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Is fermented cabbage good for you


is fermented cabbage good for you

Cabbage contains natural isothiocyanate compounds (such as sulforaphane), which have cancer-fighting properties. And as long as you choose the. Whether you are generally healthy or have a few health issues, fermented vegetables such as sauerkraut can populate your gut with the bacteria. Eating raw sauerkraut is not a fleeting food trend because sauerkraut benefits may Raw sauerkraut is simply a type of fermented cabbage that has two.
is fermented cabbage good for you
is fermented cabbage good for you

Is fermented cabbage good for you -

Fact check: More studies needed to examine link between fermented foods, COVID-19


The claim: Kimchi may protect against COVID-19

Could diet be the key to thwarting COVID-19? So claims a July Facebook post touting the Korean staple dish kimchi as a potential viral deterrent.   

The post links to a San Antonio Current article that cites a May review written by Dr. Jean Bousquet, honorary professor of Pulmonary Medicine at Montpellier University in France, which was published in the journal Clinical and Translation Allergy. The article asserts that Bousquet's theory suggests "a link between low COVID-19 fatalities and national dietary differences, specifically fermented cabbage."

"High in antioxidants, fermented cabbage can boost immunity and help decrease levels of ACE2, an enzyme in the cell membrane mostly found in the lungs that is used by COVID-19 as an entry point into the body," writer Nina Rangel states. 

The Facebook post urges readers, if interested, to test the theory themselves by making kimchi at home or buying it pre-made from advertised stores.  

Some Facebook users expressed misgivings in the comment section. One questioned if eating kimchi was so beneficial "why did it spread like wildfire in South Korea lol."

"Kimchi eating Korean husband still got COVID and the fridge stinks," another commented. 

In a comment to USA TODAY via Facebook Messenger, the San Antonio Current stated that while it did not consult any medical experts, "local chefs and purveyors of some of the featured products" were consulted before publication. 

"Though they are not medical experts, all provided valuable information on the generally positive effects of a fermented food-heavy diet," it said. 

When asked if there were any concerns that the article's information could be misconstrued, the Current replied, "We did attempt very diligently to be clear in articulating Bousquet’s theory as it relates to existing data surrounding the health benefits of a fermented cabbage-heavy diet. ... Unfortunately, we can only share the information as concisely as possible. The rest is up to the reader."

Fact check: Tuberculosis is more dangerous than COVID-19, but context matters

Fermented foods, bacteria and health

The process of preserving or producing food using microorganisms – fermentation – has been around for several centuries and was used to enhance the flavor and longevity of certain foods. The ancient Egyptians used yeast to leaven bread and brew beer, and the ancient Babylonians used a fermenting technique to preserve meat sausages. Even kombucha, the popular drink of the more health conscious, is believed to have been created by the Chinese in 200 B.C. from fermented tea leaves.

The health benefits of fermented foods and beverages, previously rooted in cultural norms, are gaining recognition within the scientific community. Fermented foods like yogurt, sauerkraut, miso or kefir are believed to help with digestion, immune function, weight loss, heart and even mental health. Kimchi, a beloved Korean side dish consisting of napa cabbage fermented with an assortment of vegetables in lactic acid bacteria (commonly used in food fermentation), is credited with various properties, among them promoting colorectal health, reducing cholesterol, anti-aging, anti-cancer and many others.

While fermented foods can provide a source of vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber, what likely confers the invaluable health benefits are the live bacteria, or probiotics, inhabiting within. 

The human body is home to trillions of bacteria, also known as microbes, and a vast number of them live in the gut. As horrifying as that may sound, the gut microbiome is exceptionally important for nutrient absorption, and problems or imbalances in the microbiome can result in anything from cardiovascular disease to psychiatric conditions. Probiotics come into the picture by repopulating the gut with good, beneficial bacteria, returning the body to a healthy state.     

Fact check: 'Plandemic' sequel makes false claims about Bill Gates

Can kimchi help against COVID-19?

