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John f kennedy jr memorial site


john f kennedy jr memorial site

This monument honors John Fitzgerald Kennedy (1917-1963), the thirty-fifth President of the United States. After serving as a naval officer during World War. Son of President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jackie Kennedy. Français: John F. Kennedy Jr. (1960 – 1999), fils du Président John F. Reactions of friends, family, and public figures by Beth Rowen Memorials to John F. Kennedy, Jr., appeared at his Tribeca home and the offices of George.
john f kennedy jr memorial site

John f kennedy jr memorial site -

November 22, 1963: Death of the President

Shortly after noon on November 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated as he rode in a motorcade through Dealey Plaza in downtown Dallas, Texas.

By the fall of 1963, President John F. Kennedy and his political advisers were preparing for the next presidential campaign. Although he had not formally announced his candidacy, it was clear that President Kennedy was going to run and he seemed confident about his chances for re-election.

At the end of September, the president traveled west, speaking in nine different states in less than a week. The trip was meant to put a spotlight on natural resources and conservation efforts. But JFK also used it to sound out themes—such as education, national security, and world peace—for his run in 1964.

Campaigning in Texas

A month later, the president addressed Democratic gatherings in Boston and Philadelphia. Then, on November 12, he held the first important political planning session for the upcoming election year. At the meeting, JFK stressed the importance of winning Florida and Texas and talked about his plans to visit both states in the next two weeks. 

Mrs. Kennedy would accompany him on the swing through Texas, which would be her first extended public appearance since the loss of their baby, Patrick, in August. On November 21, the president and first lady departed on Air Force One for the two-day, five-city tour of Texas.

President Kennedy was aware that a feud among party leaders in Texas could jeopardize his chances of carrying the state in 1964, and one of his aims for the trip was to bring Democrats together. He also knew that a relatively small but vocal group of extremists was contributing to the political tensions in Texas and would likely make its presence felt—particularly in Dallas, where US Ambassador to the United Nations Adlai Stevenson had been physically attacked a month earlier after making a speech there. Nonetheless, JFK seemed to relish the prospect of leaving Washington, getting out among the people and into the political fray.

The first stop was San Antonio. Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, Governor John B. Connally, and Senator Ralph W. Yarborough led the welcoming party. They accompanied the president to Brooks Air Force Base for the dedication of the Aerospace Medical Health Center. Continuing on to Houston, he addressed the League of United Latin American Citizens, and spoke at a testimonial dinner for Congressman Albert Thomas before ending the day in Fort Worth.

Morning in Fort Worth

A light rain was falling on Friday morning, November 22, but a crowd of several thousand stood in the parking lot outside the Texas Hotel where the Kennedys had spent the night. A platform was set up and the president, wearing no protection against the weather, came out to make some brief remarks. "There are no faint hearts in Fort Worth," he began, "and I appreciate your being here this morning. Mrs. Kennedy is organizing herself. It takes longer, but, of course, she looks better than we do when she does it." He went on to talk about the nation's need for being "second to none" in defense and in space, for continued growth in the economy and "the willingness of citizens of the United States to assume the burdens of leadership."

The warmth of the audience response was palpable as the president reached out to shake hands amidst a sea of smiling faces.

Back inside the hotel the president spoke at a breakfast of the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce, focusing on military preparedness. "We are still the keystone in the arch of freedom," he said. "We will continue to do…our duty, and the people of Texas will be in the lead."

On to Dallas

The presidential party left the hotel and went by motorcade to Carswell Air Force Base for the thirteen-minute flight to Dallas. Arriving at Love Field, President and Mrs. Kennedy disembarked and immediately walked toward a fence where a crowd of well-wishers had gathered, and they spent several minutes shaking hands.

The first lady received a bouquet of red roses, which she brought with her to the waiting limousine. Governor John Connally and his wife, Nellie, were already seated in the open convertible as the Kennedys entered and sat behind them. Since it was no longer raining, the plastic bubble top had been left off. Vice President and Mrs. Johnson occupied another car in the motorcade.

The procession left the airport and traveled along a ten-mile route that wound through downtown Dallas on the way to the Trade Mart where the President was scheduled to speak at a luncheon.

The Assassination

Crowds of excited people lined the streets and waved to the Kennedys. The car turned off Main Street at Dealey Plaza around 12:30 p.m. As it was passing the Texas School Book Depository, gunfire suddenly reverberated in the plaza.

Bullets struck the president's neck and head and he slumped over toward Mrs. Kennedy. The governor was shot in his back. 

The car sped off to Parkland Memorial Hospital just a few minutes away. But little could be done for the President. A Catholic priest was summoned to administer the last rites, and at 1:00 p.m. John F. Kennedy was pronounced dead. Though seriously wounded, Governor Connally would recover.

The president's body was brought to Love Field and placed on Air Force One. Before the plane took off, a grim-faced Lyndon B. Johnson stood in the tight, crowded compartment and took the oath of office, administered by US District Court Judge Sarah Hughes. The brief ceremony took place at 2:38 p.m.

Less than an hour earlier, police had arrested Lee Harvey Oswald, a recently hired employee at the Texas School Book Depository. He was being held for the assassination of President Kennedy and the fatal shooting, shortly afterward, of Patrolman J. D. Tippit on a Dallas street.

On Sunday morning, November 24, Oswald was scheduled to be transferred from police headquarters to the county jail. Viewers across America watching the live television coverage suddenly saw a man aim a pistol and fire at point blank range. The assailant was identified as Jack Ruby, a local nightclub owner. Oswald died two hours later at Parkland Hospital.

The President's Funeral

That same day, President Kennedy's flag-draped casket was moved from the White House to the Capitol on a caisson drawn by six grey horses, accompanied by one riderless black horse. At Mrs. Kennedy's request, the cortege and other ceremonial details were modeled on the funeral of Abraham Lincoln. Crowds lined Pennsylvania Avenue and many wept openly as the caisson passed. During the 21 hours that the president's body lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda, about 250,000 people filed by to pay their respects.

On Monday, November 25, 1963 President Kennedy was laid to rest in Arlington National Cemetery. The funeral was attended by heads of state and representatives from more than 100 countries, with untold millions more watching on television. Afterward, at the grave site, Mrs. Kennedy and her husband's brothers, Robert and Edward, lit an eternal flame.

Perhaps the most indelible images of the day were the salute to his father given by little John F. Kennedy Jr. (whose third birthday it was), daughter Caroline kneeling next to her mother at the president's bier, and the extraordinary grace and dignity shown by Jacqueline Kennedy.

As people throughout the nation and the world struggled to make sense of a senseless act and to articulate their feelings about President Kennedy's life and legacy, many recalled these words from his inaugural address:

All this will not be finished in the first one hundred days, nor in the first one thousand days, nor in the life of this administration. Nor even perhaps in our lifetime on this planet. But let us begin.

Arlington National Cemetery

To learn more about President Kennedy's funeral and grave site, go to the Arlington National Cemetery website.

Aftermath

The Warren Commission

On November 29, 1963 President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed the President's Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy. It came to be known as the Warren Commission after its chairman, Earl Warren, Chief Justice of the United States. President Johnson directed the commission to evaluate matters relating to the assassination and the subsequent killing of the alleged assassin, and to report its findings and conclusions to him.

The House Select Committee on Assassinations

The US House of Representatives established the House Select Committee on Assassinations in 1976 to reopen the investigation of the assassination in light of allegations that previous inquiries had not received the full cooperation of federal agencies.

Note to the reader: Point 1B in the link below to the findings of the 1979 House Select Committee on Assassinations states that the committee had found "a high probability that two gunmen fired" at the president. This conclusion resulted from the last-minute “discovery” of a Dallas police radio transmission tape that allegedly provided evidence that four or more shots were fired in Dealey Plaza. After the report appeared in print, acoustic experts analyzed the tape and proved conclusively that it was completely worthless—thus negating the finding in Point 1B.

The committee, which also investigated the death of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., issued its report on March 29, 1979.

Assassination Records Collection

Through the President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act of 1992, the US Congress ordered that all assassination-related material be housed together under supervision of the National Archives and Records Administration.

Источник: https://www.jfklibrary.org/learn/about-jfk/jfk-in-history/november-22-1963-death-of-the-president

Inside QAnon’s JFK Jr conspiracy

Conspiracy theorist group QAnon hit a bizarre milestone on Tuesday, when its supporters gathered for what they believed would be the return of the late JFK junior – who, they postured, would be running on an imagined 2024 ticket with former President Donald Trump.

John Fitzgerald Kennedy Junior’s plane was pulled out of the Atlantic Ocean more than 22 years ago in a crash that killed him, his wife Carolyn and his sister-in-law, Lauren Bessette.

For some QAnon true believers, however, the son of the 35th president of the United States not only survived the tragedy but is poised to make a dramatic return to public life.

A bizarre theory has emerged suggesting that the accident was just a ruse to fake his death and that he will re-emerge – perhaps as early as next month – to join a reinstated President Donald Trump as his VP.

<p>The crowds gathered at Dealey Plaza in Dallas, Texas, on Tuesday </p>

And those devotees gathered on Tuesday for what they expected would be a dramatic revelation at the AT&T Discovery Plaza in Dallas – but was in fact more of a damp squib. When JFK junior unsurprisingly failed to make an appearance, people in the crowd suggested he would in fact make an appearance at a Rolling Stones concert later that day.

Of course, he also failed to attend that event.

But that hasn’t stopped people from speculating that the deceased Kennedy is still alive.

A viral video has even shown a middle-aged man that some QAnon devotees claim is JFK Jr himself.

The theory is strange even by the standards of QAnon – which claims Democrats and Hollywood celebrities are involved in a secret cannibalistic cult which Donald Trump is secretly battling, a theory expounded in cryptic internet messages by a mysterious prophet-like figure known as Q. And while only a fraction appear to believe the JFK Jr angle, experts say it is still damaging to their relationships and their grasp on reality.

QAnon supporters gather in hope JFK Jnr. returns from dead

Will Sommer, author of the upcoming book Trust the Plan: The Rise of QAnon and the Conspiracy That Reshaped America and a longtime observer of the conspiracy theory, estimates that about 20 per cent of Q followers believe in JFK Jr’s re-emergence, but that those who do, “100 per cent believe”.

“QAnon itself is obviously pretty dangerous. It’s hard to say whether the people who believe the JFK Jr [conspiracy] are more dangerous than the QAnon people who don’t,” he told The Independent.

“Part of the problem, just like with any QAnon belief, is that it’s so bizarre that it alienates people from their friends and family.”

But how did “John John” – poignantly pictured saluting his assassinated father’s coffin at the age of three – come to be drawn into such an outlandish fantasy?

<p>A memorial to John F Kennedy Jr following his death featuring a metal sculpture recalling his salute, aged three, to his father’s funeral cortege in 1963</p>

The story goes that after faking his death, Kennedy returned two decades later to help Mr Trump drain the swamp. First he supposedly appeared as Q himself (or close to Q) with the “Q drops” of cryptic information. Then, he was to have revealed himself in 2019, to replace Mike Pence on the president’s 2020 re-election ticket, or maybe the 2021 “reinstatement” (supposedly scheduled for 13 August – although there is no mechanism for reinstating a former president), or maybe the 2024 campaign.

The timeline has kept shifting with each passing milestone.

In the meantime, the lore goes, Kennedy has been in hiding, disguised as a middle-aged, fedora-wearing financial services manager from Pittsburgh named Vincent Fusca.

JFK Jr began trending on Twitter after the comedy duo The Good Liars spotted Mr Fusca at the CPAC conservative conference in July in a video that went viral with 14,000 likes and 2,000 retweets.

“Are you JFK Jr? Yes or No? How did you survive the plane crash? Or was it faked? Wink twice if you’re JFK Jr,” the pair asked him.

Their target, apparently no longer 6ft 1in tall, and wearing a pro-Trump shirt saying “ We want you back, Sir, we miss you Mr President”, responded: “I don’t know who you are man – oh, he’s filming, we got to get going.”

Mr Fusca did not immediately respond to The Independent’s request for an interview. But it’s unclear which is the real Vincent Fusca as several Twitter accounts invoke the name of the man some believe to be a reincarnated JFK Jr.

One Twitter account @vincent_fusca with 134,000 followers, tweeted in the early hours of 7 January – the day after a pro-Trump mob stormed the Capitol to try to prevent Joe Biden’s victory being certified – a mysterious poem featuring lines like “ Surrounded by Truth you see them attack / Do they Eternally want freedom intact? … Soon you’ll be shown the republic where we emancipate at.”

Another account, @Vincent__Fusca, describes himself as a loving husband, father, patriot and Trump supporter with an undying love for the US.

Yet another is called “VINCENT FUSCA HAS OFFICIALLY RETURNED“. He hasn’t fully tweeted since Joe Biden won the election in November, but preaches his own resurrection: “My return was slated for 7/4/20- The date has moved up; VINCE FUSCA IS BACK- JFK JR IS RISEN!”

The theory appears to have emerged from an April 2018 Q drop resurfacing a pre-Q era theory in which JFK Jr’s 1999 plane crash was orchestrated by the Clintons, supposedly to prevent him running for the New York Senate seat later won by Hillary Clinton.

Fact-checkers from Snopes had tackled this older strain of the conspiracy when it spread during the 2016 election, pointing to a New York Daily News article in an effort to debunk it.

Daily News journalist Joel Siegel wrote four days after Kennedy’s death that two friends confirmed the “best-kept” secrets in politics, that he had been seeking the seat.

“The idea became moot once First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton signalled her interest in running, but the two friends said they expected the son of the slain President eventually would have jumped into politics as a candidate,” the story said.

“The second friend called Kennedy’s interest ‘pretty serious,’ adding: ‘I think he was intrigued by the idea … Would he have decided in the end to go for it? I don’t know. But he was clearly thinking about it. He talked to a few people about it. Then the Hillary thing ended it pretty quickly.”

Writing for The Daily Beast, Mr Sommer has been following the evolution of that shifting pre-Q conspiracy, into a Q-conspiracy, since it emerged on 4- and 8Chan messaging boards around October 2017.

<p>John F Kennedy Jr with President Bill Clinton at the White House in 1998</p>

The summer of that year, a new poster going simply by “R”, later dubbed Ranon, connected the existing conspiracy that Kennedy faked his death by saying he did it to become Q so that he could help his friend, Donald Trump, become president.

The supposed evidence: Mr Trump met Russian President Vladimir Putin in Helsinki on 16 July, the 19th anniversary of Kennedy’s fatal plane crash.

Mr Sommer says that for many QAnon believers, this theory is a step too far.

“There is this funny dynamic in QAnon both with JFK Jr and other stuff where they say, ‘Oh I believe that world elites drink children’s blood and all this kind of stuff, but ‘WOAH JFK Jr, that’s the crazy one’.

“I think it’s just so farcical on its face that they’re kind of embarrassed by it, if someone comes out and says I think world elites sometimes abuse their power to abuse children - that doesn’t sound that crazy. If someone were to come out and say, ‘I think JFK Jr was still alive’ - so yeah they find it embarrassing.”

Rolling Stone writer EJ Dickson continued pulling the thread and found the idea gained popularity after George W Bush campaign staffer turned investigative journalist Liz Crokin, formerly of The Chicago Tribune and National Inquirer, began tweeting and talking about the theory in 2018.

“Right after I shared this on Twitter there was a hit piece written about me and I’m thinking, that’s really crazy, that is so bizarre, I just tweeted a theory that wasn’t even my own, and said this is interesting and next thing there’s a hit piece about me, calling me names … so that made me think, there’s something to this,” she said in a YouTube interview.

“The way that Q talks about JFK Sr in the posts, it is with such love and passion, it makes me think that it is someone that is close to him. To me, if If JFK Jr faked his death and was alive, it would make sense that he was Q.”

More evidence came in the form of an (unverified) quote from Kennedy published in his George magazine just one month before his death.

He said: “If my dear friend Donald Trump ever decided to sacrifice his fabulous billionaire lifestyle to become president he would be an unstoppable force for ultimate justice that Democrats and Republicans alike would celebrate”.

The two were friends, and the photo of them together used in the post was real, from a New York Knicks game in March 1999, three months before the June 1999 issue the quote claimed to be from. The closest quote fact-checkers from the Poynter Institute’s PolitiFact found was from a story in The New York Post in November 2016 from Michael Berman, co-founder of George magazine, when Mr Trump and Kennedy schmoozed at Mar-a-Lago.

“As frequently happened to Kennedy at his events, talk soon turned to whether he could envision himself running for president. Trying to deflect the presidential chatter, Kennedy noted that the Trump estate was far more glamorous than a Kennedy family compound a few miles away. ‘I think you should be asking those questions of Donald,’ Kennedy said, according to Berman. ‘He’d clearly have the most extravagant winter White House.’”

Kennedy crashed the Piper Saratoga plane he was flying – with his wife and sister-in-law as passengers – into the Atlantic near Martha’s Vineyard on 16 July, 1999. Their bodies were found five days later. The latest tragedy to befall a family apparently haunted by misfortune made headlines around the world.

For his supposed return at a 4th of July rally in 2019, some supporters carried JFK Jr facemasks.

Others carried Trump JFK Jr 2020 flags or wore his likeness on their shirts, shouting “He’s alive”. Mr Sommer says supporters cheer and interact with Mr Fusca when they see him and ask him if he is really JFK Jr.

