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stores that sell baseball cards

The sports card shelf at the Target store in Mount Pleasant was empty Or, better yet, boxes of cards sold for $25 and quickly “flipped”. Baseball Cards 1800s-1975 1997-current • Basketball Cards 1940s-1987 1996- Our sports card store is located in North Dallas, Texas we buy and sell. Overwhelmed by the increasing demand for sports cards, Target has announced that it will temporarily stop selling MLB, NFL, NBA and Pokemon.

Stores that sell baseball cards -

The man with most baseball cards on Earth

'I wanna get to a billion'

April 22nd, 2021

It all started pretty innocently, but wonderfully, for the greatest baseball card collector in the world.

The year was 1995, and after happening upon an autograph session with Rollie Fingers, nine-year-old Paul Jones and his parents were convinced by the Hall of Famer to attend a local Triple-A Las Vegas Stars game. The family didn't know much about baseball, but Fingers thought it would be a fun way for them to find out more about the sport.

They got to the ballpark early, and, as is customary before any Major or Minor League game, kids were standing at the rail closest to the field -- trying to get player autographs. Paul was interested in all the commotion and excitement, but not really sure what to do.

"So, my wife says, 'Hey, why don't you go get him a pack of cards,'" Barry, Paul's father, told me over a recent phone call.

Barry bought a pack of Stars cards and brought Paul down to the railing where the other kids were begging players for autographs. Paul, who's autistic, but had just begun talking more and more, fell silent. He stood there like a "statue" as his father Barry described.

"Players walk by and they're looking at him, because they're waiting for, 'Can I have your autograph?'" Barry said. "What happens then is the manager walks by, Tim Flannery. He turns to Paulie and he says, 'Hey, would you like my autograph?' Paulie nods his head, Tim takes his cards, he finds his card and he signs it. ... He looks at the other cards and he sees they're not signed. ... He turns to him and says, 'Hey, would you like to go into the locker room and get the rest of your cards signed?'"

Paul looked back smiling at his dad, who was, of course, saying, "Go, go!" Paul walked with Flannery into the player clubhouse, had all of his cards signed and, almost immediately, developed a love affair with baseball and baseball card collecting.

That's all it took: The father and son were off on a decades-long, baseball-card collecting adventure.

During the 1990's and early-2000's baseball card boom, Paul and Barry got cards anywhere they could. They'd buy up card stores, Target, Walmart and KB Toys. They also traveled a lot and, when they did, they'd stop in at local Minor League or Major League baseball stadiums to purchase packs and packs of cards sold at the team store. From Vancouver to Missoula to Spokane to everywhere in between -- getting as many player autographs as they could along the way. They once went to Texas -- hitting every Major and Minor League ballpark in the state and coming home with 300 to 400 packs of cards.

"For us, it wasn't so much the quality of cards, but more the quantity of cards," Barry told me. "The more cards he had, the happier he seemed to be."

The cards were stored in boxes and filled up multiple rooms in their Vegas home. The living room, the family room, the garage, anywhere they could fit. And Paul carefully organized them each time another load came in.

"When he gets his cards, he sorts them," Barry told me. "He puts them in ABC order. And then he weeds them into the other cards that are already in ABC order."

As word got around of Paul's hobby, former collectors and friends just began sending him their cards. At times, the dedication even transcended this earthly plane.

"He's in some guy's will," Barry said. "For his baseball card collection."

It became a consistent joy for Paul to focus on, something he could look forward to day in and day out. And, as Paul told me, it opened up a world even beyond baseball.

"It helps you read, spell and do geography," he said. "It helps you keep going every day. It takes away the thing, that I'm missing Gene 16, from my head. You don't have to worry about that every day. ... It's just a fun thing to do."

"Paulie used to sit at the kitchen table, you know, read the front of the card, read the back of the card," Barry said, laughing. "It used to drive me crazy. He'd come up and ask me, 'Do you know ...' and I didn't know. Nor did I care that Rollie Fingers was known for pitching and stuff like that."

Paul quickly got into the hundreds of thousands range by the mid-2000's. And then, after getting to 528,000, he hit the record books: Guinness named him as having the largest private baseball card collection in 2008.

Most might stop after establishing a world record in something, but Paul just kept going. It brought him happiness. His story grew, people sent him more cards and it drove him to continue collecting.

Through autograph sessions and collecting, the family rubbed elbows with former and current MLBers. Paul calls Flannery and Bruce Bochy his friends (his favorite MLB team is the Giants). He has photos with former White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen.

And former All-Star Darryl Strawberry.

He even posed for an incredibly cool cover in Sports Collectors Digest one year.

Soon, Paul's treasure trove grew into the millions and then two million territory. In 2016, he told MiLB.com, "It's hard to keep counting."

Although Barry admits it turned into an expensive hobby, it's always been worth seeing the joy it brings to his son on a daily basis.

"He's just happy about it all the time," Barry said. "It didn't matter: If I bought a box, it was great. If I bought a pack, it was great."

Paul's collection hit an absurd 2.8 million in 2020, and his tale went semi-viral in a few regional outlets. His cards, in boxes of 3,500 or 5,000, and his memorabilia, were now taking up an entire basement apartment and much of the family's three-car garage in Idaho Falls.

The pandemic didn't stop people from sending Paul and Barry their cards, and the family was able to safely travel to ballparks to buy up more packs. Minor League teams weren't playing, but as Barry says, "Their stores were open!"

