the Aggies have shutout the Red Raiders four times, and the Red Raiders have shutout the Aggies four times. The Aggies hold the largest margin of victory with a 47–6 win in College Station on November 28, 1927. The Aggies and Red Raiders each have win streaks of six games, which are the longest in the series (the Aggies' streak included the 1927 and 1932 games as well as the games from 1942 to 1945; the Red Raiders' streak was uninterrupted from 1968 to 1973).

TCU

Main article: TCU–Texas A&M football rivalry

The rivalry with TCU began in 1897 and is the Aggies' third-oldest collegiate-football rivalry. Though the Aggies no longer play the Horned Frogs annually since the Southwest Conference disbanded in 1996, this series is still notable because it contains the longest, active winning streak that the Aggies have against any opponent. The Horned Frogs have not beaten the Aggies since October 21, 1972, when they won in College Station with a final score of 13–10. Adding further intrigue to this series is the fact that the Aggies' National Championship Season of 1939 succeeded the Horned Frogs' National Championship Season of 1938. Texas A&M leads the series 56–29–7 through the 2019 season.[150]

Player accomplishments

Individual awards

Heisman Trophy

Top 5 finishes for Texas A&M players:

Texas A&M first-team All-Americans

In the years since 1889, several organizations and publications have recognized the top players in the nation by naming them to All-America teams. To be considered an All-American, a player needs to be named to the first-team on at least one of the lists of these organizations. In addition, the NCAA further recognizes certain players by honoring them with the "Consensus" All-American title. At present, the Consensus honor is determined by referencing the first, second, and third teams of five organizations and assigning a varying number of points for each time a player appears on one of those five lists. The points are totaled and the player with the most points at his position is awarded the Consensus honor. The five organizations whose lists are used for the Consensus determination are the Associated Press (AP),[157]American Football Coaches Association (AFCA).,[158]Football Writers Association of America (FWAA),[159]Sporting News (TSN).,[160] and Walter Camp Football Foundation (WCFF).[161] Finally, a player can be recognized with the "Unanimous Consensus" honor if all five of the previously listed organizations have recognized that player as a First-Team All-American.

Texas A&M has had 53 players that have been named First-Team All-Americans for a total of 72 seasons (19 players have been honored in two different seasons). 30 of those were Consensus All-Americans. Texas A&M has had 27 All-Americans on Offense, 34 All-Americans on Defense, and 11 All-Americans on Special Teams. The Linebacker position is the most represented position with 14 selections (Offensive Tackle/Offensive Guard is the next highest with 12 selections). Texas A&M has had an All-American selection at every position, and has had at least one All-American in every decade since the 1930s. The highest number of All-Americans during one decade took place from 1990 to 1999 when 16 players were named All-Americans for a total of 18 seasons.

