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Heres flowers for you winters tale


heres flowers for you winters tale

Start studying The Winter's Tale. Winter 2. Leontes 3. Shifts between what can be observed and what is assumed. Here's flowers for you;. If you shall chance, Camillo, to visit Bohemia, on, 1.1.1 A sad tale's best for winter: I have one, 2.1.33 Here's flowers for you;, 4.4.122. Wherefore, gentle maiden, Do you neglect them? Here's flowers for you ; Hot lavender, mints, savoury, marjoram ; The marigold 223 WINTER'S TALE.
heres flowers for you winters tale

Heres flowers for you winters tale -

Flowers Shakespeare Famous Quotes & Sayings

List of top 31 famous quotes and sayings about flowers shakespeare to read and share with friends on your Facebook, Twitter, blogs.

Top 31 Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare

#1. Then, were not summer's distillation left
A liquid prisoner pent in walls of glass,
Beauty's effect with beauty were bereft,
Nor it nor no remembrance what it was.
But flowers distilled, though they with winter meet,
Leese but their show; their substance still lives sweet. - Author: William Shakespeare
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1207502
#2. These flowers are like the pleasures of the world. - Author: William Shakespeare
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1835683
#3. The tender spring upon thy tempting lip
Shows thee unripe; yet mayst thou well be tasted:
Make use of time, let not advantage slip;
Beauty within itself should not be wasted:
Fair flowers that are not gather'd in their prime
Rot and consume themselves in little time. - Author: William Shakespeare
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1806006
#4. They'd be complaining about having to walk, and screeching at me to 'do something, Freddy, do something!'"
"But what could you do?" she said, puzzled.
"Carry them, probably." He gave her a hopeful look. "Do you want me to carry you? - Author: Anne Gracie
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1768046
#5. I know a bank where the wild thyme blows,
Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows,
Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine,
With sweet musk-roses and with eglantine. - Author: William Shakespeare
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1667505
#6. Sweet flowers are slow and weeds make haste. - Author: William Shakespeare
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1649189
#7. Wouldn't you like to contribute to an event that is part of Christ's own prediction, "I will build my church"? - Author: Charles R. Swindoll
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1633180
#8. Flowers grow best on dungheaps, as Shakespeare never tires of saying. - Author: J.M. Coetzee
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1572928
#9. Plan for the day when all your plans fail, when those you trust betray you, when your certainty cracks like a rotten egg and you are alone in the storm. - Author: Robert Ferrigno
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1553886
#10. Where souls do couch on flowers we'll hand in hand ... - Author: William Shakespeare
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1549616
#11. The heart is like a cave; the deeper you go the more you find. - Author: Matshona Dhliwayo
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1521970
#12. Because I'm not a bad guy, Nico. Gert couldn't have loved me if I was. I realize that now. - Author: Brian K. Vaughan
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1438966
#13. Here's flowers for you; hot lavender, mints, savory, marjoram; The marigold. The Winter's Tale, Act 4, Sc.4 - Author: William Shakespeare
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1274499
#14. He was met even now As mad as the vex'd sea; singing aloud; Crown'd with rank fumiter and furrow-weeds, With bur-docks, hemlock, nettles, cuckoo-flowers, Darnel, and all the idle weeds that grow In our sustaining corn. - Author: William Shakespeare
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1255468
#15. A person could see a lot without ever leaving his own living room. Especially if he had the right tools. - Author: Stephen King
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1248756
#16. Sir, the year growing ancient,
Not yet on summer's death nor on the birth
Of trembling winter, the fairest flowers o' th' season
Are our carnations and streaked gillyvors,
Which some call nature's bastards. - Author: William Shakespeare
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1244431
#17. Feeling and experiencing infinity within this finite body, living timelessness within the time span of life - this is what you are here for - Author: Sri Sri Ravi Shankar
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #265042
#18. The best way to find Christmas; open your heart and your feet will get wings. - Author: Kristian Goldmund Aumann
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1145057
#19. In emerald tufts, flowers purple, blue and white;
Like sapphire, pearl, and rich embroidery,
Buckled below fair knighthood's bending knee;
Fairies use flower for their charactery. - Author: William Shakespeare
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1126047
#20. Pain teaches, Par'chin, Jardir had once told him, and so we give it freely. Pleasure teaches nothing, and so must be earned. - Author: Peter V. Brett
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #922633
#21. Of all the flowers, me thinks a rose is best. - Author: William Shakespeare
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #896785
#22. You'd be so lean, that blast of January
Would blow you through and through. Now, my fair'st friend,
I would I had some flowers o' the spring that might
Become your time of day. - Author: William Shakespeare
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #823139
#23. Crowns and thrones are all bodies which rise and perish and leave the world as it is. - Author: Auliq Ice
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #801230
#24. Keep The Drama In Your Books, Not Your Life." - The Cartel Publications. - Author: T. Styles
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #798799
#25. I had become conscious of my physicality, aware of my presence and open to the ugly truths of the world. At the age of thirteen, I realised that there was a danger in innocence and beauty, and I could not live with both. - Author: Tracey Emin
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #638202
#26. All the English flowers came from Shakespeare. I don't know what we did before his time.
The Secret Places of the Heart - Author: H.G.Wells
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #606589
#27. Mankind censure injustice fearing that they may be the victims of it, and not because they shrink from committing it. - Author: Plato
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #431545
#28. O friendship, I too will press flowers between the pages of Shakespeare's sonnets! - Author: Virginia Woolf
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #335958
#29. Fairies use flowers for their charactery. - Author: William Shakespeare
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #320603
#30. If we don't rebuild that connection with people we will really find even bigger gaps, because our gap on inequality is not just economic. - Author: Hillary Clinton
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #319200
#31. His steeds to water at those springs On chaliced flowers that lies; And winking Mary-buds begin To ope their golden eyes: With every thing that pretty is, My lady sweet, arise. - Author: William Shakespeare
Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #267770

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Источник: https://quotestats.com/topic/quotes-about-flowers-shakespeare/

Winter's Tale Quotes

  • Quotes About Your Man Wanting Me

    “Since ever the world was spinning And till the world shall end Youve your man in the beginning Or you have him in” — Lucy Maud Montgomery

  • After A Long Night Quotes

    “Hadrian reeked of death. It wasnt the sort of stench others could smell or that water could wash, but it lingered on him” — Michael J. Sullivan

  • Will Way Quotes

    “Here you would know, and enjoy, what prosperity will way of Washington. For a thousand leagues have nearly the same effect with a” — Benjamin Franklin

  • Quotes About Writing Articles

    “At 88 years old - with every intention of living decades longer - Im still running a company, writing articles, launching new ventures,” — David H. Murdock

  • Quotes About Not Being The Girl On The Side

    “But I knew it wasnt just the cute girl on the screen that had made Eunice cry. It was her father laughing, being” — Gary Shteyngart

  • Quotes About Putting It All On The Line

    “The problem with putting it all on the line is that it might not work out. The problem with not putting it all” — Seth Godin

  • Quotes About Gay Crush

    “No. I can quite happily say someone is handsome, good-looking, and I can see why someone would want to f**k them, but Ive” — Daniel Radcliffe

  • Interpreter Of Maladies Quotes

    “Interpreter of Maladies is the title of one of the stories in the book. And the phrase itself was something I thought of” — Jhumpa Lahiri

  • Toohey Quotes

    “Then Toohey moved through the crowd, and smiled at his friends. But between smiles and sentences, his eyes went back to the man” — Ayn Rand

  • Lenin Propaganda Quotes

    “Whatever else Lenin might have done—and it was difficult to separate the truth from the conservative propaganda—at least, Billy thought, he was serious” — Ken Follett

  • Job Searching Quotes

    “The internet was supposed to make this whole business of job searching rational and simple. You could post your resume and companies would” — Barbara Ehrenreich

  • Shipping Containers Quotes

    “They are a testament not only to the Afghans hunger for literacy, but also to their willingness to pour scarce resources into this” — Greg Mortenson

  • We're Not Normal Quotes

    “What makes us the most normal," said Reiko, "is knowing that were not normal.” — Haruki Murakami

  • Profess Love Quotes

    “How is it that you profess love for God but cant accept another human being?” — Phylicia Rashad

  • Nice And Funny Birthday Quotes

    “I put my hand on the altar rail. What if ... what if Heaven is real, but only in moments? Like a glass” — David Mitchell

  • Источник: https://www.morefamousquotes.com/topics/winters-tale-quotes/

    Rosemary and Rue, herbs that on two occasions Shakespeare placed near to one another.


    “For you there’s rosemary and rue …
    Grace and remembrance be to you both,”

    - The Winter’s Tale, Act IV, Scene 3


    “There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance; pray you love, remember ...

      there’s rue for you, and here’s some for me: we may call it herb-grace o’ Sundays: 

    O, you must wear your rue with a difference”

    - Hamlet, Act IV, Scene 5

     

    Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalus)



    Rosemary for remembrance, Shakespeare garden
    Rosemary in bloom

    Rosemary has been associated with remembrance since ancient Greece where students would wear garlands of rosemary whilst studying to aid their memories. Its botanical name comes from the Latin meaning “dew of the sea”, a reference to its blue flowers and its original habitat on the coasts of the Mediterranean. In Shakespeare’s day it was highly valued and had a variety of uses. It was used in cooking, in floor strewings, it was distilled to make medicinal simples and when grown tall its stems were used to make lutes.

    As an evergreen Rosemary represented both remembrance and constancy and played a part in both Elizabethan weddings and funerals. The 17th century poet Robert Herrick wrote “Grow it for two ends, it matters not at all, Be it for my bridal or burial.” At weddings Rosemary was carried by the bridesmaids and sprigs of it were strewn on the ground. As a symbol of fidelity the Nurse in Romeo and Juliet remarks:



    "Doth not rosemary and Romeo begin both with a letter?"

    - Romeo and Juliet, Act II, Scene 4


    There was an old folk belief that if a man could not smell Rosemary he was incapable of loving a woman.

    Rosemary also formed part of burial wreaths, which later appear when Juliet is thought to have died.


    “Dry up your tears, and stick your rosemary
    On this fair corse”


    - Romeo and Juliet, Act IV, Scene 5

    No doubt another reason for Shakespeare using it earlier in the play was to foreshadow the future tragic events.

    Rosemary from Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare garden
    Scene from Romeo and Juliet
    Sir Thomas Moore wrote  

    “As for Rosemarie I let it run alle over my garden walls, not onlie because my bees love it, but because tis the herb scared to remembrance and therefore to friendship, whence a sprig of it hath a dumb language that maketh it the chosen emblem at our funeral wakes and in our burial grounds.”


    Type:Perennial Evergreen

    Height:1 to 6 feet

    Flowers:Summer

     Rue (Ruta graveolens)

     

    Rue for a Shakespeare Garden
    Rue

     

     “Here did she fall a tear; here in this place,
    I’ll set a bank of rue, sour herb of grace;
    Rue, even for ruth here shortly shall be seen
    In the remembrance of a weeping queen.”

    - Richard II, Act III, Scene 4

    Rue has a strong aromatic smell and a bitter taste. The first part of its botanical name comes from the Greek reuo, meaning to set free. In ancient times it was thought to be an antidote for poison and disease, in Elizabethan England it was carried around as protection against the plague and witchcraft and was used in herbal strewings to repel insects. Due to its bitter taste the plant has long been symbolic of sorrow, regret and repentance, hence the expression “you’ll rue the day” meaning “you’ll be sorry for this.” When Ophelia hands it to Queen Gertrude in Hamlet, it is a subtle rebuke of her faithlessness.

    Another name for the plant was Herb of Grace or Herb Grace o’ Sundays as it was used in the early Catholic Church to sprinkle holy water and to wash away sins. The word ruth comes from the word rue and more usually meant to feel pity for or to grieve.

    In large doses Rue is toxic and is not generally recommended for internal use. It may also be dangerous to grow in your garden if you have pets. In medieval times it was sometimes used to hasten labour or in extreme cases as an abortifacient. This has led to speculation that when Ophelia utters the lines "there's rue for you, and here's some for me", she is confessing to an unwanted pregnancy, revealing another reason for ending her life.


    Type: Perennial Evergreen

    Height: 20 to 34 inches


    Flowers: Summer

    Источник: https://bardgarden.blogspot.com/2014/10/rosemary-and-rue.html

    Winter's Tale

    Front PageCourse themesMembersScheduleCourse outlineTaming ShrewHenry VMuch AdoHamletKing LearAntony & CleopatraWinter's TaleThe TempestDanceGeneral linksBackground materialEssaysU. of A. libraryEnglish Dept.InstructorSources

    Two plays in one - The Greek tragedy - The Fairy-Tale - Folk and other elements in the 'second play' -
    Winter, summer and rebirth - links - film - music


    Augustus Leopold Egg. A Scene from "The Winter's Tale," 1845 source

    If Antony and Cleopatra is, in many ways, one of Shakespeare's most straightforward plays, The Winter's Tale may seem one of the more obtuse. It was, though, much appreciated by the Victorians (who had a soft spot for such things as babies left on lonely islands). Yet if at first reading it does not seem so obviously appealing, it is one of those works that nags away at you, for it contains many curious and interesting ideas.

    In the course we looked in particular at its unusual structure, following the course theme of Shakespeare's inheritance of both medieval ideas in a popular tradition, and the Classical learning of the Renaissance.

    Two plays in one - Course theme

    The Winter's Tale is really two plays, with two distinct styles (and plot content), brought together in an unusual and unlikely ending. Although the play is based on one major source - Robert Greene's prose romance Pandosto, published in 1588 - Shakespeare's changes are extensive enough to allow this construction.

    The Greek tragedy

    The first play runs until Act III, Scene 2. The first two Acts are set in Leontes' palace (we assume the prison in II,2 is somewhere in the vicinity), and both the first two scenes of Act III are closely connected with that palace, the first showing two messengers on the way back to it, the second being 'A court of Justice', which, in spite of such an allegorical title, we again automatically assume to be in the palace. So, in terms of one of our course themes, we are in the realm of the urban, the castle, the rational place, the state where the god-like benign ruler fulfills his responsibilities. Here this is associated with Sicily.

    We are also back to the idea of personal desires (or obsessions) over-riding that ruler's judgement. Indeed, this 'first play' has all the hallmarks of a Greek tragedy, and if we were in any doubt about the Classical slant of these acts, we only have to look to the messengers who are sent to consult Apollo's oracle.

