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chinese pokemon cards worth money

“I was just looking to maybe acquire cards not only to make maybe a little bit of money short term, but also as an alternative investment for my. Use the check boxes to choose comparables and save a price estimate. Save Search. Filters. Pokémon Individual Cards. Soaring card values and this secondary market are the primary factors driving counterfeiting. Data is still scarce and we can only speculate on.

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*ARE YOUR POKEMON CARDS VALUABLE?* How To Find Value!

Chinese pokemon cards worth money -

Pokemon.com". www.pokemon.com. Retrieved 2021-09-20.
  • ^Doolan, Liam (2021-11-06). "Pokémon Trading Card Game Live Has Been Delayed Until 2022". Nintendo Life. Retrieved 2021-11-09.
  • External links[edit]

    Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon_Trading_Card_Game

    The 25 Rarest Pokemon Cards (And What They’re Worth)

    If you were a Pokemon fan back in the 1990s, you probably have a fair few old Pokemon Trading Card Game cards stashed somewhere in the back of your closet. We all had a few Caterpies and Rattattas lying around from this trend, and if you managed to collect a coveted card like a holographic Charizard, you were the talk of the school playground and truly got lucky.

    RELATED: Pokemon: The Most Valuable Pikachu Cards (And That Aren't Worth Much)

    New Pokemon cards are still being produced to this day, making many of the oldest Pokemon cards even harder to find. As long as Pokemon remains a popular video game franchise, the Pokemon Trading Card Game will keep on producing new types of cards, but none of them can reach the heights of the rarest and most valuable Pokemon cards in the history of the franchise.

    Updated August 30, 2021 by Jerrad Wyche: Pokemon cards continue to be a hot commodity and that continues to be the case well into 2021 and likely beyond. Nothing drastic has happened in the world of Pokemon Trading Cards in a while, so the 25 cards on this list remain some of the most sought-after and desired trading cards in the Pokemon franchise. Despite plenty of new sets releasing, it will take years and plenty of scarcity for them to obtain the value that many of the classic cards continue to hold to this day. This also includes the newest Pokemon Trading Card Game set, Evolving Skies.

    25 Holo Gold Star Rayquaza: $4,500

    Rather than many cards on this list, this Shiny Rayquaza from the EX Deoxys set is a rare Pokemon card that’s mostly just mythical pull from a standard set. During this expansion, Pokemon with a Gold Star in your deck, making them just as powerful as they are gorgeous with unique colors and art exiting the frame.

    Costs can vary massively, but spaces like Troll and Toad price the card at just under $4500. It simply combines all the great aspects of a standard card in the perfect combination, and the rarity of it in packs of this small expansion set make it one of the most valuable original Gen 3 cards, and one of the first major shiny cards to hit record prices before other shinies would catch up.

    24 Tropical Mega Battle: $10,000

    In the late 1990s and early 2000s, an annual Pokemon Trading Card Game tournament was held in Honolulu, Hawaii. At this 1999 event, just 12 of these Tropical Mega Battle cards were produced to be distributed to some of the lucky 50 players who attended the event, meaning the remaining number of mint copies is especially low all these years later.

    RELATED: Pokemon Sword & Shield: Things To Do After You Beat The Isle Of Armor

    Showing a Psyduck having a nap in a hammock on a tropical island, this legendary Trainer Card sells for a whole lot of cash thanks to its rarity. In fact, according to the Telegraph, a mint-condition version of the card once sold for $10,000, making it a prime example of how valuable Pokemon TCG prize cards can eventually be.

    23 Ancient Mew: $25

    While Ancient Mew is absolutely not the most expensive rare card you’re going to see on this list, it’s perhaps one of the most well-known rare cards that helps explain why certain Pokemon cards are considered rare and given high price tags. This was released to viewers of the first Pokemon movie, and while it isn’t playable in any legal tournament, its art and hieroglyphic style make it an absolutely gorgeous addition to a Pokemon card collection.

    Since few of these were properly preserved, many sites like TCGPlayer will sell heavily-played versions of the card for the simple price of around $25. That being said, eBay listing compilation sites like Mavin.io show that sealed and better-preserved versions can sell for potentially over $60 and $100, so it’s hardly worthless by the standards of most Pokemon cards.

    22 Holographic Shadowless Charizard: $500,000

    There are a lot of factors that make the Holographic Shadowless First Edition Charizard card worth so much compared to any other Charizard card. Firstly, it's a first edition version of the undoubtedly most popular Kanto starter, which already makes it extra valuable to most pokemon fans. Alongside this, the card is also shadowless, which essentially means the card lacks a shadow between the box containing the image of the Pokemon, and the rest of the card.

    This "Shadowless" effect is not a misprint or a mistake. It's actually the original Pokemon card design, as the foiling process has changed and provided a different look to modern holographic and foil cards. These Charizard cards have become one of the prime reasons for the Pokemon Card trend of the past two years, with YouTuber Logan Paul opening one as recently as February 2021 that was estimated by auction site owner Ken Goldin to sell for upwards of $500,000.

    21 Holographic Shadowless Venusaur: $3,260

    Just like its Kanto starter counterpart Charizard, Venusaur's Shadowless, holographic, first edition version is a coveted card among Pokemon fans. It doesn't quite reach the heights of Charizard's $500,000, but Venusaur always was slightly less popular compared to the other Kanto starters anyway.

    RELATED: Pokemon: Every Kanto Starter Evolution, Ranked

    Nonetheless, these cards were rare even in their original late-1990s heyday, so you can imagine how sought-after they are now. Buying one through Troll and Toad right now can cost you as little $390, but the compilation site Pokemon Prices has records of them selling up to $3260.

    20 Holographic Shadowless Blastoise: $2,475

    Out of the three final-evolution Kanto starters, it's Blastoise who has the least valuable Shadowless holographic card, reaching heights of $2475 on Pokemon Prices. We say "least valuable", but that's still a lot of money for just the one card, and it’s hardly far behind its sibling Venusaur.

    That's if Blastoise is still in mint condition, of course, which is a big ask considering these cards are over 20 years old. Carrying the powerful Water-type move Hydro Pump, this version of Blastoise was a pretty impressive card to carry in your deck back in the day, but at this point it’s still a solid collectible card.

    19 Pokemon Players’ Club Shiny Umbreon: $1,900

    If you've got a soft spot for the blue and black shiny version of the Dark-type Pokemon Umbreon, then be aware that you're not the only one. The Japanese version of the Shining Umbreon Pokemon card is pretty highly desired, with its unique coloring and gorgeous frame-piercing artwork making it fittingly beautiful as one of the first shiny Pokemon to appear on a card.

    However, its price is so high because of much more than just its looks and popularity. The Shining Umbreon card only saw a very limited release through the Japanese Pokemon Players' Club for hitting the maximum number of experience points through the club between 2005 and 2006, making it one of the rarest cards out there. For this reason, Troll and Toad has had it listed at just near and impressive $1900.

    18 Pokemon Player’s Club Shiny Espeon: $2000

    If you ever wanted proof about how much a Pokemon card’s price can change just because of the Pokemon on it, you need to look further than the Pokemon Player’s Club Shiny Espeon. This card is almost identical in story to the Umbreon card you saw just a moment ago, but required only 40,000 experience points instead of 70,000.

    RELATED: Pokemon: Every Shiny Eevee Evolution, Ranked

    Despite being more available, Troll and Toad has this card for a slightly higher price of just under $2000. This is likely because Espeon’s shiny form is more noticeable than Umbreon’s, since the bright neon-green fur is a lot more distinctive and Espeon has its own unique degree of popularity.

    17 Shining Charizard: $2,000

    Again, Shining Charizard owes its hefty price tag not just due to the Pokemon in question's general fame and popularity in its glamorous shiny form, but due to the card being a pretty exclusive and hard-to-open one. The very first version of Shining Charizard was part of the Neo Destiny set, which wasn't as mass-produced as other sets and one of the first elusive sets past the first expansions.

    As a result, only the luckiest and most dedicated of card collectors managed to grab this shining beast. It’s a pretty hefty price tag in the current Pokemon card, selling right now through Troll and Toad at $2000, despite being arguably easier to find than shiny event cards like the Pokemon Player’s Club Umbreon and Espeon cards.

    16 Holographic Shadowless Mewtwo: $20,000

    While the other Kanto starters don’t come close to Charizard in the realm of First Edition cards, it’s hard to ignore the second-place winner off of its fame in the series. Most Pokemon fans are plenty aware of Mewtwo from the original Pokemon movie, and as a result cards featuring the character will often go for record-high prices in any set.