Today, 26 years after that first Las Vegas baseball game, Paul's collection stands at nearly four million. Barry says he's building a 60-by-60 foot shed to hold any spillover and give his son his own baseball card workshop. The stash includes 55 Hall of Famers (mostly signed) and thousands of Minor and Major League players. Paul's favorite? A Mark McGwire Huntsville rookie card.

"We picked that one up for a nickel," Barry told me.

But as Paul told East Idaho News last year, it's not really who's on the card, it's more about following his passion. It's "not for the money, it's for the love of the game."

This baseball season, Paul, 34 now, will be busy serving as bat boy for the Idaho Falls Chukars of the independent Frontier League. He's excited about the opportunity but insists that it won't stop him from pursuing his No. 1 hobby of card-collecting.

"I want tons more. I wanna get to a billion."

Источник: https://www.mlb.com/news/the-man-with-the-most-baseball-cards

The Complete Guide To Selling Your Baseball Card Collection

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If you have a big baseball card collection and have no idea how to sell your cards, this guide will help you earn top dollar for your cards. Vintage sports cards have been increasing at an exponential rate in recent years, thus it could be a good time to cash in some of your prized collectibles

selling-baseball-card-collection

Selling your cards can however be an intimidating process, thus we’ve tried to explain all of the most important steps in as much detail as possible.  This guide should be the only resource that novice collectors need in order to sell their sports cards.

So, let’s not waste time- here’s the table of contents:

Are Baseball Cards Still Worth Money?

There most certainly is a very healthy market today for baseball and all sports cards. In fact, due to the widespread availability of fast internet access and various marketplaces, there has never been a more established and liquid market than the one that exists today.

Cards can be sold quite easily and for near full value, depending on the demand for the card in question.  The advent of grading companies and their associated population reports has made it so easy for collectors to get an idea of what sort of supply exists for any particular card.

In addition, collectors can now easily view the latest sales prices on eBay or at auction houses to get a very up to date picture on the value of a card.

Our New Book Is Now Available!

If you're looking to sell your collection, this resource guide will provide everything you need to know, ranging from organizing your cards, identifying your cards, whether or not to get your cards graded and the best places to sell your cards. 

selling-sports-cards

Thus, data, has led to a hobby with much less friction and more accuracy.  Data has made it easier for collectors to purchase or sell cards online or in person, with a lot less variability in pricing as compared to years past.

This lower friction and ease of doing business has also led to a significant increase in prices for cards.  

Below we can see that an index of PWCC cards has massively outperformed the S&P 500 over the past several years.

High demand vintage cards and newer cards with the fancy 1/1 designations and/or limited supply have been very hot collectibles.

pwcc-index

PWCC chart showing returns of its 500 Index versus the S&P 500

This uniformity of the hobby via better data has led to a more structured marketplace.  This has helped comfort collectors in knowing that they might have an option to sell a recently acquired card at a price close to what they paid.  

This has also led to some taking on card purchases they might not have a decade ago, due to the reliability on the system itself. 

This has given the hobby a bit of a 'stock marketplace' sort of feel, which for good or for bad, has likely led to the increase in card values in recent years.

How Do I Identify My Baseball Cards?

Before selling your collection, you have to get a good understanding of what card you actually have.  I would encourage collectors to spend some time putting together a list of their collection before trying to sell it. If you have a baseball card and have no idea what you have sitting in front of you, this section should help you identify your cards. 

First, check the back of the card. Unless it's a strip card (which normally have blank backs) then it likely has some sort of manufacturer and date information on the back. This normally gets easier the newer the card, but it's definitely a starting place for figuring out what year and make your card is.

Here's the back of a 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle, one of the most valuable of all baseball cards.

52-topps-mantle-back

Back of a 1952 Topps Mantle

In looking at the back or front we know we have a Mickey Mantle card (and if you have one of these you're one LUCKY collector).  If we look on the back, we can see at the bottom that we have a 'Topps Baseball' card but there is no identifying year. 

This is where some of the text on the back can help--if we read the card, it refers to Mantle's 1951 season, thus we can get some sort of idea that this is likely a card issued somewhere in that 1951-1953 range.  And indeed it is a 1952 Topps baseball card.

A quick Google search can always help--if we had typed in '1951 Topps Mickey Mantle' and click on 'images' in Google we actually get a bunch of photos of our 1952 Topps Mantle.  (note there is no '51 Topps' Mantle). We could also click on one of those images and figure out more about the card.

One trick that many don't know about is the Google Reverse Image Search.  If you go to images.google.com you can submit a picture and it will provide any matches to its search database.   Just click on the photo as shown in the image below (circled in red)

reverse image search

I tried this with our 1952 Mantle Back and it identified it as 'Mickey Mantle Rookie Card', which is technically not true as Mantle's 1951 Bowman is his true rookie card, it gives us enough info to make an assessment that this is actually a 1952 Topps Mantle.  That's a great start if we are selling a Mickey Mantle card worth multiple thousands of dollars.

sell-mantle-rookie-card

So, whether it's a 1952 Mickey Mantle or a 1981 Topps Joe Montana, you can utilize this same method with whatever card you might have.  If you're having any issues, get in touch with me at [email protected] and I will do my best to help you out. 

How Much Should I Ask For My Card Collection?

In order to place a rough estimate on your baseball card collection, the easiest place to start is eBay.  Examining past sales of sold cards on eBay can provide us with a great assessment of the most recent values on the marketplace.  PSA also provides a listing of recent auction sales (including eBay) which can be very helpful in determining the current value of a card.

Here's an example on how to find recent sales data on eBay.