“His whole deal is that he’s very cryptic about it. He obviously knows what’s going on but he doesn’t comment on it,” Mr Sommer says.

“He talks about Q and stuff like that. But when I’m like, I want to talk about how people think you’re JFK Jr, he doesn’t do that.”

Spotting Mr Fusca in the background of MAGA rallies and GOP events has become a popular sport for some QAnon followers.

He was seen at Mr Trump’s Ohio rally on 26 June this year, according to Patriot Takes, and before that was seen at CPAC in July. He was also seen at CPAC two years ago in this Reddit post, “JFK Jr spotted at CPAC…. Hillary’s arrest must be imminent”.

At February’s CPAC, he could be seen behind former housing secretary Ben Carson, giving a double-thumbs up, as if to say, “trust the plan”.

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Источник: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-politics/jfk-jr-qanon-back-dead-dallas-b1964092.html

The son of former U.S. President John F. Kennedy, John F. Kennedy Jr. entered the field of magazine publishing before his death in a plane crash in 1999.

Who Was John F. Kennedy Jr?

John F. Kennedy Jr. was the second child born to John F. Kennedy and Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy. He may be most remembered as a child at his father's funeral procession, bravely saluting his father's casket. Although he found success in publishing, Kennedy's life was cut short when the plane he was flying crashed into the Long Island Sound off the coast of Martha's Vineyard in 1999. His wife and sister-in-law also perished in the accident.

Early Life

John Fitzgerald Kennedy Jr. was born on November 25, 1960, in Washington, D.C. The first child ever born to a president-elect, Kennedy was the second child born to John F. Kennedy and Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy (later Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis). After President Kennedy was assassinated on November 22, 1963, little "John-John" won America's hearts in that much photographed moment when, as just a small child, he bravely saluted his father's casket. With looks inherited from his attractive parents, Kennedy, despite strict protection from his mother, was in the media spotlight his entire life as one of American journalists' favorite subjects.

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'George' Magazine Publisher

After flirting very briefly with a career in acting and graduating from Brown University and New York University Law School, Kennedy worked as an assistant district attorney in New York City. He then left the legal profession to get into the business of journalism, and in 1995 he launched the successful, hip political magazine George. Although he certainly could have had a future in politics, he never entered the political arena, choosing instead to make his own way in the world. He did, however, leave the door open for running for office later in his life. Known for his adventurous nature, he nonetheless took pains to separate himself from the more reckless antics and self-destructive impulses of some of the other men in the Kennedy clan.

Marriage to Carolyn Bessette

Named "Sexiest Man Alive" by People magazine in 1988, Kennedy had been linked with numerous Hollywood celebrities, including Madonna, Julia Roberts and Sarah Jessica Parker. In September 1996, he married longtime girlfriend, Carolyn Bessette. The two shared a loft apartment in New York City's TriBeCa neighborhood, where Kennedy was often seen rollerblading and biking on the city's streets.

Tragic Death

On July 16, 1999, Kennedy, Bessette-Kennedy, and her sister, Lauren Bessette, were flying to Martha's Vineyard on a single-engine private plane, piloted by Kennedy, en route to a cousin's wedding in Hyannisport, Massachusetts. When their plane did not arrive as scheduled, massive search parties were sent out to locate the aircraft. Search efforts persisted throughout the following days, initially to no avail. Luggage and debris from the wreckage were found washed ashore the Gay Head section of Martha's Vineyard, and the three passengers were eventually presumed dead. Across the nation, Americans mourned the loss of the beloved son of one of the country's most admired families and shared their sadness in the tragedies that seem to haunt them.

On July 21, search crews recovered the bodies of Kennedy, his wife and sister-in-law. The Kennedy and Bessette families planned a burial at sea for all three. A private mass for Kennedy and his wife was held at the Church of St. Thomas More on Manhattan's Upper East Side, where his mother worshipped; it was attended by President Bill Clinton and Hillary Clinton.

Kennedy was survived by his uncle, Massachusetts Senator Ted Kennedy, and his sister, Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg, as well as a number of cousins. Struggling from lack of advertising support (although circulation was growing), Kennedy's George magazine ceased publication in early 2001.

A&E Biography Special

July 16, 2019, marked the 20-year anniversary of Kennedy’s death. The two-hour documentary special, which aired on the anniversary, reframed the last year of his life in an entirely new way. Inspired by Steven M. Gillon’s upcoming book, America’s Reluctant Prince: The Life of John F. Kennedy Jr., this captivating special was the most substantive documentary to date and included convincing new evidence regarding his political aspirations before his untimely death. This compelling documentary shined an unexpectedly poignant light on 1999, his last year, as he coped with the fatal illness of his closest friend and cousin, Anthony Radziwill, struggled to save his marriage and tried to rescue his political magazine, George.

With the guidance of historian and longtime friend Steven M. Gillon, along with never-before-seen footage and the recollections of Anthony Radziwill's widow, Carole Radziwill who spoke in-depth for the first time, a new story emerges. As the story unfolded, viewers were given a behind the scenes look at memorable moments in Kennedy’s life including his speech at the 1988 DNC convention with never-before-broadcast footage of Kennedy rehearsing for the event, exclusive stories and photos from his wedding, reflections on George and more.

The documentary also featured extensive on-camera interviews with former President Clinton, former George publisher David Pecker, friend Gary Ginsberg, former assistant and close friend RoseMarie Terenzio as well as childhood friend Sasha Chermayeff.

Watch "John F. Kennedy Jr.: The Death of an American Prince" on HISTORY Vault

Источник: https://www.biography.com

We first published this story in 2019 to mark the 20th anniversary of the tragic deaths of Carolyn Bessette Kennedy and JFK Jr.

In early May 1999, George magazine hosted a table at the White House Correspondents Dinner. The glossy’s guest list reflected the template for the annual event: Hollywood celebrities (Sean Penn, Claire Danes), controversial pop culture figures (Larry Flynt), and writers and editors. Rarely were the latter the biggest stars of the night, but George’s editor-in-chief was John F. Kennedy Jr., and his date for the night was his wife, Carolyn Bessette Kennedy.

John, 38, was American royalty, as famous for his good looks as for his name. His wife, 33, was an enigma, mysterious and elegant. They were irresistible to cameras in their black-tie best, shaking hands with politicians and stars.

“It was magical,” George staffer RoseMarie Terenzio says of that night. “John was very much ready to make a splash with George. He was proud of it and thought, This is the time, this is the place, and we belong here. We just had a great time. Carolyn really was proud of John, and she was happy to be there to support him. She talked to everyone at the table and everyone at the next table. She went around to everyone on the staff and said hello.”

Tyler Mallory

After the dinner, held at the Washington Hilton, the group made their way to an afterparty hosted by Vanity Fair. It was this exclusive celebrity political event, and they were the stars of the show,” says Terenzio. “Everyone stopped and turned around as they walked in.”

This was a time. George had to be figured out; John's cousin is dying. Maybe Carolyn has to decide how she wants to live her life. That's when the accident happened.

It was there that one of the most famous images of the couple was taken. John’s blazer is off, and Carolyn is nestled on his lap. In one frame he is whispering in her ear, in another he is kissing her. All the questions that dogged them—about their marriage, about her deep distrust of the media, about his future and where it would take them—seem far away. They are a couple at ease and in love, content and relaxed. They fit together.

It’s impossible to know whether this photo is the truth about John and Carolyn or simply a happy moment caught amid the swirl that followed them everywhere. Despite their golden couple status, in the summer of 1999 John and Carolyn were at a crossroads. They were facing careers in flux, the ups and downs of the early years of marriage and questions about children—and, most poignantly, the final days of a close loved one, John’s cousin Anthony Radziwill.

Arnaldo MagnaniGetty Images

“This was a time,” says Matt Berman, the creative director of George and a close friend of the couple’s. “George had to be figured out; his cousin’s dying. Maybe Carolyn has to decide how she wants to live her life. Does she want to work? Does she want to have kids? Does she want to lead charities?”

“Here you are in the middle of a shift like that, and that’s when the accident happened.”

The choices they might have made—and the answers they might have found—were rendered forever unknowable on July 16. On that hazy Friday evening, John took off in his small private plane from New Jersey’s Essex County Airport, with Carolyn and her sister Lauren Bessette, 34, as his passengers. Before they reached their destination on Martha’s Vineyard, the plane crashed, killing them all.

Those who knew John and Carolyn as a couple describe a warm pair who brought together unlikely acquaintances and welcomed all those around them, from fashion types and schoolmates to George colleagues at all levelsand highbrow celebrities like John’s longtime friend Christiane Amanpour. John was compulsively busy; in addition to his hands-on role at George, he had numerous Kennedy family obligations. They traveled (that spring to London for the opening of Ralph Lauren’s new boutique) and had cozy weekend get-togethers with family on Martha’s Vineyard.

Living in a loft on North Moore Street, they were icons of Tribeca, which was midway through a transition that would take it from commercial zone to New York’s wealthiest zip code. Both John and Carolyn were regularly spotted on the cobblestone streets with their dog Friday. They helped popularize neighborhood restaurants like the Odeon and Bubby’s, both of which have become downtown institutions.

Evan AgostiniGetty Images

But beneath the surface, John and Carolyn were dealing with a heart-wrenching crisis. In early 1994, Anthony Radziwill had been diagnosed with a rare sarcoma. (The news came within weeks of Jackie Kennedy being diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which would take her life just months later.) Anthony and John were very close. The son of John’s maternal aunt Lee and Polish prince Stanisław Albrecht Radziwiłł, Anthony was nearly the same age as John and the only male cousin on Jackie’s side of the family. The two were like brothers, serving as best man in each other’s weddings.

Over the course of his illness, Anthony underwent surgeries, chemotherapy, and experimental treatments; always by his side was his wife Carole, a fellow producer at ABC News whom he married in 1994. But by 1999 it was becoming clear that Anthony would not recover. “The summer of 1999 was very difficult for all of us,” Carole remembers. “We knew that it was likely Anthony would not survive to see Labor Day, and we were all on edge, not knowing what to do or say. We were all doing our best to keep smiles on our faces.”

ALBERT MCCABEGetty Images

Those who knew John saw the impact that Anthony’s illness had on him, particularly in 1999. “That was a very painful year [for him], to watch someone he’d grown up with, who was exactly his age, and he’s dying and it’s really hard on his wife, his sister, his mother,” says Sasha Chermayeff, an artist and longtime friend who first met John when she and he both transferred to Phillips Andover Academy as juniors. “For John, I think that Anthony’s illness brought everybody closer in a good way, including Carolyn and him.”

Ron GalellaGetty Images

Carolyn too was deeply affected by the ordeal the Radziwills faced. She and Carole had made an immediate connection—each had gone from a teenage job behind the counter at a Caldor department store to marrying royalty, one figuratively, one literally. Their relationship deepened over the course of Anthony’s illness. “We grew very close, often spending day after day at various hospitals together,” Carole remembers. “I spent only five years with Carolyn before her death in 1999, but we went through a lot of real life stuff in that short time.”

John might have turned to work as a welcome distraction, but his professional life was also in something of a crisis. When he launched George in September 1995, with a Herb Ritts cover photo of Cindy Crawford outfitted as George Washington, the magazine had been a hit. Kennedy’s name and mystique gave George access to talent that most upstart publications could only dream of. Madonna contributed to the first issue, and covers featuring Kate Moss and Barbra Streisand landed with a splash. Having America’s most eligible bachelor at the helm created a built-in audience, and the first two issues broke records for ad sales in a new publication.

Getty Images/Hearst Magazine Media, Inc.

The magazine’s purview was the intersection of politics and pop culture, and it aimed to introduce smart, savvy political coverage to an audience that was often bored by the topic. “John’s basic conceit was we’re living in a world where, like it or not, pop culture and politics are merging, and if you treat politics as part of the pop culture and politicians as celebrities, you might bring more people into the tent to become interested in politics,” says literary agent David Kuhn, a friend of John’s who had worked as an editor at Vanity Fair and the New Yorker and consulted on the launch of George. “He was really ahead of his time with that idea, and no one has given him credit for it. The fact that Donald Trump is president proves that what John was saying 20 years ago has come to pass.”

But the magazine, however prescient, missed its goal of being profitable within three years, and ad rates dropped in later years. By 1999, John and his collaborators faced difficult choices about the future of their enterprise. “I think what was stressful was that we were at a growing pains point,” says Berman, author of JFK Jr., George, & Me: A Memoir. “What was going to work for us? Are we going to be better in a big corporation? Is it more of an independent project? Should John find funding and we do it on our own?”

New York Daily News ArchiveGetty Images

Kennedy’s corporate partner in George had been French publisher Hachette Filipacchi, which was reportedly considering pulling funding for the magazine. John was spotted in meetings with executives like Conde Nast’s Steve Florio, and he had flown to Toronto the week before his death for a meeting about a potential partnership with Canadian investors to buy out shares of George.

In the Spring of 1999, Hachette got a new American CEO, Jack Kliger, which put John on even shakier footing with his corporate partner. Kliger, however, disputes the idea that Hachette had stopped believing in George, insisting now that he was working with Kennedy in good faith to keep the magazine alive. “It was not making money at that point, and the trend lines were not heading the right way in terms of revenue growth versus cost growth,” Kliger says. “He understood all of that, and he wanted to figure out an alternative plan, which I said I was prepared to put forth to the corporate parent in France. We were working on that effectively, and then history cut us short.”

Kliger says Kennedy canceled a meeting with him that had been scheduled for the afternoon of the day he died, explaining that he was going away for the weekend but that he intended to meet with Kliger in the coming week.

Hanging over John at all times was the question of what, exactly, he would do with his life—and whether he would eventually follow his father and uncles into the family business and seek elected office. After his marriage that potential path became even more fraught, as it would have required the full participation of Carolyn, who guarded her privacy closely. Her distaste for the spotlight that came with being a Kennedy was articulated early on in their relationship.

During the press conference for the launch of George, Newsday reported that Carole Radziwill had been mistaken by a reporter for Carolyn. “She wouldn't be caught dead here,” Radziwill told the paper.

New York Daily News ArchiveGetty Images

In 1999, Carolyn Bessette Kennedy was facing her own professional crossroads. When she and John had begun dating, two years before their 1996 wedding, she was working for Calvin Klein. Though she is frequently described as a golden girl from Greenwich, Connecticut, she was scrappier than that reputation implies. Her parents had divorced when she was very young, and Carolyn and her twin sisters, Lisa and Lauren, had been raised by their mother Ann Freeman, an educator, and her stepfather Richard Freeman, a surgeon. Carolyn attended Boston University, where she had supported herself with part-time jobs. “She always worked,” Colleen Curtis, who roomed with Carolyn in college, told T&C in 2016. “Always.”

She had risen from a retail job at the Calvin Klein boutique in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, to a rarefied role in the company. “I’ve been doing this for 40 years now, and there are probably five or six people who stand out,” says Neil Kraft, who worked as creative director at Calvin Klein in the ’90s. “This had nothing to do with the Kennedys. I couldn’t care less about that. But she was one of those people who stood out at Calvin just as a force.”

Kevin Wisniewski/Shutterstock

Sam Shahid was an art director who worked with Carolyn on photo shoots by Calvin’s then-wife, Kelly Klein. He recalls bumping into her often at restaurants like Il Cantinori, where she would dine discreetly with friends like designer Narciso Rodriguez. “When Carolyn walked into the room, you always knew she was there, the presence. I think Calvin just worshiped her as far as the style. He really depended on her for her taste and her style and her ideas and music,” Shahid says.

By the time Carolyn married John, she was no longer working for Calvin Klein, and the frenzy that followed her everywhere made it difficult to imagine her ever working in a traditional office again. The paparazzi were merciless in their pursuit of her, staking out the Tribeca apartment and following her through the streets of the neighborhood so doggedly that she feared for her safety.

While John had been born into the public domain and raised to accept with grace the fact that the nation felt an ownership of him, Carolyn went from private citizen to world famous celebrity virtually overnight, a notoriety she did everything she could to play down. She never granted a single interview, and we have almost no examples of her talking on camera. The tabloids had rushed to label the statuesque blonde an ice princess, somehow unworthy of America’s favorite son, and her reticence led many to conclude that she was remote and humorless.

The truth, according to her friends, was far different. “She had this amazing sense of humor, really sharp and funny,” Berman says. “For the most part no one really knows what she sounded like or talked like or what kind of woman she was. I found her very down to earth, very funny, very supportive of her friends, very caring. All the things that you don’t see in a picture.”

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Berman and other George staff members say Carolyn treated them like family, visiting the office and frequently hosting them at home. She also maintained a close knit group of friends that included Narciso Rodriguez, who had designed her wedding dress; Paul Wilmot, a PR executive who was her former boss; designer Gordon Henderson; stylist Joe McKenna; Kelly Klein; Marci Klein; and casting agent Jessica Weinstein. They followed her lead and never spoke to the media about her.

Carolyn's favorite phrase was, 'We need to talk.'

At a memorial mass at New York City’s St. Thomas More Church on July 23, Hamilton South, one of her closest friends, delivered a eulogy that reflected on Carolyn’s tremendous capacity for friendship. “Her favorite phrase was, ‘We need to talk.’ That would be the beginning of a two- or three-hour telephone odyssey, a tour of Carolyn’s horizon that revealed a range of interest that left you spinning—from this new book to that museum, from fashion to Walt Whitman, from what’s in the paper to what’s up in town. She could be highbrow and low-down. It left you breathless, exhausted, and hungry for more,” he said.

