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home · merchant support · login. 0. Bpoint, Supported by the Commonwealth Bank. PAY MY BILL NOW · BPOINT FEATURES · DEVELOPER TOOLS. BPOINT. It's January 18. There's less than two weeks until the end of the month and still no Apple Pay. What's taking so long? 3 yrs Report. You're still able to make payment transfers in NetBank and the app via PayID and BSB and account number and pay bills using BPAY. Cardless Cash is also.

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Commonwealth Bank agrees to pay $700m to settle money laundering lawsuit

The Commonwealth Bank has agreed to pay $700m to settle civil proceedings relating to breaches of anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism financing laws.

If the federal court accepts the offer it will be the largest civil penalty in Australia’s corporate history.

The announcement follows court-ordered mediation between CBA and the government’s financial intelligence agency, Austrac. The deal would close civil proceedings against CBA, which began 10 months ago.

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In August Austrac announced it was suing CBA for 53,700 alleged breaches of money laundering and counter-terrorism financing laws. The case related to CBA’s use of intelligent deposit machines, a type of ATM launched in 2012, which let customers anonymously deposit and transfer cash.

The investigation, undertaken in partnership with federal police, NSW police and Western Australia police, found that the machines were being used to launder the illicit proceeds of crime.

CBA has agreed to pay a civil penalty of $700m and Austrac’s legal costs of $2.5m to end the matter. It had originally provided for an estimated penalty of $375m.

The bank’s share price jumped from $68.70 to $70.23 - or 2.2% - after the announcement, a sign shareholders were relieved about the size of the penalty. By midday the share price had settled near $69.70.

“This agreement, while it still needs to be approved by the federal court, brings certainty to one of the most significant issues we have faced,” CBA’s chief executive, Matt Comyn, said on Monday.

“While not deliberate, we fully appreciate the seriousness of the mistakes we made. Our agreement today is a clear acknowledgement of our failures and is an important step towards moving the bank forward.”

In reaching the agreement with Austrac, CBA has admitted it contravened the Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-Terrorism Financing Act 2006 on 53,750 occasions.

It has also accepted that:

  • It failed to carry out an appropriate assessment of the money laundering and terrorism financing risks of its intelligent deposit machines before October 2017.
  • It failed to complete the introduction of appropriate controls to mitigate and manage the risks before April 2018.
  • It failed to provide 53,506 threshold transaction reports to Austrac on time for cash transactions of $10,000 or more through IDMs from November 2012 to September 2015, having a total value of about $625m.
  • For three years it did not comply with the requirements of its anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism financing program relating to monitoring transactions on 778,370 accounts.
  • It failed to report suspicious matters on time, or at all, involving transactions in the tens of millions of dollars.
  • Even after it became aware of suspected money laundering or structuring on CBA accounts, it did not monitor its customers to mitigate and manage money laundering and terrorism financing risks, including the ongoing risks of doing business with those customers.

Austrac’s chief executive, Nicole Rose, said the agreement sent a strong message to the financial industry.

“As we have seen in this case, criminals will exploit poor business practices to launder the proceeds of their crimes,” Rose said. “This has real impacts on the everyday lives of Australians and puts the community at risk by increasing opportunities for terrorists to support attacks here and overseas, and enabling organised crime groups to peddle drugs to our families and friends.

“We know that businesses are the first line of defence in protecting the community and our financial system from criminal abuse, and it is critical for [money laundering and counter-terrorism financing] compliance and risk management to be embedded in business strategy and practices.”

Comyn apologised to Australians for letting them down. “We have changed senior leadership in the key roles overseeing financial crimes compliance supported by significant resources and clear accountabilities,” he said.

The attorney general, Christian Porter, said: “I congratulate Austrac, its CEO and legal team for their engagement with me which has enabled this matter to be resolved in such a successful and speedy way.”

The home affairs minister, Peter Dutton, said CBA’s disregard of its anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism obligations had allowed criminals to exploit its systems and put the Australian community at risk.

“This very large number of breaches over several years is unacceptable and should never have been allowed to happen,” Dutton said.

The treasurer, Scott Morrison, said the law was non-negotiable, especially when it came to the country’s largest financial institutions.

“The government is serious about enforcing any breaches,” he said. “Banks should be leaders in ensuring their systems cannot be compromised by criminals seeking to launder money or finance terrorist activities.”

Labor’s opposition assistant treasurer, Andrew Leigh, said the size of the payout reflected the gravity of CBA’s wrongdoing.

“Again it reinforces the call we have been making for the last two years for a royal commission,” he told Sky News. “We have seen from CBA alone, scandals ranging from children’s bank accounts to charging dead people for work that hadn’t been done.”

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/news/2018/jun/04/commonwealth-bank-agrees-to-pay-700m-to-settle-money-laundering-lawsuit

CommBank AdvancePay 

This fee is charged when your CommBank AdvancePay limit is applied to your account, regardless of whether the temporary limit is accessed or not. Your final limit will be made up of the amount approved and the fee.4

How to repay your limit

Access to CommBank AdvancePay will expire on your chosen pay date. Any money paid into your account is automatically used to repay your CommBank AdvancePay.

Check if any direct debits or scheduled payments are due within your pay cycle. You’ll need to make sure there’s enough money in your account on your chosen pay date to repay your CommBank AdvancePay, otherwise your account will be considered overdrawn when your limit expires.

If you don’t repay on time

If your CommBank AdvancePay limit is not fully repaid once your chosen pay date arrives, your account will be considered overdrawn and you’ll be charged the debit excess interest rate. This interest rate is currently 14.90% p.a. and will apply on any overdrawn amounts. 

Other fees and charges related to your everyday account will continue to apply, for example an overdraw fee (currently $15.00) may apply if you make additional transactions on your account while overdrawn. See CommBank Transaction, Savings and Investment Account Terms and Conditions (PDF).

Источник: https://www.commbank.com.au/banking/commbank-advancepay.html

How to Transfer Money Overseas with CommBank

There are a lot of numbers and information you hear about when it comes to international money transfers. Below there are extra details you might need to send money overseas and the things you don't.

Commonwealth IBAN number

IBAN is an account format used by European banks. Australian banks do not use this format and an IBAN is not required to send money to a Commonwealth bank account in Australia. Other parties with an IBAN field on their overseas payment form can simply leave this field blank. However, payers in certain countries may require you to provide one. In that case, your BSB and account number should be combined. Do not include any spaces or hyphens.