    Much like the First Edition Charizard mentioned earlier, Mewtwo has its own Holographic and Shadowless version that PSA Collector has seen sold for at least $20,000, putting it far above Venusaur and Blastoise but still far below everyone’s favorite Fire-type tyrant of the skies.

    15 Misprinted Fossil Krabby: $2,200

    Yes, you read that right. Krabby is the star of one of the rarest Pokemon cards of all. By all accounts, this crab-based Water-type isn't exactly a battling superstar. The fact that one version of its Pokemon card is so rare is a bit of a fluke, as its price comes down to a relatively simple misprint of the card.

    RELATED: Valuable Pokemon Card Errors

    The difference between these multiple miscuts and a normal card is that part of a fossil symbol to the bottom-left of its art is missing. This seemingly minor difference has driven up the price of these cards immensely, and despite going for under two dollars in its normal state, Pokemon Prices has the card record of a misprint selling for over $2200 dollars.

    14 Master’s Key: $21,000

    The Master Key is another prize card that's seriously sought after in Pokemon card collector circles. This card was only produced in Japan, and had a very limited release: only 34 actually exist. The Master Key card was handed to those competitive Pokemon players who managed to reach high ranks in the 2010 Japanese World Championship, meaning no new copies can ever come into the market.

    Collector site CardMavin estimates that this card would be worth around $21,000, but few tend to be sold since there are so few in existence. Nonetheless, if one were to be sold recently, it’s sure to hit a fairly incredible price, particularly if it’s still in one of the spectacular cases they were given out in.

    13 Parent-And-Child Event Kangaskhan: $100,000

    A common trend you’ll find with most of the rarest Pokemon cards is that they often come as part of unique events that happened only once, only being circulated in a single country or event. While these weren’t seen as major deals at the time, mostly being prizes and free giveaways, they’ve held an alarming value since they’ve never had a later reprint.

    This has never been true of the Parent-And-Child Kangaskhan, a holo foil card with unique art that only appeared as prizes for a fittingly adorable team tournament in 1998 where young children would play with a parent against other child-parent teams. Its fabulous first-edition frame and amazing original art has resulted in sales listed on PSA Card ranging from $50,000 to an incredible $150,000 with high enough quality.

    12 Prototype Blastoise: $360,000

    The regular first edition Blastoise might not have been a huge moneymaker, but an alternate edition that was made before the Pokemon TCG’s release has just recently been discovered and has hit some great records. This would be the Prototype Blasotise, which was made as a test by the game’s developer Wizards Of The Coast to show what Pokemon Cards would look like.

    RELATED: Saddest Pokemon Card Illustrations

    The result is a card that was sold for $360,000, making it one of the highest-selling cards in the history of the game. The signature trait of this card is its fonts, which are far stranger and more variant than the consistent style of modern and even most classic cards.

    11 Pokemon Snap Trainer Magazine Pikachu: $900

    If you were a Pokemon fan back in the days of the Nintendo 64 console, you might just remember the classic spin-off game Pokemon Snap. The object of this Pokemon spin-off was to snap creative in-game photos of various creatures, and there were several tie-in cards in Japan’s Pokemon Trainer Magazine to help increase the hype among fans to try this new game.

    This card was a Pikachu card with the model from Pokemon Snap as the art, making for a relatively hilarious-looking card that only could be found within this magazine in 1999. Miyabihobby has a record of an unopened magazine being sold for 100,000, or about $900 USD, but PSA Card has records of auctions ranging between $300 and $1000 for perfect condition grades.

    10 Southern Islands Reverse Holo Mew: $200

    When the second Pokemon movie was released in Japan, the makers of the Trading Card Game decided to release a special edition set of cards to mark this occasion. The Southern Islands card series was born, featuring just two sets of nine cards apiece that were unique to any other set in the game.

    Full sets of these cards can sell for a lot, but the absolute highest value is undoubtedly the Southern Islands Mew, which has a rare reverse foil treatment where the frame around the art is the only part that’s shiny. Troll and Toad is currently selling copies for just over $200 right now, making it even more valuable than the elusive and stylish Ancient Mew mentioned earlier.

    9 Tamamushi University Magikarp: $50,000

    The Tamamushi University Magikarp card is so rare that despite the fact that it depicts a frankly awful Pokemon, it's worth ridiculous sums of money. Why the high price? Well, the University Magikarp was a promotional card that saw very limited distribution at a Japanese tournament in the late 1990s.

    RELATED: The Weakest Pokemon From Each Generation, Ranked

    In total, 1000 of the cards were produced but far fewer were actually awarded and many were just stowed away forever. Barely any of these rare Magikarp cards are still in circulation today, and it’s incredibly rare to see new ones show up. At the moment, PSA Card’s Price Guide chart lists perfectly-preserved cards to have sold for around $50,000, while copies with NM-MT 8 ratings still sell for amazing heights of $12,000.

    8 Holographic First Edition Machamp: $6,000

    The Kanto starters and legendaries aren't the only original Pokemon to boast high-value shadowless holographic cards. Nearly any holographic first edition rare card from the original set can grow immensely in price compared to other rare Pokemon cards, but since they aren’t as actively hunted, their prices can vary far more wildly based on their quality.

    Machamp is one of these. According to PSA Card’s range of auction prices based on the card’s quality classification, perfect mint condition Machamps of this kind can land between $800 and $6000, while dropping just one rating down will result in prices around $200 and $900. This card in particular truly proves how important it is to keep your trading cards safe through the years, as you never know just what will become valuable twenty years later.

    7 The Masked Royal Prize Promo: $18,000

    This is undoubtedly one of the most recent rare cards, featuring the Masked Royal character from Pokemon Sun & Moon and released as recently as 2017. This is essentially a promotional card that was given out to players in an invitation-only prerelease in Tokyo for the new Shining Legends set, where only 100 copies were made.

    Even though this is a relatively normal card by most standards, this short print run means it’s incredibly hard to get, especially since it was handed out in such a restrictive event. As a result, there are actually preserved tweets of players first opening it in places like Pokeboon, while Japanese trading sites like Miyabi Hobby have past listings of the card at ¥2,000,000, which currently is equal to around $18,000 USD.

    6 Shiny Secret Rare Charizard V: $500

    If you want to get into Pokemon pack opening, but don’t want to shell out for the older packs, there are tons of new cards with similar record-setting prices that have come out in just the past two years. One of the recent premium TCG sets in the game was Champion’s Path, and certain cards in it were especially rare since you could only get packs through special products like Elite Trainer Boxes and Pin Collector packs.

    RELATED: The Most Powerful Rare Cards In The Pokemon: Trading Card Game, Ranked

    The absolute highest value cards in this set are both Charizards, one being a rainbow foil V-Max card and the other being a shiny Charizard V with black scales. Both quickly reached prices around $500, and sites like TCGPlayer still remain at the same $500 price tag.

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    Источник: https://www.thegamer.com/rarest-pokemon-cards-worth/

    One of the rarest Pokémon cards ever made just sold for nearly $200,000

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    Pokemon Card Pikachu Illustrator
    The Pokémon Company/Weiss Auctions

    One of the world's rarest Pokémon cards sold for $195,000 at an auction in Lynbrook, New York, earlier this month.

    Kotaku spotted the auction listing for "Pikachu Illustrator," which explains why the card is one of the most valuable in the long-running trading card series. The Pikachu Illustrator card was given away to 39 people who finished first or second in three special illustration contests run by CoroCoro Comic in 1998. The card features artwork by Atsuko Nishida, the creator of Pokémon's mascot, Pikachu.

    There are only 10 confirmed copies of the Pikachu Illustrator card remaining, making it the rarest card overall. According to Kotaku, the last Pikachu Illustrator card sold at auction was purchased for $54,970 in 2013.

    Earlier this year, a Pokémon card worth $60,000, Trainer No. 3, was lost in the mail after being sold on eBay. While it's not quite as rare as Pikachu Illustrator, Trainer No. 3 is another incredibly rare card given away as a contest prize.