Name Position Years at Texas A&M All-America
AP (Since 1925)AFCA (Since 1945)FWAA (Since 1944)TSN (Since 1934)WCFF (Since 1889)OtherConsensusUnanimous Consensus
Sam AdamsDE 1991–1993 1993 1993 1993 1993 1993[162]1993
Antonio ArmstrongLB 1991–1994 1994 1994
Mike ArthurC 1987–1990 1990
Patrick BatesFS 1992 1992 1992 1992[164]
Rod BernstineTE 1983–1986 1986[165]
Joe BoydOT 1936–1939 1939[166]
Marcus BuckleyLB 1990–1992 1992 1992 1992 1992 1992 1992[162]1992 1992
Randy BullockPK 2008–2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011[167]2011
Ray ChildressDT 1981–1984 1984 1983, 1984[168]1984
Quentin CoryattLB 1989–1991 1991[165]
John David CrowRB 1955–1957 1957 1957 1957 1956, 1957 1957 1957[169]1957 1957
Dave ElmendorfFS 1968–1970 1970 1970 1970
Mike EvansWR 2012–2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013
Tony FranklinPK 1975–1978 1976, 1978 1976[170]1976
Myles GarrettDE 2014–2016 2016 2016 2015, 2016 2016 2015, 2016 2016[171]2016 2016
Aaron GlennDB 1992–1993 1993 1993 1993 1993 1993 1993[172]1993 1993
Dennis Goehring OG 1953–1956 1956
Jacob GreenDE 1977–1979 1979 1979 1978
Lester HayesFS 1973–1976 1976
Bill HobbsLB 1965–1968 1967 1968[168]
Johnny HollandLB 1983–1986 1985 1985 19861985
Robert JacksonLB 1973–1976 1976 1976 1976 1976 1976 1976[173]1976 1976
Luke JoeckelOT 2010–2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012[174]2012 2012
Drew KaserP 2012-2015 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013, 2015[175]2013 2013
John KimbroughFB 1938–1940 1939, 1940 1939, 1940 1939,[176] 1940[177]1939, 1940 1940
Christian KirkPR 2015– 2015[178]
Charlie KruegerOT 1955–1957 1957 1956,[179] 1957[179]
Rolf KruegerOT 1965–1968 1968 1968[180]
Shane LechlerP 1996–1999 1999 1998 1999[181]
Darren LewisRB 1987–1990 1988, 1990 1990 1988 1990 1990[182]1990
Jack LittleFB 1949–1952 1951 1952
Leeland McElroyAP/KR 1993–1995 1995 1994 1994 1994 1994[183]1994
Braden MannP 2016-2018 2018 2018 2018 2018 2018 2018, 2019 2018 2018
Johnny ManzielQB 2012–2013 2012,2013 2012 2012 2012 2012,2013[174][184]2012
Jake MatthewsOT 2010–2013 2013 2013 2012,2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013
Tommy MaxwellFS 1965–1968 1968 1968[180]
Ray MickensDB 1992–1995 1995
Von MillerDE/LB 2007–2010 2010 2009 2010 2009,[185] 2010[186]2010
Brandon MitchellDE 1993–1996 1995
Keith MitchellLB 1993–1996 1996
Damontre MooreDE 2010–2012 2012 2012 2012 2012[184]2012
Maurice "Mo" MoormanOT 1966–1967 1966 1966 1966[180]
Dat NguyenLB 1995–1998 1998 1998 1998 1998 1998 19981998 1998
Steve O'NealP 1965-1968 1968
Jack PardeeFB 1954–1956 1956 1956[187]
Marshall RobnettOG 1938–1940 1940 1940[188]1940
John RoperLB 1985–1988 1987 1987 1987
Joe RouttOG 1935–1937 1936, 1937 1937[189]1937
Ed SimoniniLB 1972–1975 1975 1975 1975 1975 1975 1975[182]1975 1975
Bob SmithRB 1949–1951 1950[190]
Kevin SmithCB 1988–1991 1991 1991 1991 1991 1991[191]1991
Jace SternbergerTE 2018 2018 2018 2018 2018 2018 2018
Garth TenNapelLB 1973–1975 1975[165]
Pat ThomasCB 1972–1975 1974, 1975 1975 1974 1975 1974,[165] 1975[192]1974, 1975
Jason WebsterDB 1996–1999 1999[193]

Hall of Fame

Player Position Years Induction
Yale LaryS1948–19511979

Venue

Main article: Kyle Field

Kyle Field stadium (pictured in 2015), where the Aggies play their home games

The Aggies play at Kyle Field, which has been the home to the Aggies in rudimentary form since 1904, and as a permanent concrete stadium since 1927.[194] The seating capacity of 102,733 in 2015 makes the stadium the largest in the Southeastern Conference and the fourth-largest stadium in the NCAA, the fourth-largest stadium in the United States, and the sixth-largest non-racing stadium in the world. It is also the largest football stadium in the state of Texas.

Traditions

See also: Traditions of Texas A&M University

12th Man

See also: 12th Man (football)

Aggie football fans call themselves the 12th Man, meaning they are there to support the 11 players on the field. To further symbolize their "readiness, desire, and enthusiasm," the entire student body stands throughout the game.[195] In a further show of respect, the students step "off the wood" (step off the bleachers onto the concrete) whenever a player is injured or when the band plays the Aggie War Hymn or The Spirit of Aggieland.[196][197]

Seniors wearing either their Senior boots or Aggie Rings are also encouraged to join the "Boot Line." As the Fightin' Texas Aggie Band leaves the field after their half-time performances, seniors line up at the south end of Kyle Field to welcome the team back onto the field for the second half.[198]

