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How is ginger tea good for you


how is ginger tea good for you

The health benefits are diminished in the jarred version, and preservatives are typically added. Since this tea is all about immunity boosting. Ginger tea aids digestion, helps soothe upset stomachs, and can reduce nausea. It might offer some relief to women with morning sickness as well. We love this tea not only for its refreshing flavour, but for the warmth and comfort we experience after each cup, especially in winter. You may also like.

How is ginger tea good for you -

Ginger Root Tea

"The fact that this tea was made using fresh ginger root made it incredibly appealing. I made a batch of tea in under 25 minutes, boiling the ginger for the full 20 minutes, and the flavor was great! It'll surely be my new beverage of choice when it gets colder out." —Victoria Heydt

  • 2tablespoons fresh ginger root (about 2 inches)

  • 4cupswater

  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice (juice of 1/2 lime), optional

  • 1 to 2tablespoonshoney, to taste

  1. Gather the ingredients.

  2. Prepare the fresh ginger by peeling it and slicing it thinly to maximize the surface area. This will help you make a very flavorful ginger tea.

  3. In a 1 1/4-quart pot, add the water and ginger, and bring to a boil for at least 10 minutes. For a stronger and tangier tea, allow to boil for 20 minutes or more, and use more slices of ginger.

  4. Remove it from the heat, strain, and add the lime juice and honey to taste. Enjoy your ginger tea.

Tips

  • The secret to the perfect ginger tea is lots and lots of fresh ginger, simmered for a long time to bring out the flavor. You really can't overdo it, so feel free to add as much ginger as you want and keep it simmering for as long as you want.
  • The roots are typically about 1 inch in diameter, and a 2-inch section should yield about 2 tablespoons of sliced ginger. When measuring by weight, a 2-inch segment should be about 1/2 ounce.
  • If you have leftover ginger root, you can freeze it to use later.
  • For tea throughout the week, make a big batch by doubling or tripling the recipe. Store the tea in a sealed container in the refrigerator. Drink it cold or heat it up one cup at a time within a week for the freshest taste.
  • When storing ginger tea, you may notice some sediment form. It's common for particles from the strained ginger to settle, and it's safe to drink. To avoid it, strain the tea through one or two layers of cheesecloth.

Recipe Variations

  • Sweeten the tea with agave nectar rather than honey. You can also enjoy this tea unsweetened, depending on your health goals or personal taste.
  • Try this recipe with brown rice syrup or monk fruit as an alternative sweetener.
  • Switch from lime to lemon juice; fresh is best for either. Both citrus fruits are great flavor companions to ginger and give the tea a hint of vitamin C.

Does Ginger Need to Be Peeled Before Making Tea?

Peeling ginger root is not necessary and a matter of personal preference. Many people never peel the root, especially for a recipe like ginger tea when it's not consumed. Others prefer to peel older roots and leave the younger roots intact. If you choose to leave the peel, be sure to rinse and scrub the root thoroughly to remove any dirt or debris.

What Are the Health Benefits of Ginger Tea?

For many people, ginger tea is a favorite way to reap the benefits of ginger root. The spice has long played a role in traditional medicine, particularly as a digestive aid for things like upset stomach, nausea, and constipation relief. However, for some people, ginger can provoke gastrointestinal problems. Ginger also has anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant properties, and may offer relief from headaches, colds, and pain caused by inflammation. Researchers continue to look at its possible benefits for various diseases. While there are few side effects to drinking ginger tea, it's always a good idea to discuss it with your doctor.

This Warming Turmeric Tea Is Spiced With Ginger, Cinnamon, and Citrus

Источник: https://www.thespruceeats.com/homemade-ginger-tea-3377239

Discover our full range of health benefit guides and find out more about the health benefits of ginger. Also check out some of our delicious ginger recipes, from meaty mains to creamy ice-cream.

What is the history of ginger tea?

Ginger tea has a long history dating back to China some 5,000 years ago, where it was traditionally used as a health tonic. Ginger was introduced to Europe much later, originally as a culinary spice.

What are the 6 main health benefits of ginger tea?

1. May help to ease digestive discomfort

Ginger tea is probably most well-known for its potential to soothe digestive issues, and in particular for helping ease nausea. One study even suggests it may be just as effective as some medications, but with fewer side effects, in the case of morning sickness.

2. Anti-inflammatory

Ginger contains key phytonutrients known as gingerols, and research has shown that these can have an antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effect which, when drunk as a tea, may help support a healthy microbiome.

3. May help to reduce blood pressure

A 2017 study found that those who consume ginger on a daily basis had a decreased risk of hypertension. While the study didn’t look specifically at ginger tea, it may be useful to consume ginger tea if you have high blood pressure.

4. May aid weight loss

There have been a few studies into the benefits of ginger when it comes to weight and obesity. A review of this research highlighted that ginger may have a positive impact on obesity through a number of different mechanisms, including appetite control and increasing thermogenesis (heat production). Again, this research is not specific to ginger tea, but it may be beneficial to include ginger tea as part of a balanced diet.

5. Ease headaches and migraines

There’s been a fair amount of research into ginger and its pain-relieving properties, including its potential benefit for those who struggle with headaches and migraines. Drinking ginger tea, therefore, may also help both prevent and relieve headaches.

6. Antioxidant rich

Ginger is high in antioxidants and has been shown to have antiproliferative effects on tumour cells, in particular pancreatic and colon cancer – consuming ginger tea regularly may offer a preventative effect.

Is ginger tea suitable for everyone?

Ginger has a distinctive taste and so, quite literally, may not be everyone’s cup of tea!

Some people may experience side effects from drinking ginger tea, such as bloating or heartburn, and because of its potential blood pressure-lowering effects, it should be consumed in moderation by those with low blood pressure or on any blood pressure medications.

How do I include ginger tea in my diet?

Ginger tea can be consumed at any time of day. It works well as a pick-me-up first thing in the morning, but you may also find it helps after a meal to ease digestion.

You can add fresh lemon or honey, or buy different flavoured tea bags, such as lemon and ginger or ginger green tea.

Want more inspiration?
Our best ever tea recipes
Ginger recipe collection
How does food affect migraines?


This article was published on 17th June 2020.

Nicola Shubrook is a nutritional therapist and works with both private clients and the corporate sector. She is an accredited member of the British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) and the Complementary & Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC). Find out more at urbanwellness.co.uk.

All health content on bbcgoodfood.com is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other healthcare professional. If you have any concerns about your general health, you should contact your local healthcare provider. See our terms and conditions for more information.

Источник: https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/health-benefits-ginger-tea

The Power 3 Combination: Ginger, Lemon, and Honey

Ginger, lemon, and honey tea has commonly been used to handle colds and sinus infections. All of these ingredients contain powerful anti-inflammatory properties. Lemon juice provides powerful digestive enzymes while ginger stimulates digestion. Honey has a natural scraping effect on the intestines (clearing away toxic build-up).

In Ayurveda, the digestive fire is considered to be the cornerstone of health. Without it, the entire bodily system cannot function properly. Thus, the use of spices and warm foods is commonly used in this ancient medical system of India.

Ginger naturally warms the body, supporting circulation and lowering high blood pressure. This pungent root has been used for thousands of years to treat ailments such as colds, migraines, nausea, arthritis, and hypertension. It has also been known to be helpful in relieving indigestion & constipation and improving blood circulation & nutrient absorption.

Studies on Ingredients

Studies Show that Ginger Benefits May Include:

  1. improve overall cardiovascular healthy
  2. improve gastrointestinal health
  3. alleviate muscle pain that arises after intense workouts.
  4. help with motion sickness
  5. help with morning sickness
  6. help with Colic
  7. help settle an upset stomach
  8. help with alleviating gas
  9. help with alleviate bloating
  10. help with alleviate heartburn

Studies Show that Lemon:

  1. is a secretagogue—a substance that promotes secretion—which encourages the liquidation of mucus.
  2. is a source of antioxidants and nutrients. The sour taste stimulates the digestive fire which is important for cleansing, alkalizing and detoxing.
  3. may promote hydration
  4. may prevent kidney stones
  5. may support in weight loss
  6. may aid in digestions
  7. may improve skin detoxing and health

Studies Show that Honey:

  1. contains a large amount of antioxidants which are helpful in removing free radicals from the body. (The presence of free radicals has been linked to a number of chronic health issues.)
  2. contains a number of trace minerals and vitamins like calcium, magnesium, potassium, phosphorous, and zinc.
  3. may help with lowering blood pressure
  4. may help improve cholesterol
  5. may help lower triglycerides

Our Handcrafted Ginger Elixirs

ImmuneSchein's Classic Ginger Elixir contains just these three powerful ingredients—organic lemon juice, organic ginger root, and wildflower honey. With our ImmuneSchein Ginger Elixirs, we’ve done the chopping, slicing, cutting, and preparation for you—so all you have to do is add the elixir into hot water for a tea, cold water for a lemonade, sparkling water for a ginger ale, or even add with apple cider vinegar to create your own fire cider, which we refer to as Fire Schein here.

The flexibility of our elixirs allows you to create many different recipes for drinks, cocktails, mocktails, cooking, baking, and more. With digestion-enhancing ginger, detoxifying lemon, and weight-loss promoting honey, this powerful drink is sure to kick start your day.

Источник: https://immune-schein.com/blogs/news/ginger-lemon-honey-benefits-uses-and-history

You’ve probably heard of using ginger as a remedy to ease an upset stomach—remember drinking ginger ale when you had a stomach bug as a kid? Some of us even turn to ginger to calm prerace jitters or aid indigestion.

Lately, the zesty root is popping up everywhere—there are ginger-flavored energy gels, chews, and drink mixes available for athletes—and some people are swapping lemon water for ginger water, or mixing ground ginger into water, tea, or postworkout smoothies as a “detox.”

Which makes us wonder, are there really any benefits to drinking ginger water as a detox or just simply to boost your overall health? We tapped Kelly Jones, M.S., R.D. and Lori Nedescu, M.S., R.D., to find out.

The Claim:

Drinking ginger water or ginger water mixed with lemon is an effective way to reduce nausea and inflammation and detoxify the body.

The Evidence:

Because detoxification naturally happens through your organs and body processes—not from something you ingest—Jones explains, there is no scientific evidence that ginger water has detoxifying benefits.

That said, drinking ginger water can have other health benefits, especially for athletes. Adding ginger to your water may ease or prevent stomach issues if you feel sick before, during, or after a particularly intense workout. That’s because gingerols—the chemical compounds found in ginger—aid the digestion process to help alleviate nausea, according to a study published in 2015 in Phytochemistry.