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    Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/rare-pokemon-card-pokemon-illustrator-sells-for-195000-2019-10
    Pokemon.com". www.pokemon.com. Retrieved 2019-12-04.
  • ^"Pokemon Prerelease Events". TOP CUT EVENTS. Retrieved 2019-12-04.
  • ^Martinez, Phillip (2019-08-15). "Everything you need to know to watch the 2019 Pokémon World Championships". Newsweek. Retrieved 2019-12-04.
  • ^How Competitive Pokemon Works - IGN, retrieved 2019-12-04
  • ^"Pokemon Organised Play TCG Championship Points". Sutton Coldfield Pokemon club. Retrieved 2019-12-04.
  • ^ ab"The 2017 Worlds Is a Wrap!

    Since the first time Pokemon TCG was introduced to collectors and players all around the world, people have tried to make fake cards - just like they do it with the fake money or fake purses for example. 

    If you are a Pokemon collector, casual player or even competitive player, you might find your self in a position to order some products from ebay thinking you are buying real cards. After all, they look almost identical to the original ones. Yet sadly, more and more on ebay, many of the listings are for fakes.

    There are some poor, good and "almost real" fake cards that can be found on the market, mostly on ebay. (Sellers from China). 

    The best way to spot a fake card is to try to bend it. When you do that, an original card will bend much harder than a fake one. Another example is that fake holo cards are going to be much less shiny than original ones. 

    If we want to spot a fake full art or maybe a fake hyper rare card (the most popular right now on ebay), the best way to find out if a card is a real or a fake, is to use that cards in your hand and try to move your fingers around the art of the card. If the card is a full art or hyper rare card, and you can't feel texture, then it's obvious you have a fake full art or hyper rare card. Authentic Pokemon Full art / Hyper rare cards have a texture that can easily be felt, that is not like other normal cards.

    Some regular EX or GX cards are much harder to spot as a fake cards - especialy to someone who is not an old school Pokemon player or collector. The best way to see if the card is a fake, is to take a closer look at the card texture - pixels that can be found on the card and the side color of the card. Try to put a card in the light, check the card back and see if it reflects light, or simply smell the card - all original cards have a specific smell that is different from the fake cards, especially pack fresh cards. 

    Buying and selling fake Pokemon cards, and even printing them and selling is against the rules and it's also against the law. 

    Think twice before you try to buy fake Pokemon cards on ebay from China, you don't want to get involved in buying and selling counterfeits over the Internet. 

    Here are some examples of the fake cards and fake sellers who try to sell those cards: http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Pokemon-TCG-100-FLASH-CARD-LOT-RARE-20-MEGA-80-EX-CARDS-NO-REPEAT/302367281866 - notice the very different coloration of the cards compared to real ones, how they are fully shiny all over, almost a rainbow pattern with no specific part of the card being carefully colored, like real ones! Beware! 

    All of the cards on CCGCastle.com are 100% authentic and real. We never have and never will sell a fake.

    Источник: https://www.ccgcastle.com/news/2017-07-27-are-your-pokemon-cards-authentic
    chinese pokemon cards worth money

    Chinese pokemon cards worth money -

    The 25 Rarest Pokemon Cards (And What They’re Worth)

    If you were a Pokemon fan back in the 1990s, you probably have a fair few old Pokemon Trading Card Game cards stashed somewhere in the back of your closet. We all had a few Caterpies and Rattattas lying around from this trend, and if you managed to collect a coveted card like a holographic Charizard, you were the talk of the school playground and truly got lucky.

    RELATED: Pokemon: The Most Valuable Pikachu Cards (And That Aren't Worth Much)

    New Pokemon cards are still being produced to this day, making many of the oldest Pokemon cards even harder to find. As long as Pokemon remains a popular video game franchise, the Pokemon Trading Card Game will keep on producing new types of cards, but none of them can reach the heights of the rarest and most valuable Pokemon cards in the history of the franchise.

    Updated August 30, 2021 by Jerrad Wyche: Pokemon cards continue to be a hot commodity and that continues to be the case well into 2021 and likely beyond. Nothing drastic has happened in the world of Pokemon Trading Cards in a while, so the 25 cards on this list remain some of the most sought-after and desired trading cards in the Pokemon franchise. Despite plenty of new sets releasing, it will take years and plenty of scarcity for them to obtain the value that many of the classic cards continue to hold to this day. This also includes the newest Pokemon Trading Card Game set, Evolving Skies.

    25 Holo Gold Star Rayquaza: $4,500

    Rather than many cards on this list, this Shiny Rayquaza from the EX Deoxys set is a rare Pokemon card that’s mostly just mythical pull from a standard set. During this expansion, Pokemon with a Gold Star in your deck, making them just as powerful as they are gorgeous with unique colors and art exiting the frame.

    Costs can vary massively, but spaces like Troll and Toad price the card at just under $4500. It simply combines all the great aspects of a standard card in the perfect combination, and the rarity of it in packs of this small expansion set make it one of the most valuable original Gen 3 cards, and one of the first major shiny cards to hit record prices before other shinies would catch up.

    24 Tropical Mega Battle: $10,000

    In the late 1990s and early 2000s, an annual Pokemon Trading Card Game tournament was held in Honolulu, Hawaii. At this 1999 event, just 12 of these Tropical Mega Battle cards were produced to be distributed to some of the lucky 50 players who attended the event, meaning the remaining number of mint copies is especially low all these years later.

    RELATED: Pokemon Sword & Shield: Things To Do After You Beat The Isle Of Armor

    Showing a Psyduck having a nap in a hammock on a tropical island, this legendary Trainer Card sells for a whole lot of cash thanks to its rarity. In fact, according to the Telegraph, a mint-condition version of the card once sold for $10,000, making it a prime example of how valuable Pokemon TCG prize cards can eventually be.

    23 Ancient Mew: $25

    While Ancient Mew is absolutely not the most expensive rare card you’re going to see on this list, it’s perhaps one of the most well-known rare cards that helps explain why certain Pokemon cards are considered rare and given high price tags. This was released to viewers of the first Pokemon movie, and while it isn’t playable in any legal tournament, its art and hieroglyphic style make it an absolutely gorgeous addition to a Pokemon card collection.

    Since few of these were properly preserved, many sites like TCGPlayer will sell heavily-played versions of the card for the simple price of around $25. That being said, eBay listing compilation sites like Mavin.io show that sealed and better-preserved versions can sell for potentially over $60 and $100, so it’s hardly worthless by the standards of most Pokemon cards.

    22 Holographic Shadowless Charizard: $500,000

    There are a lot of factors that make the Holographic Shadowless First Edition Charizard card worth so much compared to any other Charizard card. Firstly, it's a first edition version of the undoubtedly most popular Kanto starter, which already makes it extra valuable to most pokemon fans. Alongside this, the card is also shadowless, which essentially means the card lacks a shadow between the box containing the image of the Pokemon, and the rest of the card.

    This "Shadowless" effect is not a misprint or a mistake. It's actually the original Pokemon card design, as the foiling process has changed and provided a different look to modern holographic and foil cards. These Charizard cards have become one of the prime reasons for the Pokemon Card trend of the past two years, with YouTuber Logan Paul opening one as recently as February 2021 that was estimated by auction site owner Ken Goldin to sell for upwards of $500,000.

    21 Holographic Shadowless Venusaur: $3,260

    Just like its Kanto starter counterpart Charizard, Venusaur's Shadowless, holographic, first edition version is a coveted card among Pokemon fans. It doesn't quite reach the heights of Charizard's $500,000, but Venusaur always was slightly less popular compared to the other Kanto starters anyway.

    RELATED: Pokemon: Every Kanto Starter Evolution, Ranked

    Nonetheless, these cards were rare even in their original late-1990s heyday, so you can imagine how sought-after they are now. Buying one through Troll and Toad right now can cost you as little $390, but the compilation site Pokemon Prices has records of them selling up to $3260.

    20 Holographic Shadowless Blastoise: $2,475

    Out of the three final-evolution Kanto starters, it's Blastoise who has the least valuable Shadowless holographic card, reaching heights of $2475 on Pokemon Prices. We say "least valuable", but that's still a lot of money for just the one card, and it’s hardly far behind its sibling Venusaur.

    That's if Blastoise is still in mint condition, of course, which is a big ask considering these cards are over 20 years old. Carrying the powerful Water-type move Hydro Pump, this version of Blastoise was a pretty impressive card to carry in your deck back in the day, but at this point it’s still a solid collectible card.