While there is some data to suggest probiotics may be beneficial against COVID-19, there are no published clinical studies examining the effect of kimchi. 

Bousquet, as mentioned by the San Antonio Current, theorizes that the lower COVID-19 mortality exhibited by European countries could be because of a diet consisting of foods inhibiting the molecular entry point for COVID-19, angiotensin-converting enzyme, or ACE2.   

"Foods with potent antioxidant or anti ACE activity – like uncooked or fermented cabbage – are largely consumed in low-death rate European countries, Korea and Taiwan, and might be considered in the low prevalence of deaths," Bousquet writes. 

In countries like Bulgaria, Greece, Romania and Turkey, while not comparable to other European countries in terms of health systems or death reporting, fermented foods may also impact the observed low death rates, he says.

"This might also be associated with diet since cabbage (Romania) and fermented milk (Bulgaria and Greece) are common foods," he continues. "Turkey, another apparently low-death rate country, also consumes a lot of cabbage and fermented milk products." 

Bousquet does not bring in his own data or statistical analysis to validate these assertions, but rather uses existing COVID-19 mortality data from the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource and other regional sources as a basis for his observations.  

Bousquet himself notes a low fatality rate depends on many other factors outside of eating fermented foods such as quarantine duration, health care accessibility, testing, pandemic preparedness and public hygiene. In a July interview with VICE, he stated that his findings proved "the correlation between high consumption of fermented vegetables and the low COVID-19 fatality rates, not 'the-cause-and-effect' between them."

Bousquet's findings gained so much traction among Korean Twitter users that the South Korean government released a statement denying kimchi's ability to cure COVID-19, though it could boost immunity against the virus, according to VICE.  

Fact check: 'Plandemic II' alleges false conspiracy theory involving CDC, NIH; pandemic not planned

Our ruling: Missing context 

We rate this claim as MISSING CONTEXT. Fermented foods, such as kimchi, may have health benefits likely derived from the probiotics they contain. However, there are no published clinical studies establishing kimchi's ability to prevent COVID-19. Dr. Jean Bousquet's theory of a possible correlation between a diet of fermented foods and geographical differences in low COVID-19 mortality needs further investigation. Right now there is not enough context to make such a claim.

Our fact-check sources:

  • The Rockefeller University, "History and Biochemistry of Fermented Foods"
  • Heathline, Jan. 15, 2019, "What Is Fermentation? The Lowdown on Fermented Foods"
  • Journal of Ethnic Foods, Sept. 2015, "Discussion on the origin of kimchi, representative of Korean unique fermented vegetables" 
  • Clinical and Translational Allergy, May 27, "Is diet partly responsible for differences in COVID-19 death rates between and within countries?"
  • Journal of Medicinal Food, Jan. 23, 2014, "Health Benefits of Kimchi (Korean Fermented Vegetables) as a Probiotic Food"
  • The Conversation, May 14, "What is the ACE2 receptor, how is it connected to coronavirus and why might it be key to treating COVID-19? The experts explain"
  • Frontiers in Public Health, May 8, "Using Probiotics to Flatten the Curve of Coronavirus Disease COVID-2019 Pandemic"
  • VICE, July 28, "Can Kimchi Protect You From COVID-19?" 
  • Current Opinion in Gastroenterology, Jan. 1, 2016, "The gut microbiome in health and in disease"
  • Science Magazine, May 7, "Meet the ‘psychobiome’: the gut bacteria that may alter how you think, feel, and act"

Thank you for supporting our journalism. You can subscribe to our print edition, ad-free app or electronic newspaper replica here.

Our fact check work is supported in part by a grant from Facebook.

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Источник: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/factcheck/2020/09/01/fact-check-studies-needed-link-between-fermented-foods-covid-19/5525719002/

Homemade sauerkraut is the simplest way to populate your gut with a variety of nourishing probiotics for robust gut health and immune systems!

Probiotic Rich Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage} :: 2 Ingredients, Quick Prep, Real Food!