Commonwealth Bank routing number

You may need a National Clearing Code, Routing Number, BSB Number or Sort Code, you should use the first six digits (bank and branch codes) of your account number for which you wish to receive the payment into. For example, if the account number is 01-0123-0123456-00 use 010123.

Commonwealth Bank international SWIFT code

You shouldn't need Commonwealth's SWIFT code for making a transfer overseas. Generally this is only needed when you're transferring money back into the country.

Commonwealth Bank address for international transfers

When it comes to making an international money transfer through Commonwealth Bank, you shouldn't need Commonwealth's address. You will most likely need the address of the receiving bank account. If you do need CBA's it will just be the address of your local branch.

Commonwealth account number details

You should just need the account number details of the person you're sending the money to from your Commonwealth Bank account.

Notes on international bank drafts or cheques

International bank cheques or drafts can be deposited into a Commonwealth Bank account. It can be a lengthy process. If it is in a foreign currency it will take longer to process as it will need to be returned to the country of origin for clearing. Additionally, the fees associated with these types of payments are very high. This means that we would never suggest using international bank drafts or cheques. It would be better to use a different payment method.

Источник: https://www.thecurrencyshop.com.au/guides/how-to-transfer-money-overseas-with-commonwealth-bank

StepPay: a new way to buy now, pay later everyday

It might be something you need, or just something that helps you lead a fuller life, but you don’t want everyday and unexpected costs to bite into funds you've earmarked for other things. You also don’t want it to mean you miss out on something else that’s important to you. You don’t want to have to choose.

That’s when it makes sense to “spend and split” – spread out over four equal payments and give yourself some breathing room. And that’s where StepPay, CommBank’s buy now pay, later product, comes in.

The benefits of all-in-one-place payments

StepPay sits in your CommBank app alongside all your other banking so you can see, at a glance, your account information, what you’ve spent, and any repayments coming up.

It’s far easier than tracking repayments spread across multiple banks, lenders, apps and online dashboards. And not having to use lots of different passwords is a bonus too. Not to mention the relief of feeling in control of your spending, and on top of your budget.

Use StepPay wherever

With StepPay you’re not limited to participating retailers – there’ll be no awkward moment at the register waiting to see if your card is accepted. So, your medical specialist, your favourite online retailer, even your local market stall – if they accept Mastercard®, then they’ll accept StepPay. Online and in-store.

It’s the go-to banking product you can use for all your wants and needs, every day. And activating your StepPay is easy – just three simple steps.

Buy now, pay later and stagger your repayments

StepPay can help give you greater financial control as well as peace of mind knowing that whenever and wherever costs crop up, you’ve got them covered. You can use StepPay to make purchases of between $100 and $1000, and then split your repayments into equal, more manageable instalments. These will automatically come out of your linked CommBank repayment account. No need to nibble away at your savings for everyday bills or break your carefully crafted budget.

Apply for StepPay to check your eligibility, and once activated, add the card to your digital wallet to start spending. Learn more about the simple steps to eligibility

No hidden extras

When you purchase using StepPay there’s no interest charged and no account-keeping fees. There are late payment fees if you default, but they’re capped at a maximum yearly late payment fee.

Источник: https://www.commbank.com.au/articles/buy-now-pay-later/steppay-everyday-way-to-bnpl.html

Turn your CommBank Awards points into your dream holiday

You’ve worked hard for your Commbank Awards points, so now it’s time to make them work for you! As a CommBank Awards cardholder, redeem your points for travel with no black out dates. That’s right, you can choose any seat, any airline, any destination at any time. Don't have enough points for the trip you'd like? Don't worry – you can always use a combination of Points Plus Pay. 

Go on, you deserve a break!

There has never been a better time to explore our own backyard than right now, when we have the whole place to ourselves. Whether you can escape for a road trip nearby, or want to discover a new state of mind just a short flight away, get your points to work for you and treat yourself to a holiday you’ve earned.

Earn 5,000 bonus CommBank Awards points* today.

Accommodation, flights, cruises, tours and more - when you spend $500 or more on a new booking instore between 18 October - 17 December 2021 you'll instantly score bonus Awards points. Terms and conditions apply*.

To book call 1300 165 033 or visit any Flight Centre store today.

About CommBank Awards

CommBank offers the largest rewards program of any bank in Australia^> with no expiry on points. Earn points when using your CommBank Awards card for daily spending and redeem in-store at Flight Centre for your dream holiday.

If you don't have enough points for the holiday you have been dreaming of, you can use Points Plus Pay. This lets you use the Awards points you have now, plus your Awards card to make up the difference.

Why redeem with Flight Centre?

  • Any destination. Any airline.
  • Travel anytime. There are no black out dates.
  • Book flights, hotels, car hire, cruises and holiday packages.
  • Don’t have enough points? Use Points Plus Pay.

Pay with CommBank Awards points

You can pay with your Awards points instantly in store, or over the phone. You can also redeem your points for Flight Centre Gift Cards on the Awards site, accessible via NetBank or the CommBank app

Turn your Awards points into travel:

Redeem your Awards points in store at over 300 locations nationwide. Call us on 1300 165 033

Don't have enough points?

Don't worry – you can always use a combination of Points Plus Pay.

Learn more about CommBank Awards

    A minimum spend of $500 applies, not including any points redeemed. Offer is only valid for new bookings made in-store at Flight Centre or over the phone by calling 1300 165 033 between 18 October and 17 December 2021. 5,000 Bonus CommBank Awards points is limited to one per booking. Customer must use their CommBank Awards credit card in-store at Flight Centre or over the phone by calling 1300 165 033 to qualify for bonus points. Offer is not available online.

    Источник: https://www.flightcentre.com.au/deals/commonwealth-awards

    CBA sued after sacking of staffer who discussed pay

    “Draconian clauses that prohibit employees from disclosing their remuneration to their colleagues under threat of sacking create environments in which the gender pay gap continues to exist and other inequalities are hidden and therefore cannot be addressed,” Ms Angrisano said.

    “This only benefits employers who line their pockets while employees unknowingly continue to be paid less than they’re worth.”

    CBA sacked the lender in October, just a few days before his six months’ probation was up, citing “unacceptable conduct” in his termination letter, including, among other reasons, his “discussing confidential remuneration with colleagues”.