    This first play also has the appearance of fulfilling the Aristolean unities of time and place (one place, one day), as it can easily be played on one set, and it appears to take place in one day. In fact, in a slight of theatrical hand, there is a gap of 23 days between II.1 and II.2, though the audience are not told until later, and it is very difficult, either reading or viewing the play, to realize that such a period has passed.

    More important, we have all the elements of Greek tragedy - a leader who is guilty of hubris, who, through that hubris, defies nature and the gods, sees the results of his hubris, and is therefore broken by the gods, and placed in a situation to realise the horror of his errors. Leontes' fault is his jealousy (a subject Shakespeare had already tackled in Othello), a blind jealousy that will not listen to the sober comment and advice of his court. Jean Howard, in the Norton introduction, claims: "Often said to be "irrational", this jealousy actually has its roots in the cultural practices which in Jacobean England made men the head of families...." (p.158). We have to take this statement with a large pinch of salt, since quite clearly it doesn't - it has its roots in human nature, regardless of the cultural surroundings. What places it in a context equivalent to Greek tragedy is that this personal emotion also affects the state, especially since here the succession is in question - in terms Shakespearean terms, the personal in the psychology of the leader is overriding the responsibilities of the leader.

    Leontes compounds his hubris in no uncertain fashion (and this is more late-Renaissance than Greek) in the critical passage in III.2 (p. 193 in the Norton). He has the pronouncement from the Apollonian oracle (symbolically as well as factually, since Apollo represents light, the Sun, and intellectual clarity), and immediately says the oracle is lying (not a good idea in terms of the Gods). Instantly the Gods respond - a servant rushes in saying that his son is dead (thus also making Hermione's unborn child the heir to the throne). Leontes suddenly realises:
      "Apollo's angry, and the heavens themselves/Do strike at my injustice."
    and Hermione promptly faints and, apparently, dies.

    This self-realization is much too swift for good Greek tragedy - indeed, it is so swift that Shakespeare seems to be playing with the form - but it follows the required pattern. The Greek tragedy culminates with the broken King at the end of III.2. Indeed, with an extension of Leontes' realization, so that it takes a little more time, and an extension of the final speeches of the scene, the play up to this point would in itself make a complete and perfectly satisfying tragedy along Greek lines (and, incidentally, about the same length as a Greek tragedy).

    But it doesn't stop there.

    Some other points to note:

    bulletLeaving a baby exposed to die, and being found by ordinary rural people, is a very Classical theme (continued in folk mythology - so it provides a link between the 'two plays').

     


    Oil on canvas, Victoria and Albert Museum. Steel engraving, approximately 7 x 10 inches, by Lumb Stocks. The engraving is from Charles Knight's two-volume Imperial Edition of The Works of Shakespeare (London: Virtue and Company, 1873-76). source

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


    Oil on canvas. Steel engraving, approximately 7 x 10 inches, by Lumb Stocks. The engraving is from Charles Knight's two-volume Imperial Edition of The Works of Shakespeare (London: Virtue and Company, 1873-76). source


    Thomas Charles Wageman.
     John Fawcett as Autolycus in "The Winter's Tale," 1828.

     

    The fairy-tale
     

    The 'second play' opens in III.3, which acts as a prelude to the main part of the play, starting with Time at the beginning of the fourth Act.

    This 'second play' has all the elements of a good fairy-tale. In other words, whereas the 'first play' comes out of the classical tradition, this comes from the medieval tradition.

    The fairy-tale elements include:

    bulletOpening with a journey - here across the sea (symbol of change), in a storm (also symbolic of change  - see Lear)
    bulletSetting in a distant, half-imaginary place ("The deserts of Bohemia" - see note on Bohemia and Sicily below)
    bulletA baby being left to be found by rural people, while conforming to a number of fairy-tale necessities:
    - the baby is high-born
    - the baby has to have something with him/her that will eventually identify his/her origins
    - the discovery by a low-born rural person (here a shepherd)
    bulletAn old man or equivalent who usually gives advice but does not take part in the action and often gives some sort of talisman or magic aid (here Antigonus takes this role, and leaves the talisman - the scroll.)
    bulletThe bear, in the most famous stage-direction in theatrical history, carries potent symbolism (as well as being an exciting theatrical moment - performing bears were not uncommon in Elizabethan and Jacobean England, and doubtless on was used here). Jung would have seen it as symbolizing the dark and dangerous aspect of the unconscious; in classical and Celtic mythology it is associated with the hunt and the woods; and in popular and Christian tradition both the she-bear (the female gives birth to apparently formless offspring) and the male bear (tamed by a number of saints) have their place. Bears were no longer indigenous to Britain, so the bear also adds to the wildness of Bohemia.
    bulletThere is a Prince and the Princess, whom we know should and will end up getting married.
    bulletWe know there are going to be a number of problems before that can happen.
    bulletAnd for a good fairy tale of this type, one of those problems should be one of identity. Ideally, the high-born should fall in love with the low-born (and vice-versa), so that this problem has to be solved.
    bulletHere the Princess doesn't know the Princess is a princess
    bulletThe Princess doesn't know she is a princess
    bulletWe do know. Perfect fairy-tale stuff.
    bulletThus the interest in this is not the outcome, but how we reach that outcome - particularly how the crucial discovery of princessness will be made.
    bulletIdeally, we should have a parent who tries to prevent their high-born being with a low-born - here Polixenes.
    bulletThe underlying plot is what would be seen in fairy-tale terms as a right-of-passage tale - that of Perdita and Florizel moving from adolescence to independent adults, leading to another rite-of-passage, that of marriage.
    bulletThe initial journey enter this rite-of-passage story. In fairy-tale terms, another is needed for its conclusion. Thus the Prince and Princess sail over the sea again, symbolizing the change they have arrived at.
    bulletAll one needs is a round-up[ scene after V.2, and one would have another complete play in itself.
    bulletUp to the return to Sicily, all this 'second play' takes place in the open air of the countryside, as opposed to the 'urban' setting of the first play.

     

    Folk and other elements in the 'second play'

    At the same time, Shakespeare uses other elements drawn from the folk/rural and medieval tradition:

    bulletThe sheep-shearing festival is imbued with rural folk and seasonal traditions. No date is given, but the opening lines of IV.4 would suggest April, which seems to be confirmed by Perdita, who has the flowers of summer, and those that will last into winter, but not those of spring (e.g. February-March). This would also make sense from the farming point of view.
    - It is a representation of the end of winter and the beginning of summer (if sheep are not sheared as summer starts, they start slowly loosing their wool)
    - It is a representation of continuity, the cycle of the seasons
    - It is a representation of the bounty of nature, and thus connected with fertility rights
    - Sheep-shearing is a communal event. Traditionally, groups of farmers would gather together to shear each other's sheep, since quite large numbers are required (I have myself taken part in such a sheep-shearing 'bee'). The shearing also involved women and children, not only in the obvious roles of providing food and drink to the men shearing, but also in the organization and movement of bringing the sheep to the shearers (and if Welsh rural experience is anything to go by, there were probably women shearers anyway).
    - In rural communities, such communal events would be a cause for celebration at their conclusion, especially when fertility and seasonal cycles were involved.
    bulletThe name Florizel has a distinctly medieval ring about it (he only appears in the 'second play') and inevitably recalls that of Floris in the well-known medieval story of Floris and Blanchfleur (Whiteflower), one version of which is an English version contemporary with Chaucer. Indeed, Perdita is the flower maiden, distributing them to everyone in 4.4.
    bulletThe rustics, particularly Autolycus and the clown, are from the rural tradition (the former being the wandering pedlar), as well as being in Shakespeare's own tradition of 'mechanicals'. (For Autolycus' classical name, see below).
    bulletAutolycus provides a number of songs and ballads in the rural tradition (indeed, he is in part a wandering ballad-seller), though it should be noted that the words of these ballads ranges from traditional wording and subjects to much denser language, atypical of such songs, but reflecting the dense and complex language of the play as a whole.
    bulletIf one were analyzing the 'second play' as a myth/fairy tale in psychoanalytical terms, then Autolycus represents the magician/trickster archetype, in his more scurrilous aspect.

    The classical elements in the 'fairy-tale' play

    But, of course, this 'second play' is not completely isolated from the first, and in it one sees a number of classical elements or references. Thus Florizel talks of his disguise in terms of classical metamorphoses (IV.4.25-31), while Perdita flower giving is full of classical references.

    It is notable that these classical references are given only by those who belong to the 'urban' rather than the 'wilderness', whether they are in disguise (Florizel) or simply don't know that's where they belong (Perdita). How Perdita could pick up such knowledge in the shepherd's home is a different matter, but fairy-tales are allowed such anomalies.

    The exception to this is Autolycus, whose name is deliberately of Greek origin. In Greek mythology, Autolycus was the son of Hermes, who specialized in thieving and in trickery (hence Autolycus, the Prince of Thieves, in Xena, Warrior Princess). (A second Autolycus joined the Argonauts, and wasn't heard of after their visit to the Amazons - the two get muddled up in Greek mythology). (There was also an Autolycus whom Theopilus of Antioch wrote to about the Trinity, using that word in its Christian context for the first time. He described Autolycus as an Idolater and Scorner of Christians).

    In the play, the character himself claims he was born under [the planet] Mercury, which is appropriate (and a pun), not only since Mercury is the Roman name for Hermes, but also because Mercury, in addition to his role as messenger of the gods, also has elements of the trickster in the classical tradition - he is the god of thieves. Indeed, I sometimes have the fancy that Autolycus is not really a mortal at all, but someone like Mercury in disguise, down to have a bit of fun at the humans' expense - and certainly he doesn't seem in any danger of ever getting caught.

    Jung might claim that fancy was simply a reflection of the trickster archetype at work, and indeed here is a fundamental difference between the very plastic character of Autolycus and the rather stiff mention of the gods by Florizel and Perdita. The gods that they mention have arrived - or rather more detailed knowledge of them, and of direct classical references - by means of the rediscovery of the classics by Renaissance learning and schooling. They are 'book' gods, so to speak. Autolyus, in his trickster archetype, has never been lost, travelling from ancient Greece, through Rome, via a hundred different paths, through the medieval world, here to The Winter's Tale, and on to Xena.

     

     


    Persephone

    Winter, summer and rebirth

    Perdita refers to the classical myth that is the basis for the underlying allegory of The Winter's Tale:

    O Proserpina,
    For the flowers now that. frighted, thou letst fall
    From Dis's wagon - (IV.4.116-118)

    Proserpina is the Greek goddess Persephone, who after being abducted by Hades (Dis), makes a deal whereby she will spend six months of the year below ground, and six months of the year above ground. This is the only time Shakespeare mentions her, and he refers to Dis only once again, in The Tempest, in a similar fertility context.

    Thus she is the archetypical goddess of summer, bring new life and fertility to the earth and to humankind after the long cold of winter, and she is therefore associated with flowers. She appears at this point, because it is in the middle of a festival - the sheep-shearing festival - that is has precisely the same symbolic image of new life, the shearing off of the old, the ending of the white wool of winter.

    Here, then, the classical and folk traditions meet, though, like the trickster figure, the pagan concept of the goddess of winter/summer was never lost, and Persephone is one of the Greek figures who was remembered by the medieval world.

    This central celebration of rebirth and renewal is the surface representation of the allegory of rebirth and renewal that is inherent in the whole plot, especially in the 'second play'. Perdita, the lost one, has been banished from the sterility of Sicily, that has literally rejected the Apollonian light of enlightened intellect, and is ruled by a King as suspicious as Dis in a winter world made stark by its human, rather than natural, surroundings. She is cast out as dead, but in fact she is a seed, planted in winter ground, that will grow and blossom in the natural world of Bohemia, the flower-maiden.

    Similarly her mother Hermione has been cast out as if dead, and will come to life again only when the rebirth - the new generation - returns in the renewal of summer. She is, in a sense, Persphone, cast out for the winter, reborn for the summer - only this winter is 16 years long, for the allegory is operating in real time, rather than seasonal time. At least it seems to be, until one realises that time in the play is not real time at all, but mythical time, so that 23 days can pass completely unnoticed, and 16 years pass at the behest of Time as Chorus. So in terms of the myth, of the renewal and rebirth, it doesn't matter if it's summer/winter or 16 years, as allegorically they are the same thing.

    The ending

    But winter and summer are inextricably linked - neither exist without the other, and youth needs older age and older age youth. So Sicily and Bohemia are inextricably linked, by childhood friendships, by the resolution of events in one place only being possible through events in the other, and vice versa, by the reference to the classical in the fairy-tale.

    Somehow Shakespeare has to reconcile the two plays in an ending. His solution has elements of Ovid's Metamorphosis, something of the miraculous event that a medieval audience would have enjoyed, but is essentially thoroughly classical  - a statue coming to life. The reason that this is so classical is that the medieval world had little sense of the statue as an individual work of art divorced from its architectural context of a cathedral or similar setting. Sculpture started feeing itself from such settings in the work of Flemish masters at the end of the 14th and the beginning of the 15th Century, and in Italy with the influence of classical models. The Greeks would have understood instantly, and Shakespeare's use of this motif reflects classical rather than medieval origins. It is a neat concept, as it ties so many of the play's themes together.

    Sicily and Bohemia

    Just as it would be difficult today to present a play, however mythical or allegorical, that mentioned the Czech republic and Italy without the audience having a whole raft of contemporary associations with those two places, so we should not forget that Shakespeare's audience would have had a similar set of associations with Sicily and Bohemia (now in the Czech Republic).

    Of course both are ciphers, Sicily in part representing Winter, but paradoxically also that southern Apollonian light of the intellect that is suppressed by Leontes' actions, but which will return in the rebirth prompted by the journey into instinct and back represented by Bohemia. Bohemia is in part a distant mysterious place where bears may indeed roam and fairy-tale things happen (for a more modern parallel, Transylvania is a not-so-long drive away), and it is also the place of summer and flowers (and is somewhat misrepresented by Shakespeare as bordering the sea).

    As Adriano says in Love's Labour Lost, "The words of Mercury are harsh after the songs of Apollo. You that way: we this way", but it is the shape of The Winter's Tale to bring both paths together at the end.