    19 Pokemon Players’ Club Shiny Umbreon: $1,900

    If you've got a soft spot for the blue and black shiny version of the Dark-type Pokemon Umbreon, then be aware that you're not the only one. The Japanese version of the Shining Umbreon Pokemon card is pretty highly desired, with its unique coloring and gorgeous frame-piercing artwork making it fittingly beautiful as one of the first shiny Pokemon to appear on a card.

    However, its price is so high because of much more than just its looks and popularity. The Shining Umbreon card only saw a very limited release through the Japanese Pokemon Players' Club for hitting the maximum number of experience points through the club between 2005 and 2006, making it one of the rarest cards out there. For this reason, Troll and Toad has had it listed at just near and impressive $1900.

    18 Pokemon Player’s Club Shiny Espeon: $2000

    If you ever wanted proof about how much a Pokemon card’s price can change just because of the Pokemon on it, you need to look further than the Pokemon Player’s Club Shiny Espeon. This card is almost identical in story to the Umbreon card you saw just a moment ago, but required only 40,000 experience points instead of 70,000.

    RELATED: Pokemon: Every Shiny Eevee Evolution, Ranked

    Despite being more available, Troll and Toad has this card for a slightly higher price of just under $2000. This is likely because Espeon’s shiny form is more noticeable than Umbreon’s, since the bright neon-green fur is a lot more distinctive and Espeon has its own unique degree of popularity.

    17 Shining Charizard: $2,000

    Again, Shining Charizard owes its hefty price tag not just due to the Pokemon in question's general fame and popularity in its glamorous shiny form, but due to the card being a pretty exclusive and hard-to-open one. The very first version of Shining Charizard was part of the Neo Destiny set, which wasn't as mass-produced as other sets and one of the first elusive sets past the first expansions.

    As a result, only the luckiest and most dedicated of card collectors managed to grab this shining beast. It’s a pretty hefty price tag in the current Pokemon card, selling right now through Troll and Toad at $2000, despite being arguably easier to find than shiny event cards like the Pokemon Player’s Club Umbreon and Espeon cards.

    16 Holographic Shadowless Mewtwo: $20,000

    While the other Kanto starters don’t come close to Charizard in the realm of First Edition cards, it’s hard to ignore the second-place winner off of its fame in the series. Most Pokemon fans are plenty aware of Mewtwo from the original Pokemon movie, and as a result cards featuring the character will often go for record-high prices in any set.

    Much like the First Edition Charizard mentioned earlier, Mewtwo has its own Holographic and Shadowless version that PSA Collector has seen sold for at least $20,000, putting it far above Venusaur and Blastoise but still far below everyone’s favorite Fire-type tyrant of the skies.

    15 Misprinted Fossil Krabby: $2,200

    Yes, you read that right. Krabby is the star of one of the rarest Pokemon cards of all. By all accounts, this crab-based Water-type isn't exactly a battling superstar. The fact that one version of its Pokemon card is so rare is a bit of a fluke, as its price comes down to a relatively simple misprint of the card.

    RELATED: Valuable Pokemon Card Errors

    The difference between these multiple miscuts and a normal card is that part of a fossil symbol to the bottom-left of its art is missing. This seemingly minor difference has driven up the price of these cards immensely, and despite going for under two dollars in its normal state, Pokemon Prices has the card record of a misprint selling for over $2200 dollars.

    14 Master’s Key: $21,000

    The Master Key is another prize card that's seriously sought after in Pokemon card collector circles. This card was only produced in Japan, and had a very limited release: only 34 actually exist. The Master Key card was handed to those competitive Pokemon players who managed to reach high ranks in the 2010 Japanese World Championship, meaning no new copies can ever come into the market.

    Collector site CardMavin estimates that this card would be worth around $21,000, but few tend to be sold since there are so few in existence. Nonetheless, if one were to be sold recently, it’s sure to hit a fairly incredible price, particularly if it’s still in one of the spectacular cases they were given out in.

    13 Parent-And-Child Event Kangaskhan: $100,000

    A common trend you’ll find with most of the rarest Pokemon cards is that they often come as part of unique events that happened only once, only being circulated in a single country or event. While these weren’t seen as major deals at the time, mostly being prizes and free giveaways, they’ve held an alarming value since they’ve never had a later reprint.

    This has never been true of the Parent-And-Child Kangaskhan, a holo foil card with unique art that only appeared as prizes for a fittingly adorable team tournament in 1998 where young children would play with a parent against other child-parent teams. Its fabulous first-edition frame and amazing original art has resulted in sales listed on PSA Card ranging from $50,000 to an incredible $150,000 with high enough quality.

    12 Prototype Blastoise: $360,000

    The regular first edition Blastoise might not have been a huge moneymaker, but an alternate edition that was made before the Pokemon TCG’s release has just recently been discovered and has hit some great records. This would be the Prototype Blasotise, which was made as a test by the game’s developer Wizards Of The Coast to show what Pokemon Cards would look like.

    RELATED: Saddest Pokemon Card Illustrations

    The result is a card that was sold for $360,000, making it one of the highest-selling cards in the history of the game. The signature trait of this card is its fonts, which are far stranger and more variant than the consistent style of modern and even most classic cards.

    11 Pokemon Snap Trainer Magazine Pikachu: $900

    If you were a Pokemon fan back in the days of the Nintendo 64 console, you might just remember the classic spin-off game Pokemon Snap. The object of this Pokemon spin-off was to snap creative in-game photos of various creatures, and there were several tie-in cards in Japan’s Pokemon Trainer Magazine to help increase the hype among fans to try this new game.

    This card was a Pikachu card with the model from Pokemon Snap as the art, making for a relatively hilarious-looking card that only could be found within this magazine in 1999. Miyabihobby has a record of an unopened magazine being sold for 100,000, or about $900 USD, but PSA Card has records of auctions ranging between $300 and $1000 for perfect condition grades.

    10 Southern Islands Reverse Holo Mew: $200

    When the second Pokemon movie was released in Japan, the makers of the Trading Card Game decided to release a special edition set of cards to mark this occasion. The Southern Islands card series was born, featuring just two sets of nine cards apiece that were unique to any other set in the game.

    Full sets of these cards can sell for a lot, but the absolute highest value is undoubtedly the Southern Islands Mew, which has a rare reverse foil treatment where the frame around the art is the only part that’s shiny. Troll and Toad is currently selling copies for just over $200 right now, making it even more valuable than the elusive and stylish Ancient Mew mentioned earlier.

    9 Tamamushi University Magikarp: $50,000

    The Tamamushi University Magikarp card is so rare that despite the fact that it depicts a frankly awful Pokemon, it's worth ridiculous sums of money. Why the high price? Well, the University Magikarp was a promotional card that saw very limited distribution at a Japanese tournament in the late 1990s.

    RELATED: The Weakest Pokemon From Each Generation, Ranked

    In total, 1000 of the cards were produced but far fewer were actually awarded and many were just stowed away forever. Barely any of these rare Magikarp cards are still in circulation today, and it’s incredibly rare to see new ones show up. At the moment, PSA Card’s Price Guide chart lists perfectly-preserved cards to have sold for around $50,000, while copies with NM-MT 8 ratings still sell for amazing heights of $12,000.

    8 Holographic First Edition Machamp: $6,000

    The Kanto starters and legendaries aren't the only original Pokemon to boast high-value shadowless holographic cards. Nearly any holographic first edition rare card from the original set can grow immensely in price compared to other rare Pokemon cards, but since they aren’t as actively hunted, their prices can vary far more wildly based on their quality.

    Machamp is one of these. According to PSA Card’s range of auction prices based on the card’s quality classification, perfect mint condition Machamps of this kind can land between $800 and $6000, while dropping just one rating down will result in prices around $200 and $900. This card in particular truly proves how important it is to keep your trading cards safe through the years, as you never know just what will become valuable twenty years later.

    7 The Masked Royal Prize Promo: $18,000

    This is undoubtedly one of the most recent rare cards, featuring the Masked Royal character from Pokemon Sun & Moon and released as recently as 2017. This is essentially a promotional card that was given out to players in an invitation-only prerelease in Tokyo for the new Shining Legends set, where only 100 copies were made.

    Even though this is a relatively normal card by most standards, this short print run means it’s incredibly hard to get, especially since it was handed out in such a restrictive event. As a result, there are actually preserved tweets of players first opening it in places like Pokeboon, while Japanese trading sites like Miyabi Hobby have past listings of the card at ¥2,000,000, which currently is equal to around $18,000 USD.