    Concerns ’confirmed’

    The lender denied the claim in his adverse action application to the Fair Work Commission, saying he had merely talked to co-workers about whether they were correctly compensated for overtime when working on weekends.

    His concerns were later confirmed, he claims, when it was ultimately determined he was owed money for overtime.

    In any case, he said he had only generally discussed penalty rates and the type of contracts his colleagues were on and at no point disclosed specific remuneration.

    “The [lender] and his colleagues were required to discuss the matter together to understand what their entitlement was, due to [CBA] employing its staff performing the same role on differing contractual arrangements with different entitlements to overtime and penalties,” the FSU said in his application.

    However, shortly after the conversation, the lender’s then-manager allegedly advised him that discussing penalty rates was not acceptable and would result in disciplinary action in the form of a warning letter – which was not issued before his termination.

    The sacking occurred just one month after Mr Comyn acknowledged the existence of the clauses in response to questions on September 23 from the parliamentary standing committee on economics, but said: “We don’t enforce those.

    “I don’t think that’s good policy – one that you’re not going to enforce.”

    The FSU, while maintaining the lender did not disclose pay specifics, noted in its legal challenge that “it would seem that to terminate an employee on the basis of discussing remuneration would be an act contrary to the express views of [CBA’s] own CEO”.

    The bank’s termination letter also highlighted “inappropriate conduct in team meetings including commentary that is not aligned with the bank’s policies and values”, and the lender claims his manager warned him against using “anti-CBA language”.

    But, according to the lender, this was a reference to his raising a concern “in a professional and respectful way” – and in line with his workplace rights – about directions to perform work that he believed risked placing CBA in breach of its responsible lending obligations.

    He says that after the team meeting, the business, upon reflection, agreed with his concern and withdrew the direction on the basis of the concern he had raised.

    ‘Range of conduct issues’

    The bank also cited other reasons including lack of punctuality, failing to adhere to his work call schedule, capturing confidential customer information with his phone and providing customers with incorrect information.

    But the FSU claimed these were “to hide or conceal that the real reason, the substantive and operative reason, for dismissal was because the applicant exercised his workplace right to make a complaint or inquiry into his employment”.

    A CBA spokesman said the lender’s employment with the bank was terminated before the end of his probation period “for a range of conduct issues that were raised with him on a number of occasions”.

    “[We] therefore refute the suggestion that his termination was as a direct consequence of pay secrecy,” he said.

    ”[The lender] did not demonstrate the conduct we expect from our employees, and we intend to defend his claim at the Fair Work Commission. We will not be making any further comment at this stage.”

    The FSU said CBA this year had rejected a union bid to include a provision in its enterprise agreement preventing the bank from sacking anyone for discussing pay.

    It said this followed the union securing a $10,000 pay rise for CBA call centre workers to address inequalities that were discovered because colleagues talked to each other about what they were paid.

    “If, as he says, Mr Comyn doesn’t think CBA should include clauses they don’t intend to rely on, then CBA should commit to removing these clauses from their contract templates immediately, and communicate clearly to staff that they will not enforce existing clauses,” Ms Angrisano said.

    Opposition spokesman for industrial relations Tony Burke said pay secrecy clauses had “been used for a long time to protect favouritism, and they are one of the clear barriers in pay equity for women”.

    “Pay secrecy clauses aren’t about protecting companies – they’re about preventing workers from knowing how they’re being paid compared to colleagues,” he said.

    “If you want to share how much you’re paid with your colleagues you should be allowed to – and Labor will fix this.”

    Источник: https://www.afr.com/work-and-careers/workplace/bank-sued-after-sacking-of-staffer-who-discussed-pay-20211121-p59anv

    CommBank AdvancePay 

    This fee is charged when your CommBank AdvancePay limit is applied to your account, regardless of whether the temporary limit is accessed or not. Your final limit will be made up of the amount approved and the fee.4

    How to repay your limit

    Access to CommBank AdvancePay will expire on your chosen pay date. Any money paid into your account is automatically used to repay your CommBank AdvancePay.

    Check if any direct debits or scheduled payments are due within your pay cycle. You’ll need to make sure there’s enough money in your account on your chosen pay date to repay your CommBank AdvancePay, otherwise your account will be considered overdrawn when your limit expires.

    If you don’t repay on time

    If your CommBank AdvancePay limit is not fully repaid once your chosen pay date arrives, your account will be considered overdrawn and you’ll be charged the debit excess interest rate. This interest rate is currently 14.90% p.a. and will apply on any overdrawn amounts. 

    Other fees and charges related to your everyday account will continue to apply, for example an overdraw fee (currently $15.00) may apply if you make additional transactions on your account while overdrawn. See CommBank Transaction, Savings and Investment Account Terms and Conditions (PDF).

    Источник: https://www.commbank.com.au/banking/commbank-advancepay.html

    The recent release of the Commonwealth Bank’s CommBank app for the Samsung Galaxy S4 promised to finally herald the era of smartphone payment. The app utilises the NFC capabilities of the Samsung phone directly to communicate with Mastercard PayPass terminals. Everyone else can get a stripped down “tag” which is basically a small credit card that can be fixed to the back of the phone. A little commbank pay convenient than carrying a full-sized credit card perhaps but without any real additional functionality.

    In theory, you should be able to install the CommBank App, download your credit card to the phone and wave it at PayPass terminals to buy your coffee when you are out jogging. At least that is what the commercial claims.

    The reality unfortunately is very different and the app’s launch has brought howls of frustration from almost every quarter. Even for those users who have the two supported models of the Samsung S4, getting the app working requires physically downloading the credit card details to the phone. This process has been beset with failures to which the Commonwealth Bank have remained silent.

    Even for those who have completed the process, the success of the phone actually making a payment is a hit-and-miss affair. The position of the phone is critical and users have adopted a practice of putting a finger in between the phone and the terminal to get the surfaces at the right distances from each other.

    An unforeseen and slightly amusing problem has been the reaction of shop assistants when customers have tried to pay with the phone. As one user wrote:

    “As soon as the cashier saw me put my phone to the little receiver device though she stuck her hand between my phone and the receiver and called her manager over. She thought i was scamming the machine. I explained to her it was the same as those paypass cards but she didnt want a bar of it.”

    Given the ease of NFC payment using the standard credit card, you would have to wonder why anyone would bother using their phone. In reality, most people won’t.