I've gone to eBay and searched for a 'Michael Jordan Rookie Card'.

The search results will show us all of the available cards for sale.

While this information looks good, the most valuable information is within the latest eBay completed listings.

Click on the 'Advanced' text as shown in the red circle.

ebay-advanced


Once you get to the next page, click on 'Sold Listings' .  Note I also added a filter for sold items above $500 since there was a lot of junk coming up in the results, and I know from experience that most Jordan rookies sell for over $500. 

jordan-sold-listings

This will bring up a list of the latest sales that can really help us figure out a price on our card.

Here we can see that the last sale was a PSA 4 Jordan that sold for $1025.  So we can filter through the listings to find a good idea of what our card is worth.

jordan-sold

In addition, we can also get a good snapshot of recent eBay sales (along with recent auction sales) at PSA's website.

If you google your card and just type in "PSA" at the end it should provide the first link to the PSA page for the card you are looking for.

I did this for 'Michael Jordan Fleer Rookie PSA' and the first link is the PSA Card Facts page.  

If you click on the box  'APR' (which stands for Auction Prices Realized) from the PSA Facts page it will bring you to the latest eBay and auction sales.

psa-sales-prices

PSA has made some big improvements on this part of their page, and provides a great breakdown of sales based on card grades. There's even a chart showing recent sales prices by grade as shown below:

sell-basketball-cards

For some more information and details into the more important factors on determing card values, be sure to check out our resource guide on determining baseball card values.

Should I Get My Cards Graded Before Selling Them?

Normally, a graded card is worth more than a 'raw' card that is ungraded.  Of course there are costs involved with grading (on average about $15 to $20 for bare bones services).  So you have to weigh the costs versus the ultimate potential increase in value.  Ultimately, a graded card collection will sell for more money than a similar collection that is ungraded.  If you are looking to sell your collection quickly, grading your cards might not be in your best interest as wait times have been steadily increasing of late.

A card worth $10 would not likely be worth grading at all due to the costs involved.  Normally I say that if it's worth $100 or more, it's probably worth grading. At the very least you get a holder that helps encapsulate your card and helps potentially boost the selling price. Some collectors that are set builders will decide that they want a 100% graded set, thus this could entail grading all of the non-star players.  For me, I'm normally not in any rush to send my cards off to the grading companies, unless I want an immediate opinion on authentication.

One of my biggest mistakes as a novice vintage collector was sending off some T206 commons to PSA.  At around a $12 average submission cost (I did a bulk submission) this did practically nothing to help increase the initial value I had paid for the cards. The only time this helps, is if you buy a card thinking it might be say a PSA 1 (Poor Condition) and it ends up getting graded a PSA 3 (VG) or PSA 4 (VG-EX).

Thus, before you send in for grading, weigh the costs involved versus what you think the card might actually end up being worth in graded condition (versus raw). 

Be sure to visit our resource guide on card grading and our guide to determining whether or not you should get your cards graded.

What Is The Best Way To Sell A Sports Card Collection?

eBay is the easiest place to sell your cards, but unfortunately there are fees involved.  eBay allows you list 50 items for free per month, but there is a 10% charge on the final value for selling your baseball cards.  In addition, there is cut that you have to pay PayPal (.30 + 2.9% fee) along with any shipping costs that aren't covered by the buyer. The fees can add up quickly.

There are many active Facebook groups that allow for selling and trading cards. If you search for a particular sport and era, you'll likely find a big group engaging in card trading.  Selling in Facebook groups can be done with no fees involved, but you need to make sure that you are dealing with an honest buyer/seller.  Most groups will vouch for anyone in question, and a quick search of a person's name in the group can provide some further information into their past posts/dealings. 

There are also two great forums that offering buying and selling for vintage collectors - Net54 Forums and Blowout Cards

I've never done it but some collectors will sell cards at a Pawn Shop.  I'd probably advise against this unless you're in a really desperate situation.  

Collector's would be better served by visiting a local card shop if there's one nearby.  

For higher end items, some of the big auction houses can be a good way to go.

Ten Tips To Help You Get Top Dollar For Your Card Collection

sell-card-collection-tips

1. Create A List Of Your Card Collection

It's time to figure out what it is that you own!   Go and create a list!  We've started a Google Sheet to help you with this. That sheet comes in handy when working with Dealers if selling your cards.

The more preparation you do before your start the process of selling your cards, the better off you will be. 

If you need any help in identifying your cards, go revisit our tips in helping to figure out what it is that you have.

2. Talk To Card Dealers

Go Visit A Local Baseball Card Show or search online for reputable dealers.  You might find someone willing to pay exactly what you need in person at a card show.  I'd suggest doing a little digging on the dealer in question.  Sometimes simply typing in 'Dealer XYX Scam" or "Dealer XYZ Reviews" can tell you everything you possibly need. 

3. Learn About Sports Card Grading

PSA and SGC are the most reputable graders, and while it's not necessary to grade your cards, you will tend to get more money for higher quality graded cards as opposed to those that are 'raw'.  

One downfall - due to the surge in demand of card collecting in recent years, the grading companies are backlogged big time, thus you might find yourself waiting months in order to get your card back

Be sure to check out our resource guide on grading your sports cards. 

4. Have a Price In Mind

Although you likely won't get auction pricing if selling to a dealer or at a show, it's important to understand your cards value.
As noted previously, a simple eBay search of completed listings can do wonders in helping to determine a cards most accurate value.  On average, if a card is in high demand, you might get upwards of 80% of book value for the card. 