    However, every well-informed member of the audience would have known perfectly well that both Kingdoms were within the political orbit of the Spanish empire (Sicily specifically under the house of Aragon), and thus were connected politically and in terms of governance - the childhood friendship of the two future rulers would have been quite understandable. The audience would also have been aware that Bohemia was, at the time, an important bulwark against the Ottoman empire and the Muslims, the edge of Christian Europe.

    topTwo plays in one - The Greek tragedy - The Fairy-Tale - Folk and other elements in the 'second play' -
    Winter, summer and rebirth - links - film - music

     

    Источник: http://www.artsrn.ualberta.ca/mmorris/ENGL339/winter's_tale.htm

    presentation of art by Shakespeare

    Answers 3
    Add Yours

    Answered by jill d #170087

    Art versus Nature

    What is ‘art’?

    ‘Art’ has various meanings. It does not only mean ‘pictures’ (though it is associated in Perdita’s mind with painting the face: in Shakespearean drama ‘painting’ can mean ‘make-up’). Art can also mean more widely ‘artificiality’ or ‘unnatural powers’.

    There is a contrast in the world of The Winter’s Tale between the court - which, especially through Leontes’ jealousy and plotting, has at times a sense of artificiality and deceit – and the naturalness of the country life of the shepherds. The audience is at various times in the play asked to consider whether:

    •nature is better than art

    •art is better than nature, or just different

    •art is the result of ‘natural’ skill.

    Source(s)

    http://www.crossref-it.info/textguide/The-Winter's-Tale/10/1164

    Answered by jill d #170087

    Natural purity versus artificial beauty (Act IV, sc iv)

    In the sheep-shearing scene (Act IV, sc iv) Perdita engages with Polixenes in a debate about the importance of natural purity versus artificial beauty, asserting that she does not like:

    ‘streak’d gillyvors’ (carnations and pinks)

    ‘which some call nature’s bastards’,

    because

    ‘I have heard it said

    There is an art which, in their piedness’ (mixed colouring) ‘shares

    With great creating nature.’

    Polixenes argues that the gardener’s skill which creates hybrid plants is a natural art:

    ‘Yet nature is made better by no mean

    But nature makes that mean: so, over that sort

    Which you say adds to nature, is an art

    That nature makes….

    The art itself is nature.’

    Although Perdita says that she understands his argument – ‘So it is’ – she still refuses to grow such ‘bastard’ flowers, which are so ‘streak’d’ that they seem artificially painted.

    She herself rejects make-up as unnatural:

    ‘I’ll not put

    The dibble in earth to set one slip of them;

    No more than, were I painted, I would wish

    This youth should say ‘twere well, and only therefore

    Desire to breed by me.’

    Nature versus artifice (Act V, sc iii)

    Later in the play ( Act V, sc iii) the same debate is touched on by Paulina with Leontes, this time in the Sicilian court. Paulina has hidden Hermione for sixteen years, but now presents her as a statue. The sculptor is said (Act V, sc ii) to have such talent that he:

    ‘would beguile Nature of her custom, so perfectly he is her ape’ (i.e. her mimic).

    When the statue is unveiled (Act V, sc iii), the figure of Hermione has ‘her natural posture’ and seems so realistic that Leontes thinks ‘we are mock’d with art’. He asks,

    ‘What fine chisel

    Could ever yet cut breath?’

    Paulina has to reassure him that she is not assisted by ‘wicked powers’, by which she means black magic (an ‘art’ or artificial skill). Leontes worries that it is unlawful art, magic, and he wants it not to be, ie. he thinks that it is not natural but hopes it is lawful

    ‘If this be magic, let it be an art

    Lawful as eating.’

    More on nature versus art in The Tempest: This debate about art and nature is even more noticeable in another Shakespearean Romance play, The Tempest. The main character Prospero, Duke of Milan, is a magician, cast away upon an island with his daughter Miranda, and throughout the play his magic is described as his ‘Art’. Art’ in this sense may be contrasted with nature, implying learnt or ‘artificial’ skills, which Prospero uses to control the natural forces of the island, such the invisible spirits which inhabit it, and also wider natural powers such as the sea and winds.

    Source(s)

    http://www.crossref-it.info/textguide/The-Winter's-Tale/10/1164

    Answered by jill d #170087

    The Winter’s Tale Theme of Art and Culture

    The Winter’s Tale participates in the ages old art vs. nature controversy. At the heart of the debate is the following question: Is artfulness (the creation of paintings, sculptures, plays, songs, etc. to represent the natural world) a good thing? Or does artfulness distort nature? Shakespeare also extends the debate to consider artifice in general, which has some pretty major implications in a play that takes a very self-conscious look at its status as a work of art.

    Quote #1

    PERDITA

    Sir, the year growing ancient,

    Not yet on summer's death, nor on the birth

    Of trembling winter, the fairest Hermione’s statue

    flowers o' the season

    Are our carnations and streak'd gillyvors,

    Which some call nature's bastards: of that kind

    Our rustic garden's barren; and I care not

    To get slips of them.

    POLIXENES

    Wherefore, gentle maiden,

    Do you neglect them?

    PERDITA

    For I have heard it said

    There is an art which in their piedness shares

    With great creating nature.

    POLIXENES

    Say there be;

    Yet nature is made better by no mean

    But nature makes that mean: so, over that art

    Which you say adds to nature, is an art

    That nature makes. You see, sweet maid, we marry

    A gentler scion to the wildest stock,

    And make conceive a bark of baser kind

    By bud of nobler race: this is an art

    Which does mend nature, change it rather, but

    The art itself is nature.

    PERDITA

    So it is. (4.4.6)

    Literary scholars often argue that this conversation about the merits of “gillyvors” is actually a debate about art vs. nature. When Perdita points out that she doesn’t have any “gillyvors” (gillyflowers, or carnations) to offer her guests, Polixenes takes issue with her referring to the cross-bred flowers as “nature’s bastards.” Polixenes argues that crossbred flowers are superior to plain old carnations and that the “art” of grafting is completely “natural.” (“Grafting” is a horticultural practice where a plant’s tissue is fused with another plant in order to create a “hybrid.”) Perdita, on the other hand, prefers flowers that are pure and that haven’t been influenced by the “art” of grafting.

    Quote #2

    POLIXENES

    Then make your garden rich in gillyvors,

    And do not call them bastards.

    PERDITA

    I'll not put

    The dibble in earth to set one slip of them;

    No more than were I painted I would wish

    This youth should say 'twere well and only therefore

    Desire to breed by me. Here's flowers for you;

    Hot lavender, mints, savoury, marjoram;

    The marigold, that goes to bed wi' the sun

    And with him rises weeping: these are flowers

    Of middle summer, and I think they are given

    To men of middle age. You're very welcome. (4.4.4)

    In the previous passage, we saw how, for Polixenes, grafting is a “natural” process while Perdita sees cross-breeding flowers to create a hybrid as “artifice.” In this passage, the debate turns into something quite personal for Perdita. She says she’d no sooner plant a cross-bred gillyflower in her garden than she would “paint” her face with make-up in order to attract a potential husband (Florizel, whose name associates him with the flowers of spring) to “breed” with. By this point in the conversation, grafting seems to have become a metaphor for family relationships. What’s interesting about this is that, here, Polixenes says that grafting or cross-breeding flowers will ultimately produce a “nobler” breed, but when he later learns that his son wants to “graft” himself to (marry) a lowly shepherd’s daughter, he objects. We can take the implied metaphor further by also pointing out that Perdita doesn’t realize she’s been “grafted” to the Old Shepherd’s family (she was adopted).

    Quote #3

    Your high self,

    The gracious mark o' the land, you have obscured

    With a swain's wearing, and me, poor lowly maid,

    Most goddess-like prank'd up: but that our feasts

    In every mess have folly and the feeders

    Digest it with a custom, I should blush

    To see you so attired, sworn, I think,

    To show myself a glass.

    […]

    Even now I tremble

    To think your father, by some accident,

    Should pass this way as you did: O, the Fates!

    How would he look, to see his work so noble

    Vilely bound up? What would he say? Or how

    Should I, in these my borrow'd flaunts, behold

    The sternness of his presence? (4.4.1-2)

    Perdita is pretty self-conscious about being dressed up in an artificial “Queen of the Feast” costume (when she thinks she’s nothing more than a lowly shepherd’s daughter) and she says as much in the play. While Perdita thinks it’s wrong for her to dress up as something that she’s not, the audience understands that her festival costume actually speaks to her true nature or identity (the princess and future Queen of Sicily).

    Source(s)

    http://www.shmoop.com/winters-tale/art-culture-quotes.html


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    Источник: https://www.gradesaver.com/the-winters-tale/q-and-a/analyse-the-presentation-of-art-by-shakespeare-in-winters-tale-72609

    You’re welcome, sir.

    Give me those flowers there, Dorcas. Reverend sirs,

    85For you there’s rosemary and rue; these keep

    Seeming and savour all the winter long:

    Grace and remembrance be to you both,

    And welcome to our shearing!

    You are welcome here, sir. Give me those flowers there, Dorcas. Honored sirs, for you there are rosemary and rue, which keep their appearance and scent all through the winter. May you both have grace and remembrance, and welcome to our shearing!

    PERDITA

    Sir, the year growing ancient,

    Not yet on summer’s death, nor on the birth

    Of trembling winter, the fairest

    95flowers o’ the season

    Are our carnations and streak’d gillyvors,

    Which some call nature’s bastards: of that kind

    Our rustic garden’s barren; and I care not

    To get slips of them.

    PERDITA

    Sir, the year is growing old, with the summer not yet over and the winter not yet starting. The fairest flowers of this season are carnations and two-toned gillyflowers, which some call nature’s bastards. But we don’t have any of those flowers in our garden, and I don’t care to get any cuttings of them.

    POLIXENES

    100Wherefore, gentle maiden,

    Do you neglect them?

    POLIXENES

    Kind maiden, why do you reject them?

    Источник: https://www.sparknotes.com/nofear/shakespeare/winterstale/page_158/

    By Barbara Ardingeron

    Instead of sending a billet-doux to your honey, present a tussie-mussie, a small bouquet wrapped in a lace doily or a fancier holder. Say you have a friend having a birthday and he already has too many neckties and she already has too many kitchen gadgets. Give them flowers or potted plants. The white camellia signifies “unpretending excellence.” Ivy, “with its clinging habit, is a feminine symbol” (sic., p. 53). The lily means purity. The peony symbolizes abundance. The primrose is a token of affection and respect. Get the idea? Your friends will be delighted by the flowery language.

    William Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale

    A fancy tussie-mussie

         Here’s flowers for you:
    Hot lavender, mints, savory, marjoram,
    The marigold, that goes to bed wi’ the sun,
    And with him rises weeping: these are flowers
    Of middle summer….
              —William Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale

    Shakespeare’s plays are full of flowers, not only as props but also as metaphors. Perdita, the mad king of Sicilia’s lost daughter, speaks the sad words above as she hands flowers to the king of Bohemia and to one of her father’s former advisors. Another flowery Shakespearean girl is Ophelia. When Hamlet’s feigned insanity drives her mad, she famously wanders across the stage muttering, “There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance … and there is pansies, that’s for thoughts.” Nineteenth-century Paris was madly in love with femmes fragiles like Ophelia. On the DVD of the 1868 French opera by Ambroise Thomas based on Hamlet, Ophelia sings a long, sad aria in the fourth act as she walks around the stage strewing flowers. Finally she stabs herself and falls upon the flowers and dies. The audience breaks into wild applause. She gets up and sings some more.

    My favorite flower speech in Shakespeare is this one spoken by Oberon in Act II of A Midsummer Night’s Dream:

    I know a bank where the wild thyme blows,
    Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows,
    Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine,
    With sweet musk-roses and with eglantine:
    There sleeps Titania sometime of the night,
    Lull’d in these flowers with dances and delight;
    And there the snake throws her enamell’d skin,
    Weed wide enough to wrap a fairy in….

    The grounds of the Huntington Library in San Marino, CA (just north of downtown Los Angeles), are filled with topical gardens, including a Shakespearean one. The first time I went there, I got to see real, live, growing oxlips and woodbine and eglantine.

    The language of flowers reached its greatest popularity during the Victorian Era (1837–1901), when social conventions prevented people from saying frankly what they were thinking or feeling. While Victoria sat on the throne, people had limbs instead of legs and even piano legs were modestly covered by fancy fringed scarves. Sentiment often replaced common sense, so lovers perforce found subtler ways to speak their feelings. If a suitor handed a girl a bouquet right side up, that meant he had positive thoughts about her; upside down, he had negative thoughts; and if he gave her wilted bouquet, well…. Every variety of rose or lily had its own meaning, and so did potted plants (the begonia signifies “a fanciful nature”), herbs (parsley is “useful knowledge”), and spices (cinnamon means “my fortune is yours”).

    I used the language of flowers several time inSecret Lives. In Chapter 3, the coven of magical grandmothers creates sacred space in which an old woman named Sarah can safely make a life decision. They bless her with flowers:

                 “And now,” Holde said, “let us bless you in our fashion.” Someone handed her a small branch of dusky leaves. “This is myrtle, “she said, “an ancient symbol of love. Sarah, I give you love, our love for you and your love for yourself.” She handed the myrtle to Sarah and kissed her lightly on the forehead, then returned to her seat.
            The next woman was Brooke, who stood and walked to Sarah’s side. “This is African violet,” she said. “Its symbolic meaning is ‘such worth is rare.’ I give you your own rare worth. Never forget it.” She handed a tiny potted plant with purple flowers to the older woman and gently kissed her on one cheek, then returned to her seat.
            The third was Bertha. “This chrysanthemum,” she said, “symbolizes truth. It’s your own truth I give you. Consider it well.” With a light kiss on the lips, she handed the big crimson flower to Sarah, its scent reminding them both of autumn chores and preparations for winter. “Bright blessings.”
            “This is laurel,” said Emma Clare, next, “since ancient days the symbol of glory. May you realize your own glory, the glory of your life, well and goodly lived. Bright blessin’s.” She handed the branch of dark green, aromatic leaves to Sarah, kissed her on her other cheek, and slowly returned to her own chair in the circle.
            And on around the circle came the flowers and leafy sprigs—globe amaranth for “unfading love,” gilliflowers for “bond of affection,” spicy sage for “esteem,” zinnias for “thoughts of absent friends, “aromatic vervain for “enchantment,” scentless syringa for “memory,” and more….
            Vickie prompted her daughter now. “Grammie,” the little girl said, “this is a pink rose and it means simplicity. I love you, Grammie, and … and I’ll miss you if you go away.”
            As Sarah received the rosebud from the little girl, she also got a big, wet kiss. “Thank you, honey,” she whispered. “You be a good girl now, you hear?”
            “I will. I promise.” Cindy returned to huddle very close to her mother, but her eyes never left the shining old woman in the center of the magic circle.