“To spoof herself, and to cover up what she was really doing, she’d say in these talks, ‘Now let’s remember, it’s all about me.’ She made it the permanent subject line in her e-mail: ‘It’s about me.’ But that was just another of her secrets—it was ­never about her. When you talked to Carolyn it was all about you, and all about life.”

MICHAEL FERGUSON/GLOBE PHOTOS

In his remarks, South also said that Carolyn had a professional dream of creating documentaries that would focus on people facing challenges, working out of a small office in Tribeca.

Work was reportedly not the only thing troubling her. Several books and articles published since their deaths have claimed that John and Carolyn were in a difficult patch in their marriage; there were claims that both had been unfaithful. “Three years into the marriage things were really problematic,” says Kennedy’s good friend Sasha Chermayeff. “I know that they really did love each other. It was not a lack of love.”

One source of conflict may have been the question of whether to have children. John was godfather to both of Chermayeff’s children, and she believes that he very much wanted to become a father one day. Carolyn was five years younger than John, and Chermayeff thinks he may have felt ready for parenthood before she did.

Other friends speak of a normal couple weathering the turbulence of a new marriage. Another close friend disputes reports of serious relationship woes and says that the two were working with a realtor to find a second home outside New York and thinking about having children.

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As the calendar flipped to July, both John and Carolyn were doing their best to live their lives, despite Anthony’s declining health and the questions looming around George. Carole and Anthony Radziwill had just moved into Red Gate Farm, Jackie’s home on Martha’s Vineyard, so he could spend his last summer in a serene environment.

John was recovering from a broken ankle, an injury he got in a paragliding accident over Memorial Day weekend. A lifelong athlete who used exercise as one of his main forms of stress management, John would surely have been eager to be free of the cast. He had maintained his breakneck schedule while on crutches, but his limited mobility would have had a profound affect on his mood.

In the week leading up to the plane crash there were also questions about whether Carolyn would accompany John to the Hyannis Port wedding of his cousin Rory Kennedy, the youngest of Robert and Ethel Kennedy’s children. It was an event John felt pressure to attend as an ambassador for his branch of the family, since his sister Caroline would not be there. He had his cast removed only the day before the flight. Kliger, Hachette’s CEO, recalls that John was still limping that Friday.

John had had a fascination with aviation since his early childhood, when he would watch his father’s helicopter touch down on the White House lawn. He pursued flying intermittently over the years, becoming more serious about it only after the death of his mother in 1994. (She reportedly disapproved of her son flying, perhaps partly due to her stepson Alexander Onassis having died in a crash in 1973.) John enrolled in a Florida school in early 1998 and received a private pilot’s license that April.

Estate of Stanley Tretick

Friends had been concerned about Kennedy’s interest in flying, but it fit with his enthusiasm for other adventurous pursuits, such as extreme kayaking, scuba diving, and, yes, paragliding. Chermayeff says she saw the appeal to John of piloting himself, as traveling via public airports left him uniquely vulnerable to crowds.

“It’s one thing when you’re in a restaurant and people come up to you. You can sneak out the door when you’re done and get in a cab and end up in a different place. But he hated the airport, because he was always so stuck,” she says. “He was just like, ‘I have to sit there,’ and one person after the next is just going to come up to him. He was too nice to be ruthless about it, so he loved flying, and he loved that little airport.”

While Carolyn had expressed some hesitation about flying with John, in this instance she agreed to make the trip. Her sister Lauren, who worked for Morgan Stanley and lived near them in Tribeca, chose to travel with the couple. She had weekend plans on Martha’s Vineyard, and John was going to drop her off there before continuing on to Hyannis Port.

LAURA CAVANAUGH / GLOBE PHOTOS

John typically made weekend flights to Massachusetts with his instructor, Jay Biederman, but Biederman was unavailable that Friday night. John chose to forgo taking another pilot. When his Piper Saratoga, which he had purchased less than three months earlier, took off from New Jersey at 8:39 p.m. on July 16, it is likely that it was John’s first time making the trip alone in his new plane. John and his passengers took off later than they had intended, and there was a thick haze that night that limited visibility; other pilots had decided not to fly.

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When the plane did not arrive as scheduled, Dan Samson, a longtime friend who had planned to pick up John and Carolyn, became alarmed. He checked in with the Radziwills to see if there had perhaps been a change of plans, which ignited a ping-ponging of frantic phone calls as friends and family tried to locate them.

Eventually the coast guard and navy were brought in. The search would extend across more than 1,000 square miles and last five days. It became apparent that the plane had crashed seven miles off Martha’s Vineyard a little more than an hour after departure. Rory Kennedy postponed her wedding; the white tent that had been meant to house a reception for 275 guests was used instead as a site for family to gather and wait and pray. (Rory and her fiancé married three weeks later in a small private ceremony in Greece.)

The National Transportation Safety Board report on the accident said the probable cause of the crash was “the pilot’s failure to maintain control of the airplane during a descent over water at night, which was the result of spatial disorientation.” It referenced his lack of experience flying without an instructor and the fact that he wasn’t “instrument rated,” which could have helped him navigate the overcast conditions. There were also questions about his decision to fly solo and the fact that his ankle was not fully healed.

JOHN MOTTERN

“It was so upsetting to me that he flew that night when he had just gotten his cast off,” says Chermayeff. “He wasn’t fully instrument trained; he shouldn’t have done it. It was a pilot negligent mistake in which he died and two people died with him. I have nothing but sadness about that.”

Kevin Wisniewski/Shutterstock

Richard Weise, a friend and fraternity brother of John’s from Brown who is the son of a pilot and flies himself, had mentioned to John right after he got his pilot’s license that he subscribed to a publication about climbing accidents. “I said I read it because I want to learn from other people’s mistakes. And he said, ‘Oh, you’re just trying to discourage me,’ ” Weise says. “That was probably what he didn’t get, that whole idea of learning from other people’s mistakes.”

“To be honest, I wasn’t surprised [by the crash]. Clearly he was flying in a plane that he was not trained or equipped to handle. I think he had many great qualities, but attention to detail was not one of them.”

During a week of memorials in New York and Greenwich, John, Carolyn, and Lauren’s ashes were laid to rest in the Atlantic Ocean following a Catholic service held on a navy ship. Coverage at the time noted that being at sea made it one of the few moments in John’s life when cameras were unable to intrude.

No one in the Bessette family has ever spoken publicly about the loss of two daughters. A year after the crash, Carolyn and Lauren’s mother Ann Freeman released a statement through her lawyer. In it she said, “The loss of these three young people whom we loved so much has forever changed our lives. We continue to struggle with our grief, and we choose to maintain what's left of our privacy.”

HENNY RAY ABRAMS

Three weeks after the funeral, Anthony Radziwill, who had recited Psalm 23, “The Lord Is My Shepherd,” at his best friend and cousin’s memorial, died in a hospital in Manhattan. He was buried in East Hampton. Caroline Kennedy delivered a eulogy; her brother had already begun to write one, which he never got to give.

Carole Radziwill understands better than anyone that there is no way of knowing where John and Carolyn would be today, but she has imagined it frequently over the years. “I’d like to think John and Carolyn would have lots of kids. I know they both wanted that. I imagine the tabloids would eventually tire of them and leave them to live in peace. John’s magazine, George, would be a spectacular success story. But that’s the thing about young deaths: You don’t only mourn what was, you also mourn what could have been.”

Источник: https://www.townandcountrymag.com/society/tradition/a28187331/john-f-kennedy-jr-carolyn-bessette-last-days-plane-crash-true-story/

Where is John F. Kennedy buried?

President John F. Kennedy is buried in Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia.

And in this post, we will explain why he is buried here, and how you can visit his gravesite, and explain the design of this memorial to the 35th President of the USA.

Additionally, you can all visit the gravesites of his wife, 2 children, as well as brothers Robert F. Kennedy, Teddy Kennedy, and Joe Jr.


Why is JFK Buried in Arlington National Cemetery?

On a visit to Arlington National Cemetery in March of 1963, just 8 months before his assassination, President Kennedy paid a visit to Arlington House, which had been recently renamed the Robert E. Lee National Memorial.

The president was a big history buff and he relished the chance to walk in the same room where General Lee had decided to resign from the army that he had served for 30 years.

Upon leaving the house, Kennedy soaked up the spectacular view of the cemetery as well as the capital city, purportedly stating, "I could spend forever here."

 

 

Immediately following his assassination, there were many questions as to where he would be buried.

Many people assumed he would be buried in his home state of Massachusetts as most presidents are buried in their home states, if not their home towns.  

However, when asked, his wife Jacqueline, who was informed of her husband's words, stated, "he belongs to the people."

She realized that the public was in mourning and that a small private cemetery could not sustain the number of visitors who would want to visit President Kennedy's grave.

She thus requested that her husband be laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery.


The Original Memorial

On November 25, 1963, President Kennedy's funeral commenced.

The ceremony was modeled after the service rendered for President Lincoln, also per the request of Mrs. Kennedy.  

A space on the hillside below Arlington House was chosen as the burial plot by the President's younger brother and Attorney General, Robert Kennedy, and then later confirmed by Mrs. Kennedy.

The area overlooks Memorial Bridge and offers an incredible view of Washington, DC.  

In honor of his legacy, an eternal flame was lit at the gravesite by Mrs. Kennedy.  

Mrs. Kennedy was absolutely correct in her prediction of the public's desire to visit the President's grave.

Within the first 3 years, over 16 million people came to pay their respects.

Though the initial memorial involved just a simple grave marker, the eternal flame, and a white wooden fence, the vast number of visitors necessitated the erection of a larger memorial.


John F. Kennedy Memorial Today

The current design, created by a family friend and architect John Carl Warnecke, was to be simple. 

It was to be a "grave marked by a memorial, as opposed to a memorial marked by a grave" in contrast to the more ostentatious memorials throughout the nation's capital.

There were two overriding design considerations.

The Eternal Flame


 

First, the memorial and grave would have to reflect early New England burial traditions, comprised of a simple granite headstone set flat in the ground surrounded by grass.

According to the Kennedy Library, the grave area also consists of irregular granite stones quarried near the Kennedy family home in Cape Cod.

Fescue and clover can be seen in the crevices between the stones to aid in the appearance that the stones are lying in a Massachusetts field.  

Additionally, both the granite and marble you will walk on when you visit were quarried in New England.  

Second, the design was to take into account Kennedy's faith in God. The new design incorporated the eternal flame from the first memorial.  

 

 

Excerpts from the President's first inaugural address (including the famous quote, "ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" were engraved around the elliptical, and an elevated rectangle terrace was constructed to accommodate the graves.

President Kennedy's two deceased children. The first is Patrick Kennedy, who died in infancy a few months prior to the assassination.

The second child is Arabella Kennedy, whose grave marker simply reads "Daughter" as she was stillborn and did not receive a birth certificate or an official name.

His wife, Jacqueline Kennedy, was interred after her death in 1994. 

Mrs. Kennedy came up with the idea of an eternal flame after having seen one memorializing the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier under the Arc de Triomphe in Paris.


HOW TO FIND THE MEMORIAL

The tomb and memorial to President John Fitzgerald Kennedy are located in lot 45, Section 30 of Arlington National Cemetery (ANC).  

It is a 10-minute walk from the Visitor Center (map) and a 15-minute walk from the Arlington Cemetery Metro Station.

 

 

You will not be able to drive to the gravesite. Walking is how the majority of visitors reach it.  

However, the site is one of 3 stops on the trams that operate in the cemetery. Tickets for the trams can be purchased inside of the Visitor Center.  

Please note that you will be walking up a slight incline to reach the site.  The site is wheelchair accessible.  

At the gravesite, absolute silence is expected.  Men are also expected to take off hats.

 


Robert "Bobby" Kennedy Memorial

If you are facing the memorial wall with Washington, DC viewable in the distance at JFK's gravesite, you will need to exit to your right

On June 6, 1968, less than 5 years after his brother's assassination and just a few months after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Robert Kennedy was killed after giving a speech in Los Angeles. At the time, he was the leading Democratic nominee for the presidency and was serving as Senator from New York.

Again, there was question as to where he should be buried, but ultimately it was decided to lay Senator Kennedy to rest next to his brother. A funeral Mass was held at St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York City, then his remains were transported on a train to Washington, D.C. Thousands lined the train tracks to pay their respects, delaying the train's arrival into Union Station until 9:10 p.m. A quiet and beautiful ceremony featuring 1,500 candles, Senator Kennedy's funeral at Arlington National Cemetery is the only one to take place at night.

Three years after the initial burial, a more elaborate memorial was constructed in honor of Senator Kennedy. The memorial features a semi-circular plaza, similar to the one featured in the president's memorial.  On the hill side, stands a simple, white wooden Christian cross.  At the time of RFK's funeral, this was the only white, wooden cross in ANC.

Opposite the cross, is a long, low-lying wall with shallow, calm waters with two inscriptions.  The first inscription is an excerpt taken from a speech given to students in South Africa in 1966 championing the anti-apartheid cause:

"It is from numberless diverse acts of courage and belief that human history is shaped each time a man stands up for an ideal or acts to improve the lot of others or strikes out against injustice. He sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest wall of oppression and resistance."

Possibly by design, small bubble peculate every few minutes from the back right causing small ripples waves to pass by the readers eyes.

The second quote comes from an except taken from a speech RFK delivered in Indianapolis on the night of Martin Luther King Jr's assassination.

"Aeschylus...wrote, "Even in our sleep, pain which cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart, until, in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom through the awful grace of God.' What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence and lawlessness; but is love and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country, whether they be white or whether they be black."

That evening and for several days following it, there was unrest in many cities across the USA.  Indianapolis was not one of them.

Edward "Ted" Kennedy Memorial

If facing Washington, D.C., continue down the path to your right to visit Edward Kennedy's grave.

Edward Kennedy, the youngest of the Kennedy brothers, passed away in 2009 after serving as Senator from Massachusetts for nearly 47 years. Known as the "liberal lion of the Senate," Ted Kennedy tragically lost his battle with brain cancer after 17 months. Following his death, Senator Kennedy's body was transported to Boston where it lay in repose at John F. Kennedy Library. Tens of thousands of visitors came to pay their respects to the veteran senator. A funeral mass was later held at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Basilica in Roxbury, MA. It was attended by many politicians, foreign dignitaries, and celebrities; President Obama delivered the eulogy. Senator Kennedy was then transported to Washington, DC, and a motorcade proceeded toward the Capitol before continuing on to Arlington National Cemetery.

Due to his 2 years of service in the United States Army combined with his time as senator, Ted Kennedy qualified to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery. He was laid to rest on the same slope as his brothers, just 100 feet from Robert Kennedy. His grave is marked with the same glossy white oak cross as Robert Kennedy, their's being the only two white wooden crosses in the cemetery. Senator Kennedy was a frequent visitor at Arlington National Cemetery, attending half a dozen times a year to visit his brothers and other loved ones. In 2012, a more elaborate pathway was added to the gravesite, connecting Senator Ted Kennedy's grave with those of his older brothers.

Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. 

Continue down the same pathway to the right to visit Joseph P. Kennedy Jr.'s grave.

When the new pathway was added for Ted Kennedy's grave in 2012, a memorial headstone was dedicated in honor of Joseph P. Kennedy Jr., who was the eldest of the Kennedy brothers. Prior to his death, Joseph Kennedy was very much predicted to be the leader and politician in the family. As the first born son of Joe Kennedy Sr., the U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom, Joseph Kennedy Jr. was encouraged to pursue politics after his service in the military. However, he was tragically killed in a top secret mission during World War II. Due to his bravery and sacrifice, Joseph P. Kennedy was awarded the Navy Cross, Distinguished Flying Cross, Purple Heart, and Air Medal. Following Joseph's death, John F. Kennedy, the second eldest of the Kennedy brothers, went on to fulfill those roles of leadership.

Unfortunately Joseph P. Kennedy Jr.'s remains were never recovered. However, in 2012 a cenotaph was erected in his honor.

Related Content:

 

Источник: https://freetoursbyfoot.com/john-f-kennedy-gravesite/

The son of former U.S. President John F. Kennedy, John F. Kennedy Jr. entered the field of magazine publishing before his death in a plane crash in 1999.

Who Was John F. Kennedy Jr?

John F. Kennedy Jr. was the second child born to John F. Kennedy and Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy. He may be most remembered as a child at his father's funeral procession, bravely saluting his father's casket. Although he found success in publishing, Kennedy's life was cut short when the plane he was flying crashed into the Long Island Sound off the coast of Martha's Vineyard in 1999. His wife and sister-in-law also perished in the accident.

Early Life

John Fitzgerald Kennedy Jr. was born on November 25, 1960, in Washington, D.C. The first child ever born to a president-elect, Kennedy was the second child born to John F. Kennedy and Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy (later Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis). After President Kennedy was assassinated on November 22, 1963, little "John-John" won America's hearts in that much photographed moment when, as just a small child, he bravely saluted his father's casket. With looks inherited from his attractive parents, Kennedy, despite strict protection from his mother, was in the media spotlight his entire life as one of American journalists' favorite subjects.