    6 Shiny Secret Rare Charizard V: $500

    If you want to get into Pokemon pack opening, but don’t want to shell out for the older packs, there are tons of new cards with similar record-setting prices that have come out in just the past two years. One of the recent premium TCG sets in the game was Champion’s Path, and certain cards in it were especially rare since you could only get packs through special products like Elite Trainer Boxes and Pin Collector packs.

    RELATED: The Most Powerful Rare Cards In The Pokemon: Trading Card Game, Ranked

    The absolute highest value cards in this set are both Charizards, one being a rainbow foil V-Max card and the other being a shiny Charizard V with black scales. Both quickly reached prices around $500, and sites like TCGPlayer still remain at the same $500 price tag.

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    Источник: https://www.thegamer.com/rarest-pokemon-cards-worth/
    Pokemon.com". www.pokemon.com. Retrieved 2017-09-27.
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  • ^"Pyramid: Pyramid Pick: Pokemon Trading Card Game". Sjgames.com. January 29, 1999. Retrieved 2020-05-06.
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  • ^"Pokemon TCG Online now available for iPad users in North America". Tech Times. 2 October 2014.
  • ^Matthew Kato (February 15, 2011). "Online Battles Start With Pokémon Trainer Challenge - News - www.GameInformer.com". Retrieved 2011-02-15.
  • ^ abMark Raby (Feb 16, 2011). "Pokémon trading cards getting free browser-based game, Pokemon Black / White DS News". GamesRadar. Retrieved 2011-02-22.
  • ^"New Pokémon Trading Card Game Includes Nintendo DS Tutorial - News". Nintendo World Report. Retrieved 2021-09-20.
  • ^"Pokémon TCG Live Launches Soon on Mobile Devices, Tablets, PCs, and Macs

    Why are Pokémon card prices rising?

    About two weeks ago, 34-year-old Oregon resident Kalvin Foley wanted to buy a rare Pokémon card on eBay. It was a rainbow Vmax card featuring Charizard, one of the most popular Pokémon. He was attempting to win it at the end of an auction, one of the most adrenaline-inducing parts of bidding. The card, which started off at $100, began to steadily increase. It jumped to $250. Then $300. Then $375. 

    “I’m just watching it throughout the day,” Foley recounted. When the 1-minute countdown  began, he entered in his max bid of $425. “And as soon as I did that, I think everybody else did, because it went from $375 all the way up to, like $550,” he said. 

    Now, he thought, he’d never be able to get the card. Foley said that only a year ago, it might have been worth around $250-$300 — roughly half the price.

    Why cards are rising in value right now

    Pokémon card sales and prices have skyrocketed this year, with some cards selling for hundreds of thousands of dollars. 

    On Thursday, a sealed box of Pokémon booster packs sold for a record $360,000 through Heritage Auctions, while a similar set sold for $198,000 only two months ago. According to eBay, there were 60% more Pokemon card sales on its platform in September compared to January of this year. 

    YouTube stars, celebrities and investors have dropped big bucks on cards, which has contributed to the frenzy and helped push up their value. That, in turn, has encouraged others to  snap up cards in hopes that they’ll be able to turn a profit. 

    There’s an entire genre of buyers unboxing card sets on YouTube and Twitch, where DJ and producer Steve Aoki recently hosted a live charity event devoted to opening up packs.

    “Publicity is always something that can drum up momentum and price,” said Eugene Smith, a 24-year-old card collector and investor from Tampa, Florida, who also happens to work in finance. 

    Controversial YouTuber Logan Paul has spent almost $300,000 (although he claims he’s reached his breaking point and is done buying them), while the rapper Logic dropped $226,000 on a rare 1st edition Charizard. 

    “When I was a kid I absolutely loved Pokémon but couldn’t afford the cards,” Logic said in an Instagram post.

    Collectors and investors cited several other factors that may be pushing up sales and prices — people are picking up a hobby amid pandemic boredom, the release of the COVID-19 stimulus checks has given them the extra cash to buy cards, and childhood fans have disposable incomes now. 

    “People my age are finally in their late-20s, mid-30s, and they can afford the stuff they liked when they were kids,” said Jesus Garcia, an assistant comics & comic art operations supervisor at Heritage Auctions. 

    Caitlin Sidhu, a 26-year-old collector who lives in Uruma City, Japan, said what she enjoys the most about building her collection is that she’s able to obtain all the cards she wanted as a kid.

    “[I’m] kind of like fulfilling my childhood,” Sidhu said. “A younger me would be amazed at the cards I currently have.” Right now she owns upwards of 5,000 cards, including 120 sealed booster packs and two boxes. 

    She’s also noticed an increase in prices. Before the pandemic, Sidhu bought a reverse holo Legendary Collection Pikachu for $25. Now she says it goes for about $100, give or take. 

    The recent spike in prices and sales has encouraged people, like Eugene Smith, to look through their own collections to see if they have any items worth selling.

    He’s also been actively buying cards over the past couple of months.

    “I’ve been acquiring cards. Nothing insane. But I’ve spent maybe a few thousand on them,” he said. “I was just looking to maybe acquire cards not only to make maybe a little bit of money short term, but also as an alternative investment for my savings.” 

    Jackson Donahue, a 25-year-old resident from Simsbury, Connecticut, said he’s been selling cards for about two months now, primarily through Facebook Marketplace.

    It started when he and his girlfriend were walking through the card aisle at Target and decided to buy a $4 pack on a whim. After opening it and finding a holographic card, he googled it and found it was worth $50. 

    He’s been hooked ever since. In total, Donahue estimates he’s sold about $1,600 worth of cards. 

    Card shops, not just individual sellers, are also benefiting from the rising interest in Pokémon cards.

    House of Cards & Collectibles, based in San Antonio, Texas, has seen an increase in business throughout the pandemic, with an uptick in business after people started receiving their stimulus checks.

    Paul G. Cavazos, who owns the store with his wife Rachel, said up to 80% of their overall business comes from Pokémon-related merchandise. 

    “More and more people that are between the ages of, say, 18 to 60 or older, are buying Pokémon cards for investment purposes,” he said. 

    About a year ago, he said he was selling packs of 1st edition Team Rocket cards for up to $75. This month, he’s seen those packs sell upwards of about $300 to $400 each.

    While the pandemic has led to explosive card prices and sales, Cavazos said he noticed sales started to rise after the launch of Pokémon Go in 2016. According to Heritage Auctions, eBay’s daily Pokémon card sales doubled after the game was released.

    How value is determined

    The surge in Pokémon card prices doesn’t necessarily mean every card is worth a lot of money or will be.

    “I think prices will rise for some cards, but obviously not all cards, which is what some people don’t get,” Caitlin Sidhu explained. “If cards are still in print, they won’t rise in price. Once the card is out of print it may go up in price, but it’s not guaranteed.”

    Jason A., a collector from East Tennessee who declined to give his last name, compared it to the stock market: “You can take a bet on a card’s value. Is it going to increase? Is it going to flop? Or is it just gonna stay steady?”

    “There are plenty of cards out there that when they first got released are still the same price that they were back then,” he said.

    A card’s scarcity, condition and the actual Pokémon on it all play a role in its value. First edition holographic cards released as part of Pokémon’s first print in 1999 command high prices — especially Charizard.  

    Why is he always so coveted? In that first set, he was objectively the most powerful, with both the highest HP (a Pokémon’s health gauge, if you will) and the strongest attack. But maybe the reason for his appeal is more obvious than that.

    “I mean, he’s a dragon. Kids love dragons,” Garcia said. “In the cartoon show, he was kind of rebellious, did whatever he wanted.”

    Kalvin Foley, after losing his eBay bid, said he was able to finally obtain his Rainbow Vmax Charizard in a private sale.

    Foley had been a fan of him when he was a child, and when he began to collect cards again in 2018, he admired the ways the franchise had reinvented him.

    Despite Charizard’s popularity, Garcia said the holy grail of Pokémon cards is actually the Pikachu Illustrator card, which is one of the rarest. One of the cards sold for $233,000 this July, making it the most expensive sale of a single card on record.

    Only 39 were initially released through a Japanese comic contest in 1998. (An eBay user is attempting to sell one for $2 million right now.) 

    Like analysts evaluating stocks, some professional grading companies will assign a value to a card for a fee. The two big ones out there are PSA and Beckett, which each have a scale that ranges from 1 to 10 assessing a card’s condition. 