“Ginger is known for easing stomach distress and many athletes experience frequent GI issues. Research is limited, but ginger has also been linked to having potential anti-inflammatory properties, increasing satiety, easing anxiety, and controlling blood sugar,” Nedescu tells Bicycling. Research shows that taking in 1,500 mg of ground ginger daily in small doses may be beneficial for nausea.

And because it’s natural, it’s a good choice for those undergoing chemotherapy treatment or during pregnancy, Jones tells Bicycling.

Some of us can also experience a lack of appetite after exercise, so ginger water that contains added sugar can be helpful after a race or tough workout to replenish carbohydrates while lessening nausea, says Jones.

Ginger also has anti-inflammatory effects, which can benefit all athletes, especially those with joint pain, according to a study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, where subjects with knee pain were given either ginger extract or a placebo twice daily. Those who took the ginger supplement reported a 13 percent higher reduction in pain than those given the placebo.Researchers also found that those who consumed two grams of raw ginger daily were 25 percent less sore one day after performing eccentric exercises—the “lowering down” part of exercises such as leg lifts, pushups, or bicep curls—than those who didn’t.

One undisputed benefit? Hydration. “If adding fresh ginger to your water helps you hydrate more, then that is likely the most beneficial aspect of drinking ginger water,” says Nedescu. Since the taste of ginger can be polarizing (you either love it or hate it), Jones says incorporating ginger water into your diet can be a good way to reap the health benefits without the bitter taste, since it’s diluted in water.

As for any other health claims, some studies, (such as one published in the Saudi Medical Journal that found those who consumed 3g of ground ginger per day saw reduced levels of triglycerides and LDL, bad, cholesterol, which can up stroke risk) have shown ginger to benefit blood glucose and cholesterol levels, as well as menstrual cramps, but more research is needed, Jones says.

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The Verdict:

There isn’t much research on drinking ginger water in particular, so you don’t need to suddenly rush to add it to your morning routine. But there certainly are some health benefits of ginger you can reap, and it won’t hurt you to incorporate it into your diet. So if you’re curious—or simply like the taste of ginger—go for it, Nedescu says.

Try adding up to 4g raw ginger a day, which studies have found to be the suggested safe maximum dosage, though Jones says 2g is the more-commonly recommended dosage for decreasing nausea.

To make measuring easy, 1 teaspoon of ground ginger (which translates to about 2 grams) is a safe amount to mix into water, tea, or even a smoothie if using ginger to calm nausea or provide potential anti-inflammatory benefits, Jones explains. Minor side effects such as heartburn or a burning sensation in the mouth are possible. To prevent this, avoid drinking it on an empty stomach, Nedescu says.

One way Nedescu suggests to drink it: Add ginger, lemon, a pinch of salt, and honey to water for a great homemade sports drink.

Jordan SmithDigital EditorJordan Smith is a writer and editor with over 5 years of experience reporting on health and fitness news and trends.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Источник: https://www.bicycling.com/health-nutrition/a29108878/health-benefits-of-ginger-water/

I Consumed Fresh Ginger Every Day For 1 Week, and These Were the Results

I've always loved the flavor of ginger. Spicy and pungent, it is delicious in tea form and almost completely cuts the bitterness of vegetables in fresh juices and smoothies (adding ginger is basically the only way I can stomach beets in my juices). And while I've always known it's frequently used to aid digestion, I will humbly admit I had no idea the spice boasts such a sprawling list of medicinal benefits. The experts say ginger root is a stellar anti-inflammatory, improves heart health, eases nausea and motion sickness, helps expel free radicals from the body, and is even linked with lowering cholesterol.

If this spicy root has this much power, I just had to test it out. I decided to consume fresh ginger every day for seven days. While there are many ways to consume it, I opted to head straight to my juicer each morning for a ginger and lemon shot and continued my ritual with a cup of homemade ginger tea at night. Whipping up the tea is easy; you simply pour a cup of boiling water over a hunk of raw ginger and let it sit for a few minutes.

Источник: https://www.popsugar.com/fitness/What-Happens-When-You-Drink-Ginger-Tea-Every-Day-45018663

It's no surprise that tea consumption has been popular for centuries, not only because of health benefits, but also because of the wide variety of flavors and aromas to choose from. Settling in with a good book and drinking a steaming hot cup of tea helps to relax and rejuvenate the senses while increasing your wellbeing.

One of the most popular infusions, and most widely known as a natural remedy for nausea, is ginger tea. Fresh ginger has long been a go-to solution for helping to settle an upset stomach, but ginger offers an extensive array of health benefits that go beyond stomach health.

Used by traditional Chinese and Indian Ayurvedic medicine as a way to connect with spirituality, ginger has health benefits for both the body and the mind. With the potential to regulate blood sugar levels, increase immunity and reduce pain, drinking ginger tea is a great way to stay healthy and live well.

What Is Ginger Tea?

Originating in South Asia, ginger tea is now produced mainly by China and India although it is also cultivated in the Caribbean, East Africa, Brazil and Jamaica. Ginger tea is made using the stem or root of the Zingiber officinale plant, which is closely related to other strong-flavored plants including cardamom and turmeric.

Harvesting

Fresh ginger is harvested once the plant starts to wither and the root is washed and scraped to prevent new growth. You can buy ginger root or ginger powder at your local grocery store and make your own ginger tea or opt for ginger tea in teabag form. If buying your own fresh ginger root, look for roots that are smooth and without wrinkles, which can indicate the ginger is older and less flavorful.

Taste

Ginger tea has a spicy and fragrant flavor that can be a bit intense to new palates. If ginger has too much of a kick for your taste buds, you can use lemon or honey to tone down the spice. Ginger tea can be described as having a warm, peppery and sweet flavor with a piquant smell.

Health Benefits of Ginger Tea

1. Combats Nausea

Ginger has been used for centuries as a cure for nausea and vomiting caused by morning sickness and motion sickness. A study undertaken in Thailand found that when given 1 milligram of ginger daily, 28 out of 32 participants felt an improvement in nausea related to pregnancy. The study found that there were no detectable adverse effects on the pregnant women(1).

Another study published in the Supportive Care in Cancer Journal showed that ginger was effective in treating symptoms of nausea during chemotherapy treatments for cancer. The study found the most effective dosage to be between .5 and 1 milligram of ginger (2). One cup of ginger tea contains an average of 250 milligrams of ginger, so you should drink two to four cups of ginger tea per day to get the best results when it comes to curing feelings of nausea (3) The tea may also help soothe tummy discomfort caused by bloating and cramps.

2. Builds Immunity

Ginger can give your immune system the extra boost it needs to tackle an oncoming flu or to battle a full-fledged case of the common cold. Ginger contains the biological compounds gingerol and shogaol that fight to eliminate free radicals and toxins that can cause you to get sick in the first place.

Ginger tea also contains antibacterial properties that help fight of the bacteria that can cause disease. Furthermore, the spicy kick in ginger can help to loosen chest congestion that leads to coughs and soothe a sore throat by reducing inflammation. Ginger contains high levels of vitamin C and magnesium that help to kick colds faster.

3. Improves Respiratory System

If you suffer from allergies, drinking ginger tea can be a soothing way to relieve the respiratory effects of your allergies. Allergic rhinitis is simply an overreaction of the immune system to common stimuli. Ginger works to prevent the immune system response that causes wheezing, itchy and watery eyes and sneezing.

One of the main components of ginger's allergy-fighting abilities is the compound 6-gingerol (4). This compound blocks the activation of T-cells, which are responsible for the immune system’s overreaction to normal stimuli. In a 2016 study conducted on mice, mice that received a diet containing 2 percent powdered ginger sneezed an average of 2.1 times versus the 15.2 times of the placebo group (5).

While there haven't been any studies on human subjects yet, the results from animal studies have shown promise in treating allergic reactions with ginger. In essence, ginger acts as an antihistamine that can relieve nasal congestion and sneezing, making springtime and daily allergies less debilitating.

Ginger is also beneficial in supporting overall lung health and has been used for 2,500 years as a healing root. Ginger helps to eliminate mucus, clearing the airways and making it easier to breathe. It also reduces inflammation that can cause wheezing and constricted feelings in the chest and throat (6).

4. Supports Blood Circulation

Healthy blood circulation can prevent dangerous illnesses such as blood clots. Drinking ginger tea can help keep circulation running at optimal levels, ensuring your body can perform the functions it needs to stay healthy. Ginger is a vasodilator that opens blood vessels and allows blood to flow through more easily.

Ginger contains amino acids, vitamins and minerals that improve circulation and protect heart health. By blocking fat absorption, ginger reduces the risk of heart disease by limiting build-up in arteries. Ginger contains the compounds gingerol and zingerone, which work as warming agents that effectively increase blood flow. Ginger's ability to decrease inflammation also helps to relax smooth muscle tissue in arteries and veins, thus improving circulation (7).

5. Aids in Weight Loss

If you want to lose weight faster, you may want to consider drinking ginger tea as part of your regular routine. While studies like the one published in the European Journal of Nutrition have found that drinking tea aids in weight loss in general, ginger has special compounds that make weight loss easier (8).

Ginger can aid weight loss by making it easier for the digestive system to break down fats and by blocking fat absorption in the intestines. The same compounds that allow ginger to ease nausea are the ones that enable enhanced efficiency in the digestive tract.

In a review of 27 articles, most of the experimental studies proved that ginger root played a role in accelerating weight loss. While clinical studies had more limited results, the potential for ginger to accelerate metabolism and control appetite make drinking ginger tea a good addition to a healthy diet and exercise regimen (9).

6. Reduces Pain and Inflammation

Many people suffer from aches and pains caused by exercise or a chronic disease. Consuming ginger tea may help to ease muscle pain and joint pain associated with arthritis, menstrual cramps, and osteoarthritis. The main reason behind this health benefit is the anti-inflammatory properties of ginger root.

A study published in Arthritis and Rheumatism in 2001 showed that ginger tea aided in pain relief when it came to sufferers of osteoarthritis. The study focused specifically on knee pain and 63 percent of the 247 participants felt a marked reduction in their osteoarthritis pain (10).

Ginger has also shown promise when it comes to alleviating pain caused by menstrual discomfort. A Shahed University study analyzed the effects of ginger root on 120 student residents attending the university. The students who were given 500 milligrams of ginger root powder for five days showed decreased intensity and pain duration associated with cramps compared to the control group who received a placebo (11).