Product links in this post are affiliate links. It does not cost you anything and helps maintain the free information on this site, as well as answer the questions of “what brand do you use?” Please know I never personally recommend any product I wouldn’t use on my own family.

The status of your gut determines just about everything…

At this point most people know that just about everything in the body relies on the status of your gut health. And that the status of your gut health is tied to the type of flora (bacteria) dominating the territory.

Probiotic Rich Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage} :: 2 Ingredients, Quick Prep, Real Food!If the good bacteria reigns “king,” digestion is sound, the immune system works more effectively, and the brain is clear.

When the bad bacteria is more prevalent, digestion is disrupted in a myriad of different ways (YES we should be pooping daily – if you are not you are constipated. NO your poop shouldn’t be runny, it shouldn’t hurt to poop, and indigestion, heartburn, and tummy aches are not normal!), the immune system is completely off (ie getting sick often, autoimmune disease, cancer, etc), and the brain is a foggy mess (the gut-brain connection is tied to many brain/neurological disorders from depression and Alzheimer’s to ADHD, autism, and everything in between.)

Probiotic Rich Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage} :: 2 Ingredients, Quick Prep, Real Food!Infiltrate and populate!

Traditionally fermented foods provide easy to absorb probiotics to our guts to use for battle every day. Whether you are generally healthy or have a few health issues, fermented vegetables such as sauerkraut can populate your gut with the bacteria it needs to sustain a robust immune system, healthy digestive system, and sound mind.

Probiotic Rich Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage} :: 2 Ingredients, Quick Prep, Real Food!The simplest prep – let nature do the work!

Sauerkraut prep is so simple, and yet what actually happens as the fermentation happens takes place is so interesting and complex. Just a few teaspoons of sea salt sprinkled over shredded cabbage lends the the cabbage its own brine to ferment. Over the course of a few days to a week, the sauerkraut increases in beneficial digestive enzymes, vitamins C and B, as well as a variety of strains of beneficial bacterial for the gut to flourish. It’s as simple (and as complex!) as that!

Probiotic Rich Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage} :: 2 Ingredients, Quick Prep, Real Food!How to add sauerkraut to your meal plan

My favorite way to eat sauerkraut is as a brine-y, pickled bite to a sandwich wrap, burger, or a salad. Think of anything you like to add a salty, brined bite to! If you are eating sauerkraut in a medicinal way, such as if you are on the GAPS protocol, sometimes it’s just best to eat a tablespoon or so before you eat your meal to get the digestive enzymes in your gut to help you digest your meal – and to get it over with if you don’t particularly care for the taste. I have to admit, not growing up on sauerkraut, it took me some time to get used to. I ate it because I knew I needed it, and over time I have grown to love it!

Probiotic Rich Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage} :: 2 Ingredients, Quick Prep, Real Food!Ok, but what about the kids?!

Let’s start with the little guys first! If you have little ones at home, say between the ages of 6 months to 1 year old, jump on it!You are at a really great window of time to introduce new flavors and textures where baby is willing and open – and hasn’t really learned or tested the word *no* yet 😉 I served my babies teaspoons of the brine from fermented vegetables not only to get the health benefits from it, but to get them used to the sour bite! I was always really surprised at how my babies took to ferments after the initial pucker! The cabbage softens during fermentation, so small pieces of the sauerkraut makes great finger food material for the little ones chasing food around their tray or table. Out of my 3 {very} different personality kids, they all willingly eat sauerkraut, and I truly believe it is because their palates were trained for it young.

But don’t give up on those toddlers and big kids! My biggest advice would be not to make a big deal out of it. If you have toddlers, give them bites of YOUR food first. They love eating off your plate. Set the example and eat it yourself and maybe give them bites of it straight up, or get it into a yummy sandwich and let them have at it. If you have older, school aged kids and teens I would start with just serving it in a sandwich. If they question it or turn it down, discuss the why. Talk to the school aged kids about what the bacteria in their gut is for. Let the teens read this post! Let them see the why behind it. Talk about how much better they will feel if there are some gut issues or gut related issues (from ADD to anxiety, allergies to frequent colds and on and on!). Some kids might just prefer to get a spoonful in and over-with and then enjoy their meal. Go for it! This is such an inexpensive way to get probiotics in!