    With all technologies, the biggest hurdle to adoption is getting the user to change ingrained habits. This will only happen if by using the technology, there commbank pay a clear advantage over existing or other solutions. With the advent of NFC and its role in facilitating mobile payments, the advantages seemed obvious. Users would only need to carry their phone instead of their phone and wallets. Receipts from transactions can be sent automatically to the app and the data used to provide summaries of transactions and spending. Merchants could potentially tie loyalty programs to the phone apps and of course the credit card companies are only to eager to encourage and facilitate use of their cards.

    In practice, the NFC technology in mobile phones has proved unreliable at best. Even limiting the number of phones supported hasn’t guaranteed that they will work with different terminals or even consistently with terminals that do work. Credit card NFC payment technology on the other hand has proven both simple and reliable making the motivation to switch from this technology to the phone extremely weak.

    Realising the uphill struggle facing NFC, Google has largely abandoned NFC based mobile payments and now provides a plastic magnetic stripe card to enable access to its Wallet program. The US of course is behind Europe and Australia with merchant support of NFC solar panels for trailer homes facilities and so this would have played a part in their decision to not pursue the NFC strategy. Discover online banking bonus this light, it is also not surprising that Apple has so far resisted adding NFC capabilities to its phones. Apple would never add a feature unless it was certain it could make it work seamlessly and for NFC, this is clearly a way off that happening.

    In the meantime, if you really want to use your phone to do NFC payments, take your PayPass or PayWave enabled card and stick it in your phone case.

    Источник: https://theconversation.com/commbanks-app-wont-usher-in-the-era-of-mobile-payments-21698

    CBA sued after sacking of staffer who discussed pay

    “Draconian clauses that prohibit employees from disclosing their remuneration to their colleagues under threat of sacking create environments in which the gender pay gap continues to exist and other inequalities are hidden and therefore cannot be addressed,” Ms Angrisano said.

    “This only benefits employers who line their pockets while employees unknowingly continue to be paid less than they’re worth.”

    CBA sacked the lender in October, just a few days before his six months’ probation was up, citing “unacceptable conduct” in his termination letter, including, among other reasons, his “discussing confidential remuneration with colleagues”.

    Concerns ’confirmed’

    The lender denied the claim in his adverse action application to the Fair Work Commission, saying he had merely talked to co-workers about whether they were correctly compensated for overtime when working on weekends.

    His concerns were later confirmed, he claims, when it was ultimately determined he was owed money for overtime.

    In any case, he said he had only generally discussed penalty rates and the type of contracts his colleagues were on and at no point disclosed specific remuneration.

    “The [lender] and his colleagues were required to discuss the matter together to understand what their entitlement was, due to [CBA] employing its staff performing the same role on differing contractual arrangements with different entitlements to overtime and penalties,” the FSU said in his application.

    However, shortly after the conversation, the lender’s then-manager allegedly advised him that discussing penalty rates was not acceptable and would result in disciplinary action in the form of a warning letter – which was not issued before his termination.

    The sacking occurred just one month after Mr Comyn acknowledged the existence of the clauses in response to questions on September 23 from the parliamentary standing committee on economics, but said: “We don’t enforce those.

    “I don’t think that’s good policy – one that capital one auto finance headquarters address not going to enforce.”

    The FSU, while maintaining the lender did not disclose pay specifics, noted in its legal challenge that “it would seem that to terminate an employee on the basis of discussing remuneration would be an act contrary to the express views of [CBA’s] own CEO”.

    The bank’s termination letter also highlighted “inappropriate conduct in team meetings including commentary that is not aligned with the bank’s policies and values”, and the lender claims his manager warned him against using “anti-CBA language”.

    But, according to the lender, this was a reference to his raising a concern “in a professional and respectful way” – and in line with his workplace rights – about directions to perform work that he believed risked placing CBA in breach of its responsible lending obligations.

    He says that after the team meeting, the business, upon reflection, agreed with his concern and withdrew the direction on the basis of the concern he had raised.

    ‘Range of conduct issues’

    The bank also cited other reasons including lack of punctuality, failing to adhere to his work call schedule, capturing confidential customer information with his phone and providing customers with incorrect information.

    But the FSU claimed these were “to hide or conceal that the real reason, the substantive and operative reason, for dismissal was because the applicant exercised his workplace right to make a complaint or inquiry into his employment”.

    A CBA spokesman said the lender’s employment with the bank was terminated before the end of his probation period “for a range of conduct issues that were raised with him on a number of occasions”.

    “[We] therefore refute the suggestion that his termination was as a direct consequence of pay secrecy,” he said.

    ”[The lender] did not demonstrate the conduct we expect from our employees, and we intend to defend his claim at the Fair Work Commission. We will not be making any further comment at this stage.”

    The FSU said CBA this year had rejected a union bid to commbank pay a provision in its enterprise agreement preventing the bank from sacking anyone for discussing pay.

    It said this followed the union securing a $10,000 pay rise for CBA call centre workers to address inequalities that were discovered because colleagues talked to each other about what they were paid.

    “If, as he says, Mr Comyn doesn’t think CBA should include clauses they don’t intend to rely on, then CBA should commit to removing these clauses from their contract templates immediately, and communicate clearly to staff that they will not enforce existing clauses,” Ms Angrisano said.

    Opposition spokesman for industrial relations Tony Burke said pay secrecy commbank pay had “been used for a long time to protect favouritism, and they are one of the clear barriers in pay equity for women”.

    “Pay secrecy clauses aren’t about protecting companies – they’re about preventing workers from knowing how they’re being paid compared to colleagues,” he said.

    “If you want to share how much you’re paid with your colleagues you should be allowed to – and Labor will fix this.”

    Источник: https://www.afr.com/work-and-careers/workplace/bank-sued-after-sacking-of-staffer-who-discussed-pay-20211121-p59anv

    Change the way you pay with buy now, pay later

    How can I use buy now, pay later to help balance my budget?

    At every stage commbank pay life, you’ll find yourself managing regular bills alongside those inevitable, unexpected costs. 

    Say you score a lucrative work offer, but you need to buy a crucial piece of equipment (like a camera lens or new laptop) to get the job done. Or, your flatmate tells you he’s moving out and you realise you need to replace the fridge he’s taking with him.

    Purchases like these commbank pay you grab hold of experiences. In those kinds of scenarios, the option to buy now, pay later can really save your budget.

    How does buy now, pay later work?

    Buy now, pay later products allow you to split your purchases into equal repayment instalments.