7. Regulates Blood Sugar

With rates of diabetes on the rise, more and more researchers are pouring time and effort into finding solutions and preventions for the disease. Ginger tea has shown promising results when it comes to treating diabetes by regulation of blood sugar levels.

A study by the Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences analyzed 88 people who had been living with diabetes for 10 years or more. The participants who were given 1 gram of ginger powder three times daily showed decreases in blood sugar levels after the eight-week study. The researchers believe ginger helps to regulate blood sugar by inhibiting the enzyme that breaks down glycogen, which can lead to blood sugar spikes (12).

It's also important to note that the study was conducted alongside the traditional medications the diabetic participants were prescribed by their doctors. So while drinking ginger tea won't necessarily cure diabetes, it can help to regulate blood sugar levels.

8. Supports Healthy Cholesterol Levels

One of the leading causes of death in the United States is heart disease. Contributing factors include smoking, high cholesterol and an unhealthy diet. Fortunately, if you suffer from high cholesterol and want to get healthier, ginger tea may be able to help.

Drinking ginger tea can help to lower dangerous triglycerides and LDL cholesterol, known as bad cholesterol. Ginger tea can increase circulation and reduce inflammation in arteries while reducing cholesterol, thus alleviating the risk of build-up in arteries that can cause blood clots and heart attacks (13).

9. Supports Brain Health

Consuming ginger tea can improve cognitive performance in middle-aged individuals, treat dementia, and can help to prevent neurological diseases such Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's. Most of these benefits have been attributed to the anti-inflammatory properties of the ginger root (14).

A 2011 Thai study gave 60 middle-aged women doses of 400 to 800 milligrams of ginger extract for two months while using computerized and auditory tests to monitor brain function. At the end of the study, the women who received ginger extract showed enhanced working memory and faster cognitive processing. The study also demonstrated an increased power of attention and better quality of memory (15).

A 2013 animal study also found a connection between the use of ginger root and reduced Alzheimer's disease symptoms. Rats were given varying doses of ginger root extract over a period of 35 days and tested for brain function. The rats that were given more than .05 milligrams of ginger root extract showed shorter incidences of memory deficits. While more research is needed, there is evidence that ginger consumption can have an effect delaying the cognitive impacts of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease (16).

Side Effects of Ginger Tea

In general, ginger tea doesn't have any significant side effects. Most nutrition experts and healthcare practitioners recommend consuming a maximum of 4 grams of ginger daily. Since each cup typically contains about 250 milligrams, there is no need to worry about consuming too much. However, there are a few minor irritations that can be caused by consuming ginger tea including heartburn and dizziness.

Heartburn

Consuming ginger may cause heartburn or indigestion if you are not accustomed to spicy foods. Consuming too much ginger can also cause diarrhea so start out with one or two cups per day and see how your body reacts.

Dizziness

Since ginger can lower blood pressure, you may experience feelings of dizziness or lightheadedness. Again, you would have to consume large amounts of ginger to encounter these side effects, so stay within the recommended limits.

Medication Interactions

Ginger contains the same naturally occurring salicylates that are used in aspirin and are responsible for thinning blood. Taking ginger and blood thinners can increase the risk for bruising or complications. If you take blood thinners, discuss with your doctor before drinking ginger tea regularly.

How to Brew Homemade Ginger Tea

Ginger tea can be prepared using ginger powder, tea bags, and raw ginger. It's most common to use raw or fresh ginger, but tea bags are great for use on the go or in the office. To brew ginger tea using raw ginger, use the following ginger tea recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1-inch piece of ginger
  • 8-10 ounces of water
  • Sweetener as desired

Instructions:

Step 1: Prepare Tea

If you are using raw ginger, you should start by grating the ginger into small slivers. Aim to use about 1 teaspoon of grated ginger for every 8 ounces of water. If you find that the ginger flavor is too strong for your tastes, you can add extra water.

Step 2: Boil Water

To release the flavors and healthy compounds in ginger tea, use boiling water, not just hot water, when brewing. Bring the water to a boil and then add immediately to your cup of grated ginger.

Step 3: Steep

Let the ginger steep for 10 minutes when using raw ginger. If using a tea bag, brew based on manufacturer instructions. 

Step 4: Flavor

Since ginger can have a strong taste, many people like to add lemon, honey or maple syrup as a sweetener to balance the flavor and counterbalance the spicy components.

Spruce Up Your Ginger Tea

If plain old ginger root tea isn't enough to tickle your fancy, try adding other flavors like lemon or cinnamon to the mix. Lemon ginger tea is a popular variety and all you need to do is add a few lemon slices or a dash of lemon juice to the recipe above. You can also brew masala chai tea, an Indian tea that features ginger slices, cardamom pods, black peppercorns, cinnamon sticks, and cloves. Add ginger to a health smoothie for added antioxidants.

Ginger& Apple Spice Iced Tea Recipe

If hot ginger tea isn't your thing, try an iced version instead.

Ingredients:

  • 1 2-inch piece of ginger
  • 1 tablespoon Apple Spice
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 1/2 teaspoon of cayenne pepper
  • 4 cups water
  • Sweetener as desired

Instructions:

  1. Use a grater to slice the ginger into thin pieces.
  2. Heat water in a large saucepan or a teapot and add in the ginger pieces, cayenne pepper, cinnamon and apple spice tea.
  3. Turn heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from heat and cool to room temperature.
  4. Pour the tea into a tall glass pitcher and serve in glasses filled with ice cubes.

Drink to Your Health

Ginger tea is used as a natural home remedy for a variety of ailments ranging from nausea and stomach pain to lowering high cholesterol and protecting brain function. Remember to seek medical advice for your physician before using ginger tea as a replacement for or in conjunction with any medications.

While not a standalone cure, homemade ginger tea is an ideal addition to a healthy lifestyle. The spicy flavor, warm finish and invigorating aromas make drinking this tea a delightful activity. Brew a cup of aromatic ginger tea and enjoy the benefits of relaxation and good health.

Sources:

1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11275030

2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21818642/

3. https://wholehealthchicago.com/2009/05/12/ginger/

4. https://www.wsj.com/articles/powdered-ginger-may-ease-seasonal-allergy-symptoms-1442853656

5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26403321

6. https://lunginstitute.com/blog/five-natural-remedies-promote-lung-function/

7. https://www.mannaplus.co.za/how-to-improve-blood-circulation/

8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3515715/

9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29193411

10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11710709

11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22781186

12. https://www.prevention.com/health/diabetes/ginger-shown-lower-blood-sugar-diabetics

13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18813412

14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18812031

15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3253463/

16. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23374025

Источник: https://senchateabar.com/blogs/blog/ginger-tea-benefits

Discover our full range of health benefit guides and find out more about the health benefits of ginger. Also check out some of our delicious ginger recipes, from meaty mains to creamy ice-cream.

What is the history of ginger tea?

Ginger tea has a long history dating back to China some 5,000 years ago, where it was traditionally used as a health tonic. Ginger was introduced to How is ginger tea good for you much later, originally as a culinary spice.

What are the 6 main health benefits of ginger tea?

1. May help to ease digestive discomfort

Ginger tea is probably most well-known for its potential to soothe digestive issues, and in particular for helping ease nausea. One study even suggests it may be just as effective as some medications, but with fewer side effects, in the case of morning sickness.

2. Anti-inflammatory

Ginger contains key phytonutrients known as gingerols, and research has shown that these can have an antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effect which, when drunk as a tea, may help support a healthy microbiome.

3. May help to reduce blood pressure

A 2017 study found that those who consume ginger on a daily basis had a decreased risk of hypertension. While the study didn’t look specifically at ginger tea, it may be useful to consume ginger tea if you have high blood pressure.

4. May aid weight loss

There have been a few studies into the benefits of ginger when it comes to weight and obesity. A review of this research highlighted that ginger may have a positive impact on obesity through a number of different mechanisms, including appetite control and increasing thermogenesis (heat production). Again, this research is not specific to ginger tea, but it may be beneficial to include ginger tea as part of a balanced diet.

5. Ease headaches and migraines

There’s been a fair amount of research into ginger and its pain-relieving properties, including its potential benefit for those who struggle with headaches and migraines. Drinking ginger tea, therefore, may also help both prevent and relieve headaches.

6. Antioxidant rich

Ginger is high in antioxidants and has been shown to have antiproliferative effects on tumour cells, in particular pancreatic and colon cancer – consuming ginger tea regularly may offer a preventative effect.

Is ginger tea suitable for everyone?

Ginger has a distinctive taste and so, quite literally, may not be everyone’s cup of tea!

Some people may experience side effects from drinking ginger tea, such as bloating or heartburn, and because of its potential blood pressure-lowering effects, it should be consumed in moderation by those with low blood pressure or on any blood pressure medications.

How do I include ginger tea in my diet?

Ginger tea can be consumed at any time of day. It works well as a pick-me-up first thing in the morning, but you may also find it helps after a meal to ease digestion.

You can add fresh lemon or honey, or buy different flavoured tea bags, such as lemon and ginger or ginger green tea.

Want more inspiration?
Our best ever tea recipes
Ginger recipe collection
How does food affect migraines?


This article was published on 17th June 2020.

Nicola Shubrook is a nutritional therapist and works with both private clients and the corporate sector. She is an accredited member of the British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) and the Complementary & Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC). Find out more at urbanwellness.co.uk.

All health content on bbcgoodfood.com is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other healthcare professional. If you have any concerns about your general health, you should contact your local healthcare provider. See our terms and conditions for more information.

Источник: https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/health-benefits-ginger-tea

I Consumed Fresh Ginger Every Day For 1 Week, and These Were the Results

I've always loved the flavor of ginger. Spicy and pungent, it is delicious in tea form and almost completely cuts the bitterness of vegetables in fresh juices and smoothies (adding ginger is basically the only way I can stomach beets in my juices). And while I've always known it's frequently used to aid digestion, I will humbly admit I had no idea the spice boasts such a sprawling list of medicinal benefits. The experts say ginger root is a stellar anti-inflammatory, improves heart health, eases nausea and motion sickness, helps expel free radicals from the body, and is even linked with lowering cholesterol.

If this spicy root has this much power, I just had to test it out. I decided to consume fresh ginger every day for seven days. While there are many ways to consume it, I opted to head straight to my juicer each morning for a ginger and lemon shot and continued my ritual with a cup of homemade ginger tea at how is ginger tea good for you. Whipping up the tea is easy; you simply pour a cup of boiling water over a hunk of raw ginger and let it sit for a few minutes.