Probiotic Rich Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage} :: 2 Ingredients, Quick Prep, Real Food!How do I begin eating fermented vegetables if I have never tried them before?

Fermented vegetables are teeming with good bacteria, and, especially for those with sensitive tummies, food allergies, or digestive disorders, fermented vegetables make the entire eating process easier on the gut by acting as a digestive aide! Eating even a tablespoon or so of ferment with each meal will aide in digesting your food as well as provide stability to your immune system and brain health.

Start with 1 tablespoon or so per day to begin with to allow the friendly bacteria to make their home in your gut. Starting out with too much all at once can lead to tummy upset as the good bacteria takes over the bad. Increase to 1 tablespoon 3x per day as you feel comfortable. Once your body is used to the ferments, you can eat as much as you like and tolerate. My school aged girls eat around 2 or so tablespoons of sauerkraut at a time when they eat it.

Probiotic Rich Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage} :: 2 Ingredients, Quick Prep, Real Food!Fermenting tools

While you can definitely get your ferments going today with just glass jar and a plastic lid (metal lids will corrode over time so plastic is recommended), as you get going you may want to take a look at fermenting tools that make the process even easier and stress free.

Vegetable ferments do best in an anaerobic environment (that is, “no oxygen” using an air tight seal). Plastic lids work fine, though some air does get through, and as the gasses build up in the ferment you need to “release” them by opening the lid here and there. The air that gets through also makes it easier for stray airborne microbes and molds to get in which can make the whole jar go bad.

There are a couple of sealing options you can choose from, and I really have found these to give the best fermenting results. The one that I use is the first recommendation, the Pickle Pipe.

    • The Pickle Pipe :: I am convinced a busy, “every day” mom invented this fermenting tool! Talk about zero fuss, *easy to clean,* and affordable!The Pickle Pipe creates a seal with a simple (easy to wash!) silicone disk, and the metal ring your jar comes with. The “pipe” part of the silicone disk has a special opening that only pressures open when the gasses build up in the jar and need to be released. So basically…set it and forget it! You don’t have to check for pressure everyday at all. I also am in love with their Pickle Pebbles which weight down the ferment at the top so you don’t have to worry about molding or the tips of the veggies going bad from being out of the brine. Invaluable! I have never had a ferment go bad or mold using my Pickle Pipes and Pebbles.
    • Fido Jar :: Fido jars create an incredible anaerobic sealed environment and are super easy to clean and take care of. No crazy parts to clean, and they are beautiful lined up in the kitchen to ferment! You will need to “burp” these every day or so to let the gasses out but they work very well! They are pricier than mason jars (especially if you already have a lot of mason jars at home, and can just get some Pickle Pipes to top them off), but they will last forever and, again, they are beautiful!
    • Traditional Fermentation Crock :: I have to be honest…I love these! I really do! They are on my foodie dream list and when I can afford a really beautiful new fermenting crock I really, really want one for my kitchen! They are gorgeous, easy to clean and work fantastic. They come with a weight to keep the veggies down to prevent molding and they create a perfect anaerobic environment.
    • Air-Lock Lids:: These are a really great, inexpensive option – especially if you already have a lot of mason jars at home. I think the Pickle Pipes are easier to clean and use, but if you have some of these lying around don’t let them go to waste – they work great!

One last equipment note!Many people find these Pickle Packersuseful for squeezing the cabbage for making the natural brine. I have use a wooden spoon for years but think these are great too! {My birthday is in the fall if anyone wants to send me a wishlist gift! 🙂 }. Please keep in mind not to use metal spoons as it messes with the fermenting process – only wooden utensils.

Probiotic Rich Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage} :: 2 Ingredients, Quick Prep, Real Food!