5. Consider Passing On To Heirs If Possible

Might sound crazy, but vintage baseball cards have outperformed the S&P 500 over the past 30+ Years.  If you have a high quality collection and aren't in need of immediate cash, it might be worth considering!  

6. Get Educated On The Hobby

Our work on vintage sports cards is designed to educate all card collectors.  We might just have an article on a set or card that you own.  Hopefully it's on this list!  The more educated you are in regards to your collection, the better chances you'll have of not getting taking advantage of.

7. Invest In A Scanner For Your Cards

If you have a large collection, one that might take time to sell, it might be worth your while to invest in a scanner.  One of the biggest mistakes a seller can make is sharing unclear photos with a willing buyer. Photos with your iPhone can sometimes work, but a scanner will likely get you better returns due to the higher quality of the image.  There's a great discussion here on some of the better options for use in scanning baseball cards.

8. Consign Your Cards To An Auction House

If you have some really high end items it could be in your best interest to consign your cards to an auction house.  We've put together a list of some of the most reputable auction dealers in the market. 

9. Facebook Marketplace Is A Free Option

If you want to cut costs on the sale of your card collection, Facebook Marketplace is a good option. First, it's free, and second it has huge reach.  Usually if you have cards local to a specfic market, they tend to sell better on Facebook, although there are many buyers looking to scoop up collections as well. 

10. Be Careful Of Scammers

If selling your cards to someone online without any prior connection, you need to be careful.  This would mostly include places such as Facebook and other for sale sites such as Craigslist and Offer Up.  If accepting digital payments, understand that Paypal Goods and Services will entail a fee but will provide protection for the buyer if something goes wrong with the sale.  I advise if meeting up to find a local police station which allows for online exchanges.  Check with your local police dept to see if they offer the option. 

And if you don't feel like being hassled with all the work involved in either listing on eBay or dealing with an Auction House, there are collectors that will pay top dollar for high quality sports cards and sets. One happens to be us here at All Vintage Cards (shameless plug). Below is some more information on our buying process:

Selling Your Sports Cards to All Vintage Cards

All Vintage Cards has been dealing in sports since the early 1980's and we are one of the most reputable and trusted buyers in the hobby.  While I encourage all sellers to shop around when selling a valuable card collection, I can promise that our offer will more often than not be near the top of the list.

Here's What All Vintage Cards is Currently Buying

  • All Pre-War Sports Cards including Tobacco Cards (T series), Early Candy and Gum Cards (E series) and Strip/Exhibit Cards (W series)
  • Hall of Famer's and Stars from the early Topps and Bowman Sets (1948 through 1975)
  • Key Rookie Cards of stars such as Gretzky, Montana, Brady, Jordan, Russell, Erving, Chamberlain and more
  • Unopened Wax from 50's, 60's, 70's and 80's 
  • Complete or partially complete sets of Pre-War Cards and Pre-1960 Bowman/Topps Baseball
  • Vintage Memorabilia including Autographs, Jerseys, Bats, Signed Balls etc
  • Vintage Basketball, Football and Hockey Cards in High Grades

Submit Your Collection + Get a Free Estimate

Either use the submission form below or send a list of your collection to [email protected]

Источник: https://allvintagecards.com/sell-your-baseball-cards/

FEATURED ITEMS

TONYETRADE IS THE PREFERRED SOURCE TO BUY AND SELL BASEBALL CARDS AND OTHER FINE COLLECTIBLES

Welcome to TonyeTrade, where today’s savvy collector can buy and sell baseball cards, sports memorabilia,vintage toys and other collectibles such as rare comic books.

Over more than three decades, TonyeTrade has become one of the most notable and respected figures in the hobby. Today, TonyeTrade handles some of the finest examples of sports trading cards and other items, and every year buys and sells millions of dollars of individual pieces and collections.

SELL BASEBALL CARDS

TonyeTrade is proud to have earned a reputation for honesty and paying top dollar over more than 30 years in the hobby. Our considerable liquid assets let us purchase even the largest and most valuable collections and items, and TonyeTrade also offers consignment at extremely competitive rates and flexible terms.

BUY BASEBALL CARDS

TonyeTrade continually handles some of the most sought-after sports collectibles and cards, as well as hard-to-find items such as vintage comic books. With our remarkable inventory and relationships with top collectors throughout the country, TonyeTrade is your source for even the rarest of must-have items.

NOTABLE BASEBALL CARD AND COMIC BOOK SALES

TonyeTrade sells and brokers millions of dollars in PSA- and SGC-graded cards annually, including these fine examples:

  • 1952 Topps PSA 9 Mickey Mantle
  • 1953 topps PSA 10 Mickey Mantle
  • Three T206 Honus Wagner’s
  • PSA 8 E90-1 Joe Jackson Rookie
  • The only Four base hits King Kelly
  • The only complete Joseph Hall team cabinet collection
  • The only whiz bang Babe Ruth
  • PSA 7 E101 Honus Wagner
  • PSA 8 1915 Cracker Joe Jackson
  • PSA 7 and 8 1915 Sporting News Babe Ruth Rookie
  • CGC 9.6, 9.4 Spider-Man 1
  • CGC 4.5, 3.0, 5.5 Superman 1
  • CGC 7.0, 6.0 Batman 1
  • CGC 9.0, 8.5 Incredible Hulk 1

And the list goes on and on…

Источник: https://www.tonyetrade.com/
Tagged: Magic: The Gathering, pokemon, sports cards, target

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About Joshua Nelson

Josh Nelson is a Magic: The Gathering deckbuilding savant, a self-proclaimed scholar of all things Sweeney Todd, and, of course, a writer for Bleeding Cool. In their downtime, Josh can be found painting models, playing Magic, or possibly preaching about the horrors and merits of anthropophagy. You can find them on Twitter at @Burning_Inquiry for all your burning inquiries.