    Late April and early May belong to Venus and Flora, the Roman goddess of flowers, whose festival was the Floralia. We can use the language of flowers to celebrate the Floralia today. Instead of sending a billet-doux to your honey, present a tussie-mussie. That’s a small bouquet wrapped in a lace doily or a fancier holder. Or say you know someone having a birthday around this time. Maybe he already has too many neckties and she already has too many kitchen gadgets. Give flowers or a potted plant. Refer to The Language of Flowers,  which is a lovely, faux-Victorian “treasure of verse and prose” by Victorian writers, plus a lot of nice, sentimental Victorian art. It’s filled with flower lore. We learn, for example, that the white camellia signifies “unpretending excellence.” Ivy, “with its clinging habit, is a feminine symbol” (sic., p. 53). The lily means purity. The peony symbolizes abundance. The primrose is a token of affection and respect. Get the idea? Your friends will be delighted by the flowery language. Especially after you explain it to them.

    Barbara Ardinger, Ph.D. (www.barbaraardinger.com), is a published author and freelance editor. Her newest book is Secret Lives, a novel about grandmothers who do magic.  Her earlier nonfiction books include the daybook Pagan Every Day, Finding New Goddesses (a pun-filled parody of goddess encyclopedias), and Goddess Meditations.  When she can get away from the computer, she goes to the theater as often as possible—she loves musical theater and movies in which people sing and dance. She is also an active CERT (Community Emergency Rescue Team) volunteer and a member (and occasional secretary pro-tem) of a neighborhood organization that focuses on code enforcement and safety for citizens. She has been an AIDS emotional support volunteer and a literacy volunteer. She is an active member of the neopagan community and is well known for the rituals she creates and leads.

    Like this:

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    Categories: Fiction, Poetry

    Tags: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Barbara Ardinger, Hamlet, language of flowers, Secret Lives, Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale, tussie-mussie, Victorian Era

    Источник: https://feminismandreligion.com/2013/05/05/the-language-of-flowers-by-barbara-ardinger-2/

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    By Barbara Ardingeron

    Instead of sending a billet-doux to your honey, present a tussie-mussie, a small bouquet wrapped in a lace doily or a fancier holder. Say you have a friend having a birthday and he already has too many neckties and she already has too many kitchen gadgets. Give them flowers or potted plants. The white camellia signifies “unpretending excellence.” Ivy, “with its clinging habit, is a feminine symbol” (sic., p. 53). The lily means purity. The peony symbolizes abundance. The primrose is a token of affection and respect. Get the idea? Your friends will be delighted by the flowery language.

    William Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale

    A fancy tussie-mussie

         Here’s flowers for you:
    Hot lavender, mints, savory, marjoram,
    The marigold, that goes to bed wi’ the sun,
    And with him rises weeping: these are flowers
    Of middle summer….
              —William Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale

    Shakespeare’s plays are full of flowers, not only as props but also as metaphors. Perdita, the mad king of Sicilia’s lost daughter, speaks the sad words above as she hands flowers to the king of Bohemia and to one of her father’s former advisors. Another flowery Shakespearean girl is Ophelia. When Hamlet’s feigned insanity drives her mad, she famously wanders across the stage muttering, “There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance … and there is pansies, that’s for thoughts.” Nineteenth-century Paris was madly in love with femmes fragiles like Ophelia. On the DVD of the 1868 French opera by Ambroise Thomas based on Hamlet, Ophelia sings a long, sad aria in the fourth act as she walks around the stage strewing flowers. Finally she stabs herself and falls upon the flowers and dies. The audience breaks into wild applause. She gets up and sings some more.

    My favorite flower speech in Shakespeare is this one spoken by Oberon in Act II of A Midsummer Night’s Dream:

    I know a bank where the wild thyme blows,
    Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows,
    Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine,
    With sweet musk-roses and with eglantine:
    There sleeps Titania sometime of the night,
    Lull’d in these flowers with dances and delight;
    And there the snake throws her enamell’d skin,
    Weed wide enough to wrap a fairy in….

    The grounds of the Huntington Library in San Marino, CA (just north of downtown Los Angeles), are filled with topical gardens, including a Shakespearean one. The first time I went there, I got to see real, live, growing oxlips and woodbine and eglantine.

    The language of flowers reached its greatest popularity during the Victorian Era (1837–1901), when social conventions prevented people from saying frankly what they were thinking or feeling. While Victoria sat on the throne, people had limbs instead of legs and even piano legs were modestly covered by fancy fringed scarves. Sentiment often replaced common sense, so lovers perforce found subtler ways to speak their feelings. If a suitor handed a girl a bouquet right side up, that meant he had positive thoughts about her; upside down, he had negative thoughts; and if he gave her wilted bouquet, well…. Every variety of rose or lily had its own meaning, and so did potted plants (the begonia signifies “a fanciful nature”), herbs (parsley is “useful knowledge”), and spices (cinnamon means “my fortune is yours”).

    I used the language of flowers several time inSecret Lives. In Chapter 3, the coven of magical grandmothers creates sacred space in which an old woman named Sarah can safely make a life decision. They bless her with flowers:

                 “And now,” Holde said, “let us bless you in our fashion.” Someone handed her a small branch of dusky leaves. “This is myrtle, “she said, “an ancient symbol of love. Sarah, I give you love, our love for you and your love for yourself.” She handed the myrtle to Sarah and kissed her lightly on the forehead, then returned to her seat.
            The next woman was Brooke, who stood and walked to Sarah’s side. “This is African violet,” she said. “Its symbolic meaning is ‘such worth is rare.’ I give you your own rare worth. Never forget it.” She handed a tiny potted plant with purple flowers to the older woman and gently kissed her on one cheek, then returned to her seat.
            The third was Bertha. “This chrysanthemum,” she said, “symbolizes truth. It’s your own truth I give you. Consider it well.” With a light kiss on the lips, she handed the big crimson flower to Sarah, its scent reminding them both of autumn chores and preparations for winter. “Bright blessings.”
            “This is laurel,” said Emma Clare, next, “since ancient days the symbol of glory. May you realize your own glory, the glory of your life, well and goodly lived. Bright blessin’s.” She handed the branch of dark green, aromatic leaves to Sarah, kissed her on her other cheek, and slowly returned to her own chair in the circle.
            And on around the circle came the flowers and leafy sprigs—globe amaranth for “unfading love,” gilliflowers for “bond of affection,” spicy sage for “esteem,” zinnias for “thoughts of absent friends, “aromatic vervain for “enchantment,” scentless syringa for “memory,” and more….
            Vickie prompted her daughter now. “Grammie,” the little girl said, “this is a pink rose and it means simplicity. I love you, Grammie, and … and I’ll miss you if you go away.”
            As Sarah received the rosebud from the little girl, she also got a big, wet kiss. “Thank you, honey,” she whispered. “You be a good girl now, you hear?”
            “I will. I promise.” Cindy returned to huddle very close to her mother, but her eyes never left the shining old woman in the center of the magic circle.

    Late April and early May belong to Venus and Flora, the Roman goddess of flowers, whose festival was the Floralia. We can use the language of flowers to celebrate the Floralia today. Instead of sending a billet-doux to your honey, present a tussie-mussie. That’s a small bouquet wrapped in a lace doily or a fancier holder. Or say you know someone having a birthday around this time. Maybe he already has too many neckties and she already has too many kitchen gadgets. Give flowers or a potted plant. Refer to The Language of Flowers,  which is a lovely, faux-Victorian “treasure of verse and prose” by Victorian writers, plus a lot of nice, sentimental Victorian art. It’s filled with flower lore. We learn, for example, that the white camellia signifies “unpretending excellence.” Ivy, “with its clinging habit, is a feminine symbol” (sic., p. 53). The lily means purity. The peony symbolizes abundance. The primrose is a token of affection and respect. Get the idea? Your friends will be delighted by the flowery language. Especially after you explain it to them.

    Barbara Ardinger, Ph.D. (www.barbaraardinger.com), is a published author and freelance editor. Her newest book is Secret Lives, a novel about grandmothers who do magic.  Her earlier nonfiction books include the daybook Pagan Every Day, Finding New Goddesses (a pun-filled parody of goddess encyclopedias), and Goddess Meditations.  When she can get away from the computer, she goes to the theater as often as possible—she loves musical theater and movies in which people sing and dance. She is also an active CERT (Community Emergency Rescue Team) volunteer and a member (and occasional secretary pro-tem) of a neighborhood organization that focuses on code enforcement and safety for citizens. She has been an AIDS emotional support volunteer and a literacy volunteer. She is an active member of the neopagan community and is well known for the rituals she creates and leads.

    Like this:

    LikeLoading...

    ‹ (Femen)ism? by Kile Jones

    Rituals Of Spring and Greek Easter by Carol P. Christ ›

    Categories: Fiction, Poetry

    Tags: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Barbara Ardinger, Hamlet, language of flowers, Secret Lives, Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale, tussie-mussie, Victorian Era

    Источник: https://feminismandreligion.com/2013/05/05/the-language-of-flowers-by-barbara-ardinger-2/

    Rosemary and Rue, herbs that on two occasions Shakespeare placed near to one another.


    “For you there’s rosemary and rue …
    Grace and remembrance be to you both,”

    - The Winter’s Tale, Act IV, Scene 3


    “There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance; pray you love, remember ...

      there’s rue for you, and here’s some for me: we may call it herb-grace o’ Sundays: 

    O, you must wear your rue with a difference”

    - Hamlet, Act IV, Scene 5

     

    Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalus)



    Rosemary for remembrance, Shakespeare garden
    Rosemary in bloom

    Rosemary has been associated with remembrance since ancient Greece where students would wear garlands of rosemary whilst studying to aid their memories. Its botanical name comes from the Latin meaning “dew of the sea”, a reference to its blue flowers and its original habitat on the coasts of the Mediterranean. In Shakespeare’s day it was highly valued and had a variety of uses. It was used in cooking, in floor strewings, it was distilled to make medicinal simples and when grown tall its stems were used to make lutes.

    As an evergreen Rosemary represented both remembrance and constancy and played a part in both Elizabethan weddings and funerals. The 17th century poet Robert Herrick wrote “Grow it for two ends, it matters not at all, Be it for my bridal or burial.” At weddings Rosemary was carried by the bridesmaids and sprigs of it were strewn on the ground. As a symbol of fidelity the Nurse in Romeo and Juliet remarks:



    "Doth not rosemary and Romeo begin both with a letter?"

    - Romeo and Juliet, Act II, Scene 4


    There was an old folk belief that if a man could not smell Rosemary he was incapable of loving a woman.

    Rosemary also formed part of burial wreaths, which later appear when Juliet is thought to have died.


    “Dry up your tears, and stick your rosemary
    On this fair corse”


    - Romeo and Juliet, Act IV, Scene 5

    No doubt another reason for Shakespeare using it earlier in the play was to foreshadow the future tragic events.

    Rosemary from Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare garden
    Scene from Romeo and Juliet
    Sir Thomas Moore wrote  

    “As for Rosemarie I let it run alle over my garden walls, not onlie because my bees love it, but because tis the herb scared to remembrance and therefore to friendship, whence a sprig of it hath a dumb language that maketh it the chosen emblem at our funeral wakes and in our burial grounds.”


    Type:Perennial Evergreen

    Height:1 to 6 feet

    Flowers:Summer

     Rue (Ruta graveolens)

     

    Rue for a Shakespeare Garden
    Rue

     

     “Here did she fall a tear; here in this place,
    I’ll set a bank of rue, sour herb of grace;
    Rue, even for ruth here shortly shall be seen
    In the remembrance of a weeping queen.”

    - Richard II, Act III, Scene 4

    Rue has a strong aromatic smell and a bitter taste. The first part of its botanical name comes from the Greek reuo, meaning to set free. In ancient times it was thought to be an antidote for poison and disease, in Elizabethan England it was carried around as protection against the plague and witchcraft and was used in herbal strewings to repel insects. Due to its bitter taste the plant has long been symbolic of sorrow, regret and repentance, hence the expression “you’ll rue the day” meaning “you’ll be sorry for this.” When Ophelia hands it to Queen Gertrude in Hamlet, it is a subtle rebuke of her faithlessness.

    Another name for the plant was Herb of Grace or Herb Grace o’ Sundays as it was used in the early Catholic Church to sprinkle holy water and to wash away sins. The word ruth comes from the word rue and more usually meant to feel pity for or to grieve.

    In large doses Rue is toxic and is not generally recommended for internal use. It may also be dangerous to grow in your garden if you have pets. In medieval times it was sometimes used to hasten labour or in extreme cases as an abortifacient. This has led to speculation that when Ophelia utters the lines "there's rue for you, and here's some for me", she is confessing to an unwanted pregnancy, revealing another reason for ending her life.


    Type: Perennial Evergreen

    Height: 20 to 34 inches


    Flowers: Summer

    Источник: https://bardgarden.blogspot.com/2014/10/rosemary-and-rue.html

    Winter's Tale

    Front PageCourse themesMembersScheduleCourse outlineTaming ShrewHenry VMuch AdoHamletKing LearAntony & CleopatraWinter's TaleThe TempestDanceGeneral linksBackground materialEssaysU. of A. libraryEnglish Dept.InstructorSources

    Two plays in one - The Greek tragedy - The Fairy-Tale - Folk and other elements in the 'second play' -
    Winter, summer and rebirth - links - film - music


    Augustus Leopold Egg. A Scene from "The Winter's Tale," 1845 source

    If Antony and Cleopatra is, in many ways, one of Shakespeare's most straightforward plays, The Winter's Tale may seem one of the more obtuse. It was, though, much appreciated by the Victorians (who had a soft spot for such things as babies left on lonely islands). Yet if at first reading it does not seem so obviously appealing, it is one of those works that nags away at you, for it contains many curious and interesting ideas.