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'George' Magazine Publisher

After flirting very briefly with a career in acting and graduating from Brown University and New York University Law School, Kennedy worked as an assistant district attorney in New York City. He then left the legal profession to get into the business of journalism, and in 1995 he launched the successful, hip political magazine George. Although he certainly could have had a future in politics, he never john f kennedy jr memorial site the political arena, choosing instead to make his own way in the world. He did, however, leave the door open for running for office later in his life. Known for his adventurous nature, he nonetheless took pains to separate himself from the more reckless antics and self-destructive impulses of some of the other men in the Kennedy clan.

Marriage to Carolyn Bessette

Named "Sexiest Man Alive" by People magazine in 1988, Kennedy had been linked with numerous Hollywood celebrities, including Madonna, Julia Roberts and Sarah Jessica Parker. In September 1996, he married longtime girlfriend, Carolyn Bessette. The two shared a loft apartment in New York City's TriBeCa neighborhood, where Kennedy was often seen rollerblading and biking on the city's streets.

Tragic Death

On July 16, 1999, Kennedy, Bessette-Kennedy, and her sister, Lauren Bessette, were flying to Martha's Vineyard on a single-engine private plane, piloted by Kennedy, en route to a cousin's wedding in Hyannisport, Massachusetts. When their plane did not arrive as scheduled, massive search parties were sent out to locate the aircraft. Search efforts persisted throughout the following days, initially to no avail. Luggage and debris from the wreckage were found washed ashore the Gay Head section of Martha's Vineyard, and the three passengers were eventually presumed dead. Across the nation, Americans mourned the loss of the beloved son of one of the country's most admired families and shared their sadness in the tragedies that seem to haunt them.

On July 21, search crews recovered the bodies of Kennedy, his wife and sister-in-law. The Kennedy and Bessette families planned a burial at sea for all three. A private mass for Kennedy and his wife was held at the Church of St. Thomas More on Manhattan's Upper East Side, where his mother worshipped; it was attended by President Bill Clinton and Hillary Clinton.

Kennedy was survived by his uncle, Massachusetts Senator Ted Kennedy, and his sister, Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg, as well as a number of cousins. Struggling from lack of advertising support (although circulation was growing), Kennedy's George magazine ceased publication in early 2001.

A&E Biography Special

July 16, 2019, marked the 20-year anniversary of Kennedy’s death. The two-hour documentary special, which aired on the anniversary, reframed the last year of his life in an entirely new way. Inspired by Steven M. Gillon’s upcoming book, America’s Reluctant Prince: The Life of John F. Kennedy Jr., this captivating special was the most substantive documentary to date and included convincing new evidence regarding his political aspirations before his untimely death. This compelling documentary shined an unexpectedly poignant light on 1999, his last year, as he coped with the fatal illness of his closest friend and cousin, Anthony Radziwill, struggled to save his marriage and tried to rescue his political magazine, George.

With the guidance of historian and longtime friend Steven M. Gillon, along with never-before-seen footage and the recollections of Anthony Radziwill's widow, Carole Radziwill who spoke in-depth for the first time, a new story emerges. As the story unfolded, viewers were given a behind the scenes look at memorable moments in Kennedy’s life including his speech at the 1988 DNC convention with never-before-broadcast footage of Kennedy rehearsing for the event, exclusive stories and photos from his wedding, reflections on George and more.

The documentary also featured extensive on-camera interviews with former President Clinton, former George publisher David Pecker, friend Gary Ginsberg, former assistant and close friend RoseMarie Terenzio as well as childhood friend Sasha Chermayeff.

Watch "John F. Kennedy Jr.: The Death of an American Prince" on HISTORY Vault

Источник: https://www.biography.com

Remembering John F. Kennedy Jr.: His Life In Pictures

John F. Kennedy Jr. grew up in the spotlight, commonly thought of as America’s son. In fact, his uncle, who delivered his eulogy, told mourners that, “from the first day of his life, John seemed to belong not only to our family, but to the American family.” Here, we take a look back at John F. Kennedy Jr.’s life in pictures.

Early life in the White House

Kennedy Family, 1961

The Kennedy Family at the White House, February 1961. From left to right- John F. Kennedy, Caroline Kennedy, John F. Kennedy Jr., and Jacqueline Kennedy. (Photo Credit: John F. Kennedy Library/ Stringer/ Getty Images)

John F. Kennedy Jr. was born on November 25, 1960. He was the second child born to former U.S. President John F. Kennedy and his wife Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy.

John F. Kennedy jr. exploring Kennedy's desk

John F. Kennedy Jr. exploring his father’s desk in the White House, circa May 1962. (Photo Credit: Bettmann/ Getty Images)

After John F. Kennedy was elected president, John Jr. and his older sister Caroline would explore and frolic in the Oval Office while their father worked.

Kennedy and his children in Oval Office

President John F. Kennedy working in the Oval Office while Caroline and John F. Kennedy Jr. play, October 10, 1962. (Photo Credit: Smith Collection/ Gado/ Getty Images)

On his third birthday, John F. Kennedy captured hearts around the world when he saluted his father’s coffin during the funeral procession. According to Steven M. Gillon’s 2019 book, America’s Reluctant Prince: The Life of John F. Kennedy Jr., the young boy continued to ask people if they could take him to see his dad after JFK was killed.

JFK Jr. salutes the casket to JFK

John F. Kennedy Jr. saluting his father’s casket as it is carried from St. Matthew’s Cathedral in Washington, D.C. (Bettmann/ Getty Images)

Trying to stay out of the public eye

JFK Jr., Jacqueline Kennedy, Caroline Kennedy meeting the Queen

John F. Kennedy Jr., Jaqueline Kennedy, Caroline Kennedy, and Robert Kennedy meeting the Queen during a ceremony to unveil a monument to John F. Kennedy at Runnymede. (Photo Credit: Evening Standard/ Stringer/ Getty Images)

After John F. Kennedy’s assassination, Jacqueline Kennedy moved her family to an apartment on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York City. In 1965, Britain dedicated a memorial to the late president at Runnymede. During this memorial dedication ceremony, JFK Jr. met Queen Elizabeth II.

JFK Jr. driving a motor boat

JFK Jr. driving a speed boat at the Onassis beach house in Greece, July 1970. (Photo Credit: Ron Galella/ Getty Images)

After Robert Kennedy was assassinated in 1968, Jacqueline Kennedy moved her children out of the United States. That same year, she married shipping tycoon Aristotle Onassis, and the family moved to his private island of Skorpios.

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JFK Jr. (right) sticking his tongue out during a holiday at the Crans-sur-Sierre ski resort in Switzerland, December 27, 1974. (Photo Credit: James Andanson/ Getty Images)

During his adolescent years, JFK Jr. attended a number of different private schools, including Saint David’s School and Collegiate School. He eventually graduated high school at Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts.

JFK Jr. in the play Volpone

John F. Kennedy Jr. as Bonario, a professional soldier in the play Volpone, during his freshman year at Brown University, circa March 1980. (Photo Credit: Bettmann/ Getty Images)

In 1979, JFK Jr. was a freshman at Brown University where he majored in American studies. During his time at Brown, JFK Jr. took an interest in acting, and appeared in many productions during his four years as a student there.

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John F. Kennedy Jr. at his graduation from Brown University where he graduated with a Bachelors of Arts in History, circa 1983. (Photo Credit: Bettmann/ Getty Images)

In 1983, he graduated from Brown University with a Bachelor of Arts in History.

Starting his career

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John F. Kennedy Jr. introducing his uncle, Senator Edward Kennedy, at the 1988 Democratic National Convention. (Photo Credit: Bettmann/ Getty Images)

After Kennedy Jr. graduated from Brown, he took a job with the New York City Office of Business Development, where he worked as a deputy director until 1986. In 1988, he became a summer associate at an LA law firm that had strong connections to the Democratic Party. Although he steered away from a profession in politics, he nonetheless had strong ties in the political world. What is the routing number for first interstate bank he was 27 years old, he introduced his uncle, Senator Edward Kennedy, at the 1988 Democratic National Convention in Atlanta, Georgia.

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John F. Kennedy Jr. graduates from Law School at New York University, 1989. (Photo Credit: Bettmann/ Getty Images)

In 1989, Kennedy earned a J.D. degree from the New York University School of Law. However, he failed the New York bar exam two times before eventually passing on his third try in July 1990. After passing the bar, he took a job as an assistant district attorney in New York City. However, this profession was short-lived as in 1995, he launched his political magazine George.

‘Sexiest Man Alive’

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John F. Kennedy and Daryl Hannah at the wedding of JFK Jr.’s cousin, Edward Kennedy Jr., in Rhode Island, circa October 1993. (Photo Credit: Brooks Kraft/ Getty Images)

In 1988, JFK Jr. was named People’s “Sexiest Man Alive.” His private life was often publicized, and he was romantically linked to a number of Hollywood celebrities, including Madonna, Daryl Hannah, Cindy Crawford, and Sarah Jessica Parker.

Marriage and later life

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JFK Jr. and his wife Carolyn Bessette Kennedy, circa 1998. (Photo Credit: George De Sota/ Getty Images)

In 1994, Kennedy started dating Calvin Klein publicist Carolyn Bessette. In 1995, the couple became engaged and were married in a secret ceremony off the coast of Georgia in September 1996.

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John F. Kennedy Jr. kissing Carolyn Bessette a kiss on the cheek during the 1999 Annual White House Correspondents dinner. (Photo Credit: Tyler Mallory/ Getty Images)

Carolyn had difficulty adjusting to the paparazzi and constantly being in the public eye. JFK Jr. initially believed that once he was married, the paparazzi would leave them alone, but unfortunately, it was the opposite. While JFK Jr. was used to being in the public eye, Carolyn wasn’t. This put a strain on their marriage.

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Members of the Kennedy and Bessette families embrace at the stern of the Coast Guard ship Sanibel as they prepare to travel to the U.S.S. Briscoe 22 July, 1999 for the burial at sea of John F. Kennedy Jr., Carolyn Bessette Kennedy and Lauren Bessette’s ashes. (Photo Credit: MATT CAMPBELL/AFP via Getty Images)

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On July 16, 1999, JFK Jr., Carolyn Bessette, and her sister Lauren Bessette were on their way to Cape Cod for a wedding. JFK Jr. had recently obtained his pilot’s licence and was flying the Bessette sisters in a single-engine plane. Sadly, the plane crashed into how to activate walmart prepaid debit card Atlantic, and on July 21, Navy divers located the bodies of JFK Jr., Carolyn Bessette, and Lauren Bessette. John F. Kennedy Jr. was only 38 years old when he died.

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John F. Kennedy Jr. stared out his window overlooking the Hudson River, past the piles of proofs, magazines, Knicks ticket stubs, and take-out containers on his desk. He cracked the faintest smile, as one colleague remembers. It was the summer of 1996; he was the editor of a magazine named George, which was less than a year old and still finding its way; and an idea for the September cover had just occurred to him: Madonna dressed as his mother, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

He asked his assistant, RoseMarie Terenzio, for a notepad so that he could dash off a note to Madonna with the request, while Matt Berman, George's creative director, sketched what they hoped would become the cover. Shot by avant-garde fashion photographer Nick Knight, the image would be disguised in such a way that, upon first glance, the reader would think the subject was indeed the editor’s mother, before taking a closer look to realize it was Madonna. Making the cover even more provocative was the fact that Kennedy was rumored to have dated Madonna before starting the magazine.

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Unfortunately, the pop star—perhaps one of the few people more famous than Kennedy at that time—shot him down. "Dear Johnny Boy," she began in her handwritten fax (which appears in Terenzio’s book, Fairy Tale Interrupted), "Thanks for asking me to be your mother but I’m afraid I could never do her justice. My eyebrows aren’t thick enough, for one."

With Madonna out, the September cover took a decidedly different turn—instead of referencing his mom, Kennedy chose to nod at another well-known woman in his dad’s life: Marilyn Monroe.

Drew Barrymore was posed in a nude-colored cocktail dress and platinum wig, with a mole perfectly placed on her left cheek. The idea came from George’s executive editor, Elizabeth Mitchell, who suggested it as a fiftieth-birthday tribute to President Bill Clinton. The reference: In May 1962, in front of fifteen thousand people during a Democratic-party fundraiser at Madison Square Garden, Monroe had famously serenaded Kennedy’s father ten days before his forty-fifth birthday with a breathy, seductive "Happy Birthday, Mr. President." The subtext to the song, of course, is that the president and the actress were rumored to have had an affair.

That photograph might seem a strange choice for a man who adored his mother—even stranger than asking Madonna to impersonate her—but the thing was, according to Mitchell, Kennedy never believed anything had happened between his dad and Monroe. "He just thought it was sort of tweaking the expectations of the public," she says all these years later.

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An irreverent play on politics and pop culture with a dash of Kennedy intrigue, the Barrymore/Monroe cover accurately sums up George, the magazine Kennedy launched in September 1995. His concept, in today’s terms at least, seems relatively straightforward: "a lifestyle magazine with politics at its core." Back then, however, George was revolutionary; there had never been anything quite like it. Nor had there ever been a magazine editor quite like John F. Kennedy Jr., a lawyer by training. Perhaps predictably, media critics sneered, lampooning him as aimless and unqualified, his idea frivolous. Esquire called the magazine "the riskiest venture of a pampered life indelibly marked by tragedy." Newsweek: "Kennedy has been able to live without real responsibility, as a bit of a slob, considerate john f kennedy jr memorial site his (many) women, not quite sure what he wants to do, looking forward to&thinsp.&thinsp.&thinsp. the Frisbee game in the park.&thinsp.&thinsp.&thinsp. Now, apparently, he’s ready to grow up." The Los Angeles Times asked: "Is John Kennedy Jr.’s George making American politics sexy? Or is the magazine just dumbing it down more?"

But Kennedy’s instincts were right: In the twenty years since his death, politics and pop culture have become so intertwined that candidates now spend nearly as much time courting voters on late-night shows as they do on the Sunday talk circuit. Politicians are covered as if they were celebrities, while celebrities seek out a voice on politics. The current president is largely a product of reality television, and his predecessor recently signed a production deal with Netflix. Oprah Winfrey has been seriously touted as a potential presidential candidate, as have—somewhat less seriously—The Rock and Mark Cuban. As the son of the thirty-fifth president and an elegant First Lady–turned–book editor, Kennedy was uniquely positioned to both cover and promote the marriage of politics and pop culture—because he lived it

Some of art director Matt Berman’s sketches which eventually became George’s covers:

Some of the people close to him whom I spoke with believe George was Kennedy’s first step toward his own eventual run for office. His plan, they say, was to build it up as a successful magazine that could survive without his star power so that he could one day step into politics. But he ran out of time. On July 16, 1999, less than four years after the first issue, the aircraft Kennedy was flying plunged into the Atlantic Ocean, killing him; his wife, Carolyn Bessette; and her sister Lauren Bessette. Just eighteen months later, George folded.

Beyond the can you sell gift cards for cash tragedy was a professional one: Kennedy had worked hard to build a fiercely loyal team; an exciting, buzzy brand; and a new way to think about politics. But the personal and professional were hard to separate. It was the Kennedy name that persuaded publishers, advertisers, and readers to take a chance on him, but at the same time, it was his family’s legacy that complicated his role as an editor and led to conflicts both inside and outside the magazine.

“John died before his time,” says Frank Lalli, the editor who replaced Kennedy (and who controversially put Donald Trump on the cover in 2000). “And this magazine died before its time.”


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After graduating from Brown University, in 1983, and New York University School of Law, in 1989, President John F. Kennedy’s second child worked as an assistant district attorney in Manhattan from 1989 john f kennedy jr memorial site 1993. It was President Clinton’s successful 1992 campaign, including his saxophone performance on The Arsenio Hall Show, that inspired Kennedy to create a political magazine focused more on personalities than on policy.

He brought up the idea over dinner with his friend Michael Berman, who was running the Manhattan public-relations firm PR/NY. Berman was on board. Their first step was attending a two-day seminar in 1993 called “Starting Your Own Magazine,” hosted at a New York Hilton. During one of the sessions, an instructor told the class, “You can successfully launch a magazine in just about anything except for religion and politics.” But Kennedy already had his mind made up.

Keith Kelly, then a reporter for Folio magazine and now a media columnist at the New York Post, got wind of the famous attendee at the conference. When Kelly arrived, he saw someone who looked like Kennedy standing at the front of the class helping the instructor fix a projector. That can’t be John-John, he thought. But when he approached the man later in the day, he realized it was indeed him.

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“Hey, John, are you going to start your own magazine?” Kelly asked.

Kennedy demurred. “Oh, I don’t know. I don’t know.”

Kelly pressed: “If you ever do, could you let me know first?”

Kennedy and Berman continued working on the project sporadically into spring 1994, when Kennedy set up a secret shop in Berman’s office, coming in every day to strategize. After a few months, Berman announced to his team he was selling his firm and going into business with Kennedy. The two men brought on Berman’s former employee RoseMarie Terenzio as their assistant, and they got to work on the new project.

“They thought it was too political, too hot of a potato to handle.”