    In the case of StepPay, CommBank’s buy now, pay later product, you can split purchases between $100 and $1000 into four, equal fortnightly instalments that automatically come out of your linked CommBank repayment account. This can help make it easier to stick to a budgeting plan and stay on track with your longer-term financial goals.

    And unlike other buy bank of eastman magnolia state bank, pay later products, you can use StepPay everywhere that Mastercard® is accepted, online and in-store. From your mechanic to your physiotherapist; from a fashion retailer to a hotel, online or in store.

    Giving you flexibility with how you manage your everyday expenses and the feeling of control, all your StepPay buy now, pay later purchases are visible in one place – the CommBank app.

    Easy to activate directly through the CommBank app, if you’re an eligible customer, once approved you simply need to add your StepPay card to your digital wallet and you can start spending on whatever, wherever you need.

    All in one convenient place, between StepPay, CommBank Rewards and our upcoming partnership with Little Birdie, we’re helping to make sure you never have to miss out – from the latest deals to the purchases and experiences you have your eyes on.

    How to get StepPay?

    Learn more about whether you’re eligible for StepPay, a new way to buy now, pay later, everywhere. 

    Источник: https://www.commbank.com.au/articles/buy-now-pay-later/change-the-way-you-pay.html

    Commonwealth Bank customers receiving $50 ‘sorry payments’ after IT outage

    Commonwealth Bank customers might want to check their accounts - you could be $50 richer.

    After its CommBank and Netbank systems went down on Wednesday, thousands of customers were left unable to pay bills or receive income for hours.

    Disgruntled customers took to social media to vent their spleens as the IT outage dragged on.

    But on Friday, customers began to take to Twitter for a different reason, and this time it was with less fury.

    The bank has begun rolling commbank pay $50 “sorry payments” to affected customers as a way of apologising no fee chime atm the outage, which affected credit cards and debit cards.

    “We have made a $50 goodwill payment to customers who were significantly impacted by recent technology outages in the last week, a CBA spokesperson said on Friday.

    “We’re very sorry about this and to apologise we have made a goodwill gesture payment into customer accounts who have been significantly impacted.

    “No action is required to homes for sale in mueller austin tx the payment.”

    In a response to one customer on Twitter, the bank said it had “targeted those customers who were significantly impacted by the CommBank app/NetBank outage”.

    “When a customer contacts us we will review their situation on a case by case basis.”

    ‘Disrupting your morning’

    On Wednesday the bank confirmed on Twitter there were tech issues surrounding the CommBank app and NetBank.

    “Some card settings may also be unavailable right now,” it said.

    “We apologise for disrupting your morning, we’re working urgently to fix this as soon as we can.”

    Some tap-and-go services, including Google Pay, were also impacted, while customers were greeted with an error message when commbank pay tried to log into the app.

    It was the second outage in a week after Commbank, Westpac and ANZ websites went down on June 17.

    That outage was caused after a key piece of internet infrastructure failed, the Akamai content delivery system.

    The outage stretched on for hours, with initial reports of systems going down on the morning of June 23 and only going back online for all customers early on the morning of June 24.

    Источник: https://7news.com.au/business/commbank/commonwealth-bank-customers-receiving-50-sorry-payments-after-it-outage-c-3222883

    StepPay: a new way to buy now, pay later everyday

    It might be something you need, or just something that helps you lead a fuller life, but you don’t want everyday and unexpected costs to bite into funds you've earmarked for other things. You also don’t want it to mean you miss out on something else that’s important to you. You don’t want to have to choose.

    That’s when it makes sense to “spend and split” – spread out over four equal payments and give yourself some breathing room. And that’s where StepPay, CommBank’s buy now pay, later product, comes in.

    The benefits of all-in-one-place payments

    StepPay sits in your CommBank app alongside all your other banking so you can see, at a glance, your account information, what you’ve spent, and any repayments coming up.

    It’s far easier than tracking repayments spread hotels near university at buffalo multiple banks, lenders, apps and online dashboards. And not having to use lots of different passwords is a bonus too. Not to mention the relief of feeling in control of your spending, and on top of your budget.

    Use StepPay wherever

    With StepPay you’re not limited to participating retailers – there’ll be no awkward moment at the register waiting to see if your card is accepted. So, your medical specialist, your favourite online retailer, even your local market stall – if they accept Mastercard®, then they’ll accept StepPay. Online and in-store.

    It’s the go-to banking product you can use what is the routing number for first interstate bank all your wants and needs, every day. And activating your StepPay is easy – just three simple steps.

    Buy now, pay later and stagger your repayments

    StepPay can help give you greater financial control as well as peace of mind knowing that whenever and wherever costs crop up, you’ve got them covered. You can use StepPay to make purchases of between $100 and $1000, and then split your repayments into equal, more manageable instalments. These will automatically come out of your linked CommBank repayment account. No need to nibble away at your savings for everyday bills or break your carefully crafted budget.

    Apply for StepPay to check your eligibility, and once activated, add the card to your digital wallet to start spending. Learn more about the simple steps to eligibility

    No hidden extras

    When you purchase using StepPay there’s no interest charged and no commbank pay fees. There are late payment fees if you default, but they’re capped at a maximum yearly late payment fee.

    Источник: https://www.commbank.com.au/articles/buy-now-pay-later/steppay-everyday-way-to-bnpl.html

    Commonwealth Bank agrees to pay $700m to settle money laundering lawsuit

    The Commonwealth Bank has agreed to pay $700m to settle civil proceedings relating to breaches of anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism financing laws.

    If the federal court accepts the offer it will be the largest civil penalty in Australia’s corporate history.

    The announcement follows court-ordered mediation between CBA and the government’s financial intelligence agency, Austrac. The deal would close civil proceedings against CBA, which began 10 months ago.

    Sign up to receive the top stories in Australia every day at noon

    In August Austrac announced it was suing CBA for 53,700 alleged breaches of money laundering and counter-terrorism financing laws. The case related to CBA’s use of intelligent deposit machines, a type of ATM launched in 2012, which let customers anonymously deposit and transfer cash.

    The investigation, undertaken in partnership with federal police, NSW police and Western Australia police, found that the machines were being used to launder the illicit proceeds of crime.

    CBA has agreed to pay a civil penalty of $700m and Austrac’s legal costs of $2.5m to end the matter. It had originally provided for an estimated penalty of $375m.