    In the course we looked in particular at its unusual structure, following the course theme of Shakespeare's inheritance of both medieval ideas in a popular tradition, and the Classical learning of the Renaissance.

    Two plays in one - Course theme

    The Winter's Tale is really two plays, with two distinct styles (and plot content), brought together in an unusual and unlikely ending. Although the play is based on one major source - Robert Greene's prose romance Pandosto, published in 1588 - Shakespeare's changes are extensive enough to allow this construction.

    The Greek tragedy

    The first play runs until Act III, Scene 2. The first two Acts are set in Leontes' palace (we assume the prison in II,2 is somewhere in the vicinity), and both the first two scenes of Act III are closely connected with that palace, the first showing two messengers on the way back to it, the second being 'A court of Justice', which, in spite of such an allegorical title, we again automatically assume to be in the palace. So, in terms of one of our course themes, we are in the realm of the urban, the castle, the rational place, the state where the god-like benign ruler fulfills his responsibilities. Here this is associated with Sicily.

    We are also back to the idea of personal desires (or obsessions) over-riding that ruler's judgement. Indeed, this 'first play' has all the hallmarks of a Greek tragedy, and if we were in any doubt about the Classical slant of these acts, we only have to look to the messengers who are sent to consult Apollo's oracle.

    This first play also has the appearance of fulfilling the Aristolean unities of time and place (one place, one day), as it can easily be played on one set, and it appears to take place in one day. In fact, in a slight of theatrical hand, there is a gap of 23 days between II.1 and II.2, though the audience are not told until later, and it is very difficult, either reading or viewing the play, to realize that such a period has passed.

    More important, we have all the elements of Greek tragedy - a leader who is guilty of hubris, who, through that hubris, defies nature and the gods, sees the results of his hubris, and is therefore broken by the gods, and placed in a situation to realise the horror of his errors. Leontes' fault is his jealousy (a subject Shakespeare had already tackled in Othello), a blind jealousy that will not listen to the sober comment and advice of his court. Jean Howard, in the Norton introduction, claims: "Often said to be "irrational", this jealousy actually has its roots in the cultural practices which in Jacobean England made men the head of families...." (p.158). We have to take this statement with a large pinch of salt, since quite clearly it doesn't - it has its roots in human nature, regardless of the cultural surroundings. What places it in a context equivalent to Greek tragedy is that this personal emotion also affects the state, especially since here the succession is in question - in terms Shakespearean terms, the personal in the psychology of the leader is overriding the responsibilities of the leader.

    Leontes compounds his hubris in no uncertain fashion (and this is more late-Renaissance than Greek) in the critical passage in III.2 (p. 193 in the Norton). He has the pronouncement from the Apollonian oracle (symbolically as well as factually, since Apollo represents light, the Sun, and intellectual clarity), and immediately says the oracle is lying (not a good idea in terms of the Gods). Instantly the Gods respond - a servant rushes in saying that his son is dead (thus also making Hermione's unborn child the heir to the throne). Leontes suddenly realises:
      "Apollo's angry, and the heavens themselves/Do strike at my injustice."
    and Hermione promptly faints and, apparently, dies.

    This self-realization is much too swift for good Greek tragedy - indeed, it is so swift that Shakespeare seems to be playing with the form - but it follows the required pattern. The Greek tragedy culminates with the broken King at the end of III.2. Indeed, with an extension of Leontes' realization, so that it takes a little more time, and an extension of the final speeches of the scene, the play up to this point would in itself make a complete and perfectly satisfying tragedy along Greek lines (and, incidentally, about the same length as a Greek tragedy).

    But it doesn't stop there.

    Some other points to note:

    bulletLeaving a baby exposed to die, and being found by ordinary rural people, is a very Classical theme (continued in folk mythology - so it provides a link between the 'two plays').

     


    Oil on canvas, Victoria and Albert Museum. Steel engraving, approximately 7 x 10 inches, by Lumb Stocks. The engraving is from Charles Knight's two-volume Imperial Edition of The Works of Shakespeare (London: Virtue and Company, 1873-76). source

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


    Oil on canvas. Steel engraving, approximately 7 x 10 inches, by Lumb Stocks. The engraving is from Charles Knight's two-volume Imperial Edition of The Works of Shakespeare (London: Virtue and Company, 1873-76). source


    Thomas Charles Wageman.
     John Fawcett as Autolycus in "The Winter's Tale," 1828.

     

    The fairy-tale
     

    The 'second play' opens in III.3, which acts as a prelude to the main part of the play, starting with Time at the beginning of the fourth Act.

    This 'second play' has all the elements of a good fairy-tale. In other words, whereas the 'first play' comes out of the classical tradition, this comes from the medieval tradition.

    The fairy-tale elements include:

    bulletOpening with a journey - here across the sea (symbol of change), in a storm (also symbolic of change  - see Lear)
    bulletSetting in a distant, half-imaginary place ("The deserts of Bohemia" - see note on Bohemia and Sicily below)
    bulletA baby being left to be found by rural people, while conforming to a number of fairy-tale necessities:
    - the baby is high-born
    - the baby has to have something with him/her that will eventually identify his/her origins
    - the discovery by a low-born rural person (here a shepherd)
    bulletAn old man or equivalent who usually gives advice but does not take part in the action and often gives some sort of talisman or magic aid (here Antigonus takes this role, and leaves the talisman - the scroll.)
    bulletThe bear, in the most famous stage-direction in theatrical history, carries potent symbolism (as well as being an exciting theatrical moment - performing bears were not uncommon in Elizabethan and Jacobean England, and doubtless on was used here). Jung would have seen it as symbolizing the dark and dangerous aspect of the unconscious; in classical and Celtic mythology it is associated with the hunt and the woods; and in popular and Christian tradition both the she-bear (the female gives birth to apparently formless offspring) and the male bear (tamed by a number of saints) have their place. Bears were no longer indigenous to Britain, so the bear also adds to the wildness of Bohemia.
    bulletThere is a Prince and the Princess, whom we know should and will end up getting married.
    bulletWe know there are going to be a number of problems before that can happen.
    bulletAnd for a good fairy tale of this type, one of those problems should be one of identity. Ideally, the high-born should fall in love with the low-born (and vice-versa), so that this problem has to be solved.
    bulletHere the Princess doesn't know the Princess is a princess
    bulletThe Princess doesn't know she is a princess
    bulletWe do know. Perfect fairy-tale stuff.
    bulletThus the interest in this is not the outcome, but how we reach that outcome - particularly how the crucial discovery of princessness will be made.
    bulletIdeally, we should have a parent who tries to prevent their high-born being with a low-born - here Polixenes.
    bulletThe underlying plot is what would be seen in fairy-tale terms as a right-of-passage tale - that of Perdita and Florizel moving from adolescence to independent adults, leading to another rite-of-passage, that of marriage.
    bulletThe initial journey enter this rite-of-passage story. In fairy-tale terms, another is needed for its conclusion. Thus the Prince and Princess sail over the sea again, symbolizing the change they have arrived at.
    bulletAll one needs is a round-up[ scene after V.2, and one would have another complete play in itself.
    bulletUp to the return to Sicily, all this 'second play' takes place in the open air of the countryside, as opposed to the 'urban' setting of the first play.

     

    Folk and other elements in the 'second play'

    At the same time, Shakespeare uses other elements drawn from the folk/rural and medieval tradition:

    bulletThe sheep-shearing festival is imbued with rural folk and seasonal traditions. No date is given, but the opening lines of IV.4 would suggest April, which seems to be confirmed by Perdita, who has the flowers of summer, and those that will last into winter, but not those of spring (e.g. February-March). This would also make sense from the farming point of view.
    - It is a representation of the end of winter and the beginning of summer (if sheep are not sheared as summer starts, they start slowly loosing their wool)
    - It is a representation of continuity, the cycle of the seasons
    - It is a representation of the bounty of nature, and thus connected with fertility rights
    - Sheep-shearing is a communal event. Traditionally, groups of farmers would gather together to shear each other's sheep, since quite large numbers are required (I have myself taken part in such a sheep-shearing 'bee'). The shearing also involved women and children, not only in the obvious roles of providing food and drink to the men shearing, but also in the organization and movement of bringing the sheep to the shearers (and if Welsh rural experience is anything to go by, there were probably women shearers anyway).
    - In rural communities, such communal events would be a cause for celebration at their conclusion, especially when fertility and seasonal cycles were involved.
    bulletThe name Florizel has a distinctly medieval ring about it (he only appears in the 'second play') and inevitably recalls that of Floris in the well-known medieval story of Floris and Blanchfleur (Whiteflower), one version of which is an English version contemporary with Chaucer. Indeed, Perdita is the flower maiden, distributing them to everyone in 4.4.
    bulletThe rustics, particularly Autolycus and the clown, are from the rural tradition (the former being the wandering pedlar), as well as being in Shakespeare's own tradition of 'mechanicals'. (For Autolycus' classical name, see below).
    bulletAutolycus provides a number of songs and ballads in the rural tradition (indeed, he is in part a wandering ballad-seller), though it should be noted that the words of these ballads ranges from traditional wording and subjects to much denser language, atypical of such songs, but reflecting the dense and complex language of the play as a whole.
    bulletIf one were analyzing the 'second play' as a myth/fairy tale in psychoanalytical terms, then Autolycus represents the magician/trickster archetype, in his more scurrilous aspect.

    The classical elements in the 'fairy-tale' play

    But, of course, this 'second play' is not completely isolated from the first, and in it one sees a number of classical elements or references. Thus Florizel talks of his disguise in terms of classical metamorphoses (IV.4.25-31), while Perdita flower giving is full of classical references.

    It is notable that these classical references are given only by those who belong to the 'urban' rather than the 'wilderness', whether they are in disguise (Florizel) or simply don't know that's where they belong (Perdita). How Perdita could pick up such knowledge in the shepherd's home is a different matter, but fairy-tales are allowed such anomalies.

    The exception to this is Autolycus, whose name is deliberately of Greek origin. In Greek mythology, Autolycus was the son of Hermes, who specialized in thieving and in trickery (hence Autolycus, the Prince of Thieves, in Xena, Warrior Princess). (A second Autolycus joined the Argonauts, and wasn't heard of after their visit to the Amazons - the two get muddled up in Greek mythology). (There was also an Autolycus whom Theopilus of Antioch wrote to about the Trinity, using that word in its Christian context for the first time. He described Autolycus as an Idolater and Scorner of Christians).

    In the play, the character himself claims he was born under [the planet] Mercury, which is appropriate (and a pun), not only since Mercury is the Roman name for Hermes, but also because Mercury, in addition to his role as messenger of the gods, also has elements of the trickster in the classical tradition - he is the god of thieves. Indeed, I sometimes have the fancy that Autolycus is not really a mortal at all, but someone like Mercury in disguise, down to have a bit of fun at the humans' expense - and certainly he doesn't seem in any danger of ever getting caught.

    Jung might claim that fancy was simply a reflection of the trickster archetype at work, and indeed here is a fundamental difference between the very plastic character of Autolycus and the rather stiff mention of the gods by Florizel and Perdita. The gods that they mention have arrived - or rather more detailed knowledge of them, and of direct classical references - by means of the rediscovery of the classics by Renaissance learning and schooling. They are 'book' gods, so to speak. Autolyus, in his trickster archetype, has never been lost, travelling from ancient Greece, through Rome, via a hundred different paths, through the medieval world, here to The Winter's Tale, and on to Xena.

     

     


    Persephone

    Winter, summer and rebirth

    Perdita refers to the classical myth that is the basis for the underlying allegory of The Winter's Tale:

    O Proserpina,
    For the flowers now that. frighted, thou letst fall
    From Dis's wagon - (IV.4.116-118)

    Proserpina is the Greek goddess Persephone, who after being abducted by Hades (Dis), makes a deal whereby she will spend six months of the year below ground, and six months of the year above ground. This is the only time Shakespeare mentions her, and he refers to Dis only once again, in The Tempest, in a similar fertility context.

    Thus she is the archetypical goddess of summer, bring new life and fertility to the earth and to humankind after the long cold of winter, and she is therefore associated with flowers. She appears at this point, because it is in the middle of a festival - the sheep-shearing festival - that is has precisely the same symbolic image of new life, the shearing off of the old, the ending of the white wool of winter.

    Here, then, the classical and folk traditions meet, though, like the trickster figure, the pagan concept of the goddess of winter/summer was never lost, and Persephone is one of the Greek figures who was remembered by the medieval world.

    This central celebration of rebirth and renewal is the surface representation of the allegory of rebirth and renewal that is inherent in the whole plot, especially in the 'second play'. Perdita, the lost one, has been banished from the sterility of Sicily, that has literally rejected the Apollonian light of enlightened intellect, and is ruled by a King as suspicious as Dis in a winter world made stark by its human, rather than natural, surroundings. She is cast out as dead, but in fact she is a seed, planted in winter ground, that will grow and blossom in the natural world of Bohemia, the flower-maiden.

    Similarly her mother Hermione has been cast out as if dead, and will come to life again only when the rebirth - the new generation - returns in the renewal of summer. She is, in a sense, Persphone, cast out for the winter, reborn for the summer - only this winter is 16 years long, for the allegory is operating in real time, rather than seasonal time. At least it seems to be, until one realises that time in the play is not real time at all, but mythical time, so that 23 days can pass completely unnoticed, and 16 years pass at the behest of Time as Chorus. So in terms of the myth, of the renewal and rebirth, it doesn't matter if it's summer/winter or 16 years, as allegorically they are the same thing.

    The ending

    But winter and summer are inextricably linked - neither exist without the other, and youth needs older age and older age youth. So Sicily and Bohemia are inextricably linked, by childhood friendships, by the resolution of events in one place only being possible through events in the other, and vice versa, by the reference to the classical in the fairy-tale.

    Somehow Shakespeare has to reconcile the two plays in an ending. His solution has elements of Ovid's Metamorphosis, something of the miraculous event that a medieval audience would have enjoyed, but is essentially thoroughly classical  - a statue coming to life. The reason that this is so classical is that the medieval world had little sense of the statue as an individual work of art divorced from its architectural context of a cathedral or similar setting. Sculpture started feeing itself from such settings in the work of Flemish masters at the end of the 14th and the beginning of the 15th Century, and in Italy with the influence of classical models. The Greeks would have understood instantly, and Shakespeare's use of this motif reflects classical rather than medieval origins. It is a neat concept, as it ties so many of the play's themes together.