Probiotic Rich Homemade Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage}

Homemade sauerkraut is the simplest way to populate your gut with a variety of nourishing probiotics for robust gut health and immune systems!

Course: Condiment

Cuisine: American

Keyword: fermented cabbage recipe, homemade sauerkraut, sauerkraut recipe

Servings: 8servings

Author: Renee - www.raisinggenerationnourished.com

  • 1/2 medium head of cabbage sliced thin or shredded
  • 2-3 tsp sea salt
  • 1-2 cloves of garlic smashed (Optional. I love the flavor and sweetness the garlic gives to sauerkraut - it is the only way I like it!)
  • Put a big handful of the sliced cabbage into a clean pint jar, and sprinkle the sea salt over top. Using a wooden spoon or a vegetable pounder, press and stir the cabbage, squeezing the cabbage down. The salt will draw out the natural juices in the cabbage and it will create it's own brine with the sea salt. (It takes a few minutes for the juices to develop so be patient!)

  • Keep adding cabbage into the jar, packing it down into the jar, letting the salt soften the cabbage until you reach the top of the jar (Leaving about 1 inch of head-space at the top). Allow the salt to draw out enough juices in the cabbage to be fully submerged in the brine.

  • Put your fermenting weight on top of the cabbage/brine if you are using one, and wipe the rim of the jar clean.

  • Close up your jar (Put on your Pickle Pipe, or close the lid of your Fido Jar, or lid and use your Air-Lock. A simple plastic lid can work for your first time until you get the hang of things and want to invest in something to make your fermenting process easier.).

  • Set the jar at room temperature for 1-3 weeks depending on the taste you are going for. The longer it sits, the more flavor will develop. You can open and taste along the way until you are satisfied. I ferment mine for about 2 weeks, and that is the taste my kids enjoy best. Keep in mind that if you live in a warmer climate, you may not need as much time to ferment.

Tips on recipe size

This recipe makes 1 pint of sauerkraut. It is a great amount to get started on. I typically double this recipe into 2 pint jars (you could double into a quart jar, but I like to use the 2 smaller jars so my kids can get it out of the fridge to help themselves).

A quick note for those with histamine sensitivities!

If you have a hard time tolerating fermented foods or have a histamine sensitivity/allergy, sauerkraut is not recommended. Don’t beat yourself up! I have been there (and healed from!) histamine sensitivity, and it is worth avoiding foods that bother you. I used this soil based probiotic while I was healing and tolerated it well. (UPDATE 2021 – Amazon does not seem to have the probiotic I used anymore, but Perfect Supplements does have it!) (I am not a doctor or an expert in this area, so if you have questions I can try to answer them, but the Healing Histamine website is my favorite resource for this topic!)

More real food recipes you might like ::

Источник: https://www.raisinggenerationnourished.com/2017/01/probiotic-rich-sauerkraut/
Heads of cabbage.

The word sauerkraut means "sour cabbage" in German; it's naturally fermented cabbage. Natural fermentation is one of the oldest means of food preservation and it reduces the risk of foodborne illness and food spoilage.

Nutritional value of sauerkraut

Sauerkraut is a low-calorie food; only 42 calories per cup. It's a good source of vitamin C. It's high in sodium because of the salt used in fermentation. Reduce the sodium content, as well as the tartness, by rinsing sauerkraut in cold water before using.

Ingredients: high-quality cabbage and canning salt

Sauerkraut can easily be made and preserved at home with its basic ingredients of cabbage and salt. Use a researched tested recipe, as the proportion of salt to cabbage is the critical to quality and safety of sauerkraut.

To make good sauerkraut begin by selecting disease-free, firm, sweet, mature heads of cabbage from mid- and late-season crops. Plan to begin cleaning and shredding the cabbage within 24 to 48 hours of harvest. A kraut cutter is the traditional way to shred the cabbage, but a modern-day food processor moves the process along and saves on the fingers.

A kraut cutter is the traditional way to shred the cabbage, but a modern-day food processor moves the process along and saves on the fingers.
Fermentation supplies, cabbage, crock, canning salt and brine.