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CVS pharmacy

CVS.com® is not available to customers or patients who are located outside of the United States or U.S. territories. We apologize for any inconvenience.

For U.S. military personnel permanently assigned or on temporary duty overseas, please call our Customer Service team at 1-800-SHOP CVS (1-800-746-7287) if you need assistance with your order.

Источник: https://www.cvs.com/shop/baseball-cards-jumbo-box-prodid-501577

In a move that likely will be widely regarded as frustrating, yet understandable, Target has decided to follow in Wal-Mart's footsteps and halt trading card sales in their entirety. Beginning on May 14th, Target stores around the United States will no longer be selling trading cards, including but probably not limited to sports cards of various kinds and cards from the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

A photo taken in upstate New York of the new trading card embargo by Target stores. Photo taken May 12th, and attributed to Joshua Nelson.

There is no word on whether this embargo will extend to games such as Magic: The GatheringYu-Gi-Oh, or the Digimon Card Game, but judging from the general ignorance surrounding current blanketing wyoming com, it is a safe bet to presume that it will. This embargo will last until further notice, however, meaning that there might be an end time. However, that time is not plainly in sight yet.

As we previously covered, this policy hurts card game players a ton, especially those without a local gaming shop that hasn't remained shuttered by the COVID-19 pandemic. However, considering the unfortunate circumstances, perhaps it is for the best for the time being. This past Friday, May 7th, a man pulled a gun on a group of people in a Target parking lot in Wisconsin over a dispute stemming from sports card limitations. Thankfully, no shots were fired, but the Target and a local Trader Joe's grocery store had to go into lockdown for upwards of an hour. Therefore, while the embargo might seem absolutely outrageous to many, it makes perfect sense for the sake of stores that sell baseball cards safety of the company's retail employees.

Do you agree with Target's decision to halt all trading card sales? Is discover online banking bonus retail giant going a step too far, or is their erring towards caution sensible? Let us know what you think in the comments below.

UPDATE: Target reached out to us with a brief statement letting people know they will continue to sell cards through their website.

"The safety of our guests and our team is our top priority. Out of an abundance of caution, we've decided to temporarily suspend the sale of MLB, NFL, NBA and Pokémon trading cards within our stores, effective May 14. Guests can continue to shop these cards online at Target.com."

Posted in: Card Games, Games, Tabletop

CVS pharmacy

CVS.com® is not available to customers or patients who are located outside of the United States or U.S. territories. We apologize for any inconvenience.

For U.S. military personnel permanently assigned or on temporary duty overseas, please call our Customer Service team at 1-800-SHOP CVS (1-800-746-7287) if you need assistance with your order.

Источник: https://www.cvs.com/shop/baseball-cards-jumbo-box-prodid-501577

The man with most baseball cards on Earth

'I wanna get to a billion'

April 22nd, 2021

It all started pretty innocently, but wonderfully, for the greatest baseball card collector in the world.

The year was 1995, and after happening upon an autograph session with Rollie Fingers, nine-year-old Paul Jones and his parents were convinced by the Hall of Famer to attend a local Triple-A Las Vegas Stars game. The family didn't know much about baseball, but Fingers thought it would be a fun way for them to find out more about the sport.

They got to the ballpark early, and, as is customary before any Major or Minor League game, kids were standing at the rail closest to the field -- trying to get player autographs. Paul was interested in all the commotion and excitement, but not really sure what to do.

"So, my wife says, 'Hey, why don't you go get him a pack of cards,'" Barry, Paul's father, told me over a recent phone call.

Barry bought a pack of Stars cards and brought Paul down to the railing where the other kids were begging players for autographs. Paul, who's autistic, but had just begun talking more and more, fell silent. He stood there like a "statue" as his father Barry described.

"Players walk by and they're looking at him, because they're waiting for, 'Can I have your autograph?'" Barry said. "What happens then is the manager walks by, Tim Flannery. He turns to Paulie and he says, 'Hey, would you like my autograph?' Paulie nods his head, Tim takes his cards, citizen com app finds his card and he signs it. . He looks at the other cards and he sees they're not signed. . He turns to him and says, 'Hey, would you like to go into the locker room and get the rest of your cards signed?'"

Paul looked back smiling at his dad, who was, of course, saying, "Go, go!" Paul walked with Flannery into the player clubhouse, had all of his cards signed and, almost immediately, developed a love affair with baseball and baseball card collecting.

That's all it took: The father and son were off on a decades-long, baseball-card collecting adventure.

During the 1990's and early-2000's baseball card boom, Paul and Barry got cards anywhere they could. They'd buy up card stores, Target, Walmart and KB Toys. They also traveled a lot and, when they did, they'd stop in at local Minor League or Major League baseball stadiums to purchase packs and packs of cards sold at the team store. From Vancouver to Missoula to Spokane to everywhere in between -- getting as many player autographs as they could along the way. They once went to Texas -- hitting every Major and Minor League ballpark in the state and coming home with 300 to 400 packs of cards.

"For us, it wasn't so much the quality of cards, but more the quantity of cards," Barry told me. "The more cards he had, the happier he seemed to be."

The cards were stored in boxes and filled up multiple rooms in their Vegas home. The living room, the family room, the garage, anywhere they could fit. And Paul carefully organized them each time another load came in.