    Sicily and Bohemia

    Just as it would be difficult today to present a play, however mythical or allegorical, that mentioned the Czech republic and Italy without the audience having a whole raft of contemporary associations with those two places, so we should not forget that Shakespeare's audience would have had a similar set of associations with Sicily and Bohemia (now in the Czech Republic).

    Of course both are ciphers, Sicily in part representing Winter, but paradoxically also that southern Apollonian light of the intellect that is suppressed by Leontes' actions, but which will return in the rebirth prompted by the journey into instinct and back represented by Bohemia. Bohemia is in part a distant mysterious place where bears may indeed roam and fairy-tale things happen (for a more modern parallel, Transylvania is a not-so-long drive away), and it is also the place of summer and flowers (and is somewhat misrepresented by Shakespeare as bordering the sea).

    As Adriano says in Love's Labour Lost, "The words of Mercury are harsh after the songs of Apollo. You that way: we this way", but it is the shape of The Winter's Tale to bring both paths together at the end.

    However, every well-informed member of the audience would have known perfectly well that both Kingdoms were within the political orbit of the Spanish empire (Sicily specifically under the house of Aragon), and thus were connected politically and in terms of governance - the childhood friendship of the two future rulers would have been quite understandable. The audience would also have been aware that Bohemia was, at the time, an important bulwark against the Ottoman empire and the Muslims, the edge of Christian Europe.

    topTwo plays in one - The Greek tragedy - The Fairy-Tale - Folk and other elements in the 'second play' -
    Winter, summer and rebirth - links - film - music

     

    Источник: http://www.artsrn.ualberta.ca/mmorris/ENGL339/winter's_tale.htm

    Winter's Tale Quotes

  • Quotes About Your Man Wanting Me

    “Since ever the world was spinning And till the world shall end Youve your man in the beginning Or you have him in” — Lucy Maud Montgomery

  • After A Long Night Quotes

    “Hadrian reeked of death. It wasnt the sort of stench others could smell or that water could wash, but it lingered on him” — Michael J. Sullivan

  • Will Way Quotes

    “Here you would know, and enjoy, what prosperity will way of Washington. For a thousand leagues have nearly the same effect with a” — Benjamin Franklin

  • Quotes About Writing Articles

    “At 88 years old - with every intention of living decades longer - Im still running a company, writing articles, launching new ventures,” — David H. Murdock

  • Quotes About Not Being The Girl On The Side

    “But I knew it wasnt just the cute girl on the screen that had made Eunice cry. It was her father laughing, being” — Gary Shteyngart

  • Quotes About Putting It All On The Line

    “The problem with putting it all on the line is that it might not work out. The problem with not putting it all” — Seth Godin

  • Quotes About Gay Crush

    “No. I can quite happily say someone is handsome, good-looking, and I can see why someone would want to f**k them, but Ive” — Daniel Radcliffe

  • Interpreter Of Maladies Quotes

    “Interpreter of Maladies is the title of one of the stories in the book. And the phrase itself was something I thought of” — Jhumpa Lahiri

  • Toohey Quotes

    “Then Toohey moved through the crowd, and smiled at his friends. But between smiles and sentences, his eyes went back to the man” — Ayn Rand

  • Lenin Propaganda Quotes

    “Whatever else Lenin might have done—and it was difficult to separate the truth from the conservative propaganda—at least, Billy thought, he was serious” — Ken Follett

  • Job Searching Quotes

    “The internet was supposed to make this whole business of job searching rational and simple. You could post your resume and companies would” — Barbara Ehrenreich

  • Shipping Containers Quotes

    “They are a testament not only to the Afghans hunger for literacy, but also to their willingness to pour scarce resources into this” — Greg Mortenson

  • We're Not Normal Quotes

    “What makes us the most normal," said Reiko, "is knowing that were not normal.” — Haruki Murakami

  • Profess Love Quotes

    “How is it that you profess love for God but cant accept another human being?” — Phylicia Rashad

  • Nice And Funny Birthday Quotes

    “I put my hand on the altar rail. What if ... what if Heaven is real, but only in moments? Like a glass” — David Mitchell

  • Источник: https://www.morefamousquotes.com/topics/winters-tale-quotes/
    Two men and a woman stand behind the title 'The Winter's Tale'

    April 26, 2021, by Peter Kirwan

    The Winter’s Tale (RSC) @ BBC4

    It’s become customary to see theatre shows performed in empty auditoria over the last year, but perhaps none quite so grandly empty as the RSC’s new Winter’s Tale. This is a production that has skipped over its own ‘gap of time’ – fully rehearsed but pulled just before it was due to open back in 2020 by the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic, the cast and crew have now reunited to put on a made-for-screen version – which now has the ignominious distinction of being the first of the RSC’s trudge through the canon under Gregory Doran’s leadership to be as-live but without an audience.

    In converting the production to something designed for camera, stage director Erica Whyman and screen director Bridget Caldwell have made surprisingly few concessions to the medium. Leontes (Joseph Kloska) fires his asides directly down the camera lens, unblinking and intimidating as he addresses us with an uncomfortably intense focus. Autolycus (Anne Odeke) later has an incomprehensible aside to the camera about Shakespeare writing King Lear during a pandemic, a joke which had outstayed its welcome by August 2020. Other characters, however, deliver their asides to the empty seats, studiously ignoring the camera. And dynamically, the company still project as if to fill a packed house; while a typical compromise of the live broadcasts, I feel that if ever there were an opportunity to experiment more with dynamics and intimacy on that stage, this would have been that opportunity.

    Whyman sets her production in the middle of the twentieth century, beginning in 1953 and skipping to the late ‘60s. While the setting is in many ways inconsequential (Sicilia is dressed in the same combination of tuxedos and evening wear that makes too many Winter’s Tales indistinguishable from one another), it affords the filmed version its most important innovation, which is the self-conscious remediation of public scenes within the production. The trial of Hermione (Kemi-Bo Jacobs) sees her placed atop a scaffold while an old-school television camera is pointed at her. In grainy black and white footage reminiscent of Elizabeth I’s coronation, Hermione is exposed before the world, forced to account for herself. Fascinatingly, Hermione focuses on addressing herself to those present, completely ignoring the camera; Leontes, however, positions himself between the camera and Hermione, often addressing his remarks to Hermione while facing the camera instead, insistently remediating her for ‘his’ audience. The stage cameras stay distant from Hermione for much of this scene, though by the end of this scene even they are being pulled in close to Jacobs’s magnetic performance – however, the production intelligently puts Leontes’ and Hermione’s different strategies into productive tension.

    Leontes needs the cameras. In Kloska’s performance, Leontes is a bitter little man who seems small. His rage hits a hysterical pitch early on, and unfortunately doesn’t leave the actor much space to go, making the performance a little monotonous at first (though he manages to switch up a gear when flailing at Camillo, and later while screeching at Paulina and Antigonus). Hermione is radiant, confident, moving around the centre of the stage with a grace and charm that seem to win over everyone. Leontes is marginalised, stuck at the edge of the stage with his head slightly hung, seeming like he has internalised his sense of impotency so much that he’s already isolating himself. It’s in this vein that he turns to the camera for support, and the camera gives it him – in a particularly disappointing choice, the camera even goes for a close-up on Hermione and Polixenes holding hands that Leontes himself doesn’t see, as if the camera is independently providing verification of Leontes’ imagination. But even this support isn’t enough for Leontes. The production and Kloska’s performance do an excellent job of portraying him as a sad little man whose bluster and self-pity are pathetic; however, he never seems to command any authority. Camillo speaks back to him frankly, Paulina talks rings around him, and Hermione seems entirely unabashed by his accusations. It’s never quite clear why those around him don’t laugh in his face at his threats, as he doesn’t seem to wield any physical or constitutional authority. Even when he flails the sword on which he makes his courtiers swear around as if to threaten people with it, it’s clear he doesn’t really know what he’s doing.

    The men in Leontes’ court, in general, are weak, and Whyman’s production is clear that women are (or should be) the real power in Sicilia. Leontes most clearly shows his instability when he kicks Perdita’s crib flying off the stage – a genuinely shocking moment, especially as I had temporarily forgotten that a Gentleman (Baker Mukasa) was trying desperately to calm the crying baby in his arms (unsuccessfully). The Gentleman fails to stop Leontes, too, from grabbing Perdita’s head in a vice-like grip, a genuinely unsettling gesture in its violence and disregard. Antigonus (Colm Gormley), too, is sincere in his pleas with Leontes, but ultimately unable to break through, and his sigh of exasperation at the difficulty of controlling his own wife spoke very poorly of him. By contrast, Amanda Hadingue’s Paulina is a formidable substitute for Hermione, a no-nonsense WI-type who strides confidently across the stage and speaks without shame or fear, and with no small amount of scorn for her husband. Yet Hadingue’s Paulina is also vulnerable – in one of the production’s strongest moments, after Hermione’s ‘death’, Paulina takes no prisoners as she chews out Leontes, but when her rage is spent, she becomes subdued and cries quietly.

    The women of the play take vengeance on weak men in the transition to Bohemia. Emerging from the grid-like scaffolding structure that made up the backdrop, five female members of the ensemble move slowly, walking backwards towards Antigonus as he cradles Perdita in his arms in the centre of a ring of fans (the onstage fans creating an impressive tunnel of air). Turning to face them, Antigonus finds himself lashed and mauled by the sweeping arms and ferocious swipes of the five women, moving as one, a roar of women’s rage that reaches across the ocean and takes vengeance on the man who has carried out Leontes’ orders. As Antigonus is killed, a single long cloth floats and shifts in the tunnel of air created by the fan, which an ethereal Hermione pulls down and remakes as her daughter, swaddling it together to give Perdita a second birth in Bohemia.

    The 1960s setting for Bohemia has been done before (Propeller come immediately to mind), and here creates a mish-mash of colourful reference points that one suspects would have worked better with an audience present. Odeke’s Autolycus sets the tone with a song set to a medley of 60s musical styles from big band to rock n’roll, and does a nice Hamlet skit with a skull. Isobel Waller-Bridge’s music – and the on-point onstage band – were a highlight of this second half, creating a festival atmosphere that wanders oddly in its reference points, but at least (and most importantly) captured the fun of the sheep-shearing. Autolycus, in particular, seems to be just doing his own thing – at one point, faced with needing to exchange clothes with Florizel, he shoves his face into a Victoria sponge (as a disguise) and strips off his trousers, before confronting the Shepherds with confident hand on hips, cream-covered face and shirt tucked into underpants.

    Bohemia is coded as the North East of England (Newcastle or close enough), and is suitably earthy. Here the Shepherd is regendered as a Shepherdess (Zoe Lambert), Mopsa and Dorcas (Vicky Hall and Alice Blundell) get additional stage time, including being present with the Young Shepherd (William Grint) at the start of his being robbed, and Bohemia – or at least this part of it – feels like a women-run place. This provides the context in which Perdita (Georgia Landers) flowers. This Perdita is confident, even cocky. The remediation comes into play again here as the sheep-shearing is filmed on an early home video camera, and Perdita enjoys flirting with the camera, showing her enjoyment of sexual puns and kissing Florizel (the winsome Assad Zaman) without embarrassment. Particularly in contrast to Sicilia, this feels like a liberated space, which makes it all the more awful when Polixenes (Andrew French) reveals himself, roaring into the centre of the revellers and taking up an enormous amount of space with his violence. French’s performance is one of the buried delights of this production. In Sicilia he is quiet, confident, and a polite match for Jacobs’s charming Hermione; when he discovers Leontes’ betrayal, he is devastated, and leaves sadly. So his sudden roar of rage in Bohemia feels all the more shocking for having come from such a peaceful place, betraying the ferocity with which he governs his own interests, at any rate.

    There are more subtleties, but I particularly wanted to address the excellent performances by the two Deaf actors, Grint as the Young Shepherd and Bea Webster as Emilia. Emilia is prominent in the Sicilia scenes, and there’s a touching moment as Ihsan Ahmed’s Mamillius signs with her, showing a connection between the two. The production’s treatment of its Deaf characters is, however, inconsistent – Emilia, in particular, is signed to very inconsistently, and the film oscillates between providing subtitles for her and not. The inconsistencies carry over into the Bohemia scenes, where a lot of work has been put into reworking scenes such as Autolycus robbing the Clown – which here has five people onstage for much of its length, including Mopsa and Dorcas – but which becomes quickly cluttered and confused. Grint’s performance is excellent, showing vulnerability as Mopsa and Dorcas fight for his attention, but there are too many moments when actors seem to be speaking over him rather than listening to him, especially during the ‘gentlemen born’ scene where the Shepherdess speaks a version of the Clown’s lines in English while the Clown signs, but converting the language to position it from her own point of view.

    The return to Sicilia suggests the melding of worlds. Sicilia now appears to be predominantly run by women, including Cleomines and Dion (Avita Jay and Mogali Masuku), and Leontes seems to be a much calmer figure, still with a nervous energy that makes sense of his hysteria earlier, but now more grounded, more at peace with himself. And it’s in this vein that he is reunited with Hermione, who the camera stays disappointingly different from while she stands as a statue, surrounded by ceiling-high drapes that keep her partially concealed from the surroundings and render her as part of the backdrop. At the point of awakening, though, the remaining drapes fall to the ground and the family are able to gather around. The conclusion is moving, though weirdly the most highlighted moment is actually the announcement of Paulina’s betrothal to Camillo (Ben Caplan), for which the production slows right down to give it significance. After Leontes announces their engagement, the two turn slowly to one another, walk together, and then suddenly give each other an enormous, emotional embrace, as if suddenly clinging to their only rock in a stormy sea. It doesn’t feel earned by what we’ve seen of them before, but it’s a powerful moment, beautifully delivered.

    This Winter’s Tale doesn’t feel like one that makes a distinctive case for the play. Its moments of striking visual beauty and conceptual movement – as in the Bear attack – are riveting, but the production seems to move from idea to idea without consistency, and lovely ideas such as the remediation of Hermione’s trial are regrettably not followed up on. And in playing such a loud, lively production to an empty theatre, the production set itself a formidable challenge in attempting to create an atmosphere. But at its best, this is a thoughtful, visually rich production, whose austere, statuesque curtain call – no bows, just standing – acknowledges the lack of its physical audience and invites us back to Stratford.