The tradition began in Dallas on January 2, 1922, at the Dixie Classic, the forerunner of the Cotton Bowl Classic. A&M played defending national champion Centre College in the first post-season game in the southwest. In this hard fought game, which produced national publicity, an underdog Aggie team was slowly defeating a team which had allowed fewer than 6 points per game. The first half produced so many injuries for A&M that Coach D. X. Bible feared he wouldn't have enough men to finish the game. At that moment, he called into the Aggie section of the stands for E. King Gill, a student who had left football after the regular season to play basketball. Gill, who was spotting players for a Waco newspaper and was not in football uniform, donned the uniform of injured player Heine Weir and stood on the sidelines to await his turn. Although he did not actually play in the game, his readiness to play symbolized the willingness of all Aggies to support their team to the point of actually entering the game. When the game ended in a 22–14 Aggie victory, Gill was the only man left standing on the sidelines for the Aggies. Gill later said, "I wish I could say that I went in and ran for the winning touchdown, but I did not. I simply stood by in case my team needed me."[199]

In the 1980s, the tradition was expanded as coach Jackie Sherrill created the 12th Man squad led by 12th man standout Dean Berry. Composed solely of walk-on (non-scholarship) players, the squad would take the field for special teams' performances.[199] This squad never allowed a kickoff return for a touchdown.[200] Sherrill's successor, R. C. Slocum, amended the tradition in the 1990s to allow one walk-on player, wearing the No. 12 jersey, to take the field for special teams' plays.[199] The player is chosen based on the level of determination and hard work shown in practices. Coach Dennis Franchione has continued Slocum's model, while also keeping an all-walk-on kickoff team that played three times in the 2006 season.[200]

Bonfire

Main article: Aggie Bonfire

Aggie Bonfire was a long-standing tradition at Texas A&M University as part of a college rivalry with the University of Texas at Austin, known as t.u. by Texas A&M students. For ninety years, Texas A&M students built and burned a large bonfire on campus each fall. Known within the Aggie community simply as Bonfire, the annual fall event symbolized the students' "burning desire to beat the hell outta t.u."[201] The bonfire was traditionally lit around Thanksgiving in conjunction with the festivities surrounding the annual game between the schools.[202]

The first on-campus Aggie Bonfire was burned in 1909, and the tradition continued for the next 90 years.[202] For almost two decades, Bonfire was constructed from debris and pieces of wood that Aggies "found," including lumber intended for a dormitory that students appropriated in 1912.[203] The event became school-sanctioned in 1936, and, for the first time, students were provided with axes, saws, and trucks and pointed towards a grove of dead trees on the edge of town.[202] In the following years the Bonfire became more elaborate, and in 1967 the flames could be seen 25 miles (40 km) away. In 1969, the stack set the world record at 111 feet (30 m) tall.[202][204]

In 1978, Bonfire shifted to a wedding-cake style, in which upper stacks of logs were wedged on top of lower stacks. The structure was built around a fortified centerpole, made from two telephone poles.[205] Although tradition stated that if Bonfire burned through midnight A&M would win the following day's game, with the introduction of the wedding cake design Bonfire began to fall very quickly, sometimes burning for only 30 or 45 minutes.[206]

At 2:42 am on November 18, 1999, the partially completed Aggie Bonfire, standing 40 feet (10 m) tall and consisting of about 5000 logs, collapsed during construction. Of the 58 students and former students working on the stack, 12 were killed and 27 others were injured.[205] On November 25, 1999, the date that Bonfire would have burned, Aggies instead held a vigil and remembrance ceremony. Over 40,000 people, including former President George H.W. Bush and his wife Barbara and then-Texas governor George W. Bush and his wife Laura, lit candles and observed up to two hours of silence at the site of the Bonfire collapse.[207] The Bonfire Memorial was officially dedicated on November 18, 2004.[208]

Bonfire was postponed until 2002 in order to restructure it to make it safer. Delays in the development of a safety plan and a high estimated cost (mainly due to liability insurance), led A&M president Ray Bowen to postpone Bonfire indefinitely.[209] Despite the university's refusal to allow Bonfire to take place on campus, since 2002 a non-university sanctioned Bonfire has burned annually.[210] Known as Student Bonfire, the off-campus event draws between 8,000 and 15,000 fans.[211] Student Bonfire utilizes many changes for safety purposes, and has only recorded two serious injuries since its inception, neither life-threatening. The newly designed stack was designed by a professional engineer (a former student) and features a center pole with 4 perimeter poles connected via "windle-sticks". In the new design, the height is capped at 45 feet (not including the outhouse), and all the logs touch the ground. Alcohol is strictly prohibited from all student bonfire functions as it was revealed that a number of the students working on the collapsed bonfire in 1999 had BACs higher than the legal driving limit.