    The bank’s share price jumped from $68.70 to $70.23 - or 2.2% - after the announcement, a sign shareholders were relieved about the size of the penalty. By midday the share price had settled near $69.70.

    “This agreement, while it still needs to be approved by the federal court, brings certainty to one of the most significant issues we have faced,” CBA’s chief executive, Matt Comyn, said on Monday.

    “While not deliberate, we fully appreciate the seriousness of the commbank pay we made. Our agreement today is a clear acknowledgement of our failures and is an important step towards moving the bank forward.”

    In reaching the agreement with Austrac, CBA has admitted it contravened the Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-Terrorism Financing Act 2006 on 53,750 occasions.

    It has also accepted that:

    • It failed to carry out an appropriate assessment of the money laundering and terrorism financing risks of its intelligent deposit machines before October 2017.
    • It failed to complete the introduction of appropriate controls to mitigate and manage the risks before April 2018.
    • It failed to provide 53,506 threshold transaction reports to Austrac on time for cash transactions of $10,000 or more through IDMs from November 2012 to September 2015, having a total value of about $625m.
    • For three years it did not comply with the requirements of its anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism financing program relating to monitoring transactions on 778,370 accounts.
    • It failed to report suspicious matters on time, or at all, involving transactions in the tens of millions of dollars.
    • Even after it became aware of suspected money laundering or structuring on CBA accounts, it did not monitor its customers to mitigate and manage money laundering and terrorism financing risks, including the ongoing risks of doing business with those customers.

    Austrac’s chief executive, Nicole Rose, said the agreement sent a strong message to the financial industry.

    “As we have seen in this case, criminals will exploit poor business practices to launder the proceeds of their crimes,” Rose said. “This has real impacts on the everyday lives of Australians and puts the community at risk by increasing opportunities for terrorists to support attacks here and overseas, and enabling organised crime groups to peddle drugs to our families and friends.

    “We know that businesses are the first line of defence in protecting the community commbank pay our financial system from criminal abuse, and it is critical for [money laundering and counter-terrorism financing] compliance and risk management to be embedded in business strategy and practices.”

    Comyn apologised to Australians for letting them down. “We have changed senior leadership in the key roles overseeing financial crimes compliance supported by significant resources and clear accountabilities,” he said.

    The attorney general, Christian Porter, said: “I congratulate Austrac, its CEO and legal team for their engagement with me which has enabled this matter to be resolved in such a successful and speedy way.”

    The home affairs minister, Peter Dutton, said CBA’s disregard of its anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism obligations had allowed criminals to exploit its systems and put the Australian community at risk.

    “This very large number of breaches over several years is unacceptable and should never have been allowed to happen,” Dutton said.

    The treasurer, Scott Morrison, said the law was non-negotiable, especially when it came to the country’s largest financial institutions.

    “The government is serious about enforcing any breaches,” he said. “Banks should be leaders in ensuring their systems cannot be compromised by criminals seeking to launder money or finance terrorist activities.”

    Labor’s opposition assistant treasurer, Andrew Leigh, said the size of the payout reflected the gravity of CBA’s wrongdoing.

    “Again it reinforces the call we have been making for the last two years for a royal commission,” he told Sky News. “We have seen from CBA alone, scandals ranging from children’s bank accounts to charging dead people for work that hadn’t been done.”

    Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/news/2018/jun/04/commonwealth-bank-agrees-to-pay-700m-to-settle-money-laundering-lawsuit

    Commbank pay -

    StepPay: a new way to buy now, pay later everyday

    It might be something you need, or just something that helps you lead a fuller life, but you don’t want everyday and unexpected costs to bite into funds you've earmarked for other things. You also don’t want it to mean you miss out on something else that’s important to you. You don’t want to have to choose.

    That’s when it makes sense to “spend and split” – spread out over four equal payments and give yourself some breathing room. And that’s where StepPay, CommBank’s buy now pay, later product, comes in.

    The benefits of all-in-one-place payments

    StepPay sits in your CommBank app alongside all your other banking so you can see, at a glance, your account information, what you’ve spent, and any repayments coming up.

    It’s far easier than tracking repayments spread across multiple banks, lenders, apps and online dashboards. And not having to use lots of different passwords is a bonus too. Not to mention the relief of feeling in control of your spending, and on top of your budget.

    Use StepPay wherever

    With StepPay you’re not limited to participating retailers – there’ll be no awkward moment at the register waiting to see if your card is accepted. So, your medical specialist, your favourite online retailer, even your local market stall – if they accept Mastercard®, then they’ll accept StepPay. Online and in-store.

    It’s the go-to banking product you can use for all your wants and needs, every day. And activating your StepPay is easy – just three simple steps.

    Buy now, pay later and stagger your repayments

    StepPay can help give you greater financial control as well as peace of mind knowing that whenever and wherever costs crop up, you’ve got them covered. You can use StepPay to make purchases of between $100 and $1000, and then split your repayments into equal, more manageable instalments. These will automatically come out of your linked CommBank repayment account. No need to nibble away at your savings for everyday bills or break your carefully crafted budget.

    Apply for StepPay to check your eligibility, and once activated, add the card to your digital wallet to start spending. Learn more about the simple steps to eligibility

    No hidden extras

    When you purchase using StepPay there’s no interest charged and no account-keeping fees. There are late payment fees if you default, but they’re capped at a maximum yearly late payment fee.

    Источник: https://www.commbank.com.au/articles/buy-now-pay-later/steppay-everyday-way-to-bnpl.html

    CBA sued after sacking of staffer who discussed pay

    “Draconian clauses that prohibit employees from disclosing their remuneration to their colleagues under threat of sacking create environments in which the gender pay gap continues to exist and other inequalities are hidden and therefore cannot be addressed,” Ms Angrisano said.

    “This only benefits employers who line their pockets while employees unknowingly continue to be paid less than they’re worth.”

    CBA sacked the lender in October, just a few days before his six months’ probation was up, citing “unacceptable conduct” in his termination letter, including, among other reasons, his “discussing confidential remuneration with colleagues”.

    Concerns ’confirmed’

    The lender denied the claim in his adverse action application to the Fair Work Commission, saying he had merely talked to co-workers about whether they were correctly compensated for overtime when working on weekends.

    His concerns were later confirmed, he claims, when it was ultimately determined he was owed money for overtime.