Источник: https://www.popsugar.com/fitness/What-Happens-When-You-Drink-Ginger-Tea-Every-Day-45018663

It's no surprise that tea consumption has been usps office open today for centuries, not only because of health benefits, but also because of the wide variety of flavors and aromas to choose from. Settling in with a good book and drinking a steaming hot cup of tea helps to relax and rejuvenate the senses while increasing your wellbeing.

One of the most popular infusions, and most widely known as a natural remedy for nausea, is ginger tea. Fresh ginger has long been a go-to solution for helping to settle an upset stomach, but ginger offers an extensive array of health benefits that go beyond stomach health.

Used by traditional Chinese and Indian Ayurvedic medicine as a way to bbt online login with spirituality, ginger has health benefits for both the body and the mind. With the potential to regulate blood sugar levels, increase immunity and reduce pain, drinking ginger tea is a great way to stay healthy and live well.

What Is Ginger Tea?

Originating in South Asia, ginger tea is now produced mainly by China and India although it is also cultivated in the Caribbean, East Africa, Brazil and Jamaica. Ginger tea is made using the stem or root of the Zingiber officinale plant, which is closely related to other strong-flavored how is ginger tea good for you including cardamom and turmeric.

Harvesting

Fresh ginger is harvested once the plant starts to wither and the root is washed and scraped to prevent new growth. You can jose cuervo silver ginger root or ginger powder at your local grocery store and make your own ginger tea or opt for ginger tea in teabag form. If buying your own fresh ginger root, look for roots that are smooth and without wrinkles, which can indicate the ginger is older and less flavorful.

Taste

Ginger tea has a spicy and fragrant flavor that can be a bit intense to new palates. If ginger has too much of a kick for your taste buds, you can use lemon or honey to tone down the spice. Ginger tea can be described as having a warm, peppery and sweet flavor with a piquant smell.

Health Benefits of Ginger Tea

1. Combats Nausea

Ginger has been used for centuries as a cure for nausea and vomiting caused by morning sickness and motion sickness. A study undertaken in Thailand found that when given 1 milligram of ginger daily, 28 out of 32 participants felt an improvement in nausea related to pregnancy. The study found that there were no detectable adverse effects on the pregnant women(1).

Another study published in the Supportive Care in Cancer Journal showed that ginger was effective in treating symptoms of nausea during chemotherapy treatments for cancer. The study found the most effective dosage to be between .5 and 1 milligram of ginger (2). One cup of ginger tea contains an average of 250 milligrams of ginger, so you should drink two to four cups of ginger tea per day to get the best results when it comes to curing feelings of nausea (3) The tea may also help soothe tummy discomfort caused by bloating and cramps.

2. Builds Immunity

Ginger can give your immune system the extra boost it needs to tackle an oncoming flu or to battle a full-fledged case of the common cold. Ginger contains the biological compounds gingerol and shogaol that fight to eliminate free radicals and toxins that can cause you to get sick in the first place.

Ginger tea also contains antibacterial properties that help fight of the bacteria that can cause disease. Furthermore, the spicy kick in ginger can help to loosen chest congestion that leads to coughs and soothe a sore throat by reducing inflammation. Ginger contains high levels of vitamin C and magnesium that help to kick colds faster.

3. Improves Respiratory System

If death at a funeral 2010 bathroom scene suffer from allergies, drinking ginger tea can be a soothing way to relieve the respiratory effects of your allergies. Allergic rhinitis is simply an overreaction of the immune system to common stimuli. Ginger works to prevent the immune system response that causes wheezing, itchy and watery eyes and sneezing.

One of the main components of ginger's allergy-fighting abilities is the compound 6-gingerol (4). This compound blocks the activation of T-cells, which are responsible for the immune system’s overreaction to normal stimuli. In a 2016 study conducted on mice, mice that received a diet containing 2 percent powdered ginger sneezed an average of 2.1 times versus the 15.2 times dte energy pay bill online customer service the placebo group (5).

While there haven't been any studies on human subjects yet, the results from animal studies have shown promise in treating allergic reactions with ginger. In essence, ginger acts as an antihistamine that can relieve nasal congestion and sneezing, making springtime and daily allergies less debilitating.

Ginger is also beneficial in supporting overall lung health and has been used for 2,500 years as a healing root. Ginger helps to eliminate mucus, clearing the airways and making it easier to breathe. It also reduces inflammation that can cause wheezing and constricted feelings in the chest and throat (6).

4. Supports Blood Circulation

Healthy blood circulation can prevent dangerous illnesses such as blood clots. Drinking ginger tea can help keep circulation running at optimal levels, ensuring your body can perform the functions it needs to stay healthy. Ginger is a vasodilator that opens blood vessels and allows blood to flow through more easily.

Ginger contains amino acids, vitamins and minerals that improve circulation and protect heart health. By blocking fat absorption, ginger reduces the risk of heart disease by limiting build-up in arteries. Ginger contains the compounds gingerol and zingerone, which work as warming agents that effectively increase blood flow. Ginger's ability to decrease inflammation also helps to relax smooth muscle tissue in arteries and veins, thus improving circulation (7).

5. Aids in Weight Loss

If you want to lose weight faster, you may want to consider drinking ginger tea as part of your regular routine. While studies like the one published in the European Journal of Nutrition have found that drinking tea aids in weight loss in general, ginger has special compounds that make weight loss easier (8).

Ginger can aid weight loss by making it easier for the digestive system to break down fats and by blocking fat absorption in the intestines. The same compounds that allow ginger to ease nausea are the ones that enable how is ginger tea good for you efficiency in the digestive tract.

In a review of 27 articles, most of the experimental studies proved that ginger root played a role in accelerating weight loss. While clinical studies had more limited results, the potential for ginger to accelerate metabolism and control appetite make drinking ginger tea a good addition to a healthy diet and exercise regimen (9).

6. Reduces Pain and Inflammation

Many people suffer from aches and pains caused by exercise or a chronic disease. Consuming ginger tea may help to ease muscle pain and joint pain associated with arthritis, menstrual cramps, and osteoarthritis. The main reason behind this health benefit is the anti-inflammatory properties of ginger root.

A study published in Arthritis and Rheumatism in 2001 showed that ginger tea aided in pain relief when it came to sufferers of osteoarthritis. The study focused specifically on knee pain and 63 percent of the 247 participants felt a marked reduction in their osteoarthritis pain (10).

Ginger has also shown promise when it comes to alleviating pain caused by menstrual discomfort. A Shahed University study analyzed the effects of ginger root on 120 student residents attending the university. The students who were given 500 milligrams of ginger root powder for five days showed decreased intensity and pain duration associated with cramps compared to the control group who received a placebo (11).

7. Regulates Blood Sugar

With rates of diabetes on the rise, more and more researchers are pouring time and effort into finding solutions and preventions for the disease. Ginger tea has shown promising results when it comes to treating diabetes by regulation of blood sugar levels.

A study by the Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences analyzed 88 people who had been living with diabetes for 10 years or more. The participants who were given 1 gram of ginger powder three times daily showed decreases in blood sugar levels after the how is ginger tea good for you study. The researchers believe ginger helps to regulate blood sugar by inhibiting the enzyme that breaks down glycogen, which can lead to blood sugar spikes (12).

It's also important to note that bank of america mobile app for tablet study was conducted alongside the traditional medications the diabetic participants were prescribed by their doctors. So while drinking ginger tea won't necessarily cure diabetes, it can help to regulate blood sugar levels.

8. Supports Healthy Cholesterol Levels

One of the leading causes of death in the First community bank branch locations States is heart disease. Contributing factors include smoking, high cholesterol and an unhealthy diet. Fortunately, if you suffer from high cholesterol and want to get healthier, ginger tea may be able to help.

Drinking ginger tea check deposit time wells fargo help to lower dangerous triglycerides and LDL cholesterol, known as bad cholesterol. Ginger tea can increase circulation and reduce inflammation in arteries while reducing cholesterol, thus alleviating the risk of build-up in arteries that can cause blood clots and heart attacks (13).

9. Supports Brain Health

Consuming ginger tea can improve cognitive performance in middle-aged individuals, treat dementia, and can help to prevent neurological diseases such Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's. Most of these benefits have been attributed to the anti-inflammatory properties of the ginger root (14).

A 2011 Thai study gave 60 middle-aged women doses of 400 to 800 milligrams of ginger extract for two months while using computerized and auditory tests to monitor brain function. At the how is ginger tea good for you of the study, the women who received ginger extract showed enhanced working memory and faster cognitive processing. The study also demonstrated an increased power of attention and better quality of memory (15).

A 2013 animal study also found a connection between the use of ginger root and reduced Alzheimer's disease symptoms. Rats were given varying doses of ginger root extract over a period of 35 days and tested for brain function. The rats that were given more than .05 milligrams of ginger root extract showed shorter incidences of memory deficits. While more research is needed, there is evidence that ginger consumption can have an effect delaying the cognitive impacts of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease (16).

Side Effects of Ginger Tea

In general, ginger tea doesn't have any significant side effects. Most nutrition experts and healthcare practitioners recommend consuming a maximum of 4 grams of ginger daily. Since each cup typically contains about 250 milligrams, there is no need to worry about consuming too much. However, there are a few minor irritations that can be caused by consuming ginger tea including heartburn and dizziness.

Heartburn

Consuming ginger may cause heartburn or indigestion if you are not accustomed to spicy foods. Consuming too much ginger can also hotels near university at buffalo diarrhea so start out with one or two cups per day and see how your body reacts.

Dizziness

Since ginger can lower blood pressure, you may experience feelings of dizziness or lightheadedness. Again, you would have to consume large amounts of ginger to encounter these side effects, so stay within the recommended limits.

Medication Interactions

Ginger contains the same naturally occurring salicylates that are used in aspirin and are responsible for thinning blood. Taking ginger and blood thinners can increase the risk for bruising or complications. If you take blood thinners, discuss with your doctor before drinking ginger tea regularly.

How to Brew Homemade Ginger Tea

Ginger tea can be prepared using ginger powder, tea bags, and raw ginger. It's most common to use raw or fresh ginger, but tea bags are great for use on the go or in the office. To brew ginger tea using raw ginger, use the following ginger tea recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1-inch piece of ginger
  • 8-10 ounces of water
  • Sweetener as desired

Instructions:

Step 1: Prepare Tea

If you are using raw ginger, you should start by grating the ginger into small slivers. Aim 1st grade lesson plans use about 1 teaspoon of grated ginger for every 8 ounces of water. If you find that the ginger flavor is too strong for your tastes, you can add extra water.

Step 2: Boil Water

To release the flavors and healthy compounds in ginger tea, use boiling water, not just hot water, when brewing. Bring the water to a boil and then add immediately to your cup of grated ginger.