Fightin' Texas Aggie Band

Main article: Fightin' Texas Aggie Band

The Fightin' Texas Aggie Band (also known as The Noble Men of Kyle or the Aggie Band) is the official marching band of Texas A&M University. Composed of over 400 men and women from the school's Corps of Cadets,[212] it is the largest military marching band in the world. The complex straight-line maneuvers, performed exclusively to traditional marches, are so complicated and precise that computer marching simulations say they cannot be performed.[213]

Since its inception in 1894, its members eat together, sleep in the same dormitories, and practice up to forty hours per week on top of a full academic schedule. The Aggie Band performs at all home football games, some away games, and university and Corps functions throughout the year. Other events in which the band participated include inauguration parades for many United States Presidents and Texas Governors, major annual parades across the country, and the dedication ceremony for the George H. W. Bush Presidential Library.[214][215][216]

Midnight Yell Practice

Main article: Midnight Yell Practice

Midnight Yell Practice is a pep rally usually held the night before a football game. If the football game is to be held at Kyle Field, midnight yell takes place the day of the football game at 12:00 am If the football game is an away game, a yell is held on the Thursday night before at the Corps Arches on the Texas A&M campus, and Midnight Yell will be held in the city the game is being played.

Wrecking Crew

Hand sign for the Wrecking Crew

The term Wrecking Crew is a name given to defenses of the football team.[217][218] The term, coined by defensive back Chet Brooks, became popular during the coach R. C. Slocum's tenure in 80s and the 90s. After the coach's firing, many fans, coaches, and sports analysts feel that recent Aggie defenses have not "earned" the title.[218][219] Despite this, the university still owns a trademark on the term.[220]

Yell Leaders

Main article: Aggie Yell Leaders

Yell Leaders are five students who lead the crowd in yells during the games. The team consists of three seniors and two juniors elected by the student body. The Yell Leaders take the place of traditional "cheerleaders" and perform many of the same functions without the gymnastics and dance routines. They also participate in post-game activities such as being thrown in the Fish Pond if the team wins, or leading the student body in the singing of The Twelfth Man if the team loses.

Future opponents

Non-division opponents

Texas A&M plays South Carolina as a permanent non-division opponent annually and rotates around the East division among the other six schools.[221]

Non-conference opponents

Announced schedules as of April 26, 2020.[222]

See also

References

  1. ^NCAA (2009). "NCAA Football Award Winners"(PDF). p. 16. Archived from the original(PDF) on June 11, 2010.
  2. ^"Texas A&M University Brand Guide". Retrieved May 16, 2018.
  3. ^"SEC: Texas A&M to join in July 2012". Associated Press. September 5, 2011.
  4. ^ abRappoport, Ken (January 2013). Texas A&m Aggies. ISBN .
  5. ^ abc"Texas A&M Football History". 12thman.com. Archived from the original on January 4, 2015. Retrieved December 2, 2014.
  6. ^"Charley Moran". College Football at Sports-Reference.com.
  7. ^"E.H. Harlan". College Football at Sports-Reference.com.
  8. ^"Texas A&M Aggies tell Big 12 they'll seek new conference". ESPN.com. August 31, 2011.
  9. ^"Dana Bible". College Football at Sports-Reference.com.
  10. ^ ab"BIBLE, DANA XENOPHON". tshaonline.org. June 12, 2010.
  11. ^ abc"BELL, WILLIAM MADISON [MATTY]". tshaonline.org. June 12, 2010.
  12. ^ ab"Homer Norton". footballfoundation.org. National Football Foundation.
  13. ^ ab"Homer Norton". College Football at Sports-Reference.com.
  14. ^TaylorTRoom (October 6, 2008). "The More Things Change..."Barking Carnival.
Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_A%26M_Aggies_football

Isaiah Land highlights SWAC honors for Florida A&M football

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (famuathletics.com) — Florida A&M football has nine players named to the All-SWAC Teams, and Isaiah Land was named the Defensive Player of the Year. The Rattlers tied with Jackson State for the most players on the All-SWAC Teams.