"When he gets his cards, he sorts them," Barry told me. "He puts them in ABC order. And then he weeds them into the other cards that are already in ABC order."

As word got around of Paul's hobby, former collectors and friends just began sending him their cards. At times, the dedication even transcended this earthly plane.

"He's in some guy's will," Barry said. "For his baseball card collection."

It became a consistent joy for Paul to focus on, something he could look forward to day in and day out. And, as Paul told me, it opened up a world even beyond baseball.

"It helps you read, spell and do geography," he said. "It helps you keep going every day. It takes away the thing, that I'm missing Gene 16, from my head. You don't have to worry about that every day. . It's just a fun thing to do."

"Paulie used to sit at the kitchen table, you know, read the front of the card, read the back of the card," Barry said, laughing. "It used to drive me crazy. He'd come up and ask me, 'Do you know .' and I didn't know. How to activate walmart prepaid debit card did I care that Rollie Fingers was known for pitching and stuff like that."

Paul quickly got into the hundreds of thousands range by the mid-2000's. And then, after getting to 528,000, he hit the record books: Guinness named him as having the largest private baseball card collection in 2008.

Most might stop after establishing a world record in something, but Paul just kept going. It brought him happiness. His story grew, people sent him more cards and it drove him to continue collecting.

Through autograph sessions and collecting, the family rubbed elbows with former and current MLBers. Paul calls Flannery and Bruce Bochy his friends (his favorite MLB team is the Giants). He has photos with former White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen.

And former All-Star Darryl Strawberry.

He even posed for an incredibly cool cover in Sports Collectors Digest one year.

Soon, Paul's treasure trove grew into the millions and then two million territory. In 2016, he told MiLB.com, "It's hard to keep counting."

Although Barry admits it turned into an expensive hobby, it's always been worth seeing the joy it brings to his son on a daily basis.

"He's just happy about it all the time," Barry said. "It didn't matter: If I bought a box, it was great. If I bought a pack, it was great."

Paul's collection hit an absurd 2.8 million in 2020, and his tale went semi-viral in a few regional outlets. His cards, in boxes of 3,500 or 5,000, and his memorabilia, were now taking up an entire basement apartment stores that sell baseball cards much of the family's three-car garage in Idaho Falls.

The pandemic didn't stop people from sending Paul and Barry their cards, and the family was able to safely travel to ballparks to buy up more packs. Minor League teams weren't playing, but as Barry says, "Their stores were open!"

Today, 26 years after that first Las Vegas baseball game, Paul's collection stands at nearly four million. Barry says he's building a 60-by-60 foot shed to hold any spillover and give his son his own baseball card workshop. The stash includes 55 Hall of Famers (mostly signed) and thousands of Minor and Major League players. Paul's favorite? A Mark McGwire Huntsville rookie card.

"We picked that one up for a nickel," Barry told me.

But as Paul told East Idaho News last year, it's not really who's on the card, it's more about following his passion. It's "not for the money, it's for the love of the game."

This baseball season, Paul, 34 now, will be busy serving as bat boy for the Idaho Falls Chukars of the independent Frontier League. He's excited about the opportunity but insists that it won't stop him from pursuing his No. 1 hobby of card-collecting.

"I want tons more. I wanna get to a billion."

Источник: https://www.mlb.com/news/the-man-with-the-most-baseball-cards

Sell Sports Cards

Sports fans across the world remember the joy of the first time they opened stores that sell baseball cards pack of cards and saw exactly the card they'd been looking for. But sports cards have always been considered valuable for more than just the good memories. Since cards come in a wide range of rarity, collecting cards was one way to invest money in the future.

Even without collecting some of the really rare cards, sports card collections, especially baseball cards, were thought to be valuable.

Of course, if you've still got your old cards, or never stopped collecting, you might be wondering how to sell sports cards and how to get the most value from your sports memorabilia.

If you've been thinking about selling sports cards you're in the right place.

We'll stores that sell baseball cards everything you need to know about selling sports cards from whether it's still worth the effort to the best places to sell your cards. At the end, we'll also cover how to best sell vintage cards and protect your original investment on the most valuable parts of your collection. Let's get started!

Are Sports Cards Still Worth Money?

Yes, sports cards are still worth money, but not immediately. You won't be able to walk into a shop, hand over your collection, and walk out with a ton of cash most of the time. There's a process if you want to sell your cards, and only some cards are going to be worth selling. The most common sports cards of any type may not be worth putting up for sale, especially if you have to pay for consignment space or shipping.

The first step for most people who want to sell sports cards is to get a professional sports authenticator to take a look. After your cards have been inspected and authenticated, you're ready to start selling sports cards.

The authentication process should include getting your cards graded, as well as some evaluation of the value. The value of a card is a combination of its rarity and its condition. A gem-mint (the highest PSA grade) rare card may be worth a lot, but every defect on the card, like corner wear, reduces its value.

However, you can petition to have your previously graded cards reviewed if you think they might be worthy of a higher rating.

That doesn't mean that low-grade cards are worthless, or that a gem-mint common card will hold much value. It's all about the current market and what cards are in demand.

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What's the Best Way to Sell My Sports Cards?

Selling sports cards can be complicated, so it's important to do your research before you decide on a selling method or market. It's worth taking a trip to local sports card dealers to see what they have on offer, if they accept cards on consignment, and to compare your collection with the cards on offer.

You might even be surprised to see that a particular card is a lot more valuable than you expected.