Step 3: Steep

Let the ginger steep for 10 minutes when using raw ginger. If using a tea bag, brew based on manufacturer instructions. 

Step 4: Flavor

Since ginger can have a strong taste, many people like to add lemon, honey or maple syrup as a sweetener to balance the flavor and counterbalance the spicy components.

Spruce Up Your Ginger Tea

If plain old ginger root tea isn't enough to tickle your fancy, try adding other flavors like lemon or cinnamon to the mix. Lemon ginger tea is a popular variety and all you need to do is add a few lemon slices or a dash of lemon juice to the recipe above. You can also brew masala chai tea, an Indian tea that features ginger slices, cardamom pods, black peppercorns, cinnamon sticks, and cloves. Add ginger to a health smoothie for added antioxidants.

Ginger& Apple Spice Iced Tea Recipe

If hot ginger tea isn't your thing, try an iced version instead.

Ingredients:

  • 1 2-inch piece of ginger
  • 1 tablespoon Apple Spice
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 1/2 teaspoon of cayenne pepper
  • 4 cups water
  • Sweetener as desired

Instructions:

  1. Use a grater to slice the ginger into thin pieces.
  2. Heat water in a large saucepan or a teapot and add in the ginger pieces, cayenne pepper, cinnamon and apple spice tea.
  3. Turn heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from heat and cool to room temperature.
  4. Pour the tea into a tall glass pitcher and serve in glasses filled with ice cubes.

Drink to Your Health

Ginger tea is used as a natural home remedy for a variety of ailments ranging from nausea and stomach pain to lowering high cholesterol and protecting brain function. Remember to seek medical advice for your physician before using ginger tea as a replacement for or in conjunction with any medications.

While not a standalone cure, homemade ginger tea is an ideal addition to a healthy lifestyle. The spicy flavor, warm finish and invigorating aromas make drinking this tea a delightful activity. Brew a cup of aromatic ginger tea and enjoy the benefits of relaxation and good health.

Sources:

1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11275030

2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21818642/

3. https://wholehealthchicago.com/2009/05/12/ginger/

4. https://www.wsj.com/articles/powdered-ginger-may-ease-seasonal-allergy-symptoms-1442853656

5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26403321

6. https://lunginstitute.com/blog/five-natural-remedies-promote-lung-function/

7. https://www.mannaplus.co.za/how-to-improve-blood-circulation/

8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3515715/

9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29193411

10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11710709

11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22781186

12. https://www.prevention.com/health/diabetes/ginger-shown-lower-blood-sugar-diabetics

13. hfcu online login. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18812031

15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3253463/

16. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23374025

Источник: https://senchateabar.com/blogs/blog/ginger-tea-benefits

The Power 3 Combination: Ginger, Lemon, and Honey

Ginger, lemon, and honey tea has commonly been used to handle colds and sinus infections. All of these ingredients contain powerful anti-inflammatory properties. Lemon juice provides powerful digestive enzymes while ginger stimulates digestion. Honey has a natural scraping effect on the intestines (clearing away toxic build-up).

In Ayurveda, the digestive fire is considered to be the cornerstone of health. Without it, the entire bodily system cannot function properly. Thus, the use of spices and warm foods is commonly used in this ancient medical system of India.

Ginger naturally warms the body, supporting circulation and lowering high blood pressure. This pungent root has been used for thousands of years to treat ailments such as colds, migraines, nausea, arthritis, and hypertension. It has also been known to be helpful in relieving indigestion & constipation and improving blood circulation & nutrient absorption.

Studies on Ingredients

Studies Show that Ginger Benefits May Include:

  1. improve overall cardiovascular healthy
  2. improve gastrointestinal health
  3. alleviate muscle pain that arises after intense workouts.
  4. help with motion sickness
  5. help with morning sickness
  6. help with Colic
  7. help settle an upset stomach
  8. help with alleviating gas
  9. help with alleviate bloating
  10. help with alleviate heartburn

Studies Show that Lemon:

  1. is a secretagogue—a substance that promotes secretion—which encourages the liquidation of mucus.
  2. is a source of antioxidants and nutrients. The sour taste stimulates the digestive fire which is important for cleansing, alkalizing and detoxing.
  3. may promote hydration
  4. may prevent kidney stones
  5. may support in weight loss
  6. may aid in digestions
  7. may improve skin detoxing and health

Studies Show that Honey:

  1. contains a large amount of antioxidants which are helpful in removing free radicals from the body. (The presence of free radicals has been linked to a number of chronic health issues.)
  2. contains a number of trace minerals and vitamins like calcium, magnesium, potassium, phosphorous, and zinc.
  3. may help with lowering blood pressure
  4. may help improve cholesterol
  5. may help lower triglycerides

Our Handcrafted Pay cox bill over phone Elixirs

ImmuneSchein's Classic Ginger Elixir contains just these three powerful ingredients—organic lemon juice, organic ginger root, and wildflower honey. With our ImmuneSchein Ginger Elixirs, we’ve done the chopping, slicing, cutting, and preparation for you—so all you have to do is add the elixir into hot water for a tea, cold water for a lemonade, sparkling water for a ginger ale, or even add with apple cider vinegar to create your own fire cider, which we refer to as Fire Schein here.

The flexibility of our elixirs allows you to create many different recipes for drinks, cocktails, mocktails, cooking, baking, and more. With digestion-enhancing ginger, detoxifying lemon, and weight-loss promoting honey, this powerful drink is sure to kick start your day.

Источник: https://immune-schein.com/blogs/news/ginger-lemon-honey-benefits-uses-and-history

Ginger Root Tea

"The fact that this tea was made using fresh ginger root made it incredibly appealing. I made a batch of tea in under 25 minutes, boiling the ginger for the full 20 minutes, and the flavor was great! It'll surely be my new beverage of choice when it gets colder out." —Victoria Heydt

  • 2tablespoons fresh ginger root (about 2 inches)

  • 4cupswater

  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice (juice of 1/2 lime), optional

  • 1 to 2tablespoonshoney, to taste

  1. Gather the ingredients.

  2. Prepare the fresh ginger by peeling it and slicing it thinly to maximize the surface area. This will help you make a very flavorful ginger capital one logo transparent.

  3. In a 1 1/4-quart pot, add the water and ginger, and bring us bank bank customer service a boil for at least 10 minutes. For a stronger and tangier tea, allow to boil for 20 minutes or more, and use more slices of ginger.

  4. Remove it from the heat, strain, and add the lime juice and honey to taste. Enjoy your ginger tea.

Tips

  • The secret to the perfect ginger tea is lots and lots of fresh ginger, simmered for a long time to bring out the flavor. You really can't overdo it, so feel free to add as much ginger as you want and keep it simmering for as long as you want.
  • The roots are typically about 1 inch in diameter, and a 2-inch section should yield about 2 tablespoons how is ginger tea good for you sliced ginger. When measuring by weight, a 2-inch segment should be about 1/2 ounce.
  • If you have leftover ginger root, you can freeze it to use later.
  • For tea throughout the week, make a big batch by doubling or tripling the recipe. Store the tea in a sealed container in the refrigerator. Drink it cold or heat it up one cup at a time within a usa t mobile imei check for the freshest taste.
  • When storing ginger tea, you may notice some sediment form. It's common for particles from the strained ginger to settle, and it's safe to drink. To avoid it, strain the tea through one or two layers of cheesecloth.

Recipe Variations

  • Sweeten the tea with agave nectar rather than honey. You can also enjoy this tea unsweetened, depending on your health goals or personal taste.
  • Try this recipe with brown rice syrup or monk fruit as an alternative sweetener.
  • Switch from lime to lemon juice; fresh is best for either. Both citrus fruits are great flavor companions to ginger and give the tea a hint of vitamin C.

Does Ginger Need to Be Peeled Before Making Tea?

Peeling ginger root is not necessary and a matter of personal preference. Many people never peel the root, especially for a recipe like ginger tea when it's not consumed. Others prefer to peel older roots and leave the younger roots intact. If you choose to leave the peel, be sure to rinse and scrub the root how is ginger tea good for you to remove any dirt or debris.

What Are the Health Benefits of Ginger Tea?

For many people, ginger tea is a favorite way to reap the benefits of ginger root. The spice has long played a role in traditional medicine, particularly as a digestive aid for things like upset stomach, nausea, and constipation relief. However, for some people, ginger can provoke gastrointestinal problems. Ginger also has anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant properties, and may offer relief from headaches, colds, and pain caused by inflammation. Researchers continue to look at its possible benefits for various diseases. While there are few side effects to drinking ginger tea, it's always a good idea to discuss it with your doctor.

This Warming Turmeric Tea Is Spiced With Ginger, Cinnamon, and Citrus

Источник: https://www.thespruceeats.com/homemade-ginger-tea-3377239

What Does Ginger Tea Do for You?

Ginger has been used for centuries, both in cooking and for medicinal purposes. Although the root is often used as an ingredient in cooked dishes or ground and dried into an integral item in your spice cabinet, ginger tea is also becoming increasingly popular. Available in ready-made tea bags or easily made at home with fresh ginger root, ginger tea can get rid of nausea, alleviate pain, reduce chronic inflammation and improve digestion and alleviate uncomfortable digestive symptoms.

Settle Your Stomach

Ginger is widely known as an anti-nausea aid. Because of this, ginger is often recommended as a remedy for those who get seasick.

According to a 2016 report in Integrative Medicine Insights, the compounds gingerol and shogaol, which give ginger its bite, are responsible for helping reduce nausea and associated vomiting; but it doesn’t apply only to seasickness. Ginger tea can also reduce nausea associated with morning sickness during pregnancy and following chemotherapy treatment.

Improve Digestion

Your digestive tract goes all the way from your mouth to your anus, and for everything to run smoothly, every structure along the way has to be able to do its job properly. Unfortunately, there are an estimated 60 to 70 million Americans affected by digestive diseases.

The good news is that the same compounds in ginger how is ginger tea good for you that help alleviate nausea can give an assist to the digestive tract by helping to relieve irritation of the digestive tract, by stimulating your body to produce more of the saliva that kicks off digestion and by increasing the production of bile, which helps break down fat. Ginger has also been shown to improve movement of food and fluids through the digestive tract, which can help prevent constipation.

Reduce Your Pain

Ginger tea may also be an effective remedy for pain. Studies show that consuming ginger daily can help reduce pain and muscle soreness following exercise and help relieve the pain of menstrual cramps.