The early nineties were a golden age for glossy magazines. It was an incredibly lucrative business, because, in the days before the Internet became ubiquitous, companies poured their advertising budgets into magazines. Readership was surging, particularly among celebrity-focused titles like People, which drew 3.1 million readers a week in 1994. The biggest magazines helped define the zeitgeist with their covers, turning celebrities into overnight icons—a nude and pregnant Demi Moore photographed by Annie Leibovitz for Vanity Fair, or Rolling Stone crowning Nirvana the “New Faces of Rock” in 1992. But finding a company willing to back Kennedy and Berman’s concept was difficult—in spite of Kennedy’s famous name—because of the belief that it was difficult to sell advertising in political publications. Compared with glossy magazines, titles like The New Republic and the National Review had smaller circulations and fewer ads, and the ads they did have were typically from the low-ticket likes of university presses.

Kennedy had pitched a George prototype to publishing giant Hearst, the owner of magazines including Cosmopolitan and, yes, Esquire, but the company declined to work with him, according to Samir Husni, who consulted for Hearst in the mid-nineties. “They thought it was too political, too hot of a potato to handle,” he says. “They didn’t see a business model that would sustain the magazine.”

When Rolling Stone cofounder and Kennedy family friend Jann Wenner heard about the magazine, he was irate, according to a 1995 Esquire story. “What’s this about?” he allegedly asked Kennedy. “You better see me immediately. Politics doesn’t sell. It’s not commercial.”

In early 1994, Berman and Kennedy found a partner in David Pecker, then president of Hachette Filipacchi Magazines, which at the time published Elle, Car and Driver, andWoman’s Day. (All three are now Hearst titles. Pecker, meanwhile, has become famous for his friendship with Donald Trump; Pecker’s current company, American Media Inc., which published the National Enquirer, helped squelch negative stories in 2016 about then candidate Trump.) Pecker jumped at the opportunity to make a deal with Kennedy and, according to reports from that time, agreed to invest $20 million over five years. In a 1995 interview with New York magazine, Pecker accidentally called George a “living, breathing orgasm,” which, the writer posits, “doesn’t, in fact, seem too far from his hopes for it. All in all, Mr. Pecker is pretty excited.”

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“John had shopped the idea for George to all the major publishers, many of whom, like Jann Wenner, were personal friends. One by one they turned him down, usually with the excuse that a magazine connecting politics and pop culture would never work,” Pecker recalls via email. “Eventually, John came to see me at Hachette and when he explained his concept, I enthusiastically agreed to go forward. I not only recognized the reader appeal a magazine edited by John would have, but all the advertiser interest it would generate as well.”

One of the first things Hachette wanted to change was the magazine’s name—the company offered alternatives like Crisscross, meant to suggest the intersection of politics and pop culture. But Kennedy and Berman insisted on George—a mildly irreverent nod to the first president—and when an anonymous source leaked to Page Six that Kennedy was starting a magazine called George, the name was set.

Pecker was right about the advertisers. Before the magazine launched, Kennedy went to Detroit to lure the auto companies—traditionally among the most desired of advertisers, both for their deep pockets and for their blue-chip cachet—into buying space.

“I went to Detroit to talk to people at General Motors, Chrysler, and Ford. I followed John by a week,” former Vanity Fair editor Graydon Carter remembers. “People were lining up around corners to get to see him. He was filling auditoriums. By the time I got up there, it would be just me and my salesperson out there in a small office of metal furniture. We were very much overshadowed by the presence of John Kennedy.”

Kennedy’s salesmanship worked, with GM becoming George’s largest advertiser. Pecker says, “The first issue sold out with over five hundred ad pages, more than the September issue of Vogue at that time.”


In early 1995, Kennedy was quietly building his staff with the help of a discreet headhunting firm that had worked with his uncle, Senator Robert F. Kennedy. One of the people brought in was Elizabeth Mitchell, an editor at Spin (another magazine started by a famous scion: Bob Guccione Jr.), who would eventually become George’s executive editor. Kennedy struck Mitchell as curious, funny, and down-to-earth.

Courtesy of Matt Berman

"He had definitely read through a lot of the pieces I had edited at Spin,” Mitchell says. “I was in charge of the international investigative features and the heavier political content, and he had specific questions about the things I worked on. Mainly he was interested in how we got access that allowed us to embed reporters in the Irish Republican Army, in a helicopter in Mogadishu, into the first financial bank customer service texas of the key generals during the Yugoslavian war. And how had I found the writers."

At one point during the meeting, Mitchell recalls, a staff member from the headhunting firm asked what they wanted to drink. Kennedy wanted water, to which the staffer responded: “Do you want Evian ice cubes or tap ice cubes?” Kennedy, to his credit, considered it an odd request. “You know, a block of ice cubes are fine,” he said. “It doesn’t have to be fancy.”

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The initial staff was composed of just eight editors, who shared office space on the forty-first floor of Hachette headquarters on Broadway and Fifty-first Street with the staffs of Elle and another fashion magazine, Mirabella. George’s new colleagues would conveniently find excuses to use the photocopier right outside Kennedy’s office to catch a glimpse of the handsome, famous editor. A giant orange George logo adorned a hallway wall in the mostly drab space. Kennedy’s own office featured a black-and-white photo of Mick Jagger on the family’s boat in Hyannis alongside a bust of George Washington and a photo of Kennedy himself as a little boy on his dad’s shoulders. Kennedy’s girlfriend, Carolyn Bessette, sent over a mid-century sofa to dress up the space, but it quickly became covered by rumpled T-shirts and sweatpants.

“We went rollerblading with John in Central Park at midnight. And it was just the fucking coolest.”

Once in place, the team had just three months to create the premiere issue. They put in grueling hours, working forty days straight, taking one day off, then working another forty. They’d sometimes stay at the office past midnight—including Kennedy, fueled by coffee and Diet Coke. On weekends, dressed in shorts and a T-shirt, he would surprise the staff by sneaking his black-and-white puppy, Friday, into the office in a duffel bag. On late nights, the editors would order pizza or dinner from Rice ’n’ Beans, Kennedy’s favorite restaurant on Ninth Avenue.

“It was notable in this grinding work situation that you would look over and there’s John working away with you,” says Mitchell. “You felt like, okay, that person who could do anything in the world is choosing to be here doing this work; you can certainly suck it up and keep going.”


Kennedy knew how important his first cover would be to establish the publication not as the “John Kennedy magazine” but as something that stood on its own. To brainstorm cover subjects, he invited fashion photographer Herb Ritts, a friend of his, and Matt Berman, the creative director (and no relation to Michael Berman), to his TriBeCa loft. Over Rolling Rocks with Bessette, they threw out names of all-American celebrities who could represent the brand. Kennedy suggested Bill Clinton. Ritts proposed supermodel Cindy Crawford, who at the time was also appearing regularly on TV in Pepsi ads and as the host of MTV’s popular House of Style.

“Cindy Crawford’s perfect,” Bessette said. “She’s all-American, a self-made woman, sexy, strong, and smart.”

Ritts suggested dressing Crawford as George Washington—a cheeky play on politics and pop culture. They all agreed, and Kennedy called the model himself to ask her to be on his first cover.

“He called my hotel. He reached out directly. And who’s going to say no?” Crawford says. “I trusted Herb Ritts enough to know it would be okay. But it was kind of like, I’m going to do what? Dress like George Washington? With the wig and everything?”

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It wasn’t just the wig. After studying old paintings on the set of the photo shoot, the team decided to stuff Crawford’s skintight breeches with a sock. Matt Berman was unsure whether Kennedy, who wasn’t on set, would be quite that adventurous, but he figured they could make changes in postproduction. Sure enough, when Kennedy saw proofs a few days later, his response to Berman was “Maestro, what the fuck?” They airbrushed out the bulge.

At this point, two years after that how-to-make-a-magazine seminar, Kennedy made good on his promise to Keith Kelly. He called the reporter and said he was granting him the first interview about George.


As Kennedy geared up for the launch, his personal life hit a milestone. During Fourth of July weekend in 1995, at his family’s home in Martha’s Vineyard, Kennedy proposed to Bessette, a striking, stylish blonde who worked in public relations for Calvin Klein. They hoped to keep the engagement quiet for as long as possible, as Bessette prioritized her privacy.

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Kennedy had served as America’s crown prince since his birth—only two and a half weeks after his father was elected president, in November 1960. John F. Kennedy would die just three days before his son’s third birthday, the toddler becoming an instantly tragic icon after photographers snapped him saluting his father’s casket. Kennedy’s mother shielded him and his sister, Caroline, from the press as they grew up in Manhattan. But as soon as he finished boarding school, the tabloids descended. After People named him its Sexiest Man Alive in 1988, his relationships with celebrities like Sarah Jessica Parker and Daryl Hannah were covered breathlessly. The news that he was now off the market would most certainly cause a media frenzy.

The New York Post broke the engagement story the Friday before Labor Day—mere days before Kennedy and Michael Berman’s scheduled press conference to unveil George. Berman was furious, worried the gossip would overshadow the launch, recalls Terenzio, who was asked to fax a statement denying the engagement to the Associated Press. Sure enough, there was a deluge of coverage about her statement. When hundreds of reporters and dozens of TV cameras showed up at Federal Hall—where George Washington took his presidential oath—on September 7, 1995, for the first George press conference, they may have been hoping for titillating details about Kennedy’s love life. But the event was focused squarely on the magazine.

Kennedy, dressed in a navy double-breasted suit with a bright white pocket square, stepped behind the small wooden podium in the vast marble building. Berman and Pecker sat on small wooden folding chairs to his log homes for sale in texas, and to Kennedy’s right stood the first cover of George, on which Crawford posed confidently in a powdered wig and midriff-baring costume. It was Kennedy’s first time addressing reporters since his mother’s death the year before, and he’d worked with an image consultant who prepped him on personal or potentially embarrassing questions that might be asked. Still, he looked nervous.

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“I don’t think I’ve seen as many of you in one place since they announced the results of my first bar exam,” joked Kennedy, who had appeared on the cover of the New York Post in 1990 with the headline “The Hunk Flunks” after failing the New York bar exam for a second time. He talked about the mission of his magazine, and when asked what his mother would think about his new venture, Kennedy said, “I think she’d be mildly amused, glad she wasn’t standing here, and very proud.”

With the tagline “Not just politics as usual,” George hit newsstands in September 1995, a bimonthly selling for $2.95. It was a runaway success, selling out its print run of nearly five hundred thousand issues—by comparison, The New Republic typically sold one hundred thousand issues at that time, while Vanity Fair had more than 1 million readers a month that year.

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The political landscape was primed for George. The Clintons had brought youth and accessibility to the presidency for the first time in years. Secondary figures like George Stephanopoulos, then a thirty-four-year-old White House boy wonder, were getting increasing attention. And on Capitol Hill, Newt Gingrich, who in 1994 had led Republicans to their first House majority in forty years, was weaponizing the media like no other leader of Congress had before. George treated budding D. C. personalities like celebrities and brought movie stars into the political conversation. Early issues featured an essay titled “The Next American Revolution Is Now” by novelist Caleb Carr, an article about Time Warner’s war against rap music, a satirical piece about Jesus running in the ’96 election by Beavis and Butt-Head writers Sam Johnson and Chris Marcil, and a Q+A with Planned Parenthood strategist Leslie Sebastian.

Throughout the fall of 1995, the staff kept up its grueling hours and Kennedy remained a hands-on editor. The cover motif of celebs decked out in early-American regalia stuck, with Robert De Niro posing as a sword-carrying Washington for the second issue and Charles Barkley in a powdered wig and basketball shorts on the third cover. After the success of the first three issues, Hachette increased the magazine’s frequency to monthly and doubled the staff. At the same time, Kennedy’s second-in-command, Eric Etheridge, resigned. Etheridge has never spoken publicly about George and declined to be interviewed for this piece, but others at the magazine say he and Kennedy had disagreed about the direction of the magazine.

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“I really respected Eric. I thought he was extremely smart. He had a really tough situation, which was mapping out the definition of what George is,” says Mitchell. “I think he probably had an idea that John was going to be less involved in the editorial decisions, but it was clear that John wanted to be involved.”

Mitchell was promoted to the role of Kennedy’s No. 2, but whereas Etheridge had simply been listed on the masthead as editor, Mitchell was given the title of executive editor, indicating that editor-in-chief Kennedy alone was the top editorial voice. In pitch meetings, he would pepper editors with questions about their angles. Though he didn’t have a formal journalism training, he had good instincts about what made an interesting story, according to his staff. His frequent question was “Why would people care about this?” Then senior editor Richard Bradley remembers filing a profile on presidential candidate Pat Buchanan to Kennedy, who remarked, “It feels like you’re missing the point on this.” Kennedy thought the story focused too much on policy and Washington intrigue and not enough on personal details, which he believed George’s readers were always more interested in.

Courtesy of Matt Berman

“He was a dominant force in every meeting,” says senior editor Ned Martel. “Nothing went forward without him knowing about it, or understanding it completely.”

The staff was young—most were in their twenties—and Kennedy took his role as a leader seriously. He initiated team outings to movie matinees, plays, and baseball games and organized touch-football games—a Kennedy family tradition—in Central Park’s Sheep Meadow. The editorial team was tight-knit. Former staffers beam when sharing memories of Kennedy showing up on his bike at their birthday parties at downtown bars and going out of his way to give personal gifts for holidays.

“Even though he often did stay late, [Kennedy] also would just disappear, and one night we disappeared with him,” recalls associate editor Hugo Lindgren. “Me and my friend Manny—we were both associate editors—went Rollerblading with John in Central Park at midnight. And it was just the fucking coolest.”


Courtesy of Matt Berman

In each issue, Kennedy wrote an editor’s letter and interviewed a famous figure, such as former Alabama governor George Wallace, Elizabeth Dole, and Gerald Ford. Other standing features included a pop-culture-figure column called “If I Were President.” In the first issue, Madonna proclaimed, “Howard Stern would get kicked out of the country and Roman Polanski would be allowed back in.” There were interviews with up-and-coming political personalities—the young conservative pollster Kellyanne Fitzpatrick, now known by her married name, Kellyanne Conway, was interviewed about “why female and Generation X voters are ripe prospects for the GOP.” Her response: “To younger voters, the lack of hope and optimism is the most glaring absence in politics today.” Fitzpatrick did polling for the magazine and is quoted in a few subsequent issues offering a conservative voice. “Look, there’s plenty of times where I’ve been in the, you know, quota on any panel. Hey, let’s get a conservative. We’ll call Kellyanne,” Conway says. “But John never made it that way. He was generally interested in why somebody would have a different point of view than most of the people he knew.”

(A staffer also remembers her stopping by the George offices to pass out her business cards and encourage editors to come to her stand-up-comedy shows. Though Conway doesn’t recall this, she says she did one stand-up show in D. C. during that time period. “I totally missed my calling in this world,” she says.)

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The mix of politics and pop culture sometimes fell flat. In the 1996 State of the Union address, President Clinton had recommended implementing school uniforms, and the magazine used that as a peg to do a high-fashion photo shoot. “We asked a handful of the fashion industry’s brightest talents to design uniforms that one might be happy to wear instead of enduring the daily ritual of donning the apparel equivalent to Brussels sprouts,” writes David Coleman. The net effect is a forced effort to make a political publication look like a fashion magazine. But features by Norman Mailer on Bill Clinton and Bob Dole during the 1996 campaign hit the mark. (They were also yet another wink at JFK’s presidency: During the 1960 campaign, Mailer had written a pioneering New Journalism profile of Kennedy’s father for Esquire titled “Superman Comes to the Supermarket.”)

George was undoubtedly a major success—one editor says MTV was eager to partner with the magazine early on—but the political-media elite scoffed. White House deputy for intergovernmental affairs John Emerson told the Los Angeles Times in 1996, “Do I read George? I skim George.” An unnamed pundit called the magazine a “net loss of information.” But the magazine’s competitors may have been more threatened than they let on. One night over dinner at the downtown Manhattan hot spot Balthazar, Matt Berman was approached by a Vanity Fair editor who asked what covers George had in the works.

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“He’s like, ‘You know, I have a fabulous idea for you: You should do Adolf Hitler on the cover.’ He was thinking, Oh, I got this kid art director here. I’m going to try to make a mess,” says Berman, who gave an exaggerated eye roll, then reported it back to Kennedy at the office the next day. “John goes, ‘Oh, right. That’s a great idea. They’d love that over at Vanity Fair.’ They were watching us.”

Kennedy and his staff mostly brushed off criticism and focused on their goal of speaking to a broader audience. He was proudest when readers wrote in to say they’d never really paid attention to politics before but loved George. Kennedy relished the rare industry affirmation when it did come, though.

“I remember later when I got hired at the Times, John wrote me the nicest note,” says Lindgren, who went on to become the editor of The New York Times Magazine from 2010 to 2013. “He was like, ‘I’m psyched someone from George is working at The New York Times; it’s a validation of what we do here.’ ”


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As George took off, there was increasing attention placed on Kennedy and Bessette as well. When the time came to plan their wedding, held in the fall of 1996, the couple was desperate to keep the event quiet so that the press wouldn’t get wind of it—Kennedy couldn’t even risk his staff finding out. So Terenzio covered by telling them that Kennedy and Bessette were going to Ireland for a vacation and wouldn’t be reachable for a couple days. When Bessette needed wedding programs, she was afraid to have them done professionally, lest one find its way to a reporter, so she and Terenzio snuck into the George offices late one evening to use the magazine’s printers.