    Say you have a 1st edition Charizard that was released back in 1999. In October, the trading card investment company CardHops said a PSA 9 grading put its worth at $50,000–$70,000. But a PSA 10 meant it was worth $140,000–$200,000 plus. (As we saw with Logic.) 

    “It’s a big jump between one single grade,” Garcia said. “Why? Because everybody wants the perfect card.” 

    One of the great ironies in the world of collectibles is that errors (not to be mistaken with flaws) can also help an item become that much more valuable — whether it’s a novel, a postage stamp or merchandise from a popular franchise.  

    A Dragonite card with an inverted stamp, for example, was at one point listed on the site TrollandToad for nearly $1,500. Without this marking, you can buy the card for under 10 bucks.

    After all, when value is tied to scarcity, a misprint helps differentiate you from the sea of other mass-produced goods.

    Is the card market a bubble ready to pop?

    Everyone Marketplace spoke with gave us mostly the same assessment: prices for some cards will probably decrease eventually, but they’re not going to tank so badly that the entire market will crash. 

    The degree of the decline — and when — will depend on the type of card, according to Eugene Smith. The vintage cards released back in the ‘90s are no longer being printed and are basically part of history now, meaning many of them will likely continue to have value.

    But because grading companies like PSA are still going through a backlog of cards, Smith thinks there will be an increase in supply.

    “Then post-holidays, there’s going to be far less consumer spending happening. It’s pretty much a perfect scenario for a decrease — a correction,” Smith said of the Pokémon vintage card market.

    Garcia agrees that prices will eventually level off, although he doesn’t think they’ll dip that drastically.

    “Pokémon is one of those things that’s never gone out of style,” he said.

    Since Pokémon first launched on the GameBoy in 1996, the franchise has spawned the trading card game, a wildly popular anime series that continues to run new episodes, dozens of console games and Pokémon Go, which was The Summer Event of 2016 and helped add $7.5 billion in market value to Nintendo within 48 hours.

    Many collectors, like Caitlin Sidhu, Kalvin Foley and Jason A., became Pokémon fans when they were kids, proving its longevity.  

    Jason A. said this will probably be a lifelong hobby of his. “The only way I would stop collecting cards is if it were physically impossible for me to actually find them anymore,” he said.

    Some of them are also introducing the series and the games to their children, creating a whole new generation of fans. Foley said he has a 2-year-old son who likes looking at his Pokémon merchandise and watching the anime with him. 

    Applying the words “phenomenon” and “craze” to the franchise wouldn’t be accurate because they imply something that is ephemeral. Pokémon — which celebrates its 25th birthday in February of next year — is now an established moneymaker. 

    We may not be able to predict the market with certainty, but the franchise’s future success is probably a safe bet.

    Источник: https://www.marketplace.org/2020/11/20/why-are-pokemon-card-prices-rising/

    One of the rarest Pokémon cards ever made just sold for nearly $200,000

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    Pokemon Card Pikachu Illustrator
    The Pokémon Company/Weiss Auctions

    One of the world's rarest Pokémon cards sold for $195,000 at an auction in Lynbrook, New York, earlier this month.

    Kotaku spotted the auction listing for "Pikachu Illustrator," which explains why the card is one of the most valuable in the long-running trading card series. The Pikachu Illustrator card was given away to 39 people who finished first or second in three special illustration contests run by CoroCoro Comic in 1998. The card features artwork by Atsuko Nishida, the creator of Pokémon's mascot, Pikachu.

    There are only 10 confirmed copies of the Pikachu Illustrator card remaining, making it the rarest card overall. According to Kotaku, the last Pikachu Illustrator card sold at auction was purchased for $54,970 in 2013.

    Earlier this year, a Pokémon card worth $60,000, Trainer No. 3, was lost in the mail after being sold on eBay. While it's not quite as rare as Pikachu Illustrator, Trainer No. 3 is another incredibly rare card given away as a contest prize.

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    Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/rare-pokemon-card-pokemon-illustrator-sells-for-195000-2019-10

    11 rare Pokémon cards that could make you rich

    More than 20 years after it was originally released, Pokémon is arguably more popular than it has ever been. Pokémon GO is estimated to have been downloaded more than 500 million times and the new Pokémon Sun and Moon games have sold nearly 15 million since they launched on 3DS in November, while shops are stocking Pokémon Trading Cards for the first time in years.

    Now, the Pokémon Trading Card game is set to get a boost when the Sun & Moon cards are released in the UK on February 3. Pokémon Trading Cards are still being swapped by kids, but those who have been playing for years might have some cards that they wouldn't want to give away.

    Over the last 20 years, hundreds of sets and promotional cards have been released, and some of them are so rare that they are now worth a fortune. Here are 11 of the rarest Pokemon cards – have you got any of these?

    1. Chairzard Base Set (PSA Graded, 1st Edition): Est. value, £800+

    A picture of the Charizard Base Set Pokémon Trading Card

    At the height of the Pokémon craze in the late-90s, Charizard was the fan-favourite Pokémon. Even though there were shiny Venusaur and Blastiose cards, it was the Charizard card that stirred up the real fuss.

    Even to this day, people are still excited when they pull this card in the 'reprinted' XY Evolutions set. While hoarders of it may be disappointed that the value of the card hasn't gone up that much over the years, a mint condition (graded by PSA) first-edition Charizard could be worth in the region of $1000 - $2000.

    2. Shining Charizard – Neo Destiny (PSA Graded, 1st Edition): Est. Value, £200-£1000

    A picture of the Shining Charizard - Neo Destiny Pokémon Trading Card

    A few years after the Charizard Base Set craze, there was another Charizard card to drool over. The Neo Destiny set introduced Shining Charizard – the card shows a shiny Charizard, a special and rare alternative that was introduced in the second generation of Pokémon games. It also has an attack that you need five energy for, which was very unusual at the time.

    Due to the Pokémon card craze tailing off at this point, Neo Destiny cards were not made in such quantities, and were harder to find in shops. There have been many 'shining' editions of Pokémon in card form over the years, but it's the Charizard yet again that collectors can't get enough of.

    3. Lets Trade Please! – Promo: Est. value, £50

    A picture of the Let's Trade Please Pokémon Trading Card

    In 1998 there was a promotion in Japan which enabled fans to send off for this card. The promo appeared on a leaflet with a music CD called 'Let's Trade Please' – fans needed to send a letter with two Pokémon cards that they would like to trade, and in return they got the Let's Trade Please promotional card, along with a promo Venusaur, Charizard, or Blastiose.  

    It's one of only two cards in Pokémon TCG to have a holographic back, and its interesting artwork was drawn by Pokémon TCG mascot 'Imakuni?'. Due to the limited time available to get this promo, there doesn't appear to be many of these cards in circulation. While not one of the most expensive cards on this list, it's certainly rare.

    4. Base set Booster Box – Black Triangle Error: Est. Value, $8,700 for a sealed box, £200 for a booster pack

    It can be far more cost-effective for a collector to buy cards in bulk, usually by purchasing a whole booster box. Some may even buy a box, keep it sealed, and hope that it will go up in value over the years as that set becomes harder to obtain. Needless to say, the older Pokémon booster boxes can sell for thousands on eBay.

    Recently, popular Pokémon TCG YouTuber Unlisted Leaf got the surprise of his life. Unknowing to him (and probably the person that sold it to him) he bought a sealed Base set box that's one of the rarest boxes available. The booster packets within had black triangles over the 'first edition' writing – this is because the factory that printed these cards were no longer printing first editions. These are said to only have been printed in the factory for a couple of hours.

    A sealed box is worth around $11,000, but there's pretty much no way of knowing if you have black triangle packets until the seal is broken and you've opened the box.

    5. Gold Star cards: Est. value, £100-£600

    A picture of a Vaporeon gold star Pokemon trading card

    Following on from the Shining cards found in the Neo Revelation and Neo Destiny expansions, Shiny Pokémon returned in later sets that were known by fans as Pokémon Gold Star cards. 

    These cards feature the shiny (alternate colour) variants of Pokémon, and are very hard to find. It is said that the odds of pulling a gold star card is only one, or maybe two, per booster box. The most valuable gold star cards are the Japanese Eevee evolution cards as they were only awarded to members of the Pokémon Players Club. These cards feature a gold star next to the Pokémon's name.