For a study published in the Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 122 women who experienced moderate to severe menstrual cramps were divided into two separate groups. One group was given mefenamic acid, a prescription medication for pain relief, every eight hours while the other group was instructed to consume ginger every six hours. At the end of the study, researchers concluded that ginger is just as effective for pain relief as the prescription medication, but without any of the adverse side effects.

Lower Inflammation

Chronic inflammation is associated with hundreds of diseases and conditions, including diabetes, respiratory disease, ulcerative colitis and some cancers. There are many things that can cause chronic inflammation, but getting it under control is essential for your health. According to research, a specific compound in ginger called 10-gingerol can significantly reduce inflammation, especially in the brain.

References

Writer Bio

Lindsay Boyers is a holistic nutritionist with a Bachelor's degree in food and nutrition and a certificate in holistic nutrition consulting. She has a background in functional nutrition and is currently studying for her RD exam. In addition to contributing to Livestrong.com, she how is ginger tea good for you 11 published books, including The Everything Guide to Gut Health, The Everything Guide to the Ketogenic Diet, and The Everything Guide to Intermittent Fasting.

Источник: https://healthyeating.sfgate.com/ginger-tea-you-8779.html

How is ginger tea good for you -

Ginger is a bold, aromatic spice that once might’ve been only associated with the holiday season (think gingerbread) but has since made its way into mainstream health trends (such as drinking ginger tea or ginger water to aid digestion). And, it easily elevates baked goods, savory dishes, and drinks.

“Ginger is actually a plant, and the ginger spice that we use in cooking comes from the root of the plant,” says Amber Pankonin, M.S., RD, owner of Stirlist.

Not only is it delicious, it also has some awesome health benefits.

[The 2021 Runner's World Calendar features gorgeous photos, monthly motivation, and tips to inspire your running all year long.]

“Ginger has been traditionally known as a carminative or a substance that soothes the intestinal tract,” says Sonya Angelone, M.S., RDN, and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “More recently, ginger has been found to have anti-inflammatory effects.”

It’s also a good source of phytonutrients (compounds produced naturally in plants).

“Ginger itself is not a great source of any one particular nutrient, but it does contain phytochemicals, which are found in both fresh and dried versions,” says Pankonin.

Benefits of Ginger

→ Ginger may help with wear and tear on knees.
In one study done on people with osteoarthritis, it was found that fresh ginger may help to lower pain and disability from arthritis.

“Since this is a condition of wear and tear, runners may find that ginger can help knee pain, and it is safer than taking non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory medications,” Angelone.

→ It might help improve digestion in general.
Runners can deal with a gamut of gut issues, from diarrhea to constipation, which can impact your training.

Ginger has been shown to help to improve gastric motility, which basically means it can help with the movement of food from your mouth to the large intestine, says Pankonin. This one is important for runners because a healthy digestive system can help improve performance.

Join Runner’s World+ today for more nutrition tips!

→ It may help treat migraines.

Ginger was shown to help reducemigraine pain as much as prescription medicine in this study published in Phytotherapy Research in 2014. Headaches are a pain for everyone, especially if they get in your way of training.

“A small amount of powdered ginger may do the trick and get them back on the road,” says Angelone.

→ Ginger can help reduce nausea.
Ginger has antiemetic properties that can increase gastric emptying (food emptying from the stomach to the small intestine). Basically, ginger works to improve the general health of your digestive tract, which could help alleviate nausea, says Pankonin.

→ It could help with menstrual cramps.

If cramps prevent you from logging your miles, ginger may help.

There has been some research that shows ginger may be effective in decreasing pain during the first three to four days of a menstrual cycle, says Pankonin.

Ginger may reduce inflammation.

Anti-inflammatory compounds found in ginger—gingerols and shogaols— may be helpful in aiding recovery after long runs when inflammatory chemicals settle in, says Angelone.

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How Much Ginger Should I Eat?

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To get the full benefits of ginger, you don’t need very much.

In general, the average recommendation is about 1 gram of real ginger per day to help relieve nausea, and this doesn’t count anything that comes from cookies or sodas, says Pankonin. There are ginger capsules available, but before adding any kind of ginger supplement, you should consult with your physician, as it might interfere with certain medications.

When it comes to cooking, different forms of ginger may be best for certain dishes, according to Angelone.

Crystalized ginger, chopped: In tea (or in hot water to make a hot beverage), oatmeal, cookie recipes, apple/pear crisps, banana bread, pancakes, infused into maple syrup.

Ginger powder: It can be used most anywhere, especially when you want it blended.

Fresh ginger, grated: Hot water, tea, vegetables, stir fry, poached fish especially salmon, steamed rice (cook together).

And the type of ginger you use may also impact how much you use in recipes.

“Whenever you convert from a fresh spice to dried spice, the ratio 3:1. So, if your recipe called for 3 teaspoons of fresh ginger, you would only need 1 teaspoon of dried ginger,” says Pankonin.


The Best Ginger Recipes For Runners

Here are seven delicious ginger-filled recipes to help fuel you for your runs.

Whole Wheat Chocolate Chip Gingerbread Pancakes

If you need the perfect holiday treat, try these whole wheat chocolate chip gingerbread pancakes. They are made with Greek yogurt for extra protein, making them the perfect recovery meal after a run, says Sarah Schlichter, MPH, RDN, and owner of Bucket List Tummy.


Pork Tenderloin with Cherry Chutney

This pork tenderloin with cherry chutney contains both lean protein and a good source of healthy carbohydrates from the cherry chutney—which also contains fresh ginger.

“The combination of carbs and lean protein provides a nutritious energy source for runners,” says Pankonin.


Prerun Sweet Potato Ginger Energy Bites

These sweet potato ginger energy bites are a filled with antioxidants. They make a great anti-inflammatory snack for before, during, or after a run, says Schlichter. The ginger can help alleviate any exercise-related nausea, and the sweet potatoes are a great carbohydrate option that’s easy on the stomach.


Easy Weeknight Quinoa Stir Fry

This quinoa stir fry will be a crowd favorite and chances are you might already have these ingredients in your pantry and fridge, says Pankonin. Plus, the addition of vegetables from the stir fry might even help reduce oxidative stress after long workouts.


Gingerbread Crockpot Oatmeal

This gingerbread crockpot oatmeal is a great make-ahead meal for a morning run, full of holiday flavors and carbohydrates for quick energy!” says Schlichter.


Sweet Potato Orange Salad with Honey Mustard Dressing

If you’re in need of a good energy source to fuel up before a race without upsetting your stomach, try this sweet potato orange salad with honey mustard dressing recipe. It’s made with sweet potatoes (which contain vitamin A, and help support immune health) and ginger, which makes it a great meal, says Pankonin.


Easy Egg Noodle Stir-Fry with Veggies and Chicken

Looking for a quick 30-minute meal? This egg noodle stir-fry with veggies and chickenmakes weeknight dinners easy, says Schlichter. The best part: it’s ready in one pan, and has the perfect blend of protein, carbohydrates, and vegetables for optimal recovery and balanced macronutrients.

Emily ShifferEmily Shiffer is a former digital web producer for Men’s Health and Prevention, and is currently a freelancer writer specializing in health, weight loss, and fitness.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Источник: https://www.runnersworld.com/nutrition-weight-loss/a35058557/benefits-of-ginger/

I Consumed Fresh Ginger Every Day For 1 Week, and These Were the Results

I've always loved the flavor of ginger. Spicy and pungent, it is delicious in tea form and almost completely cuts the bitterness of vegetables in fresh juices and smoothies (adding ginger is basically the only way I can stomach beets in my juices). And while I've always known it's frequently used to aid digestion, I will humbly admit I had no idea the spice boasts such a sprawling list of medicinal benefits. The experts say ginger root is a stellar anti-inflammatory, improves heart health, eases nausea and motion sickness, helps expel free radicals from the body, and is even linked with lowering cholesterol.

If this spicy root has this much power, I just had to test it out. I decided to consume fresh ginger every day for seven days. While there are many ways to consume it, I opted to head straight to my juicer each morning for a ginger and lemon shot and continued my ritual with a cup of homemade ginger tea at night. Whipping up the tea is easy; you simply pour a cup of boiling water over a hunk of raw ginger and let it sit for a few minutes.

Источник: https://www.popsugar.com/fitness/What-Happens-When-You-Drink-Ginger-Tea-Every-Day-45018663

You’ve probably heard of using ginger as a remedy to ease an upset stomach—remember drinking ginger ale when you had a stomach bug as a kid? Some of us even turn to ginger to calm prerace jitters or aid indigestion.

Lately, the zesty root is popping up everywhere—there are ginger-flavored energy gels, chews, and drink mixes available for athletes—and some people are swapping lemon water for ginger water, or mixing ground ginger into water, tea, or postworkout smoothies as a “detox.”

Which makes us wonder, are there really any benefits to drinking ginger water as a detox or just simply to boost your overall health? We tapped Kelly Jones, M.S., R.D. and Lori Nedescu, M.S., R.D., to find out.

The Claim:

Drinking ginger water or ginger water mixed with lemon is an effective way to reduce nausea and inflammation and detoxify the body.

The Evidence:

Because detoxification naturally happens through your organs and body processes—not from something you ingest—Jones explains, there is no scientific evidence that ginger water has detoxifying benefits.

That said, drinking ginger water can have other health benefits, especially for athletes. Adding ginger to your water may ease or prevent stomach issues if you feel sick before, during, or after a particularly intense workout. That’s because gingerols—the chemical compounds found in ginger—aid the digestion process to help alleviate nausea, according to a study published in 2015 in Phytochemistry.

“Ginger is known for easing stomach distress and many athletes experience frequent GI issues. Research is limited, but ginger has also been linked to having potential anti-inflammatory properties, increasing satiety, easing anxiety, and controlling blood sugar,” Nedescu tells Bicycling. Research shows that taking in 1,500 mg of ground ginger daily in small doses may be beneficial for nausea.

And because it’s natural, it’s a good choice for those undergoing chemotherapy treatment or during pregnancy, Jones tells Bicycling.

Some of us can also experience a lack of appetite after exercise, so ginger water that contains added sugar can be helpful after a race or tough workout to replenish carbohydrates while lessening nausea, says Jones.

Ginger also has anti-inflammatory effects, which can benefit all athletes, especially those with joint pain, according to a study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, where subjects with knee pain were given either ginger extract or a placebo twice daily. Those who took the ginger supplement reported a 13 percent higher reduction in pain than those given the placebo.Researchers also found that those who consumed two grams of raw ginger daily were 25 percent less sore one day after performing eccentric exercises—the “lowering down” part of exercises such as leg lifts, pushups, or bicep curls—than those who didn’t.