The tactics worked, and Bessette and Kennedy wed on Georgia’s Cumberland Island on September 21, 1996, with no press in sight. The Monday after the ceremony, Kennedy arranged for Terenzio to leave cigars on the fulton bank boss online login staffers’ desks and Champagne for the women with a note that read: “I just wanted to let you know while you were all toiling away, I went and got myself married. I had to be a bit sneaky for reasons that by now are obvious. I wanted you all to enjoy these small tokens of gratitude and fellowship. You folks all do amazing work and it’s an honor to have you as colleagues.”

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That he thought to praise his colleagues in his wedding announcement was classic Kennedy. His staff and friends describe him as kind, funny, and easygoing. He was quick to crack a joke, the first to call to congratulate former staffers on new jobs, and in spite of the paparazzi who constantly trailed him, his preferred mode of transportation around Manhattan remained his bike. The closest anyone comes to a criticism is the observation by a colleague that Kennedy could have a temper—though, they say, he readily admitted mistakes and apologized. But unpretentiousness aside, his star power was undeniable, and dealing with it could be complicated.

“There was this kind of tension where, like, are you working for John or are you working for George? It should’ve been pretty much the same, but it wasn’t invariably,” says Bradley, who replaced Mitchell as executive editor in early 1999.

Kennedy’s relationship with Michael Berman also became an office distraction and eventually the subject of media coverage as their partnership soured. Berman had stepped into the role of publisher, while Kennedy took the head editing role, and Berman’s lack of authority over editorial caused discord.

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In January 1997, the strain erupted into a physical altercation after a difference of opinion over an article that left Berman’s shirtsleeve ripped. After the incident, Kennedy asked for a locksmith to change the lock on his door. Two days later, he offered Berman a new dress shirt as an apology. Shortly after, however, Berman left his position as the magazine’s publisher, moving to a new movie and television division at Hachette. Kennedy took on a dual role as editor-in-chief and president.

“I don’t know exactly what went down with him and Mike. I mean, maybe I knew at some point and I’ve forgotten, but people do get a little crazy around someone like John,” Lindgren says. “Michael and he, I think, had a really good friendship at some point, and then didn’t, and I think that can be very disturbing to people. They sort of lose their special ‘in,’ and that’s what really fucks people up.”

Berman didn’t respond to repeated requests for comment for this piece. At the time of his departure, he told Keith Kelly, “It was always professional. It wasn’t a dispute so much as a maturing of differences. For me, George was an entrepreneurial idea and a challenge, but it wasn’t anything I expected to stay with throughout my career.”


Kennedy again drew attention away from the magazine when two members of his family made headlines.

Over the decades, nearly a dozen Kennedys have run for office, and how John Jr. would cover his family was a question dating back to George's launch. In a 1995 interview with Larry King, Kennedy said, “If you are going to write about politics, every now and then there is going to be a Kennedy who is going to be doing something and we should write about it. We’re not going to go out of our way. Certainly, there are enough people that write about the Kennedys without us joining in.”

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But when his cousin Congressman Joe Kennedy II had his marriage annulled and another cousin, Michael Kennedy, was accused of having an affair with a fourteen-year-old babysitter, Kennedy addressed the scandals in his magazine. His September 1997 editor's letter began, “I've learned a lot about temptation recently. But that doesn't make me desire any less. If anything, to be reminded of the possible perils of succumbing to what's forbidden only makes it more alluring.” Kennedy continued: “Two members of my family chased an idealized alternative to their life. One left behind an embittered wife, and another, in what looked to be a hedge against mortality, fell in love with youth and surrendered his judgment in the process. Both became poster boys for bad behavior. Perhaps they deserved it. Perhaps they should have known better. To whom much is given, much is expected, right? The interesting thing was the ferocious condemnation of their excursions beyond the bounds of acceptable behavior. Since when does someone need to apologize on television for getting divorced?”

“I’ve learned a lot about temptation recently. But that doesn't make me desire any less.”

On the cover, Kate Moss appeared nude as Eve. Alongside his letter, Kennedy posed nearly nude, in strategic shadows, gazing up at an apple. Back then, the photo garnered most of the attention and the letter was largely interpreted as a rebuke of his relatives. But today, it reads like a tone-deaf defense of the men, ignoring their privilege and power while usps office open today disturbingly dismissive of the women, especially the teenage girl who was the victim of an alleged statutory rape. (The Norfolk district attorney called off the investigation into charges after the babysitter declined to cooperate.)

When asked later about the photo and editor's letter, Kennedy said he didn't regret them. “I did that because that was something I wanted to say and something that I had felt strongly about, which is, we judge harshly people in the public eye for being human. The picture had to accompany the letter because the picture exposed me to judgment,” he told Brill's Content in 1999.

Not long after that issue came out, one of the biggest political stories of the decade broke: President Clinton's relationship with intern Monica Lewinsky. It should have been perfect fodder for the magazine; in fact, Kenneth Starr's September 1998 report revealed that Lewinsky had tried to get a job at George after her time at the White House. But the magazine chose to cover the controversy by having Kennedy interview Gary Hart, another politician brought down by a sex scandal, along with a profile of Clinton confidant Vernon Jordan (who was linked to the Lewinsky story) and a column on workplace sexual harassment.

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“During the Lewinsky scandal, John had great reluctance to cover that,” says Bradley. “But if you didn't cover it, you kind of would've been completely irrelevant.”

Some of that reluctance may have been due to the fact that Kennedy's father had had multiple affairs while in the White House. When Kennedy was asked at the press conference launching George if the magazine would cover the sex lives of politicians, he admitted, “It would be disingenuous to say I don't have some sensitivity to the seamy side of issues.”

Keith Kelly remembers the Lewinsky story as the beginning of the magazine's decline. “By the end, it seemed to be running out of gas. Advertisers had lost some how to activate walmart prepaid debit card the enthusiasm,” he says. “And there was the Clinton scandal with Monica Lewinsky&thinsp.&thinsp.&thinsp.&thinsp. They didn't really dive into that story. I think he was a little hamstrung by his own family history with those things.” In 1999, even as the economy boomed (the dot-com bust was a couple years away), newsstand sales declined by double digits, though overall circulation, buoyed by subscriptions, was relatively healthy at around four hundred thousand copies per month.

Kennedy's relationship with Pecker was becoming increasingly strained as well. Kennedy was constantly expected to woo advertisers and began to suspect he was being used as bait for other Hachette deals. And Pecker pushed for Kennedy to move into a more public-facing role. Before Michael Berman left, he and Kennedy had come up with an idea for a George TV show with political commentary. Kennedy had no interest in becoming an on-air personality, yet according to two staffers, Pecker was moving forward on a deal for a Kennedy-hosted series with potential partners.

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Pecker wouldn't comment on specific business dealings but tells me, “[Kennedy] had his own vision for George, and he would insist on maintaining that vision. I began to provide more and more advice when the newsstand began to decline&thinsp.&thinsp.&thinsp.&thinsp. I had several conversations with John about taking more risks editorially.”

In February 1999, Pecker unexpectedly left Hachette for American Media, Inc. At that point, George, nearing its four-year anniversary, had a loyal audience, with one of the strongest subscription-renewal rates within the company, but it had never made money. (This was not necessarily unusual for a new magazine in that era; patient and/or profligate publishers—notably Condé Nast—sometimes waited quite a bit longer to see titles make it into the black.) Kennedy was becoming frustrated with Hachette, but when he met with the new president and CEO, Jack Kliger, in June 1999, he was open to discussing plans to make the magazine profitable.

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“Figuring out how to make it work well for both of us was a priority,” Kliger says. “When I got to Hachette, I was hired with an awful lot of issues, including George and Mirabella, and also I was following a CEO named David Pecker, who left us with a lot of stuff to clean up. You could put it that way.”

According to Kliger, Kennedy put together a strategy to reduce frequency, rein in costs, and increase George's digital presence. (The magazine had had a website since its 1995 launch, but a look at archived versions shows it mostly served as a home for print stories, and the editors say it wasn't a priority.) Kliger says he was never aware of talk of TV deals but that Kennedy made it clear he didn't want his family name to be exploited. “John always expressed a concern about being used as a bird in a gilded cage. That was how to contact edd disability phrase.”

While efforts were made to reinvigorate the magazine's business, on the editorial side, Kennedy was preparing for one of his biggest interviews yet: a sit-down with Fidel Castro in Cuba. He'd done a pre-interview with Castro and was planning to go back to Cuba for New Year's weekend to talk to him on the record.


That interview never happened. On July 16, 1999, Kennedy was flying his wife and her sister Lauren to Martha's Vineyard for his cousin Rory's wedding. At some point in the night, the plane crashed nose-first into the Atlantic Ocean.

Terenzio was the first member of the George staff to learn the editor had gone missing. She was staying at his TriBeCa apartment because her air-conditioner was broken. John f kennedy jr memorial site little after midnight, she got a call from Carole Radziwill, a relative of Kennedy's who was trying to get in touch with the couple. Radziwill explained that a friend who was supposed to pick up Kennedy and the Bessettes at the Vineyard airport had told the family they'd never arrived. After trying to call Kennedy's flight instructor, nearby airports, and some of his friends and relatives, Terenzio called Matt Berman, who was planning to the skeleton key in hindi download to Los Angeles in the morning to shoot Rob Lowe for the next cover.

“You can't go to L. A.,” she said. “John never landed last john f kennedy jr memorial site switched his flight to 11:00 a.m. and left to meet Terenzio at Kennedy's loft. Hours passed without any news. Berman then pushed his flight to 1:00 p.m. and told Lowe's team only the photographer would be at the shoot. As the day wore on, newscasters began to describe Kennedy and the Bessettes as officially lost, and Berman took a cab up to the George offices. That afternoon and the weeks that followed are now a blur, he says. The bodies of Kennedy, Bessette, and her sister were found six days after their disappearance.

“There was this sort of sense of sad sorrow but also purposelessness. What the hell do we do now? What's the point?” says Bradley, who was the executive editor at that time. There was the practical question of what to do about the next issue of the magazine, but also the chaos of the news cycle in which they were now the center.

“We were very protective of him and his privacy, and then that suddenly became moot. The entire country, world, was talking about what happened to John and Carolyn and Lauren. Here we were, the people who professionally knew him better than anyone, and we didn't feel like we could say a word about it,” Bradley says. “We were told that we couldn't say a word about it by Rose [Terenzio], who told the staff that this was what Caroline Kennedy wanted, and Caroline was the significant owner of the magazine at the time when John died.” (Terenzio says she doesn't remember Caroline giving that directive.)

Kliger, who'd only been on the job for a little more than a month, instructed the team to move forward with their work and assured them the magazine would continue without Kennedy. According to Kliger, he had the backing of Hachette's owner, Jean-Luc Lagardère: “His first comment after I confirmed to him that John had passed away is 'Well, we're not going to close the magazine. I'm not going to leave that as his legacy that it was closed immediately following his death, so we will continue publishing and we'll see what happens.' ”

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After Hachette bought the Kennedy family's 50 percent stake in the magazine, Kliger began taking meetings with possible new editors-in-chief. The New York Times wrote, “The position of editor-in-chief at George has probably been the most difficult job to fill in the magazine industry this year, if not this decade. After all, who would want to step into a role established by a favorite son of America?”

But Kliger says he had plenty of interest, including from Al Franken, the comedian who commerce bank secured credit card later become a senator. “I was willing to meet with Franken, just because he expressed interest. He had, of course, a career with Saturday Night Live. He knew what journalism and writing were about, but at the meeting, Jean-Luc said, 'No. We have to have somebody that knows how to put out a periodic magazine from both a journalistic as well as an editorial-operations point of view.' I agreed.”

Kliger eventually offered the job to Frank Lalli, a former managing editor of Money magazine.

“I not only read the prospectus, but they sent over the last year's worth of the magazine and I looked at them very, very carefully,” Lalli says. “I don't think John was fulfilling the prospectus he wrote. I don't think he had the staff to fulfill it. So what I brought to it was a kind of editorial expertise that John didn't have.”

The staff underwent an overhaul after Lalli arrived. He ended the contracts of columnists Ann Coulter and Paul Begala, whom Kennedy had signed up earlier that year; Lalli felt they were too partisan. He says the relationship with Coulter ended after he refused to run a column because he found it to be homophobic.

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“I got rid of more than half of the staff in six months. A lot were emotionally spent; others weren't very good at all, actually,” Lalli says. “One of John's really good friends told me later, 'You know John took in strays.' So then, little by little, I put together the staff we wanted to put together. And we did some really good journalism.”

Lalli's first issue hit newsstands in March 2000, featuring Donald Trump on the cover with the headline “The Secret Behind Trump's Political Fling.” Lalli says the idea came from how to check wells fargo routing number on the business side of the magazine who knew Trump. (Pecker, who'd already left Hachette, wasn't involved with the cover.) At the time, Trump was a famous but often ridiculed real estate developer with multiple bankruptcies on his résumé who hadn’t yet starred on The Apprentice. He was someone who hsbc mortgage login us more in tabloid gossip columns than on the business pages, which is why former George staffers believe Kennedy wouldn't have put him on the cover.

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“I remember we went to Trump Tower and we did a portrait of Melania and him. He did have his hand on her ass the whole time, squeezing it. I'm thinking, This is so gross,” says Matt Berman, who left the magazine shortly after that shoot. “There were always people that you're constantly&thinsp.&thinsp.&thinsp. They're orbiting. There were probably just scraps of people after John passed away. I was in a daze by then. I'll tell you, John would've never put him on the cover.”

Bradley, who left around the same time Lalli started, says, “Trump would not have been someone that we'd put on the cover, because there stores that sell baseball cards nothing about Trump that represented what John believed in.” Bradley describes the new editorial team as “a group of people who were determined basically to say, 'Fuck you' to what the old guard did and establish their independence and announce that they weren't going to be chained to John Kennedy's vision for the magazine.”

The new George featured a piece on Elián González, the Cuban boy who was embroiled in a charged custody battle, which garnered a lot of attention. And Lalli says he was proud of landing a cover interview with Linda Tripp, the former confidante of Monica Lewinsky's who had betrayed her. “I saw that and I was like, 'Oh my God, John is spinning in his grave like a top,' ” says Bradley.

Though newsstand sales increased under Lalli, advertising revenue continued to drop, and nearly eighteen months after Kennedy's death, George folded. Kliger says, “We just came to the conclusion that we tried, we gave it a shot, we spent some money. At that point, we just had to focus on our core businesses and we couldn't see how we could get George to be in that ring. It was a tough decision.”


One question that has lingered over the two decades since Kennedy's death is: Would he have eventually followed in the footsteps of so many of his relatives and run for office? It came up in nearly every interview he sat for, and he always deflected with a joke like “I've never been asked that!” Many colleagues of his whom I spoke with believe he would have done so—but not until the magazine was healthy enough to survive without him.

“My feeling was always that George was a way of testing the waters for him, to kind of turn the tables on the people who would be asking questions about him if he ran for office and sort of get a perspective on it,” Bradley says. “I thought that was kind of a genius thing to do.”

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Had Kennedy had been able to leave George on a solid foundation before entering, say, a Senate race, what might that have looked like? “My mind's thinking is that if that magazine would have kept publishing, it would have been the perfect magazine for the times we're in,” Kliger says. “It would have been a magazine more squarely about politics and the consciousness of a millennial generation. I think Beto O'Rourke and Elizabeth Warren would have been on the cover. It was a great concept ahead of its time. I wish we would have been able to stick with it because I think it would be a very relevant and needed product today. I think the times have come to George.”

Maybe. But maybe that would have been a double-edged sword. Certainly the magazine would have faced unprecedented competition from emerging digital media outlets like BuzzFeed News and The Daily Beast, not to mention lifestyle publications like Teen Vogue, Elle, and GQ, which help drive the political conversation today. In fact, it's difficult to name a title aiming for an audience broader than Cat Fancy's which doesn't touch on politics. what is the routing number for first interstate bank only can coverage of politics and pop culture go together, they have to go together. It really is the lens through which you have to view the world,” says Noah Shachtman, the editor in chief of The Daily Beast. “Our core mission is we explore politics and pop culture and power. It's what we do, yeah, it's definitely part of the mission.”

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Kennedy may have foreseen the changing media landscape. But today's political journalists don't point to George as the catalyst. “I'm not sure it has [a legacy],” says CNN's Jake Tapper, who wrote an article for George about the future of transportation. “I don't think very much in journalism has a legacy. We all just do the best job we can and what we do is important but journalism is ephemeral and it's the people we cover that matter, not us.”

There is also a big difference between George's relatively bipartisan point of view and today's polarization, especially now that Trump has raised the political stakes and soft, glossy coverage of the president and his administration would draw accusations that the indefensible was being normalized. And celebrities who want to be a part of the political conversation are now expected to be informed about the policies of whomever they're lending their support to. Remember the outcry when Kanye West showed up at the White House? A light-hearted “If I Were President” celebrity column like the one George featured would be a lightning rod today. Maybe in the last two decades the culture caught up to George, but then a proudly provocative reality TV star president gave new meaning to the tagline “Not just politics as usual.”

George tried to liven up politics,” says MSNBC's Hardball host Chris Matthews, who wrote for the first issue of George about the ways in which Congress is like high school. “I personally think you don't have to colorize politics anymore. I think [Kennedy] probably thought the stiff shirts have to be colorized, that they needed to give it some MSG.