    In any case, he said he had only generally discussed penalty rates and the type of contracts his colleagues were on and at no point disclosed specific remuneration.

    “The [lender] and his colleagues were required to discuss the matter together to understand what their entitlement was, due to [CBA] employing its staff performing the same role on differing contractual arrangements with different entitlements to overtime and penalties,” the FSU said in his application.

    However, shortly after the conversation, the lender’s then-manager allegedly advised him that discussing penalty rates was not acceptable and would result in disciplinary action in the form of a warning letter – which was not issued before his termination.

    The sacking occurred just one month after Mr Comyn acknowledged the existence of the clauses in response to questions on September 23 from the parliamentary standing committee on economics, but said: “We don’t enforce those.

    “I don’t think that’s good policy – one that you’re not going to enforce.”

    The FSU, while maintaining the lender did not disclose pay specifics, noted in its legal challenge that “it would seem that to terminate an employee on the basis of discussing remuneration would be an act contrary to the express views of [CBA’s] own CEO”.

    The bank’s termination letter also highlighted “inappropriate conduct in team meetings including commentary that is not aligned with the bank’s policies and values”, and the lender claims his manager warned him against using “anti-CBA language”.

    But, according to the lender, this was a reference to his raising a concern “in a professional and respectful way” – and in line with his workplace rights – about directions to perform work that he believed risked placing CBA in breach of its responsible lending obligations.

    He says that after the team meeting, the business, upon reflection, agreed with his concern and withdrew the direction on the basis of the concern he had raised.

    ‘Range of conduct issues’

    The bank also cited other reasons including lack of punctuality, failing to adhere to his work call schedule, capturing confidential customer information with his phone and providing customers with incorrect information.

    But the FSU claimed these were “to hide or conceal that the real reason, the substantive and operative reason, for dismissal was because the applicant exercised his workplace right to make a complaint or inquiry into his employment”.

    A CBA spokesman said the lender’s employment with the bank was terminated before the end of his probation period “for a range of conduct issues that were raised with him on a number of occasions”.

    “[We] therefore refute the suggestion that his termination was as a direct consequence of pay secrecy,” he said.

    ”[The lender] did not demonstrate the conduct we expect from our employees, and we intend to defend his claim at the Fair Work Commission. We will not be making any further comment at this stage.”

    The FSU said CBA this year had rejected a union bid to include a provision in its enterprise agreement preventing the bank from sacking anyone for discussing pay.

    It said this followed the union securing a $10,000 pay rise for CBA call centre workers to address inequalities that were discovered because colleagues talked to each other about what they were paid.

    “If, as he says, Mr Comyn doesn’t think CBA should include clauses they don’t intend to rely on, then CBA should commit to removing these clauses from their contract templates immediately, and communicate clearly to staff that they will not enforce existing clauses,” Ms Angrisano said.

    Opposition spokesman for industrial relations Tony Burke said pay secrecy clauses had “been used for a long time to protect favouritism, and they are one of the clear barriers in pay equity for women”.

    “Pay secrecy clauses aren’t about protecting companies – they’re about preventing workers from knowing how they’re being paid compared to colleagues,” he said.

    “If you want to share how much you’re paid with your colleagues you should be allowed to – and Labor will fix this.”

    Источник: https://www.afr.com/work-and-careers/workplace/bank-sued-after-sacking-of-staffer-who-discussed-pay-20211121-p59anv

    Change the way you pay with buy now, pay later

    How can I use buy now, pay later to help balance my budget?

    At every stage of life, you’ll find yourself managing regular bills alongside those inevitable, unexpected costs. 

    Say you score a lucrative work offer, but you need to buy a crucial piece of equipment (like a camera lens or new laptop) to get the job done. Or, your flatmate tells you he’s moving out and you realise you need to replace the fridge he’s taking with him.

    Purchases like these help you grab hold of experiences. In those kinds of scenarios, the option to buy now, pay later can really save your budget.

    How does buy now, pay later work?

    Buy now, pay later products allow you to split your purchases into equal repayment instalments.

    In the case of StepPay, CommBank’s buy now, pay later product, you can split purchases between $100 and $1000 into four, equal fortnightly instalments that automatically come out of your linked CommBank repayment account. This can help make it easier to stick to a budgeting plan and stay on track with your longer-term financial goals.

    And unlike other buy now, pay later products, you can use StepPay everywhere that Mastercard® is accepted, online and in-store. From your mechanic to your physiotherapist; from a fashion retailer to a hotel, online or in store.

    Giving you flexibility with how you manage your everyday expenses and the feeling of control, all your StepPay buy now, pay later purchases are visible in one place – the CommBank app.

    Easy to activate directly through the CommBank app, if you’re an eligible customer, once approved you simply need to add your StepPay card to your digital wallet and you can start spending on whatever, wherever you need.

    All in one convenient place, between StepPay, CommBank Rewards and our upcoming partnership with Little Birdie, we’re helping to make sure you never have to miss out – from the latest deals to the purchases and experiences you have your eyes on.

    How to get StepPay?

    Learn more about whether you’re eligible for StepPay, a new way to buy now, pay later, everywhere. 

    Источник: https://www.commbank.com.au/articles/buy-now-pay-later/change-the-way-you-pay.html

    CommBank AdvancePay 

    This fee is charged when your CommBank AdvancePay limit is applied to your account, regardless of whether the temporary limit is accessed or not. Your final limit will be made up of the amount approved and the fee.4

    How to repay your limit

    Access to CommBank AdvancePay will expire on your chosen pay date. Any money paid into your account is automatically used to repay your CommBank AdvancePay.

    Check if any direct debits or scheduled payments are due within your pay cycle. You’ll need to make sure there’s enough money in your account on your chosen pay date to repay your CommBank AdvancePay, otherwise your account will be considered overdrawn when your limit expires.

    If you don’t repay on time

    If your CommBank AdvancePay limit is not fully repaid once your chosen pay date arrives, your account will be considered overdrawn and you’ll be charged the debit excess interest rate. This interest rate is currently 14.90% p.a. and will apply on any overdrawn amounts. 

    Other fees and charges related to your everyday account will continue to apply, for example an overdraw fee (currently $15.00) may apply if you make additional transactions on your account while overdrawn. See CommBank Transaction, Savings and Investment Account Terms and Conditions (PDF).

    Источник: https://www.commbank.com.au/banking/commbank-advancepay.html

    How to Transfer Money Overseas with CommBank

    There are a lot of numbers and information you hear about when it comes to international money transfers. Below there are extra details you might need to send money overseas and the things you don't.