One undisputed benefit? Hydration. “If adding fresh ginger to your water helps you hydrate more, then that is likely the most beneficial aspect of drinking ginger water,” says Nedescu. Since the taste of ginger can be polarizing (you either love it or hate it), Jones says incorporating ginger water into your diet can be a good way to reap the health benefits without the bitter taste, since it’s diluted in water.

As for any other health claims, some studies, (such as one published in the Saudi Medical Journal that found those who consumed 3g of ground ginger per day saw reduced levels of triglycerides and LDL, bad, cholesterol, which can up stroke risk) have shown ginger to benefit blood glucose and cholesterol levels, as well as menstrual cramps, but more research is needed, Jones says.

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The Verdict:

There isn’t much research on drinking ginger water in particular, so you don’t need to suddenly rush to add it to your morning routine. But there certainly are some health benefits of ginger you can reap, and it won’t hurt you to incorporate it into your diet. So if you’re curious—or simply like the taste of ginger—go for it, Nedescu says.

Try adding up to 4g raw ginger a day, which studies have found to be the suggested safe maximum dosage, though Jones says 2g is the more-commonly recommended dosage for decreasing nausea.

To make measuring easy, 1 teaspoon of ground ginger (which translates to about 2 grams) is a safe amount to mix into water, tea, or even a smoothie if using ginger to calm nausea or provide potential anti-inflammatory benefits, Jones explains. Minor side effects such as heartburn or a burning sensation in the mouth are possible. To prevent this, avoid drinking it on an empty stomach, Nedescu says.

One way Nedescu suggests to drink it: Add ginger, lemon, a pinch of salt, and honey to water for a great homemade sports drink.

Jordan SmithDigital EditorJordan Smith is a writer and editor with over 5 years of experience reporting on health and fitness news and trends.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Источник: https://www.bicycling.com/health-nutrition/a29108878/health-benefits-of-ginger-water/

The Power 3 Combination: Ginger, Lemon, and Honey

Ginger, lemon, and honey tea has commonly been used to handle colds and sinus infections. All of these ingredients contain powerful anti-inflammatory properties. Lemon juice provides powerful digestive enzymes while ginger stimulates digestion. Honey has a natural scraping effect on the intestines (clearing away toxic build-up).

In Ayurveda, the digestive fire is considered to be the cornerstone of health. Without it, the entire bodily system cannot function properly. Thus, the use of spices and warm foods is commonly used in this ancient medical system of India.

Ginger naturally warms the body, supporting circulation and lowering high blood pressure. This pungent root has been used for thousands of years to treat ailments such as colds, migraines, nausea, arthritis, and hypertension. It has also been known to be helpful in relieving indigestion & constipation and improving blood circulation & nutrient absorption.

Studies on Ingredients

Studies Show that Ginger Benefits May Include:

  1. improve overall cardiovascular healthy
  2. improve gastrointestinal health
  3. alleviate muscle pain that arises after intense workouts.
  4. help with motion sickness
  5. help with morning sickness
  6. help with Colic
  7. help settle an upset stomach
  8. help with alleviating gas
  9. help with alleviate bloating
  10. help with alleviate heartburn

Studies Show that Lemon:

  1. is a secretagogue—a substance that promotes secretion—which encourages the liquidation of mucus.
  2. is a source of antioxidants and nutrients. The sour taste stimulates the digestive fire which is important for cleansing, alkalizing and detoxing.
  3. may promote hydration
  4. may prevent kidney stones
  5. may support in weight loss
  6. may aid in digestions
  7. may improve skin detoxing and health

Studies Show that Honey:

  1. contains a large amount of antioxidants which are helpful in removing free radicals from the body. (The presence of free radicals has been linked to a number of chronic health issues.)
  2. contains a number of trace minerals and vitamins like calcium, magnesium, potassium, phosphorous, and zinc.
  3. may help with lowering blood pressure
  4. may help improve cholesterol
  5. may help lower triglycerides

Our Handcrafted Ginger Elixirs

ImmuneSchein's Classic Ginger Elixir contains just these three powerful ingredients—organic lemon juice, organic ginger root, and wildflower honey. With our ImmuneSchein Ginger Elixirs, we’ve done the chopping, slicing, cutting, and preparation for you—so all you have to do is add the elixir into hot water for a tea, cold water for a lemonade, sparkling water for a ginger ale, or even add with apple cider vinegar to create your own fire cider, which we refer to as Fire Schein here.

The flexibility of our elixirs allows you to create many different recipes for drinks, cocktails, mocktails, cooking, baking, and more. With digestion-enhancing ginger, detoxifying lemon, and weight-loss promoting honey, this powerful drink is sure to kick start your day.

Источник: https://immune-schein.com/blogs/news/ginger-lemon-honey-benefits-uses-and-history

It's no surprise that tea consumption has been popular for centuries, not only because of health benefits, but also because of the wide variety of flavors and aromas to choose from. Settling in with a good book and drinking a steaming hot cup of tea helps to relax and rejuvenate the senses while increasing your wellbeing.

One of the most popular infusions, and most widely known as a natural remedy for nausea, is ginger tea. Fresh ginger has long been a go-to solution for helping to settle an upset stomach, but ginger offers an extensive array of health benefits that go beyond stomach health.

Used by traditional Chinese and Indian Ayurvedic medicine as a way to connect with spirituality, ginger has health benefits for both the body and the mind. With the potential to regulate blood sugar levels, increase immunity and reduce pain, drinking ginger tea is a great way to stay healthy and live well.

What Is Ginger Tea?

Originating in South Asia, ginger tea is now produced mainly by China and India although it is also cultivated in the Caribbean, East Africa, Brazil and Jamaica. Ginger tea is made using the stem or root of the Zingiber officinale plant, which is closely related to other strong-flavored plants including cardamom and turmeric.

Harvesting

Fresh ginger is harvested once the plant starts to wither and the root is washed and scraped to prevent new growth. You can buy ginger root or ginger powder at your local grocery store and make your own ginger tea or opt for ginger tea in teabag form. If buying your own fresh ginger root, look for roots that are smooth and without wrinkles, which can indicate the ginger is older and less flavorful.

Taste

Ginger tea has a spicy and fragrant flavor that can be a bit intense to new palates. If ginger has too much of a kick for your taste buds, you can use lemon or honey to tone down the spice. Ginger tea can be described as having a warm, peppery and sweet flavor with a piquant smell.

Health Benefits of Ginger Tea

1. Combats Nausea

Ginger has been used for centuries as a cure for nausea and vomiting caused by morning sickness and motion sickness. A study undertaken in Thailand found that when given 1 milligram of ginger daily, 28 out of 32 participants felt an improvement in nausea related to pregnancy. The study found that there were no detectable adverse effects on the pregnant women(1).

Another study published in the Supportive Care in Cancer Journal showed that ginger was effective in treating symptoms of nausea during chemotherapy treatments for cancer. The study found the most effective dosage to be between .5 and 1 milligram of ginger (2). One cup of ginger tea contains an average of 250 milligrams of ginger, so you should drink two to four cups of ginger tea per day to get the best results when it comes to curing feelings of nausea (3) The tea may also help soothe tummy discomfort caused by bloating and cramps.

2. Builds Immunity

Ginger can give your immune system the extra boost it needs to tackle an oncoming flu or to battle a full-fledged case of the common cold. Ginger contains the biological compounds gingerol and shogaol that fight to eliminate free radicals and toxins that can cause you to get sick in the first place.

Ginger tea also contains antibacterial properties that help fight of the bacteria that can cause disease. Furthermore, the spicy kick in ginger can help to loosen chest congestion that leads to coughs and soothe a sore throat by reducing inflammation. Ginger contains high levels of vitamin C and magnesium that help to kick colds faster.

3. Improves Respiratory System

If you suffer from allergies, drinking ginger tea can be a soothing way to relieve the respiratory effects of your allergies. Allergic rhinitis is simply an overreaction of the immune system to common stimuli. Ginger works to prevent the immune system response that causes wheezing, itchy and watery eyes and sneezing.

One of the main components of ginger's allergy-fighting abilities is the compound 6-gingerol (4). This compound blocks the activation of T-cells, which are responsible for the immune system’s overreaction to normal stimuli. In a 2016 study conducted on mice, mice that received a diet containing 2 percent powdered ginger sneezed an average of 2.1 times versus the 15.2 times of the placebo group (5).

While there haven't been any studies on human subjects yet, the results from animal studies have shown promise in treating allergic reactions with ginger. In essence, ginger acts as an antihistamine that can relieve nasal congestion and sneezing, making springtime and daily allergies less debilitating.

Ginger is also beneficial in supporting overall lung health and has been used for 2,500 years as a healing root. Ginger helps to eliminate mucus, clearing the airways and making it easier to breathe. It also reduces inflammation that can cause wheezing and constricted feelings in the chest and throat (6).

4. Supports Blood Circulation

Healthy blood circulation can prevent dangerous illnesses such as blood clots. Drinking ginger tea can help keep circulation running at optimal levels, ensuring your body can perform the functions it needs to stay healthy. Ginger is a vasodilator that opens blood vessels and allows blood to flow through more easily.

Ginger contains amino acids, vitamins and minerals that improve circulation and protect heart health. By blocking fat absorption, ginger reduces the risk of heart disease by limiting build-up in arteries. Ginger contains the compounds gingerol and zingerone, which work as warming agents that effectively increase blood flow. Ginger's ability to decrease inflammation also helps to relax smooth muscle tissue in arteries and veins, thus improving circulation (7).

5. Aids in Weight Loss

If you want to lose weight faster, you may want to consider drinking ginger tea as part of your regular routine. While studies like the one published in the European Journal of Nutrition have found that drinking tea aids in weight loss in general, ginger has special compounds that make weight loss easier (8).

Ginger can aid weight loss by making it easier for the digestive system to break down fats and by blocking fat absorption in the intestines. The same compounds that allow ginger to ease nausea are the ones that enable enhanced efficiency in the digestive tract.

In a review of 27 articles, most of the experimental studies proved that ginger root played a role in accelerating weight loss. While clinical studies had more limited results, the potential for ginger to accelerate metabolism and control appetite make drinking ginger tea a good addition to a healthy diet and exercise regimen (9).

6. Reduces Pain and Inflammation

Many people suffer from aches and pains caused by exercise or a chronic disease. Consuming ginger tea may help to ease muscle pain and joint pain associated with arthritis, menstrual cramps, and osteoarthritis. The main reason behind this health benefit is the anti-inflammatory properties of ginger root.