“Today we know we've got plenty of that. We're not looking to sexy it up.”

Kate StoreyEsquire Writer-at-LargeKate Storey is a Writer-at-Large for Esquire covering culture, politics, and style.

Источник: https://www.esquire.com/news-politics/a27031243/john-kennedy-jr-george-magazine-true-story/

Sen. Kennedy Delivers JFK Jr. Eulogy

NEW YORK (AP) _ In a heartbreakingly familiar scene, John F. Kennedy Jr. was eulogized Friday as a free spirit who carried the torch of America’s first family of politics with unusual ease and grace and _ like his father _ ``had every gift but length of years.″

``He was a boy who grew into a man with a zest for life and a love of adventure,″ said Sen. Edward Kennedy, JFK Jr.’s uncle. ``He was a pied piper who brought us all along. . He had a legacy, and he learned to treasure it. He was part of a legend, and he learned to live with it.″

Kennedy’s life was cut in half, the senator told 350 family members and friends who filled the velvet-lined pews at the Gothic-style Church of St. Thomas More on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, where JFK Jr.’s mother often sought solace.

``We dared to think . that this John Kennedy would live to comb gray hair,″ the senator said, borrowing from the poet William Butler Yeats. ``But like his father, he had every gift but length of years.″

The memorial Mass came a week after the plane piloted by Kennedy, 38, crashed off Martha’s Vineyard _ killing him, his wife, Carolyn Bessette Kennedy, 33, and sister-in-law Lauren Bessette, 34.

Family and friends _ among them President Clinton, Hillary Rodham Clinton and Muhammad Ali _ celebrated Kennedy as a playful and courageous man who kept his bearings long after he was the child who saluted his father’s casket and was cast as the heir to Camelot.

Sen. Kennedy, who delivered eulogies for Robert F. Kennedy in 1968 and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis in 1994, invoked a phrase often used to describe the length of President Kennedy’s term as he remarked on JFK Jr.’s marriage.

``For a thousand days, he was san jose state basketball score husband who adored the wife who became his perfect soul mate,″ Sen. Kennedy said. ``John’s father taught us all to reach for the moon and the stars. John did that in all he did _ and he found his shining star when he married Carolyn Bessette.″

The senator added: ``He was still becoming the person he would be, and doing it by the beat of his own drummer. He had only just begun. There was in him a great promise of things to come.″

At the end of the 10-minute eulogy, JFK Jr.’s sister, Caroline Kennedy, rose and hugged her uncle, who had fought back tears. Mourners said she read from Shakespeare’s ``The Tempest″ and, helped by her husband and three children, lighted a candle.

A gospel choir sang ``Amazing Grace.″ Worshippers sang along and tapped their seats to ``Swing Low, Sweet Chariot.″ Hip-hop artist Wyclef Jean was the soloist for the reggae anthem ``Many Rivers to Cross.″

Fashion executive Hamilton South gave the eulogy for Ms. Kennedy. He was a close friend of the couple and had joined them on skiing trips.

Ms. Kennedy’s mother, Ann Freeman, read from Henry Scott Holland’s meditation ``Facts of Faith.″ Though it was not known which part she read, the piece includes this passage: ``Death is nothing at all. It does not count. I have only slipped away into the next room. . I am but waiting for you, for an interval, somewhere very near, just around the corner.″

Also among those filling the 126-year-old church for the invitation-only service were RFK’s widow, Ethel Kennedy; Robert F. Kennedy Jr.; Maria Shriver and husband Arnold Schwarzenegger; and Maurice Tempelsman, Mrs. Onassis’ longtime companion.

After the memorial, the congregation walked two blocks uptown to the landmark Convent of the Sacred Heart for a reception. Several Kennedys walked hand-in-hand, their heads down and their eyes hidden by sunglasses.

The media-shy Caroline Kennedy, her husband, Edwin Schlossberg, and their children took a limousine to the reception as church bells rang and helicopters buzzed overhead. At one point, she lowered a window and waved to the crowd that had swelled on the sidewalks around the church in the hours before the service.

Onlookers were kept more than a half-block from the entrance to St. Thomas More amid tight security.

Dog-walkers, nannies pushing strollers and tourists jockeyed for the chance to bid farewell to the man who grew up in front of a nation’s eyes to become a prosecutor, quiet philanthropist, irreverent magazine entrepreneur and subway-riding New Yorker _ one of their own.

``I feel like I grew up with the Kennedys,″ said Alane Repa, 48, visiting from Chicago.

Genie Wong, 46, who lives five blocks from the church, said she often saw Kennedy riding his bike in nearby Central Park.

``Now, I’m sorry I never stopped to say hello,″ she said. ``I’ll never get that chance.″

The service was held one day after the three crash victims’ ashes were cast into the sea off the coast of Martha’s Vineyard, near the crash site.

Ms. Bessette is to be honored with a private service Saturday at an Episcopal church in her family’s hometown of Greenwich, Conn. Sen. Kennedy and several other members of the Kennedy clan are expected to attend.

Also Friday, wreckage from the plane was brought by a Navy salvage ship to Middletown, R.I. The National Transportation Safety Board trucked the pieces to Otis Air Force Base on Cape Cod, Mass., where they will be examined by crash investigators. Determining the cause of the crash is expected to take six to nine months.

Источник: https://apnews.com/01abef6812439583addf05dbadad936d

We first published this story in 2019 to mark the 20th anniversary of the tragic deaths of Carolyn Bessette Kennedy and JFK Jr.

In early May 1999, George magazine hosted a table at the White House Correspondents Dinner. The glossy’s guest list reflected the template for the annual event: Hollywood celebrities (Sean Penn, Claire Danes), controversial pop culture figures (Larry Flynt), and writers and editors. Rarely were the latter the biggest stars of the night, but George’s editor-in-chief was John F. Kennedy Jr., and his date for the night was his wife, Carolyn Bessette Kennedy.

John, 38, was American royalty, as famous for his good looks as for his name. His wife, 33, was an enigma, mysterious and elegant. They were irresistible to cameras in their black-tie best, shaking hands with politicians and stars.

“It was magical,” George staffer RoseMarie Terenzio says of that night. “John was very much ready to make a splash with George. He was proud of it and thought, This is the time, this is the place, and we belong here. We just had a great time. Carolyn really was proud of John, and she was happy to be there to support him. She talked frontier communications ct bill pay everyone at the table and everyone at the next table. She went around to everyone on the staff and said hello.”

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After the dinner, held at the Washington Hilton, the group made their way to an afterparty hosted by Vanity Fair. It was this exclusive celebrity political event, and they were the stars of the show,” says Terenzio. “Everyone stopped and turned around as they walked in.”

This was a time. George had to be figured out; John's cousin is dying. Maybe Carolyn has to decide how she wants to live her life. That's when the accident happened.

It was there that one of the most famous images of the couple was taken. John’s blazer is off, and Carolyn is nestled on his lap. In one frame he is whispering in her ear, in another he is kissing her. All the questions that dogged them—about their marriage, about her deep distrust of the media, about his future and where it would take them—seem far away. They are a couple at ease and in love, content and relaxed. They fit together.

It’s impossible to know whether this photo is the truth about John and Carolyn or simply a happy moment caught amid the swirl that followed them everywhere. Despite their golden couple status, in the summer of 1999 John and Carolyn were at a crossroads. They were facing careers in flux, the ups and downs of the early years of marriage and questions about children—and, most poignantly, the final days of a close loved one, John’s cousin Anthony Radziwill.

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“This was a time,” says Matt Berman, the creative director of George and a close friend of the couple’s. “George had to be figured out; his cousin’s dying. Maybe Carolyn has to decide how she wants to live her life. Does she want to work? Does she want to have kids? Does she want to lead charities?”

“Here you are in the middle of a shift like that, and that’s when the accident happened.”

The choices they might have made—and the answers they might have found—were rendered forever unknowable on July 16. On that hazy Friday evening, John took off in his small private plane from New Jersey’s Essex County Airport, with Carolyn and her sister Lauren Bessette, 34, as his passengers. Before they reached their destination on Martha’s Vineyard, the plane crashed, killing them all.

Those who knew John and Carolyn as a couple describe a warm pair who brought together unlikely acquaintances and welcomed all those around them, from fashion types and schoolmates to George colleagues at all levelsand highbrow celebrities like John’s longtime friend Christiane Amanpour. John was compulsively busy; in addition to his hands-on role at George, he had numerous Kennedy family obligations. They traveled (that spring to London for the opening of Ralph Lauren’s new boutique) and had cozy weekend get-togethers with family on Martha’s Vineyard.

Living in a loft on North Moore Street, they were icons of Tribeca, which was midway through a transition that would take it from commercial zone to New York’s wealthiest zip code. Both John and Carolyn were regularly spotted on the cobblestone streets with their dog Friday. They helped popularize neighborhood restaurants like the Odeon and Bubby’s, both of which have become downtown institutions.

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But beneath the surface, John and Carolyn were dealing with a heart-wrenching crisis. In early 1994, Anthony Radziwill had been diagnosed with a rare sarcoma. (The news came within weeks of Jackie Kennedy being diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which would take her life just months later.) Anthony and John were very close. The son of John’s maternal aunt Lee and Polish prince Stanisław Albrecht Radziwiłł, Anthony was nearly the same age as John and the only male cousin on Jackie’s side of the family. The two were like brothers, serving as best man in each other’s weddings.

Over the course of his illness, Anthony underwent surgeries, chemotherapy, and experimental treatments; always by his side was his wife Carole, a fellow producer at ABC News whom he married in 1994. But by 1999 it was becoming clear that Anthony would not recover. “The summer of 1999 was very difficult for all of us,” Carole remembers. “We knew that it was likely Anthony would not survive to see Labor Day, and we were all on edge, not knowing what to do or say. We were all doing our best to keep smiles on our faces.”

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Those who knew John saw the impact that Anthony’s illness had on him, particularly in 1999. “That was a very painful year [for him], to watch someone he’d grown up with, who was exactly his age, and he’s dying and it’s really hard on his wife, his sister, his mother,” says Sasha Chermayeff, an artist and longtime friend who first met John when she and he both transferred to Phillips Andover Academy as juniors. “For John, I think that Anthony’s illness brought everybody closer in a good way, including Carolyn and him.”

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Carolyn too was deeply affected by the ordeal the Radziwills faced. She and Carole had made an immediate connection—each had gone from a teenage job behind the counter at a Caldor department store to marrying royalty, one figuratively, one literally. Their relationship deepened over the course of Anthony’s illness. “We grew very close, often spending day after day at various hospitals together,” Carole remembers. “I spent only five years with Carolyn before her death in 1999, but we went through a lot of real life stuff in that short time.”

John might have turned to work as a welcome distraction, but his professional life was also in something of a crisis. When he launched George in September 1995, with a Herb Ritts cover photo of Cindy Crawford outfitted as George Washington, the magazine had been a hit. Kennedy’s name and mystique gave George access to talent that most upstart publications could only dream of. Madonna contributed to the first issue, and covers featuring Kate Moss and Barbra Streisand landed with a splash. Having America’s most eligible bachelor at the helm created a built-in audience, and the first two issues broke records for ad sales in a new publication.

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The magazine’s purview was the intersection of politics and pop culture, and it aimed to introduce smart, savvy political coverage to an audience that was often bored by the topic. “John’s basic conceit was we’re living in a world where, like it or not, pop culture and politics are merging, and if you treat politics as part of the pop culture and politicians as celebrities, you might bring more people into the tent to become interested in politics,” says literary agent David Kuhn, a friend of John’s who had worked as an editor at Vanity Fair and the New Yorker and consulted on the launch of George. “He was really ahead of his time with that idea, and no one has given him credit for it. The fact that Donald Trump is president proves that what John was saying 20 years ago has come to pass.”

But the magazine, however prescient, missed first lutheran church amery wi goal of being profitable within three years, and ad rates dropped in later years. By 1999, John and his collaborators faced difficult choices about the future of their enterprise. “I think what was stressful was that we were at a growing pains point,” says Berman, author of JFK Jr., George, & Me: A Memoir. “What was going to work for us? Are we going to be better in a big corporation? Is it more of an independent project? Should John find funding and we do it on our own?”

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Kennedy’s corporate partner in George had been French publisher Hachette Filipacchi, which was reportedly considering pulling funding for the magazine. John was spotted in meetings with executives like Conde Nast’s Steve Florio, and he had flown to Toronto the week before his death for a meeting about a potential partnership with Canadian investors to buy out shares of George.

In the Spring of 1999, Hachette got a new American CEO, Jack Kliger, which put John on even shakier footing with his corporate partner. Kliger, however, disputes the idea that Hachette had stopped believing in George, insisting now that he was working with Kennedy in good faith to keep the magazine alive. “It was not making money at that point, and the trend lines were not heading the right way in terms of revenue growth versus cost growth,” Kliger says. “He understood all of that, and he wanted to figure out an alternative plan, which I said I was prepared to put forth to the corporate parent in France. We were working on that effectively, and then history cut us short.”

Kliger says Kennedy canceled a meeting with him that had been scheduled for the afternoon of the day he died, explaining that he was going away for the weekend but that he intended to meet with Kliger in the coming week.

Hanging over John at all times was the question of what, exactly, he would do with his life—and whether he would eventually follow his father and uncles into the family business and seek elected office. After his marriage that potential path became even more fraught, as it would have required the full participation of Carolyn, who guarded her privacy closely. Her distaste for the spotlight that came with being a Kennedy was articulated early on in their relationship.

During the press conference for the launch of George, Newsday reported that Carole Radziwill had been mistaken by a reporter for Carolyn. “She wouldn't be caught dead here,” Radziwill told the paper.

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In 1999, Carolyn Bessette Kennedy was facing her own professional crossroads. When she and John had begun dating, two years before their 1996 wedding, she was working for Calvin Klein. Though she is frequently described as a golden girl from Greenwich, Connecticut, she was scrappier than that reputation implies. Her parents had divorced when she was very young, and Carolyn and her twin sisters, Lisa and Lauren, had been raised by their mother Ann Freeman, an educator, and her stepfather Richard Freeman, a surgeon. Carolyn attended Boston University, where she had supported herself with part-time jobs. “She always worked,” Colleen Curtis, who roomed with Carolyn in college, told T&C in 2016. “Always.”

She had risen from a retail job at the Calvin Klein boutique in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, to a rarefied role in the company. “I’ve been doing this for 40 years now, and there are probably five or six people who stand out,” says Neil Kraft, who worked as creative director at Calvin Klein in the ’90s. “This had nothing to do with the Kennedys. I couldn’t care less about that. But she was one of those people who stood out at Calvin just as a force.”

Kevin Wisniewski/Shutterstock

Sam Shahid was an art director who worked with Carolyn on photo shoots by Calvin’s then-wife, Kelly Klein. He recalls bumping into her often at restaurants like Il Cantinori, where she would dine discreetly with friends like designer Narciso Rodriguez. “When Carolyn walked into the room, you always knew she was there, the presence. I think Calvin just worshiped her as far as the style. He really depended on her for her taste and her style and her ideas and music,” Shahid says.

By the time Carolyn married John, she was no longer working for Calvin Klein, and the frenzy that followed her everywhere made it difficult how to calculate balloon mortgage payment imagine her ever working in a traditional office again. The paparazzi were merciless in their pursuit of her, staking out the Tribeca apartment and following her through the streets of the neighborhood so doggedly that she feared for her safety.

While John had been born into the public domain and raised to accept with grace the fact that the nation felt an pnc bank locations warsaw indiana of him, Carolyn went from private citizen to world famous celebrity virtually overnight, a notoriety she did everything she could to play down. She never granted a single interview, and we have almost no examples of her talking on camera. The tabloids had rushed to label the statuesque blonde an ice princess, somehow unworthy of America’s favorite son, and her reticence led many to conclude that she was remote and humorless.

The truth, according to her friends, was far different. “She had this amazing sense of humor, really sharp and funny,” Berman says. “For the most part no one really john f kennedy jr memorial site what she sounded like or talked like or what kind of woman she was. I found her very down to earth, very funny, very supportive of nyc doe student account friends, very caring. All the things that you don’t see in a picture.”

Lawrence SchwartzwaldGetty Boost mobile bill pay contact number and other George staff members say Carolyn treated them like family, visiting the office and frequently hosting them at home. She also maintained a close knit group of friends that included Narciso Rodriguez, who had designed her wedding dress; Paul Wilmot, a PR executive who was her former boss; designer Gordon Henderson; stylist Joe McKenna; Kelly Klein; Marci Klein; and casting agent Jessica Weinstein. They followed her lead and never spoke to the media about her.

Carolyn's favorite phrase was, 'We need to talk.'

At a memorial mass at New York City’s St. Thomas More Church on July 23, Hamilton South, one of her closest friends, delivered a eulogy that reflected on Carolyn’s tremendous capacity for friendship. “Her favorite phrase was, ‘We need to talk.’ That would be the beginning of a two- or three-hour telephone odyssey, a tour of Carolyn’s horizon that revealed a range of interest that left you spinning—from this new book to that museum, from fashion to Walt Whitman, from what’s in the paper to what’s up in town. She could be highbrow and low-down. It left you breathless, exhausted, and hungry for more,” he said.