Unfortunately, after doing your research it can still be hard to tell what will be the best way to sell your sports cards. Things like shipping costs and listing fees can quickly eat into profits from online sales while selling in consignment shops and local groups can take a long time and may not win the same prices.

The truth is that the best method of selling your sports cards depends on what kinds of cards you have, how active your local sports card community is, and what grade your cards are after authentication. That said, we'll talk about some of the pros and cons of each selling method in the next section.

That way you'll be able to decide for yourself what the best method of selling your sports cards will be.

Places to Sell Sports Cards

This isn't a complete list of the places you can reasonably sell sports cards by any means, but it's a good place to get started if you're ready to get started selling sports cards.

1. eBay

eBay what state is murder capital one of the go-to marketplaces for trading cards of all types, including sports cards. The site usually has a wide selection of different cards, and is a reasonable way to check on the current market value of a card.

Payment through eBay is secure and reliable, and you might even be able to sell some cards above market value through auctions. However, auctioning cards also runs the risk of someone buying the card for less than it's worth. You'll also have to pay shipping costs to send the card to its buyer, which can get expensive if you want to list individual cards.

You may also be charged extra to list your cards on eBay if you have 200 or more cards that you want to sell. That means that it may be in your interest to list cards in groups so that you're not having to pay for shipping and listings on each individual card.

Related: Make Money Flipping on eBay

Sell Sports Cards - Dave and Adams

2. Dave & Adams

Dave & Adams is a great way to sell your sports cards if you want to sell them directly and don't want to mess with complicated order fulfillment. Dave & Adams will buy cards from you to list on their site. That means that you'll get a guaranteed price on every card, and they handle the details of finding new owners.

This is a good option for people with large collections, especially if you don't have many rare or highly valuable cards in the collection. It's also good if you're looking to cash out your collection quickly, or don't want to learn the details of selling different kinds of cards. They're also a good place to sell modern cards since a modern card tends to have less value than a vintage sports card.

However, Dave & Adams buys cards slightly below what they think they can get for the card, which means that you won't take home 100% of the profits. If you decide to go with Dave & Adams it's a good idea to know what your cards are worth ahead of time hotels near university at buffalo you can tell reasonable offers from cheap ones.

Sell Sports Cards - SlabStox

3. SlabStox

SlabStox is a relatively new platform for buying and selling trading cards, but it's a fantastic option if you'd like to sell directly to the new owner. You have the ability to list and sell each sports card individually, and they accept the full range of cards from baseball cards to hockey cards.

The platform itself just exists to help connect sellers with buyers, you'll still have to handle the details of the transaction yourself, including shipping the cards.

It's a reasonable option if you want to treat selling cards like having an online card shop, but the overall experience is similar to selling on eBay.

4. Facebook Groups

Facebook Groups are a great way to sell cards if you're looking for top-dollar and don't mind waiting, or if you want to sell cards locally. That's because groups and Facebook Marketplace can both help connect you to potential buyers locally, or to a more motivated potential buyer further away.

Of course, if you list your cards on Facebook you'll need to do all the value research yourself. It also helps to share authentication details to help make sure each item sells. Without authentication, buyers might not be willing to risk a buying a fake card.

Selling on Facebook can be similar to selling on eBay and other online marketplaces, but several factors make it stand out. For one thing, you may be able to find a market for cards that don't have much value otherwise. For another, the lack of a bidding option means that your profit is more consistent, but may not be as high per card.

5. Craigslist

Craigslist isn't where most people think of to look for sports cards, but it's a good platform if you want to sell complete sets or multiple cards. It's also a good place for card flippers to look for cards since may collectors who list on Craigslist are motivated to sell and list their cards under market value.

That means that Craigslist can be a good place to pick up affordable cards to list on more traditional card markets. Savvy Craigslist users can profit quickly by picking up valuable cards often mixed in with other sports cards and reading market demand well.

6. Card Shows

Card shows are a great place to buy or sell cards from your collection. Collectors know that card shows are a great place to pick up rarer cards, or to find card by card number. Plus, card shows often attract other collectibles and can be a good place to sell sports memorabilia in addition to cards.

However, card shows can sometimes be a difficult place to get the best value for your cards. Sellers are looking to sell at the highest prices, while collectors are looking for the best deal, which can mean that some shows have inflated prices. It can take savvy haggling to get a good deal as either the buyer or seller.

Card shows also require that you bring your collection to the show if you want to sell it. That can be difficult for individual collectors, so shows tend to attract card flippers more than casual collectors.

However, card shows can offer some of the best prices if you're looking to sell baseball cards or vintage cards.

Related: Flea Market Flipping

7. Beckett

Beckett is one of the most popular online card selling platforms, and really caters to people who are looking for a specific sports card. That can make it a great place to sell if you have valuable or vintage cards, but also means that this market place is a little more competitive.

For more average collections, without the benefit of particularly rare cards, Beckett might not be the best place to sell for a profit. However, if you're looking to buy sports cards stores that sell baseball cards aren't many better places.

Related: Best Hobbies that Make Money

8. Sports Card Shops

Local sports card shops are another good option, assuming you have one available. Shops tend to recognize the value of buying from local collectors, and many also have consignment space so you can choose how you'd prefer to market your cards.

Best of all, sports card shops value rare cards because they can bring more attention to the whole store. If you have particularly rare cards you'd like to sell you may be able to get a better price for those cards simply because the store wants to have them in their business.

9. Private Card Auction Houses

Private card auction houses are best for valuable collections and professionals. They attract card flippers, card shops, and other professionals, including authenticators. That means that prices are usually good and sellers usually have several options to help make sure their cards sell.