    6. Espeon Gold Star: Est. value, £1,400

    A picture of an Espeon gold star Pokémon Trading Card

    Probably the hardest to find and most sought-after Gold Star Pokémon card is a Japanese Espeon Star. Members of the Japanese Daisuki club had to earn enough points through various activities to earn a shiny Espeon card. Getting enough points was difficult so not many managed to get hold of one. Even though this card was printed in English (and still sells for a lot of money), the difficulty of obtaining it in Japan means that the Japanese variant of this card is worth a lot more. 

    7. Pre-Release Raichu: Est. value, £8,000

    A picture of the rare pre-release Raichu Pokémon Trading Card

    Leading up to the second Pokémon card expansion Jungl',  a 'PRERELEASE' Raichu card was printed by error. These cards were believed to have been printed alongside the pre-release Clefable card (which is actually in the Jungle set).

    Wizards of the Coast, the company in charge of manufacturing Pokémon cards at the time, denied the existence of this card for many years, until, in 2006, a member of staff released an image of the card. Of the 100 or so created in error, it's believed that only ten cards remain after most of them were destroyed.

    8. Number 1-3 Trainer/World Championship cards: Est. value, Unknown

    A picture of a Pokémon 2006 World Championship card

    For almost as long as the Pokémon TCG has been going, there have been official competitions. The prize for winning many of these competitions has been super-exclusive Pokémon cards as prizes, including the rare No. 1 – 3 Trainer cards, World Championship Trainer cards, and Trophy Pikachu. 

    Fans needed to attend and place highly at competitions (or even staff them) to get their hands on some of these limited printed cards. In recent years, players competing in the Pokémon Video Game Championships have also received promo Pokémon cards. While some trainers are keen to keep their card as token of achievement, few go on to sell these cards to collectors.

    9. Shaymin EX: Roaring Skies: Est. value, £50-£100

    A picture of the Shaymin EX - Roaring Skies Pokémon Trading Card

    Not an old card by any means, but for today's competitive Pokémon TCG players, Shaymin EX is really worth getting hold of.  

    The card's ability allows you to draw cards until you have six in your hand when you play the card to your bench. After using the move Sky Return, you return Shaymin EX and all cards attached back to your hand. This also removes all damage counters done to Shaymin EX, meaning you can play the card over and over, making it tricky to remove from play.  

    With roughly another year left in the competitive TCG legal set (although it is rumoured that a re-print is on the way), some players would be keen to have this card in their deck. Roaring Skies Booster Boxes, which hold no guarantee of even having Shaymin EX, sell for around £100-£250, much higher than usual booster box prices of recent sets.

    10. Pokémon Snap cards/Pokémon Art Academy cards: Est. value, Unknown

    Pokémon Snap and Pokémon Art Academy have both had Pokémon TCG artwork competitions. The Pokémon Snap N64 game had players taking pictures of Pokémon in the wild, and, at the time of release, some of the best pictures were chosen to appear on Pokémon cards. The images were credited to the artist, but very few cards were made, and so it's hard to find an exact value for any of the Pokémon Snap cards.  

    Jump forward to 2014-2015 and Pokémon Art Academy players had the opportunity to submit their best artwork, with the winners receiving 100 Pokémon promo cards featuring their design. Due to the small amount of winners and cards given to them, very few are parting ways with their winning cards. Good luck finding these on eBay.

    11. Illustrator: Est. value, £43,000

    A picture of the rare Illustrator Pokémon Trading Card

    The ultimate Pokémon card and the holy grail for collectors – it's the Pokémon Illustrator card. This promotional card was awarded to those who had won a Pokémon Card Game contest in the Japanese magazine CoroCoro. Only 39 cards were awarded, and very few are said to still be in circulation. 

    This card is unique in that it has 'Illustrator' where the 'Trainer' title should be, and it has a pen symbol for the set series.  Last year, at a private auction, the Illustrator card was sold for over $54,000 in California. This makes it the most expensive Pokémon card ever sold. 

    For more games coverage, follow @RedBullGames on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

    Источник: https://www.redbull.com/my-en/rarest-pokemon-cards-in-the-world
    Pokemon.com". www.pokemon.com. Retrieved 2019-12-04.
  • ^"Pokemon Prerelease Events". TOP CUT EVENTS. Retrieved 2019-12-04.
  • ^Martinez, Phillip (2019-08-15). "Everything you need to know to watch the 2019 Pokémon World Championships". Newsweek. Retrieved 2019-12-04.
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  • ^"Pokemon Organised Play TCG Championship Points". Sutton Coldfield Pokemon club. Retrieved 2019-12-04.
  • ^ ab"The 2017 Worlds Is a Wrap!

    : Chinese pokemon cards worth money

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    One of the rarest Pokémon cards ever made just sold for nearly $200,000

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    Pokemon Card Pikachu Illustrator
    The Pokémon Company/Weiss Auctions

    One of the world's rarest Pokémon cards sold for $195,000 at an auction in Lynbrook, New York, earlier this month.

    Kotaku spotted the auction listing for "Pikachu Illustrator," which explains why the card is one of the most valuable in the long-running trading card series. The Pikachu Illustrator card was given away to 39 people who finished first or second in three special illustration contests run by CoroCoro Comic in 1998. The card features artwork by Atsuko Nishida, the creator of Pokémon's mascot, Pikachu.

    There are only 10 confirmed copies of the Pikachu Illustrator card remaining, making it the rarest card overall. According to Kotaku, the last Pikachu Illustrator card sold at auction was purchased for $54,970 in 2013.

    Earlier this year, a Pokémon card worth $60,000, Trainer No. 3, was lost in the mail after being sold on eBay. While it's not quite as rare as Pikachu Illustrator, Trainer No. 3 is another incredibly rare card given away as a contest prize.

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    Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/rare-pokemon-card-pokemon-illustrator-sells-for-195000-2019-10
    Pokemon.com". www.pokemon.com. Retrieved 2021-09-20.
  • ^Doolan, Liam (2021-11-06). "Pokémon Trading Card Game Live Has Been Delayed Until 2022". Nintendo Life. Retrieved 2021-11-09.
  • External links[edit]

    Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon_Trading_Card_Game

    In the '90s, most of us were busy hoarding Beanie Babies in hopes they would pay for our college education once they increased in value. That totally backfired, but another '90s toy hidden in the depths of our childhood bedrooms can actually be worth a boatload. Some rare Pokémon cards can easily pay for your college loans.

    The Pokémon Trading Card Game is arguably one of the most fun and original card games of the last few decades. Throughout the years, Pokémon has done its best to make these little pieces of paper extremely limited - and some efforts have resulted in outrageous prices nowadays.

    The rarest cards were given to a select few master trainers who won tournaments, but you may actually have some of the most expensive Pokémon cards in your regular collection. Factory errors also occurred, from the base set first edition misprint to free promotional movie cards that didn't come out as planned. These are among the rarest Pokémon cards in the bunch.

    On the trading circuit, Pokémon cards receive a Professional Sports Authenticator (PSA) number. Number 10 is complete mint condition and will potentially increase the value of your Pokémon cards by thousands. However, if your card's PSA falls below a 7, it dramatically decreases in value. In August 2019, for example, a 103-piece set of Mint 10 condition cards including a first edition Charizard sold for $107,010 at auction. Each of the cards is considered rare, which proves their increasing value is unrelenting. 

    Do you have a secret goldmine hidden in your grade school backpack? There's only one way to find out. These are the Pokémon cards that cost the most money.

    Источник: https://www.ranker.com/list/most-expensive-pokmon-cards/mariel-loveland

    11 rare Pokémon cards that could make you rich

    More than 20 years after it was originally released, Pokémon is arguably more popular than it has ever been. Pokémon GO is estimated to have been downloaded more than 500 million times and the new Pokémon Sun and Moon games have sold nearly 15 million since they launched on 3DS in November, while shops are stocking Pokémon Trading Cards for the first time in years.

    Now, the Pokémon Trading Card game is set to get a boost when the Sun & Moon cards are released in the UK on February 3. Pokémon Trading Cards are still being swapped by kids, but those who have been playing for chinese pokemon cards worth money might have some cards that they wouldn't want to give away.

    Over the last 20 years, hundreds of sets and promotional cards have been released, and some of them are so rare that they are now worth a fortune. Here are 11 of the rarest Pokemon cards – have you got any of these?

    1. Chairzard Base Set (PSA Graded, 1st Edition): Est. value, £800+

    A picture of the Charizard Base Set Pokémon Trading Card

    At the height of the Pokémon craze in the late-90s, Charizard was the fan-favourite Pokémon. Even though there were shiny Venusaur and Blastiose cards, it was the Charizard card that stirred up the real fuss.