    Thanks to Nora Williams and everyone who took part in the #WTWatchParty including Pascale Aebischer, Thea Buckley, Susanne Greenhalgh, Erin Sullivan, John Wyver and others.

    Posted in Theatre review

    Источник: https://blogs.nottingham.ac.uk/bardathon/2021/04/26/the-winters-tale-rsc-bbc4/

    Contrasts and divisions

    Two different countries

    The Winter's Tale is the play which most significantly breaks the ‘rule' of the Unities, as it not only moves across sixteen years but between Sicilia and Bohemia. This allows Shakespeare to create two different moods – the dark threatening tone of Leontes' jealousy and attack on Hermione, and the light, pleasant mood of the Bohemian sheep-shearing.

    However, the divisions are not really so clear cut. Hermione's playful teasing of both Polixenes and Mamillius brings a lighter side to Sicilia, whilst Polixenes' anger and threats towards Florizel, Perdita and the shepherds brings a darker tone into Bohemia. And of course both places and both moods come together in the last scenes.

    Tragedy and comedy

    Although the divisions are not clear-cut, in many ways The Winter's Tale seems more like a tragedy in the first half and a comedy in the second.

    • In Shakespearean tragedies such as Hamlet, Macbeth and Othello, we witness the disruption of the social order as loyalty between husband and wife, children and parents, kings and subjects, breaks down, symbolising an increasing disorder in the world, and the protagonists are dead by the end of the play
    • In comedies such as As You Like It and Much Ado About Nothing, the plays end in marriages for love, and no-one dies.

    But we should notice that in most Shakespearean plays there is a mixture of comedy and tragedy:

    • In Much Ado About Nothing, as in The Winter's Tale, a lover wrongly suspects his lady of unfaithfulness. He does not kill her, as Othello kills Desdemona, but she is thought to be dead, just as Hermione is
    • In Twelfth Night - a rollicking comedy in many ways - Malvolio is wrongly imprisoned, as is Hermione, and the disguised Viola is almost killed because of her love for Orsino
    • In the tragedy King Lear, the Fool punctuates the narrative with humour
    • Although Hermione does not actually die, there are still two deaths in The Winter's Tale, both caused by Leontes' jealousy: those of Mamillius and Antigonus. For this reason, the play retains the sadness of tragedy even when there is reconciliation at the end.

    Winter and summer

    (See also: The seasons)

    The changing atmosphere between the first and second halves of The Winter in BohemiaWinter's Tale is also indicated to the audience by reference to the changing seasons.

    Winter

    Although there is no mention of snow or wintry weather in the first half of the play, Mamillius' comment (in Act II, sc i) that ‘a sad tale's best for winter' seems to confirm that this is the season in which the first three Acts take place.

    Spring

    When we first move to Bohemia again after Time's intervention, we are greeted (in Act IV, sc iii) by Autolycus, singing of how spring takes over from winter:

    ‘When daffodils begin to peer,
    With heigh! The doxy over the dale,
    Why then comes in the sweet o' the year
    For the red blood reigns in the winter's pale.'

    His song sets the tone for the light-hearted pastoral scene to follow (see also: The Pastoral tradition.). Although his words mention springtime, we find that in Bohemia we have now moved past spring into full summer.

    Summer

    • When we meet the Clown (the young shepherd), he is on his way to buy spices and other special foods for the sheep-shearing feast. In England (and Shakespeare's shepherds are English in their conversation and habits, even though they are supposed to be Bohemian) sheep-shearing took place in early to middle summer
    • When Polixenes meets the sixteen-year-old Perdita, she presents him with summer flowers:

    ‘Here's flowers for you:
    Hot lavender, mints, savory, marjoram,
    The marigold, that goes to bed wi' th' sun
    And with him rises, weeping: these are flowers
    Of middle summer'

    She makes it quite clear that spring has passed, telling the youthful Florizel, Mopsa and Dorcas:

    ‘I would I had some flowers o' th' spring, that might
    Become your time of day….
    bold oxlips and
    The crown imperial; lilies of all kinds,
    The flower-de-luce being one: O these I lack...'

    The sense of summer and the warmth of the sun lasts throughout the scene. Even when the mood changes with Polixenes' threats, the sun still shines, as Perdita says defiantly:

    ‘The selfsame sun that shines upon his court
    Hides not his visage from our cottage, but
    Looks on alike.'

    an idea from Classical Greek drama that plays should not depict longer than a day, not have sub-plots or be set in more than one location

    The 'protagonist' in Greek drama meant the chief contender, or main actor.

    Bringing together those who have been alienated in any way, or being reconciled. Used in the New Testament to express how the actions of Jesus have brought together God and humankind.

    1. Associated with spiritual care 2. A literary work depicting sheperds or rural life.

    Источник: https://crossref-it.info/textguide/the-winters-tale/10/1158

    : Heres flowers for you winters tale

    First bank woodbury tn
    BMW CAR CLUB OF AMERICA
    Heres flowers for you winters tale
    JOSE MOURINHO WIKI
    Heres flowers for you winters tale

    You’re welcome, sir.

    Give me those flowers there, Dorcas. Reverend sirs,

    85For you there’s rosemary and rue; these keep

    Seeming and savour all the winter long:

    Grace and remembrance be to you both,

    And welcome to our shearing!

    You are welcome here, sir. Give me those flowers there, Dorcas. Honored sirs, for you there are rosemary and rue, which keep their appearance and scent all through the winter. May you both have grace and remembrance, and welcome to our shearing!

    PERDITA

    Sir, the year growing ancient,

    Not yet on summer’s death, nor on the birth

    Of trembling winter, the fairest

    95flowers o’ the season

    Are our carnations and streak’d gillyvors,

    Which some call nature’s bastards: of that kind

    Our rustic garden’s barren; and I care not

    To get slips of them.

    PERDITA

    Sir, the year is growing old, with the summer not yet over and the winter not yet starting. The fairest flowers of this season are carnations and two-toned gillyflowers, which some call nature’s bastards. But we don’t have any of those flowers in our garden, and I don’t care to get any cuttings of them.

    POLIXENES

    100Wherefore, gentle maiden,

    Do you neglect them?

    POLIXENES

    Kind maiden, why do you reject them?

    Источник: https://www.sparknotes.com/nofear/shakespeare/winterstale/page_158/

    presentation of art by Shakespeare

    Answers 3
    Add Yours

    Answered by jill d #170087

    Art versus Nature

    What is ‘art’?

    ‘Art’ has various meanings. It does not only mean ‘pictures’ (though it is associated in Perdita’s mind with painting the face: in Shakespearean drama ‘painting’ can mean ‘make-up’). Art can also mean more widely ‘artificiality’ or ‘unnatural powers’.

    There is a contrast in the world of The Winter’s Tale between the court - which, especially through Leontes’ jealousy and plotting, has at times a sense of artificiality and deceit – and the naturalness of the country life of the shepherds. The audience is at various times in the play asked to consider whether:

    •nature is better than art

    •art is better than nature, or just different

    •art is the result of ‘natural’ skill.

    Source(s)

    http://www.crossref-it.info/textguide/The-Winter's-Tale/10/1164

    Answered by jill d #170087

    Natural purity versus artificial beauty (Act IV, sc iv)

    In the sheep-shearing scene (Act IV, sc iv) Perdita engages with Polixenes in a debate about the importance of natural purity versus artificial beauty, asserting that she does not like:

    ‘streak’d gillyvors’ (carnations and pinks)

    ‘which some call nature’s bastards’,

    because

    ‘I have heard it said

    There is an art which, in their piedness’ (mixed colouring) ‘shares

    With great creating nature.’

    Polixenes argues that the gardener’s skill which creates hybrid plants is a natural art:

    ‘Yet nature is made better by no mean

    But nature makes that mean: so, over that sort

    Which you say adds to nature, is an art

    That nature makes….

    The art itself is nature.’

    Although Perdita says that she understands his argument – ‘So it is’ – she still refuses to grow such ‘bastard’ flowers, which are so ‘streak’d’ that they seem artificially painted.

    She herself rejects make-up as unnatural:

    ‘I’ll not put

    The dibble in earth to set one slip of them;

    No more than, were I painted, I would wish

    This youth should say ‘twere well, and only therefore

    Desire to breed by me.’

    Nature versus artifice (Act V, sc iii)

    Later in the play ( Act V, sc iii) the same debate is touched on by Paulina with Leontes, this time in the Sicilian court. Paulina has hidden Hermione for sixteen years, but now presents her as a statue. The sculptor is said (Act V, sc ii) to have such talent that he:

    ‘would beguile Nature of her custom, so perfectly he is her ape’ (i.e. her mimic).

    When the statue is unveiled (Act V, sc iii), the figure of Hermione has ‘her natural posture’ and seems so realistic that Leontes thinks ‘we are mock’d with art’. He asks,

    ‘What fine chisel

    Could ever yet cut breath?’

    Paulina has to reassure him that she is not assisted by ‘wicked powers’, by which she means black magic (an ‘art’ or artificial skill). Leontes worries that it is unlawful art, magic, and he wants it not to be, ie. he thinks that it is not natural but hopes it is lawful

    ‘If this be magic, let it be an art

    Lawful as eating.’

    More on nature versus art in The Tempest: This debate about art and nature is even more noticeable in another Shakespearean Romance play, The Tempest. The main character Prospero, Duke of Milan, is a magician, cast away upon an island with his daughter Miranda, and throughout the play his magic is described as his ‘Art’. Art’ in this heres flowers for you winters tale may be contrasted with nature, implying learnt or ‘artificial’ skills, which Prospero uses to control the natural forces of the island, such the invisible spirits which inhabit it, and also wider natural powers such as the sea and winds.

    Source(s)

    http://www.crossref-it.info/textguide/The-Winter's-Tale/10/1164

    Answered by jill d #170087

    The Winter’s Tale Theme of Art and Culture

    The Winter’s Tale participates in the ages old art vs. nature controversy. At the heart of the debate is the following question: Is artfulness (the creation of paintings, sculptures, plays, songs, etc. to represent the natural world) a good thing? Or does artfulness distort nature? Shakespeare also extends the debate to consider artifice in general, which has some pretty major implications in a play that takes a very self-conscious look at its status as a work of art.

    Quote #1

    PERDITA

    Sir, the year growing ancient,

    Not lionbank com on summer's death, nor on the birth

    Of trembling winter, the fairest Hermione’s statue

    flowers o' the season

    Are our carnations and streak'd gillyvors,

    Which some call nature's bastards: of that kind

    Our rustic garden's barren; and I care not

    To get slips of them.

    POLIXENES

    Wherefore, gentle maiden,

    Do you neglect them?

    PERDITA

    For I have heard it said

    There is an art which in their piedness shares

    With great creating nature.

    POLIXENES

    Say there be;

    Yet nature is made better by no mean

    But nature makes that mean: so, over that art

    Which you say adds to nature, is an art

    That nature makes. You see, sweet maid, we marry

    A gentler scion to the wildest stock,

    And make conceive a bark of baser kind

    By bud of nobler race: this is an art

    Which does mend nature, change it rather, but

    The art itself is nature.

    PERDITA

    So it is. (4.4.6)

    Literary scholars often argue that this conversation about the merits of “gillyvors” is actually a debate about art vs. nature. When Perdita points out that she doesn’t have any “gillyvors” (gillyflowers, or carnations) to offer her guests, Polixenes takes issue with her referring to the cross-bred flowers as “nature’s bastards.” Polixenes argues that crossbred flowers are superior to plain old carnations and that the “art” of grafting is completely “natural.” (“Grafting” is a horticultural practice where a plant’s tissue is fused with another plant in order to create a “hybrid.”) Perdita, on the other hand, prefers flowers that are pure and that haven’t been influenced by the “art” of grafting.

    Quote #2

    POLIXENES

    Then make your garden rich in gillyvors,

    And do not call them bastards.

    PERDITA

    I'll not put

    The dibble in earth to set one slip of them;

    No more than were I painted I would wish

    This youth should say 'twere well and only therefore

    Desire to breed by me. Here's flowers for you;

    Hot lavender, mints, savoury, marjoram;

    The marigold, that goes to bed wi' the sun

    And with him rises weeping: these are flowers

    Of middle summer, and I think they are given

    To men of middle age. You're very welcome. (4.4.4)

    In the previous passage, we saw how, for Polixenes, grafting is a “natural” process while Perdita sees cross-breeding flowers to create a hybrid as “artifice.” In this passage, the debate turns into something quite personal for Perdita. She says she’d no sooner plant a cross-bred gillyflower in her garden than she would “paint” her face with make-up in order to attract a potential husband (Florizel, whose name associates him with the flowers of spring) to “breed” with. By this point in the conversation, grafting seems to have become a metaphor for family relationships. What’s interesting about this is that, here, Polixenes says that grafting or cross-breeding flowers will ultimately produce a “nobler” breed, but when he later learns that his son wants to “graft” himself to (marry) a lowly shepherd’s daughter, he objects. We can take the implied metaphor further by also pointing out that Perdita doesn’t realize she’s been “grafted” to the Old Shepherd’s family (she was adopted).

    Quote #3

    Your high self,

    The gracious mark o' the land, you have obscured

    With a swain's wearing, and me, poor lowly maid,

    Most goddess-like prank'd up: but that our feasts

    In every mess have folly and the feeders

    Digest it with a custom, I should blush

    To see you so attired, sworn, I think,

    To show myself a glass.

    […]

    Even now I tremble

    To think your father, by some accident,

    Should pass this way as you did: O, the Fates!

    How would he look, to see his work so noble

    Vilely bound up? What would he say? Or how

    Should I, in these my borrow'd flaunts, behold

    The sternness of his presence? (4.4.1-2)

    Perdita is pretty self-conscious about being dressed up in an artificial “Queen of the Feast” costume (when she thinks she’s nothing more than a lowly shepherd’s daughter) and she says as much in the play. While Perdita thinks it’s wrong for her to dress up as something that she’s not, the audience understands city bank lubbock texas phone number her festival costume actually speaks to her true nature or identity (the princess and future Queen of Sicily).