Isaiah Land - Linebacker - Defensive Player of the Year / All-SWAC First Team Defense

Isaiah Land is one of the best players in the nation as he is one of 25 players named a Buck Buchanan Award Finalist.

Land leads the nation with 25.5 tackles for loss and 19 sacks. Land has added three forced fumbles, two pass breakups, and one fumble recovery.

Land was named week 4 BOXTOROW Player of the Week after a three-sack performance vs. Alabama State. Then he was named week 5 SWAC Defensive Player of the Week after setting a Rattlers' record five sacks versus South Carolina State. Land earned another SWAC Defensive Player of the Week in week eight after recording six tackles, 4.5 tackles for loss, and 1.5 sacks in a win at Mississippi Valley State.

Land recorded a sack or tackles for loss in ten of the 11 games this season and recorded two or more sacks in five games and did the same for tackles for loss in six games.

Bishop Bonnett - Running Back - All-SWAC First Team Offense

Bishop Bonnett has been one of the best backs in the nation all season long. Bonnett currently ranks 20th in the nation in rushing and leads the SWAC with 955 yards. Bonnett is also 11th in yards per carry while leading the SWAC. Bonnett eclipsed the 100-yard mark five different times, including a season-high 166 yards in a thrilling win at Alabama A&M, in which he had the game-winning 80-yard touchdown run.

Bonnett adds 89-yards in the receiving game to give him 1,044 all-purpose good for fourth-best in the league and has six total touchdowns.

Keenan Forbes - Offensive Line - All-SWAC First Team Offense

Keenan Forbes has played at an elite level all season long, finishing the season with 92 knockdowns and allowed only one sack.

Forbes and the rest of the offensive line allowed only 14 sacks, which was #1 in the conference and the 18th in the country. They also led the way for the conference's leading rusher Bishop Bonnett.

Markquese Bell - Safety - All-SWAC First Team Defense

Markquese Bell is one of the best players in the nation as he is one of 25 players named a Buck Buchanan Award Finalist.

Bell led the Rattlers with 79 tackles (4th most in SWAC), adding 6.5 tackles for loss, four forced fumbles, two sacks, one interception, and one pass breakup.

Bell ranks eighth in the nation in forced fumbles

Bell was named the week 3 SWAC Defensive Player of the Week and Reese's Senior Bowl Defensive Player of the Week after a 15 tackle, sack, and forced fumble performance at USF.

BJ Bohler - Cornerback - All-SWAC First Team Defense

BJ Bohler has been one of the best corners in the nation as he's ranked 20th in the nation in pass breakups and 22nd in the nation in interceptions (2nd in SWAC).

Bohler is also the Rattlers' second-leading tackler with 46 tackles.

Bohler had the most significant impact on the field in the 2021 Florida Blue Florida Classic as he was named the game's MVP. He had an interception in the first quarter, in which the Rattlers scored on the next play. Late in the third quarter, he forced a fumble, recovered it, and returned it 56-yards for a touchdown. Bohler added four tackles and a pass breakup as the Rattlers defeated the Wildcats 46-21. Bohler's performance in the Florida Classic earned him the week 12 SWAC Defensive Player of the Week.

Jose Romo-Martinez - Kicker - All-SWAC First Team Specialist

Jose Romo-Martinez had the best punting average in the SWAC, averaging 42.91 yards per punt. Romo-Martinez had eight punts of 50+ yards, pinned opponents inside the 20 11 times, and forced 13 fair catches.

Romo-Martinez had a season-long 64-yard punt. Romo-Martinez was named SWAC Special Teams Player of the Week in weeks five and ten.

Jay Jackson-Williams - Offensive Line - All-SWAC Second Team Offense

Jay Jackson-Williams (LT) had the second most knockdowns for the Rattlers with 49.

Jay Jackson-Williams and the rest of the offensive line allowed only 14 sacks, which was #1 in the conference and the 18th in the country. They also led the way for the conference's leading rusher Bishop Bonnett.

Jackson-Williams played 724 snaps.

Savion Williams - Defensive Line - All-SWAC Second Team Defense

Savion Williams made his season debut in the fifth game of the season and wreaked havoc in every game since picking up 23 tackles, nine tackles for loss, 4.5 sacks, and a safety.