A study published in Arthritis and Rheumatism in 2001 showed that ginger tea aided in pain relief when it came to sufferers of osteoarthritis. The study focused specifically on knee pain and 63 percent of the 247 participants felt a marked reduction in their osteoarthritis pain (10).

Ginger has also shown promise when it comes to alleviating pain caused by menstrual discomfort. A Shahed University study analyzed the effects of ginger root on 120 student residents attending the university. The students who were given 500 milligrams of ginger root powder for five days showed decreased intensity and pain duration associated with cramps compared to the control group who received a placebo (11).

7. Regulates Blood Sugar

With rates of diabetes on the rise, more and more researchers are pouring time and effort into finding solutions and preventions for the disease. Ginger tea has shown promising results when it comes to treating diabetes by regulation of blood sugar levels.

A study by the Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences analyzed 88 people who had been living with diabetes for 10 years or more. The participants who were given 1 gram of ginger powder three times daily showed decreases in blood sugar levels after the eight-week study. The researchers believe ginger helps to regulate blood sugar by inhibiting the enzyme that breaks down glycogen, which can lead to blood sugar spikes (12).

It's also important to note that the study was conducted alongside the traditional medications the diabetic participants were prescribed by their doctors. So while drinking ginger tea won't necessarily cure diabetes, it can help to regulate blood sugar levels.

8. Supports Healthy Cholesterol Levels

One of the leading causes of death in the United States is heart disease. Contributing factors include smoking, high cholesterol and an unhealthy diet. Fortunately, if you suffer from high cholesterol and want to get healthier, ginger tea may be able to help.

Drinking ginger tea can help to lower dangerous triglycerides and LDL cholesterol, known as bad cholesterol. Ginger tea can increase circulation and reduce inflammation in arteries while reducing cholesterol, thus alleviating the risk of build-up in arteries that can cause blood clots and heart attacks (13).

9. Supports Brain Health

Consuming ginger tea can improve cognitive performance in middle-aged individuals, treat dementia, and can help to prevent neurological diseases such Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's. Most of these benefits have been attributed to the anti-inflammatory properties of the ginger root (14).

A 2011 Thai study gave 60 middle-aged women doses of 400 to 800 milligrams of ginger extract for two months while using computerized and auditory tests to monitor brain function. At the end of the study, the women who received ginger extract showed enhanced working memory and faster cognitive processing. The study also demonstrated an increased power of attention and better quality of memory (15).

A 2013 animal study also found a connection between the use of ginger root and reduced Alzheimer's disease symptoms. Rats were given varying doses of ginger root extract over a period of 35 days and tested for brain function. The rats that were given more than .05 milligrams of ginger root extract showed shorter incidences of memory deficits. While more research is needed, there is evidence that ginger consumption can have an effect delaying the cognitive impacts of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease (16).

Side Effects of Ginger Tea

In general, ginger tea doesn't have any significant side effects. Most nutrition experts and healthcare practitioners recommend consuming a maximum of 4 grams of ginger daily. Since each cup typically contains about 250 milligrams, there is no need to worry about consuming too much. However, there are a few minor irritations that can be caused by consuming ginger tea including heartburn and dizziness.

Heartburn

Consuming ginger may cause heartburn or indigestion if you are not accustomed to spicy foods. Consuming too much ginger can also cause diarrhea so start out with one or two cups per day and see how your body reacts.

Dizziness

Since ginger can lower blood pressure, you may experience feelings of dizziness or lightheadedness. Again, you would have to consume large amounts of ginger to encounter these side effects, so stay within the recommended limits.

Medication Interactions

Ginger contains the same naturally occurring salicylates that are used in aspirin and are responsible for thinning blood. Taking ginger and blood thinners can increase the risk for bruising or complications. If you take blood thinners, discuss with your doctor before drinking ginger tea regularly.

How to Brew Homemade Ginger Tea

Ginger tea can be prepared using ginger powder, tea bags, and raw ginger. It's most common to use raw or fresh ginger, but tea bags are great for use on the go or in the office. To brew ginger tea using raw ginger, use the following ginger tea recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1-inch piece of ginger
  • 8-10 ounces of water
  • Sweetener as desired

Instructions:

Step 1: Prepare Tea

If you are using raw ginger, you should start by grating the ginger into small slivers. Aim to use about 1 teaspoon of grated ginger for every 8 ounces of water. If you find that the ginger flavor is too strong for your tastes, you can add extra water.

Step 2: Boil Water

To release the flavors and healthy compounds in ginger tea, use boiling water, not just hot water, when brewing. Bring the water to a boil and then add immediately to your cup of grated ginger.

Step 3: Steep

Let the ginger steep for 10 minutes when using raw ginger. If using a tea bag, brew based on manufacturer instructions. 

Step 4: Flavor

Since ginger can have a strong taste, many people like to add lemon, honey or maple syrup as a sweetener to balance the flavor and counterbalance the spicy components.

Spruce Up Your Ginger Tea

If plain old ginger root tea isn't enough to tickle your fancy, try adding other flavors like lemon or cinnamon to the mix. Lemon ginger tea is a popular variety and all you need to do is add a few lemon slices or a dash of lemon juice to the recipe above. You can also brew masala chai tea, an Indian tea that features ginger slices, cardamom pods, black peppercorns, cinnamon sticks, and cloves. Add ginger to a health smoothie for added antioxidants.

Ginger& Apple Spice Iced Tea Recipe

If hot ginger tea isn't your thing, try an iced version instead.

Ingredients:

  • 1 2-inch piece of ginger
  • 1 tablespoon Apple Spice
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 1/2 teaspoon of cayenne pepper
  • 4 cups water
  • Sweetener as desired

Instructions:

  1. Use a grater to slice the ginger into thin pieces.
  2. Heat water in a large saucepan or a teapot and add in the ginger pieces, cayenne pepper, cinnamon and apple spice tea.
  3. Turn heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from heat and cool to room temperature.
  4. Pour the tea into a tall glass pitcher and serve in glasses filled with ice cubes.

Drink to Your Health

Ginger tea is used as a natural home remedy for a variety of ailments ranging from nausea and stomach pain to lowering high cholesterol and protecting brain function. Remember to seek medical advice for your physician before using ginger tea as a replacement for or in conjunction with any medications.

While not a standalone cure, homemade ginger tea is an ideal addition to a healthy lifestyle. The spicy flavor, warm finish and invigorating aromas make drinking this tea a delightful activity. Brew a cup of aromatic ginger tea and enjoy the benefits of relaxation and good health.

Sources:

1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11275030

2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21818642/

3. https://wholehealthchicago.com/2009/05/12/ginger/

4. https://www.wsj.com/articles/powdered-ginger-may-ease-seasonal-allergy-symptoms-1442853656

5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26403321

6. https://lunginstitute.com/blog/five-natural-remedies-promote-lung-function/

7. https://www.mannaplus.co.za/how-to-improve-blood-circulation/

8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3515715/

9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29193411

10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11710709

11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22781186

12. https://www.prevention.com/health/diabetes/ginger-shown-lower-blood-sugar-diabetics

13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18813412

14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18812031

15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3253463/

16. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23374025

Источник: https://senchateabar.com/blogs/blog/ginger-tea-benefits

Ginger Root Tea

"The fact that this tea was made using fresh ginger root made it incredibly appealing. I made a batch of tea in under 25 minutes, boiling the ginger for the full 20 minutes, and the flavor was great! It'll surely be my new beverage of choice when it gets colder out." —Victoria Heydt

  • 2tablespoons fresh ginger root (about 2 inches)

  • 4cupswater

  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice (juice of 1/2 lime), optional

  • 1 to 2tablespoonshoney, to taste

  1. Gather the ingredients.

  2. Prepare the fresh ginger by peeling it and slicing it thinly to maximize the surface area. This will help you make a very flavorful ginger tea.

  3. In a 1 1/4-quart pot, add the water and ginger, and bring to a boil for at least 10 minutes. For a stronger and tangier tea, allow to boil for 20 minutes or more, and use more slices of ginger.

  4. Remove it from the heat, strain, and add the lime juice and honey to taste. Enjoy your ginger tea.

Tips

  • The secret to the perfect ginger tea is lots and lots of fresh ginger, simmered for a long time to bring out the flavor. You really can't overdo it, so feel free to add as much ginger as you want and keep it simmering for as long as you want.
  • The roots are typically about 1 inch in diameter, and a 2-inch section should yield about 2 tablespoons of sliced ginger. When measuring by weight, a 2-inch segment should be about 1/2 ounce.
  • If you have leftover ginger root, you can freeze it to use later.
  • For tea throughout the week, make a big batch by doubling or tripling the recipe. Store the tea in a sealed container in the refrigerator. Drink it cold or heat it up one cup at a time within a week for the freshest taste.
  • When storing ginger tea, you may notice some sediment form. It's common for particles from the strained ginger to settle, and it's safe to drink. To avoid it, strain the tea through one or two layers of cheesecloth.

Recipe Variations

  • Sweeten the tea with agave nectar rather than honey. You can also enjoy this tea unsweetened, depending on your health goals or personal taste.
  • Try this recipe with brown rice syrup or monk fruit as an alternative sweetener.
  • Switch from lime to lemon juice; fresh is best for either. Both citrus fruits are great flavor companions to ginger and give the tea a hint of vitamin C.

Does Ginger Need to Be Peeled Before Making Tea?

Peeling ginger root is not necessary and a matter of personal preference. Many people never peel the root, especially for a recipe like ginger tea when it's not consumed. Others prefer to peel older roots and leave the younger roots intact. If you choose to leave the peel, be sure to rinse and scrub the root thoroughly to remove any dirt or debris.

What Are the Health Benefits of Ginger Tea?

For many people, ginger tea is a favorite way to reap the benefits of ginger root. The spice has long played a role in traditional medicine, particularly as a digestive aid for things like upset stomach, nausea, and constipation relief. However, for some people, ginger can provoke gastrointestinal problems. Ginger also has anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant properties, and may offer relief from headaches, colds, and pain caused by inflammation. Researchers continue to look at its possible benefits for various diseases. While there are few side effects to drinking ginger tea, it's always a good idea to discuss it with your doctor.

This Warming Turmeric Tea Is Spiced With Ginger, Cinnamon, and Citrus

Источник: https://www.thespruceeats.com/homemade-ginger-tea-3377239

You can watch a thematic video

10 Amazing Health Benefits of Ginger
how is ginger tea good for you

Comments

  1. hello sir, why is it still not approved? Its been more than 5 days and still not approved. is there anybody who has got thier noc approved from online?

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