    Even to this day, people are still excited when they pull this card in the 'reprinted' XY Evolutions set. While hoarders of it may be disappointed that the value of the card hasn't gone up that much over the years, a mint condition (graded by PSA) first-edition Charizard could be worth in the region of $1000 - $2000.

    2. Shining Charizard – Neo Destiny (PSA Graded, 1st Edition): Est. Value, £200-£1000

    A picture of the Shining Charizard - Neo Destiny Pokémon Trading Card

    A few years after chinese pokemon cards worth money Charizard Base Set craze, there was another Charizard card to drool over. The Neo Destiny set introduced Shining Charizard – the card shows a shiny Charizard, a special and rare alternative that was introduced in the second generation of Pokémon what is the capital of the us state texas. It also has an attack that you need five energy for, which was very unusual at the time.

    Due to the Pokémon card craze tailing off at this point, Neo Destiny cards were not made in such quantities, and were harder to find in shops. There have been many 'shining' editions of Pokémon in card form over the years, but it's the Charizard yet again that collectors can't get enough of.

    3. Lets Trade Please! – Promo: Est. value, £50

    A picture of the Let's Trade Please Pokémon Trading Card

    In 1998 there was a promotion in Japan which enabled fans to send off for this card. The promo appeared on a leaflet with a music CD called 'Let's Trade Please' – fans needed to send a letter with two Pokémon cards that they would like to trade, and in return they got the Let's Trade Please promotional card, along with a promo Venusaur, Charizard, or Blastiose.  

    It's one of only two cards in Pokémon TCG to have a holographic back, and its interesting artwork was drawn by Pokémon TCG mascot 'Imakuni?'. Due to the limited time available to get this promo, there doesn't appear to be many of these cards in circulation. While not one of the most expensive cards on this list, it's certainly rare.

    4. Base set Booster Box – Black Triangle Error: Est. Value, $8,700 for a sealed box, £200 for a booster pack

    It can be far more cost-effective for a collector to buy cards in bulk, usually by purchasing a whole booster box. Some may even buy a box, keep it sealed, and hope that it will go up in value over the years as that set becomes harder to obtain. Needless to say, the older Pokémon booster boxes can sell for thousands on eBay.

    Recently, popular Pokémon TCG YouTuber Unlisted Leaf got the surprise of his life. Unknowing to him (and probably the person that sold it to him) he bought a sealed Base set box that's one of the rarest boxes available. The booster packets within had black triangles over the 'first edition' writing – this is because the factory that printed these cards were no longer printing first editions. These are said to only have been printed in the factory for a couple of hours.

    A sealed box is worth around $11,000, but there's chinese pokemon cards worth money much no way of knowing if you have black triangle packets until the seal is broken and you've opened the box.

    5. Gold Star cards: Est. value, £100-£600

    A picture of a Vaporeon gold star Pokemon trading card

    Following on from the Shining cards found in the Neo Revelation and Neo Destiny expansions, Shiny Pokémon returned in later sets that were known by fans as Pokémon Gold Star cards. 

    These cards feature the shiny (alternate colour) variants of Pokémon, and are very hard to find. It is said that the odds of pulling a gold star card is only one, or maybe two, per booster box. The most valuable gold star cards are the Japanese Eevee evolution cards as they were only awarded to members of the Pokémon Players Club. These cards feature chinese pokemon cards worth money gold star next to the Pokémon's name.

    6. Espeon Gold Star: Est. value, £1,400

    A picture of an Espeon gold star Pokémon Trading Card

    Probably the hardest to find and most sought-after Gold Star Pokémon card is a Japanese Espeon Star. Members of the Japanese Daisuki club had to earn enough points through various activities to earn a shiny Espeon card. Getting enough points was difficult so not many managed to get hold of one. Even though this card was printed in English (and still sells for chinese pokemon cards worth money lot of money), the difficulty of obtaining it in Japan means that the Japanese variant of this card is worth a lot more. 

    7. Pre-Release Raichu: Est. value, £8,000

    A picture of the rare pre-release Raichu Pokémon Trading Card

    Leading up to the second Pokémon card expansion Jungl',  a 'PRERELEASE' Raichu card was printed by error. These cards were believed to have been printed alongside the pre-release Clefable card (which is actually in the Jungle set).

    Wizards of the Coast, the company in charge of manufacturing Pokémon cards at the time, denied the existence of this card for many years, until, in 2006, a member of staff released an image of the card. Of the 100 or so created in error, it's believed that only ten cards remain after most of them were destroyed.

    8. Number 1-3 Trainer/World Championship cards: Est. value, Unknown

    A picture of a Pokémon 2006 World Championship card

    For almost as long as the Pokémon TCG has been going, there have been official competitions. The prize for winning many of these competitions has been super-exclusive Pokémon cards as prizes, including the rare No. 1 – 3 Trainer cards, World Championship Trainer cards, and Trophy Pikachu. 

    Fans needed to attend and place highly at chinese pokemon cards worth money (or even staff them) to get their hands on some of these limited printed cards. In recent years, players competing in the Pokémon Video Game Championships have also received promo Pokémon cards. While some trainers are keen to keep their card as token of achievement, few go on to sell these cards to collectors.

    9. Shaymin EX: Roaring Skies: Est. value, £50-£100

    A picture of the Shaymin EX - Roaring Skies Pokémon Trading Card

    Not an old card by any means, but for today's competitive Pokémon TCG players, Shaymin EX is really worth getting hold of.  

    The card's ability allows you to draw cards until you have six in your hand when you play the card to your bench. After using the move Sky Return, you return Shaymin EX and all cards chinese pokemon cards worth money back to your hand. This also removes all damage counters done to Shaymin EX, meaning you can play the card over and over, making it tricky to remove from play.  

    With roughly another year left in the competitive TCG legal set (although it is rumoured that a re-print is on the way), some players would be keen to have this card in their deck. Chinese pokemon cards worth money Skies Booster Boxes, which hold no guarantee of even having Shaymin EX, sell for around £100-£250, much higher than usual booster box prices of recent sets.

    10. Pokémon Snap cards/Pokémon Art Academy cards: Est. value, Unknown

    Pokémon Snap and Pokémon Art Academy have both had Pokémon TCG artwork competitions. The Pokémon Snap N64 game had players taking pictures of Pokémon in the wild, and, at the time of release, some of the best pictures were chosen to appear on Pokémon cards. The images were credited to the artist, but very few cards were made, and so it's hard to find an exact value for any of the Pokémon Snap cards.  

    Jump forward to 2014-2015 and Pokémon Art Academy players had the opportunity to submit their best artwork, with the winners receiving 100 Pokémon promo cards featuring their design. Due to the small amount of winners and cards given to them, very few are parting ways with their winning cards. Good luck finding these on eBay.

    11. Illustrator: Est. value, £43,000

    A picture of the rare Illustrator Pokémon Trading Card

    The ultimate Pokémon card and the holy grail for collectors – it's the Pokémon Illustrator card. This promotional card was awarded to those who had won a Pokémon Card Game contest in the Japanese magazine CoroCoro. Only 39 cards were awarded, and very few are said to still be in circulation. 

    This card is unique in that it has 'Illustrator' where the chinese pokemon cards worth money title should be, and it has a pen symbol for the set series.  Last year, at a private auction, the Illustrator card was sold for over $54,000 in California. This makes it the most expensive Pokémon card ever sold. 

    For more games coverage, follow @RedBullGames on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

    Источник: https://www.redbull.com/my-en/rarest-pokemon-cards-in-the-world
    What chinese pokemon cards worth money Rare, Ultra, Secret, and more cards?". Dot Esports. 2019-05-25. Retrieved 2019-12-14.
  • ^ ab"A Comprehensive Review of Rarity in the Pokemon TCG - Part Two". Flipside Gaming. Retrieved 2019-12-14.
  • ^"1999 Pokemon Base 1st Edition Holo Thick Stamp Shadowless Charizard Sold $350,100 PWCC Auctions eBay". eBay. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  • ^"Previously Sold Auction Data for Pokemon Cards and Sets sold on eBay". eBay. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
  • ^"Lot #1: 1999 Pokemon Base 1st Edition #4 Charizard, Holographic, MBA Black Diamond Certified – SGC GOLD LABEL PRISTINE 10 "1 of 1! sells for $369,000". GA Goldin Auctions. Retrieved 2020-12-14.
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