Private card auction houses can also be a good place to find prewar cards and other rare and valuable sports memorabilia.

10. OfferUp

OfferUp is another online selling platform, and one that's a little more expensive than other options since there is a fee for listing all cards. However, the real advantage of selling through OfferUp is that the buyer is responsible for shipping. That means that you get to keep a larger percentage of the selling price.

OfferUp is also a larger platform, so you'll be able to attract more potential buyers. However, that also means that price competition is fierce and it can be hard to get top dollar for your cards.

11. PSA Card Forums

PSA Card Forums is a good option for sellers who don't mind putting in a little research and extra work. The big advantage here is that PSA card forums allows collectors to list their cards and collections, and make those collections visible.

That means that savvy sellers can reach out to collectors and offer to sell them the exact cards they are missing, filling in the gaps and making a quick profit in the meantime.

This system is effective for card collectors as well since complete sets are usually worth more than incomplete sets, even if the set is only missing common low-value cards.

Sell Sports Cards - TonyeTrade

12. TonyeTrade

TonyeTrade specializes a little more in baseball cards, but you can list almost any sports cards on the site. They also specialize in sports comics and other rare memorabilia.

Unlike other trading sites, TonyeTrade buys the cards and other collectibles you want to sell from you directly. Just contact them with an exact listing of what you have and would like to sell, and they will quote you what they'd be willing to pay.

However, that does mean that you may not be able to sell if you don't have anything TonyeTrade is interested in purchasing right then.

13. StockX

If you're looking for an auction-only marketplace as an alternative to selling your sports cards on eBay, StockX may be a good option. StockX is also a good site for sellers that don't want to go through the process of authentication and getting their cards graded on their own since the site handles those details.

Simply list your minimum price, and then, once the auction goes through, send the card to StockX. They handle details of making sure the card is authenticated, in the proper condition, and that it meets all other requirements.

After authenticating the cards, StockX sends the card to the buyer. That means there is a little more of a delay after a purchase, but also means that the buyer has a lot less work to sell their cards.

14. COMC

COMC is another option that will buy your cards directly from you for listing on their site. That eliminates the hassle of storing and shipping cards, and you won't have to worry about finding a buyer, but it also means that you'll lose out on some of the profit.

COMC is a little different though. Stores that sell baseball cards of getting an upfront payment for the value of the card, COMC acts a little like an auction or drop shipping site in that you mostly get payment after each card has sold. It also means that payment reflects the selling price a little more closely than some other sites that handle finding buyers and shipping.

15. Blowout Forums

Blowout Forums is one option that's a little less geared toward the buying and selling of cards, and more about talking about cards and enthusing over new releases. However, like any forum focused on sports cards, Blowout Forums does offer a section for buyers and sellers. In fact, while selling is a little less common with Blowout Forums, the crowd of card enthusiasts means you can get some of the best prices selling on Blowout Forums.

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How To Get Good Value For Vintage Sports Cards

Vintage sports cards have the most value when they are in good condition, but there are buyers for almost all vintage cards, regardless of condition.

When it comes to selling vintage cards, watch the markets closely. Some cards' value is relatively stable, while others see swells and dips depending on market availability. If you have a valuable card and can capitalize on a price peak, that's one of the best ways to make money off the card.

If you have a large collection of vintage cards it may also be in your best interest to keep your cards held back waiting for those swells. Limiting the market supply of already rare cards is a good way for sellers to increase their profits.

It's also important to make sure you only list vintage cards on sites known for attracting enthusiast buyers. Sportscard lovers frb cleveland much more likely to recognize the value of a vintage card than casual buyers. You want to attract experienced collectors, flippers, and even some vintage collectors.

Can You Make Money Flipping Sports Cards?

A lot of collectors wonder if they could make money flipping cards instead of just selling their own. The truth is that getting into flipping cards can be difficult, and you'll likely need a fair amount of money to invest at first, but you can make money.

In fact, depending on the kinds of cards you want to trade, sports card flippers can turn the hobby into a full-time job and reliable income.

The problem is that you need to have a lot of knowledge about sports cards, across multiple sports and eras, to really succeed. Flipping sports cards also takes a lot of time and patience, and most flippers maintain accounts on multiple buying and selling platforms.

That's a lot of moving parts to track and maintain, which can make the job more difficult. It's also difficult to manage because you may want to double list some cards, which also means making sure the listing is always accurate, and that you remove all copies of a listing as soon as the card has sold.

Many sports card flippers use their own collections to earn seed money for the hobby. Otherwise, it's a good idea to have at least several hundred dollars you can invest into flipping, without expecting a return on that investment for several months.

Getting certified as an authenticator can help as well since you'll be able to make some money authenticating other people's cards in addition to your own.

Final Thoughts on Selling Sports Cards

That's it folks, that's what you need to know about the best platforms for selling sports cards, and what you need to know before you get started. We trust that you already know your cards pretty well, stores that sell baseball cards you're armed with everything you need stores that sell baseball cards get started.

Remember that market is everything when it comes to selling sports cards. Choosing the right place to sell your cards is the best way to get the right buyer and the best price. Be patient, wait for a good offer, and don't underrate the value of your cards.

Have you sold sports cards? Comment your thoughts below!

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Forrest is a personal finance, entrepreneurship, and investing enthusiast dedicated to helping others obtain life long wealth. He owns several different blogs and is also passionate about health and fitness.

Источник: https://www.dontworkanotherday.com/sell-sports-cards

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