“To spoof herself, and to cover up what she was really doing, she’d say in these talks, ‘Now let’s remember, it’s all about me.’ She made it the permanent subject line in her e-mail: ‘It’s about me.’ But that was just another of her secrets—it was ­never about her. When you talked to Carolyn it was all about you, and all about life.”

MICHAEL FERGUSON/GLOBE PHOTOS

In his remarks, South also said that Carolyn had a professional dream of creating documentaries that would focus on people facing challenges, working out of a small office in Tribeca.

Work was reportedly not the only thing troubling her. Several books and articles published since their deaths have claimed that John and Carolyn were in a difficult patch in their marriage; there were claims that both had been unfaithful. “Three years into the marriage things were really problematic,” says Kennedy’s good friend Sasha Chermayeff. “I know that they really did love each other. It was not a lack of love.”

One source of conflict may have been the question of whether to have children. John was godfather to both of Chermayeff’s children, and she believes that he very much wanted to become a father one day. Carolyn was five years younger than John, and Chermayeff thinks he may have felt ready for parenthood before she did.

Other friends speak of a normal couple weathering the turbulence of a new marriage. Another close friend disputes reports of serious relationship woes and says that the two were working with a realtor to find a second home outside New York and thinking about having children.

RJ CapakGetty Images

As the calendar flipped to July, both John and Carolyn were doing their best to live their lives, despite Anthony’s declining health and the questions looming around George. Carole and Anthony Radziwill had just moved into Red Gate Farm, Jackie’s home on Martha’s Vineyard, so he could spend his last summer in a serene environment.

John was recovering from a broken ankle, an injury he got in a paragliding accident over Memorial Day weekend. A lifelong athlete who used exercise as one of his main forms of stress management, John would surely have been eager to be free of the cast. He had maintained his breakneck schedule while on crutches, but his limited mobility would have had a profound affect on his mood.

In the week leading up to the plane crash there were also questions about whether Carolyn would accompany John to the Hyannis Port wedding of his cousin Rory Kennedy, the youngest of Robert and Ethel Kennedy’s children. It was an event John felt pressure to attend as an ambassador for his branch of the family, since his sister Caroline would not be there. He had his cast removed only the day before the flight. Kliger, Hachette’s CEO, recalls that John was still limping that Friday.

John had had a fascination with aviation since his early childhood, when he would watch his father’s helicopter touch down on the White House lawn. He pursued flying intermittently over the years, becoming more serious about it only after the death of his mother in 1994. (She reportedly disapproved of her son flying, perhaps partly due to her stepson Alexander Onassis having died in a crash in 1973.) John enrolled in a Florida school in early 1998 and received a private pilot’s license that April.

Estate of Stanley Tretick

Friends had been concerned about Kennedy’s interest in flying, but it fit with his enthusiasm for other adventurous pursuits, such as extreme kayaking, scuba diving, and, yes, paragliding. Chermayeff says she saw the appeal to John of piloting himself, as traveling via public airports left him uniquely vulnerable to crowds.

“It’s one thing when you’re in a restaurant and people come up to you. You can sneak out the door when you’re done and get in a cab and end up in a different place. But he hated the airport, because he was always so stuck,” she says. “He was just like, ‘I have to sit there,’ and one person after the next is just going to come up to him. He was too nice to be ruthless about it, so he loved flying, and he loved that little airport.”

While Carolyn had expressed some hesitation about flying with John, in this instance she agreed to make the trip. Her sister Lauren, who worked for Morgan Stanley and lived near them in Tribeca, chose to travel with the couple. She had weekend plans on Martha’s Vineyard, and John was going to drop her off there before continuing on to Hyannis Port.

LAURA CAVANAUGH / GLOBE PHOTOS

John typically made weekend flights to Massachusetts with his instructor, Jay Biederman, but Biederman was unavailable that Friday night. John chose to forgo taking another pilot. When his Piper Saratoga, which he had purchased less than three months earlier, took off from New Jersey at 8:39 p.m. on July 16, it is likely that it was John’s first time making the trip alone in his new plane. John and his passengers took off later than they had intended, and there was a john f kennedy jr memorial site haze that night that limited visibility; other pilots had decided not to fly.

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When the plane did not arrive as scheduled, Dan Samson, a longtime friend who had planned to pick up John and Carolyn, became alarmed. He checked in with the Radziwills to see if there had perhaps been a change of plans, which ignited a ping-ponging of frantic phone calls as friends and family tried to locate them.

Eventually the coast guard and navy were brought in. The search would extend across more than 1,000 square miles and last five days. It became apparent that the plane had crashed seven miles off Martha’s Vineyard a little more than an hour after departure. Rory Kennedy postponed her wedding; the white tent that had been meant to house a reception for 275 guests was used instead as a site for family to gather and wait and pray. (Rory and her fiancé married three weeks later in a small private ceremony in Greece.)

The National Transportation Safety Board report on the accident said the probable cause of the crash was “the pilot’s failure to maintain control of the airplane during a descent over water at night, which was the result of spatial disorientation.” It referenced his lack of experience flying without an instructor and the fact that he wasn’t “instrument rated,” which could have helped him navigate the overcast conditions. There were also questions about his decision to fly solo and the fact that his ankle was not fully healed.

JOHN MOTTERN

“It was so upsetting to me that he flew that night when he had just gotten his cast off,” says Chermayeff. “He wasn’t fully instrument trained; he shouldn’t have done it. It was a pilot negligent mistake in which he died and two people died with him. I have nothing but sadness about that.”

Kevin Wisniewski/Shutterstock

Richard Weise, a friend and fraternity brother of John’s from Brown who is the son of a pilot and flies himself, had mentioned to John right after he got his pilot’s license that he subscribed to a publication about climbing accidents. “I said I read it because I want to learn from other people’s mistakes. And he said, ‘Oh, you’re just trying to discourage me,’ ” Weise says. “That was probably what he didn’t get, that whole idea of learning from other people’s mistakes.”

“To be honest, I wasn’t surprised [by the crash]. Clearly he was flying in a plane that he was not trained or equipped to handle. I think he had many great qualities, but attention to detail was not one of them.”

During a week of memorials in New York and Greenwich, John, Carolyn, and Lauren’s ashes were laid to rest in the Atlantic Ocean following a Catholic service held on a navy ship. Coverage at the time noted that being at sea made it one of the few moments in John’s life when cameras were unable to intrude.

No one in the Bessette family has ever spoken publicly about the loss of two daughters. A year after the crash, Carolyn and Lauren’s mother Ann Freeman released a statement through her lawyer. In it she said, “The loss of these three young people whom we loved so much has forever changed our lives. We continue to struggle with our grief, and we choose to maintain what's left of our privacy.”

HENNY RAY ABRAMS

Three weeks after the funeral, Anthony Radziwill, who had recited Psalm 23, “The Lord Is My Shepherd,” at his best friend and cousin’s memorial, died in a hospital in Manhattan. He was buried in East Hampton. Caroline Kennedy delivered a eulogy; her brother had already begun to write one, which he never got to give.

Carole Radziwill understands better than anyone that there is no way of knowing where John and Carolyn would be today, but she has imagined it frequently over the years. “I’d like to think John and Carolyn would have lots of kids. I know they both wanted that. I imagine the tabloids would eventually tire of them and leave them to live in peace. John’s magazine, George, would be a spectacular success story. But that’s the thing about young deaths: You don’t only mourn what was, you also mourn what could have been.”

Источник: https://www.townandcountrymag.com/society/tradition/a28187331/john-f-kennedy-jr-carolyn-bessette-last-days-plane-crash-true-story/

When Prince Philip was a pillar of strength for John F. Kennedy Jr

A touching moment between the Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip, and John F Kennedy Jr in the wake of JFK's assassination, in 1963.

In the wake of Prince Philip's sad death on Fri, Apr 9, the whole of the United Kingdom has been in a state of mourning. Tributes to the late Duke of Edinburgh have been pouring in from around the world, and many have taken the opportunity to share their memories of the man.

Details about Prince Philip's funeral have been released, while members of the Royal Family have offered tributes to their late father. Now, a story has emerged about Prince Philip helping a young John F. Kennedy Jr in the wake of his father's assassination.

Author Paul Brandus detailed in a tweet how Prince Philip consoled a two-year-old JFK Jr. after flying to Washington, D.C., for President John F. Kennedy's funeral.

Brandus said "The weekend of the Kennedy assassination, he (Prince Philip) flew to Washington for the funeral. At the White House on Sunday, Nov. 24, 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy was looking for John Jr. and opened the door to his playroom. There she found the Prince sprawled on the floor, playing and laughing with the murdered president's son. Days from his 3d birthday, John had said earlier that he "didn't have anybody to play with" (also: "where's Daddy?") and her Majesty's husband decided that he would entertain the boy. RIP."

Brandus also shared a photo of Prince Philip holding the young boy's hand.

It is also of course worth noting the role Prince Philip played for Harry and William following their mother's death. The Duke of Edinburgh was reportedly a pillar of strength for the young men in the aftermath of Princess Diana's death.

Prince Philip notably urged Prince William and Harry to walk behind their mother's hearse at her funeral, which William has spoken about in recent years. William and Harry's relationship with their grandfather stayed strong as they both grew older, and both will, of course, be in attendance at his funeral on Sat, Apr 17.

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Источник: https://britishheritage.com/royals/prince-philip-john-f-kennedy-jfk-death

November 22, 1963: Death of the President

Shortly after noon on November 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated as he rode in a motorcade through Dealey Plaza in downtown Dallas, Texas.

By the fall of 1963, President John F. Kennedy and his political advisers were preparing for the next presidential campaign. Although he had not formally announced his candidacy, it was clear that President Kennedy was going to run and he seemed confident about his chances for re-election.

At the end of September, the president traveled west, speaking in nine different states in less than a week. The trip was meant to put a spotlight on natural resources and conservation efforts. But JFK also used it to sound out themes—such as education, national security, and world peace—for his run in 1964.

Campaigning in Texas

A month later, the president addressed Democratic gatherings in Boston and Philadelphia. Then, on November 12, he held the first important political planning session for the upcoming election year. At the meeting, JFK stressed the importance of winning Florida and Texas and talked about his plans to visit both states in the next two weeks. 

Mrs. Kennedy would accompany him on the swing through Texas, which would be her first extended public appearance since the loss of their baby, Patrick, in August. On November 21, the president and first lady departed on Air Force One for the two-day, five-city tour of Texas.

President Kennedy was aware that a feud among party leaders in Texas could jeopardize his chances of carrying the state in 1964, and one of his aims for the trip was to bring Democrats together. He also knew that a relatively small but vocal group of extremists was contributing to the political tensions in Texas and would likely make its presence felt—particularly in Dallas, where US Ambassador to the United Nations Adlai Stevenson had been physically attacked a month earlier after making a speech there. Nonetheless, JFK seemed to relish the prospect of leaving Washington, getting out among the people and into the political fray.

The first stop was San Antonio. Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, Governor John B. Connally, and Senator Ralph W. Yarborough led the welcoming party. They accompanied the president to Brooks Air Force Base for the dedication of the Aerospace Medical Health Center. Continuing on to Houston, he addressed the League of United Latin American Citizens, and spoke at a testimonial dinner for Congressman Albert Thomas before ending the day in Fort Worth.

Morning in Fort Worth

A light rain was falling on Friday morning, November 22, but a crowd of several thousand stood in the parking lot outside the Texas Hotel where the Kennedys had spent the night. A platform was set up and the president, wearing no protection against the weather, came out to make some brief remarks. "There are no faint hearts in Fort Worth," he began, "and I appreciate your being here this morning. Mrs. Kennedy is organizing herself. It takes longer, but, of course, she looks better than we do when she does it." He went on to talk about the nation's need for being "second to none" in defense and in space, for continued growth in the economy and "the willingness of citizens of the United States to assume the burdens of leadership."

The warmth of the audience response was palpable as the president reached out to shake hands amidst a sea of smiling faces.

Back inside the hotel the president spoke at a breakfast of the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce, focusing on military preparedness. "We are still the keystone in the arch of freedom," he said. "We will continue to do…our duty, and the people of Texas will be in the lead."

On to Dallas

The presidential party left the hotel and went by motorcade to Carswell Air Force Base for the thirteen-minute flight to Dallas. Arriving at Love Field, President and Mrs. Kennedy disembarked and immediately walked toward a fence where a crowd of well-wishers had gathered, and they spent several minutes shaking hands.

The first lady received a bouquet of red roses, which she brought with her to the waiting limousine. Governor John Connally and his wife, Nellie, were already seated in the open convertible as the Kennedys entered and sat behind them. Since it was no longer raining, the plastic bubble top had been left off. Vice President and Mrs. Johnson occupied another car in the motorcade.

The procession left the airport and traveled along a ten-mile route that wound through downtown Dallas on the way to the Trade Mart where the President was scheduled to speak at a luncheon.

The Assassination

Crowds of excited people lined the streets and waved to the Kennedys. The car turned off Main Street at Dealey Plaza around 12:30 p.m. As it was passing the Texas School Book Depository, gunfire suddenly reverberated in the plaza.

Bullets struck the president's neck and head and he slumped over toward Mrs. Kennedy. The governor was shot in his back. 

The car sped off to Parkland Memorial Hospital just a few minutes away. But little could be done for the President. A Catholic priest was summoned to administer the last rites, and at 1:00 p.m. John F. Kennedy was pronounced dead. Though seriously wounded, Governor Connally would recover.

The president's body was brought to Love Field and placed on Air Force One. Before the plane took off, a grim-faced Lyndon B. Johnson stood in the tight, crowded compartment and took the oath of office, administered by US District Court Judge Sarah Hughes. The brief ceremony took place at 2:38 p.m.

Less than an hour earlier, police had arrested Lee Harvey Oswald, a recently hired employee at the Texas School Book Depository. John f kennedy jr memorial site was being held for the assassination of President Kennedy and the fatal shooting, shortly afterward, of Patrolman J. D. Tippit on a Dallas street.

On Sunday morning, November 24, Oswald was scheduled to be transferred from police headquarters to the county jail. Viewers across America watching the live television coverage suddenly saw a man aim a pistol and fire at point blank range. The assailant was identified as Jack Ruby, a local nightclub owner. Oswald died two hours later at Parkland Hospital.

The President's Funeral

That same day, President Kennedy's flag-draped casket was moved from the White House to the Capitol on a caisson drawn by six grey horses, accompanied by one riderless black horse. At Mrs. Kennedy's request, the cortege and other ceremonial details were modeled on the funeral of Abraham Lincoln. Trading card stores in houston tx lined Pennsylvania Avenue and many wept openly as the caisson passed. During the 21 hours that the president's body lay in john f kennedy jr memorial site in the Capitol Rotunda, about 250,000 people filed by to pay their respects.

On Monday, November 25, 1963 President Kennedy was laid to rest in Arlington National Cemetery. The funeral was attended by heads of state and representatives from more than 100 countries, with untold millions more watching on television. Afterward, at the grave site, Mrs. Kennedy and her husband's brothers, Robert and Edward, lit an eternal flame.

Perhaps the most indelible images of the day were the salute to his father given by little John F. Kennedy Jr. (whose third birthday it was), daughter Caroline kneeling next to her mother at the president's bier, and the extraordinary grace and dignity shown by Jacqueline Kennedy.

As people throughout the nation and the world struggled to make sense of a senseless act and to articulate their feelings about President Kennedy's life and legacy, many recalled these words from his inaugural address:

All this will not be finished in the first one hundred days, nor in the first one thousand days, nor in the life of this administration. Nor even perhaps in our lifetime on this planet. But let us begin.

Arlington National Cemetery

To learn more about President Kennedy's funeral and grave site, go to the Arlington National Cemetery website.

Aftermath

The Warren Commission

On November 29, 1963 President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed the President's Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy. It came to be known as the Warren Commission after its chairman, Earl Warren, Chief Justice of the United States. President Johnson directed the commission to evaluate matters relating to the assassination and the subsequent killing of the alleged assassin, and to report its findings and conclusions to him.

The House Select Committee on Assassinations

The US House of Representatives established the House Select Committee on Assassinations in 1976 to reopen the investigation of the assassination in light of allegations that previous inquiries had not received the full cooperation of federal agencies.

Note to the reader: Point 1B in the link below to the findings of the 1979 House Select Committee on Assassinations states that the committee had found "a high probability that two gunmen fired" at the president. This conclusion resulted from the last-minute “discovery” of a Dallas police radio transmission tape that allegedly provided evidence that four or more shots were fired in Dealey Plaza. After the report appeared in print, acoustic experts analyzed the tape and proved conclusively that it was completely worthless—thus negating the finding in Point 1B.

The committee, which also investigated the death of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., issued its report on March 29, 1979.

Assassination Records Collection

Through the President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act of 1992, the US Congress ordered that all assassination-related material be housed together under supervision of the National Archives and Records Administration.

Источник: https://www.jfklibrary.org/learn/about-jfk/jfk-in-history/november-22-1963-death-of-the-president

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  1. Maybe just do a video of 10 mediocre cash sign up cards. Personally I'm building a large base of 20+ base and I don't care about travel so these cards are good for a lot of people like me. Eventually I'll get under 5/24 again but having that extra firm base is nice (currently 11/21)

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