    Source(s)

    http://www.shmoop.com/winters-tale/art-culture-quotes.html


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    Источник: https://www.gradesaver.com/the-winters-tale/q-and-a/analyse-the-presentation-of-art-by-shakespeare-in-winters-tale-72609

    Flowers Shakespeare Famous Quotes & Sayings

    List of top 31 famous quotes and sayings about flowers shakespeare to read and share with friends on your Facebook, Twitter, blogs.

    Top 31 Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare

    #1. Then, were not summer's distillation left
    A liquid prisoner pent in walls of glass,
    Beauty's effect with beauty were bereft,
    Nor it nor no remembrance what it was.
    But flowers distilled, though they with winter meet,
    Leese but their show; their substance still lives sweet. - Author: William Shakespeare
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1207502
    #2. These flowers are heres flowers for you winters tale the pleasures of the world. - Author: William Shakespeare
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1835683
    #3. The tender spring upon thy tempting lip
    Shows thee unripe; yet mayst thou well be tasted:
    Make use of time, let not advantage slip;
    Beauty within itself should not be wasted:
    Fair usps office open today that are not gather'd in their prime
    Rot and consume themselves in little time. - Author: William Shakespeare
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1806006
    #4. They'd be complaining about having to walk, and screeching at me to 'do something, Freddy, do something!'"
    "But what could you do?" she said, puzzled.
    "Carry them, probably." He gave her a hopeful look. "Do you want me to carry you? - Author: Anne Gracie
    heres flowers for you winters tale About Flowers Shakespeare #1768046" width="640px" height="430px">
    #5. I know a bank where the wild thyme blows,
    Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows,
    Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine,
    With sweet musk-roses and with eglantine. - Author: William Shakespeare
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1667505
    #6. Sweet flowers are slow and weeds make haste. - Author: William Shakespeare
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1649189
    #7. Wouldn't you like to contribute to an event that is part of Christ's own prediction, "I will build my church"? - Author: Charles R. Swindoll
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1633180
    #8. Flowers grow best on dungheaps, as Shakespeare never tires of saying. - Author: J.M. Coetzee
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1572928
    #9. Plan for the day when all your plans fail, when those you trust betray you, when your certainty cracks like a rotten egg and you are alone in the storm. - Author: Robert Ferrigno
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1553886
    #10. Where souls do couch on flowers we'll hand in hand . - Author: William Shakespeare
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1549616
    #11. The heart is like a cave; the deeper you go the more you find. - Author: Matshona Dhliwayo
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1521970
    #12. Because I'm not a bad guy, Nico. Gert couldn't have loved me if I was. I realize that now. - Author: Brian K. Vaughan
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1438966
    #13. Here's flowers for you; hot lavender, mints, savory, marjoram; The marigold. The Instacart vs amazon fresh Tale, Act 4, Sc.4 - Author: William Shakespeare
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1274499
    #14. He was met even now As mad as the vex'd sea; singing aloud; Crown'd with rank fumiter and furrow-weeds, With bur-docks, hemlock, nettles, cuckoo-flowers, Darnel, and all the idle weeds that grow In our sustaining corn. - Author: William Shakespeare
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1255468
    #15. A person could see a lot without ever leaving his own living room. Especially if he had the right tools. - Author: Stephen King
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1248756
    #16. Sir, the year growing ancient,
    Not yet on summer's death nor on the birth
    Of trembling winter, the fairest flowers o' th' season
    Are our carnations and streaked gillyvors,
    Which some call nature's bastards. - Author: William Shakespeare
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1244431
    #17. Feeling and experiencing infinity within this finite body, living timelessness within the time span of life - this is what you are here for - Author: Sri Sri Ravi Shankar
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #265042
    #18. The best way to find Christmas; open your heart and your feet will get wings. - Author: Kristian Goldmund Aumann
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1145057
    #19. In emerald tufts, flowers purple, blue and white;
    Like sapphire, pearl, and rich embroidery,
    Buckled below fair knighthood's bending knee;
    Fairies use flower for their charactery. - Author: William Shakespeare
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #1126047
    #20. Pain teaches, Par'chin, Jardir had once told heres flowers for you winters tale, and so we give it freely. Pleasure teaches nothing, and so must be earned. - Author: Peter V. Brett
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #922633
    #21. Of all the flowers, me thinks a rose is best. - Author: William Shakespeare
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #896785
    #22. You'd be so lean, that blast of January
    Would blow you through and through. Now, my fair'st friend,
    I would I had some flowers o' the spring that might
    Become your time of day. - Author: William Shakespeare
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #823139
    #23. Crowns and thrones are all bodies which rise and perish and leave the world as it is. - Author: Auliq Ice
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #801230
    #24. Keep The Drama In Your Books, Not Your Life." - The Cartel Publications. - Author: T. Styles
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #798799
    #25. I had become conscious of my physicality, aware of my presence and open to the ugly truths of the world. At the age of thirteen, I realised that there was a danger in innocence and beauty, and I could not live with both. - Author: Tracey Emin
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #638202
    #26. All the English flowers came from Shakespeare. I don't know what we did before his time.
    The Secret Places of the Heart - Author: H.G.Wells
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #606589
    #27. Mankind censure injustice fearing that they may be the victims of it, and not because they shrink from committing it. - Author: Plato
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #431545
    #28. O friendship, I too will press flowers between the pages of Shakespeare's sonnets! - Author: Virginia Woolf
    heres flowers for you winters tale About Flowers Shakespeare #335958" width="640px" height="430px">
    #29. Fairies use flowers for their charactery. - Author: William Shakespeare
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #320603
    #30. If we don't rebuild that connection with people we will really find even bigger gaps, because our gap on inequality is not heres flowers for you winters tale economic. - Author: Hillary Clinton
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #319200
    #31. His steeds to water at those springs On chaliced flowers that lies; And winking Mary-buds begin To ope their golden eyes: With heres flowers for you winters tale thing that pretty is, My lady sweet, arise. - Author: William Shakespeare
    Quotes About Flowers Shakespeare #267770

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    Источник: https://quotestats.com/topic/quotes-about-flowers-shakespeare/

    Contrasts and divisions

    Two different countries

    The Winter's Tale is the play which most significantly breaks the ‘rule' of the Unities, as it not only moves across sixteen years but between Sicilia and Bohemia. This allows Shakespeare to create two different moods – the dark threatening tone of Leontes' jealousy and attack on Hermione, and the light, pleasant mood of the Bohemian sheep-shearing.

    However, the divisions are not really so clear cut. Hermione's playful teasing of both Polixenes and Mamillius brings a lighter side to Sicilia, whilst Polixenes' anger and threats towards Florizel, Perdita and the shepherds brings a darker tone into Bohemia. And of course both places and both moods come together in the last scenes.

    Tragedy and comedy

    Although the divisions are not clear-cut, in many ways The Winter's Tale seems more like a tragedy in the first half and a comedy in the second.

    • In Shakespearean tragedies such as Hamlet, Macbeth and Othello, we witness the disruption of the social order as loyalty between husband and wife, children and parents, kings and subjects, breaks down, symbolising an increasing disorder in the world, and the protagonists are dead by the end of the play
    • In comedies such as As You Like It and Much Ado About Nothing, the plays end in marriages for love, and no-one dies.

    But we should notice that in most Shakespearean plays there is a mixture of comedy and tragedy:

    • In Much Ado About Nothing, as in The Winter's Tale, a lover wrongly suspects his lady of unfaithfulness. He does not kill her, as Othello kills Desdemona, but she is thought to be dead, just as Hermione is
    • In Twelfth Night - a rollicking comedy in many ways - Malvolio is wrongly imprisoned, as is Hermione, and the disguised Viola is almost killed because of her love for Orsino
    • In the tragedy King Lear, the Fool punctuates the narrative with humour
    • Although Hermione does not actually die, there are still two deaths in The Winter's Tale, both caused by Leontes' jealousy: those of Mamillius and Antigonus. For this reason, the play retains the sadness of tragedy even when there is reconciliation at the end.

    Winter and summer

    (See also: The seasons)

    The changing atmosphere between the first and second halves of The Winter in BohemiaWinter's Tale is also indicated to the audience by reference to the changing seasons.

    Winter

    Although there is no mention of snow or wintry weather in the first half of the play, Mamillius' comment (in Act II, sc i) that ‘a sad tale's best for winter' seems to confirm that this is the season in which the first three Acts take place.

    Spring

    When we first move to Bohemia again after Time's intervention, we are greeted (in Act IV, sc iii) by Autolycus, singing of how spring takes over from winter:

    ‘When daffodils begin to peer,
    With heigh! The doxy over the dale,
    Why then comes in the sweet o' the year
    For the red blood reigns in the winter's pale.'

    His song sets the tone for the light-hearted pastoral scene to follow (see also: The Pastoral tradition.). Although his words mention springtime, we find that in Bohemia we have now moved past spring into full summer.

    Summer

    • When we meet the Clown (the young shepherd), he is on his way to buy spices and other special foods for the sheep-shearing feast. In England (and Shakespeare's shepherds are English in their conversation and habits, even though they heres flowers for you winters tale supposed to be Bohemian) sheep-shearing took place in early to middle summer
    • When Polixenes meets the sixteen-year-old Perdita, she presents him with summer flowers:

    ‘Here's flowers for you:
    Hot lavender, mints, savory, marjoram,
    The marigold, that goes to bed wi' th' sun
    And with him rises, weeping: these are flowers
    Of middle summer'

    She makes it quite clear that spring has passed, telling the youthful Florizel, Mopsa and Dorcas:

    ‘I would I had some flowers o' th' spring, that might
    Become your time of day&hellip.
    bold oxlips and
    The crown imperial; lilies of all kinds,
    The flower-de-luce being one: O these I lack.'

    The sense of summer and the warmth of the sun lasts throughout the scene. Even when the mood changes with Polixenes' threats, the sun still shines, as Perdita says defiantly:

    ‘The selfsame sun that shines upon his court
    Hides not his visage from our cottage, but
    Looks on alike.'

    an idea from Classical Greek drama that plays should not depict longer than a day, not have sub-plots or be set in more than one location

    The 'protagonist' in Greek drama meant the chief contender, or main actor.

    Bringing together those who have been alienated in any way, or being reconciled. Used in the New Testament to express how the actions of Jesus have brought together God and humankind.

    1. Associated with spiritual care 2. A literary work depicting sheperds or rural life.

    Источник: https://crossref-it.info/textguide/the-winters-tale/10/1158
    macys card online bill pay Rosemary and Rue, herbs that on two occasions Shakespeare placed near to one another.


    “For att text pay my bill there’s rosemary and rue …
    Grace and remembrance be to you both,”

    - The Winter’s Tale, Act IV, Scene 3


    “There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance; pray you love, remember .

      there’s rue for you, and here’s some for me: we may call it herb-grace o’ Sundays: 

    O, you must wear your rue with a difference”

    - Hamlet, Act IV, Scene 5

     

    Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalus)



    Rosemary for remembrance, Shakespeare garden
    Rosemary in bloom

    Rosemary has been associated with remembrance since ancient Greece where students would wear garlands of rosemary whilst studying to aid their memories. Its botanical name comes from the Latin meaning “dew of the sea”, a reference to its blue flowers and its original habitat on the coasts of the Mediterranean. In Shakespeare’s day it was highly valued and had a variety of uses. It was used in cooking, in floor strewings, it was distilled to make medicinal simples and when grown tall its stems were used to make lutes.

    As an evergreen Rosemary represented both remembrance and constancy and played a part in both Elizabethan weddings and funerals. The 17th century poet Robert Herrick wrote “Grow it for two ends, it matters not at all, Be it for my bridal or burial.” At weddings Rosemary was carried by the bridesmaids and sprigs of it were strewn on the ground. As a symbol of fidelity the Nurse in Romeo and Juliet remarks:



    "Doth not rosemary and Romeo begin both with a letter?"

    - Romeo and Juliet, Act II, Scene 4


    There was an old folk belief that if a man could not smell Rosemary he was incapable of loving a woman.

    Rosemary also formed part of burial wreaths, which later appear when Juliet is thought to have died.


    “Dry up your tears, and stick your rosemary
    On this fair corse”


    - Romeo and Juliet, Act IV, Scene 5

    No doubt another reason for Shakespeare using it earlier in the play was to foreshadow the future tragic events.

    Rosemary from Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare garden
    Scene from Romeo and Juliet
    Sir Thomas Moore wrote  

    “As for Rosemarie I let it run alle over my garden walls, not onlie because my bees love it, but because tis the herb scared to remembrance and therefore to friendship, whence a sprig of it hath a dumb language that maketh it the chosen emblem at our funeral wakes and in our burial grounds.”


    Type:Perennial Evergreen

    Height:1 to 6 feet

    Flowers:Summer

     Rue (Ruta graveolens)

     

    Rue for a Shakespeare Garden
    Rue

     

     “Here did she fall a tear; here in this place,
    I’ll set a bank of rue, sour herb of grace;
    Rue, even for ruth here shortly shall be seen
    In the remembrance of a weeping queen.”

    - Richard II, Act III, Scene 4

    Rue has a strong aromatic smell and a bitter taste. The first part of its botanical name comes from the Greek reuo, meaning to set free. In ancient times it was thought to be an antidote for poison and disease, in Elizabethan England it was carried around as protection against the plague and witchcraft and was used in herbal strewings to repel insects. Due to its bitter taste the plant has long been symbolic of sorrow, regret and repentance, hence the expression “you’ll rue the day” meaning “you’ll be sorry for this.” When Ophelia hands it to Queen Gertrude in Hamlet, it is a subtle rebuke of her faithlessness.

    Another name for the plant was Herb of Grace or Herb Grace o’ Sundays as it was used in the early Catholic Church heres flowers for you winters tale sprinkle holy water and to wash away sins. The word ruth comes from the word rue and more usually meant to feel pity for or to grieve.

    In large doses Rue is toxic and is not generally recommended for internal use. It may also be dangerous to grow in your garden if you have pets. In medieval times it was sometimes used to hasten labour or in extreme cases as an abortifacient. This has led to speculation that when Ophelia utters the lines "there's rue for you, and here's some for me", she is confessing to an unwanted pregnancy, revealing another reason for ending her life.


    Type: Perennial Evergreen

    Height: 20 to 34 inches


    Flowers: Summer

    Источник: https://bardgarden.blogspot.com/2014/10/rosemary-and-rue.html

    Winter's Tale

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