    Commonwealth IBAN number

    IBAN is an account format used by European banks. Australian banks do not use this format and an IBAN is not required to send money to a Commonwealth bank account in Australia. Other parties with an IBAN field on their overseas payment form can simply leave this field blank. However, payers in certain countries may require you to provide one. In that case, your BSB and account number should be combined. Do not include any spaces or hyphens.

    Commonwealth Bank routing number

    You may need a National Clearing Code, Routing Number, BSB Number or Sort Code, you should use the first six digits (bank and branch codes) of your account number for which you wish to receive the payment into. For example, if the account number is 01-0123-0123456-00 use 010123.

    Commonwealth Bank international SWIFT code

    You shouldn't need Commonwealth's SWIFT code for making a transfer overseas. Generally this is only needed when you're transferring money back into the country.

    Commonwealth Bank address for international transfers

    When it comes to making an international money transfer through Commonwealth Bank, you shouldn't need Commonwealth's address. You will most likely need the address of the receiving bank account. If you do need CBA's it will just be the address of your local branch.

    Commonwealth account number details

    You should just need the account number details of the person you're sending the money to from your Commonwealth Bank account.

    Notes on international bank drafts or cheques

    International bank cheques or drafts can be deposited into a Commonwealth Bank account. It can be a lengthy process. If it is in a foreign currency it will take longer to process as it will need to be returned to the country of origin for clearing. Additionally, the fees associated with these types of payments are very high. This means that we would never suggest using international bank drafts or cheques. It would be better to use a different payment method.

    Источник: https://www.thecurrencyshop.com.au/guides/how-to-transfer-money-overseas-with-commonwealth-bank

    Commonwealth Bank agrees to pay $700m to settle money laundering lawsuit

    The Commonwealth Bank has agreed to pay $700m to settle civil proceedings relating to breaches of anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism financing laws.

    If the federal court accepts the offer it will be the largest civil penalty in Australia’s corporate history.

    The announcement follows court-ordered mediation between CBA and the government’s financial intelligence agency, Austrac. The deal would close civil proceedings against CBA, which began 10 months ago.

    Sign up to receive the top stories in Australia every day at noon

    In August Austrac announced it was suing CBA for 53,700 alleged breaches of money laundering and counter-terrorism financing laws. The case related to CBA’s use of intelligent deposit machines, a type of ATM launched in 2012, which let customers anonymously deposit and transfer cash.

    The investigation, undertaken in partnership with federal police, NSW police and Western Australia police, found that the machines were being used to launder the illicit proceeds of crime.

    CBA has agreed to pay a civil penalty of $700m and Austrac’s legal costs of $2.5m to end the matter. It had originally provided for an estimated penalty of $375m.

    The bank’s share price jumped from $68.70 to $70.23 - or 2.2% - after the announcement, a sign shareholders were relieved about the size of the penalty. By midday the share price had settled near $69.70.

    “This agreement, while it still needs to be approved by the federal court, brings certainty to one of the most significant issues we have faced,” CBA’s chief executive, Matt Comyn, said on Monday.

    “While not deliberate, we fully appreciate the seriousness of the mistakes we made. Our agreement today is a clear acknowledgement of our failures and is an important step towards moving the bank forward.”

    In reaching the agreement with Austrac, CBA has admitted it contravened the Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-Terrorism Financing Act 2006 on 53,750 occasions.

    It has also accepted that:

    • It failed to carry out an appropriate assessment of the money laundering and terrorism financing risks of its intelligent deposit machines before October 2017.
    • It failed to complete the introduction of appropriate controls to mitigate and manage the risks before April 2018.
    • It failed to provide 53,506 threshold transaction reports to Austrac on time for cash transactions of $10,000 or more through IDMs from November 2012 to September 2015, having a total value of about $625m.
    • For three years it did not comply with the requirements of its anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism financing program relating to monitoring transactions on 778,370 accounts.
    • It failed to report suspicious matters on time, or at all, involving transactions in the tens of millions of dollars.
    • Even after it became aware of suspected money laundering or structuring on CBA accounts, it did not monitor its customers to mitigate and manage money laundering and terrorism financing risks, including the ongoing risks of doing business with those customers.

    Austrac’s chief executive, Nicole Rose, said the agreement sent a strong message to the financial industry.

    “As we have seen in this case, criminals will exploit poor business practices to launder the proceeds of their crimes,” Rose said. “This has real impacts on the everyday lives of Australians and puts the community at risk by increasing opportunities for terrorists to support attacks here and overseas, and enabling organised crime groups to peddle drugs to our families and friends.

    “We know that businesses are the first line of defence in protecting the community and our financial system from criminal abuse, and it is critical for [money laundering and counter-terrorism financing] compliance and risk management to be embedded in business strategy and practices.”

    Comyn apologised to Australians for letting them down. “We have changed senior leadership in the key roles overseeing financial crimes compliance supported by significant resources and clear accountabilities,” he said.

    The attorney general, Christian Porter, said: “I congratulate Austrac, its CEO and legal team for their engagement with me which has enabled this matter to be resolved in such a successful and speedy way.”

    The home affairs minister, Peter Dutton, said CBA’s disregard of its anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism obligations had allowed criminals to exploit its systems and put the Australian community at risk.

    “This very large number of breaches over several years is unacceptable and should never have been allowed to happen,” Dutton said.

    The treasurer, Scott Morrison, said the law was non-negotiable, especially when it came to the country’s largest financial institutions.

    “The government is serious about enforcing any breaches,” he said. “Banks should be leaders in ensuring their systems cannot be compromised by criminals seeking to launder money or finance terrorist activities.”

    Labor’s opposition assistant treasurer, Andrew Leigh, said the size of the payout reflected the gravity of CBA’s wrongdoing.

    “Again it reinforces the call we have been making for the last two years for a royal commission,” he told Sky News. “We have seen from CBA alone, scandals ranging from children’s bank accounts to charging dead people for work that hadn’t been done.”

    Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/news/2018/jun/04/commonwealth-bank-agrees-to-pay-700m-to-settle-money-laundering-lawsuit
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    CARA DAFTAR COMMBANK MOBILE BIAR TIDAK PERGI KE KANTOR CABANG IKUTI LANGKAH LANGKAH NYA BIAR LOLOS

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