Williams averaged 1.29 tackles for loss per game, which was good for the fifth-best in the SWAC. The same goes for his .64 sacks per game.

Deonte Williams - Defensive Line - All-SWAC Second Team Defense

Deonte Williams often found himself in the backfield as he finished the season with seven tackles for loss and four sacks. Williams added two forced fumbles and a fumble recovery on the season.

After a two-sack, forced fumble, and fumble recovery performance, Williams earned week 2 SWAC Defensive Player of the Week.

- All stats are post Bethune-Cookman at the time of league voting

Full SWAC Honors

Offensive Player of the Year

Aqeel Glass- Alabama A&M

Defensive Player of the Year

Isaiah Land- Florida A&M

Newcomer of the Year

James Houston- Jackson State

Freshman of the Year

Shedeur Sanders- Jackson State

Coach of the Year

Deion Sanders- Jackson State

All-SWAC First Team Offense

Quarterback: Aqeel Glass- Alabama A&M

Running Back: Bishop Bonnett- Florida A&M

Running Back: Gary Quarles- Alabama A&M

Offensive Lineman: Keenan Forbes- Florida A&M

Offensive Lineman: Dallas Black- Southern

Offensive Lineman: Mark Evans II- Arkansas-Pine Bluff

Offensive Lineman: Johnathan Bishop- Southern

Offensive Lineman: Drake Centers- Texas Southern

Wide Receiver: Abdul-Fatai Ibrahim- Alabama A&M

Wide Receiver: Odieu Hilaire- Alabama A&M

Tight End: Kemari Averett- Bethune-Cookman

All-SWAC First Team Defense 

Defensive Lineman: James Houston- Jackson State

Defensive Lineman: Jason Dumas- Prairie View A&M

Defensive Lineman: Sundiata Anderson- Grambling State

Defensive Lineman: Antwan Owens- Jackson State

Linebacker: Isaiah Land- Florida A&M

Linebacker: Untareo Johnson- Bethune-Cookman

Linebacker: Aubrey Miller- Jackson State

Defensive Back: Markquese Bell- Florida A&M

Defensive Back: Drake Cheatum- Prairie View A&M

Defensive Back: BJ Bohler- Florida A&M

Defensive Back: Omari Hill-Robinson- Bethune-Cookman

All-SWAC First Team Specialist

Place Kicker: Jose Romo-Martinez- Florida A&M

Punter: Josh Sanchez- Arkansas-Pine Bluff

Return Specialist: Isaiah Bolden- Jackson State

All-SWAC Second Team Offense

Quarterback: Shedeur Sanders- Jackson State

Running Back: Caleb Johnson- Mississippi Valley State

Running Back: Niko Duffey- Alcorn State

Offensive Lineman: Tony Gray- Jackson State

Offensive Lineman: Ja'Tyre Carter- Southern

Offensive Lineman: Danny Garza- Prairie View A&M

Offensive Lineman: Jay Jackson-Williams- Florida A&M

Offensive Lineman: Robert Alston- Alabama State

Wide Receiver: Keith Corbin- Jackson State

Wide Receiver: Dee Anderson- Alabama A&M

Tight End: Jyrin Johnson- Texas Southern

All-SWAC Second Team Defense 

Defensive Lineman: Ronnie Thomas- Mississippi Valley State

Defensive Lineman: Savion Williams- Florida A&M

Defensive Lineman: Michael Badejo- Texas Southern

Defensive Lineman: Deonte Williams- Florida A&M

Linebacker: Monroe Beard III- Arkansas-Pine Bluff

Linebacker: Keonte Hampton- Jackson State

Linebacker: Tarik Cooper- Texas Southern

Defensive Back: Irshaad Davis- Alabama State

Defensive Back: Keonte' Daniels- Mississippi Valley State

Defensive Back: Darius Campbell- Prairie View A&M

Defensive Back: Shilo Sanders- Jackson State

All-SWAC Second Team Specialist

Place Kicker: Garrett Urban- Grambling State

Punter: Garrett Urban- Grambling State

Return Specialist: Darnell Deas- Bethune-Cookmam

Источник: https://www.wtxl.com/sports/college-sports/famu/isaiah-land-highlights-swac-honors-for-florida-a-m-football

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