Canning or pickling salt draws out the cabbage juice so it can be fermented. Using too little salt not only softens the cabbage but also yields a product lacking in flavor. Too much salt delays the natural fermentation process. For every 5 pounds of shredded cabbage, mix in 3 tablespoons of canning salt.

Choose the right container to ferment the cabbage

The choice of container to pack the cabbage in is important. Old-fashioned earthenware crocks are traditional and are still a good choice as long as they are not cracked or chipped. Food-grade plastic pails that are sturdy and rigid make excellent containers. You do not want to make sauerkraut in metal containers of any type or in plastic containers that were never intended for food use.

Pack tightly and cover the cabbage

Sauerkraut brining.

Once the cabbage and salt mixture is packed tightly into a suitable container, it's essential that you cover the cabbage and liquid to exclude air, since the fermentation process requires an anaerobic (air-tight) condition. A salt-water (brine-filled), food-grade plastic bag is one of the easiest and best ways to both cover and weigh down the cabbage.

Temperature range needed for fermentation

Store the container at 70 to 75 F while fermenting. At these temperatures, the sauerkraut will be ready in 3 to 4 weeks.

  • At 70 to 75 F, kraut will be fully fermented in about 3 to 4 weeks.
  • At 60 to 65 F, fermentation may take 5 to 6 weeks.
  • At temperatures lower than 60 F, kraut may not ferment.
  • Above 75 F, kraut may become soft.

Sauerkraut recipe

Yield: about 9 quarts

Ingredients

  • 25 lbs. cabbage.
  • 3/4 cup canning or pickling salt.

Procedure

Work with about 5 pounds of cabbage at a time.

  1. Discard outer leaves.
  2. Rinse heads under cold running water and drain.
  3. Cut heads in quarters and remove cores.
  4. Shred or slice to a thickness of a quarter.
Adding salt into cabbage.

Put in containers and add salt.

  1. Put cabbage in a suitable fermentation container and add 3 tablespoons of salt.
  2. Mix thoroughly, using clean hands.
  3. Pack firmly until salt draws juices from cabbage.

Repeat shredding, salting and packing until all cabbage is in the container.

  • Be sure container is deep enough so that its rim is at least 4 or 5 inches above the cabbage.
  • If juice does not cover cabbage, add boiled and cooled brine (1-1/2 tablespoons of salt per quart of water).

Add plate and weights, cover container with a clean bath towel.

Store at 70 to 75 F while fermenting.

During fermentation:

  • If you weigh the cabbage down with a brine-filled bag, don't disturb the crock until normal fermentation is completed (when bubbling ceases).
  • If you use a plate and jars as weights, you will have to check the kraut 2 to 3 times each week and remove scum if it forms.

Fully fermented sauerkraut may be canned or frozen

To can sauerkraut:

  • Hot pack: Bring kraut and liquid slowly to a boil in a large kettle, stirring frequently. Remove from heat and fill jars rather firmly with kraut and juices, leaving ½ inch headspace.
  • Raw pack: Fill jars firmly with kraut and cover with juices, leaving ½ inch headspace.
  • Wipe jar rim and adjust lids.
  • Process in a boiling water bath.
    • Raw pack: process pints for 25 minutes and quarts for 30 minutes.
    • Hot pack: process pints for 15 minutes and quarts for 20 minutes.

To freeze sauerkraut:

  • Fill pint- or quart-size freezer bags or reusable ridge plastic freezer containers.
  • Fill to 1 - 2 inches from their tops, squeeze out air, seal and label.
  • Freeze for 8 - 12 months.

Debbie Botzek-Linn, former Extension educator; William Schafer, emeritus Extension specialist; and Suzanne Driessen, Extension educator

Источник: https://extension.umn.edu/preserving-and-preparing/how-make-your-own-sauerkraut

What Are the Health Benefits of Sauerkraut?

Sauerkraut is great addition to salads, sandwiches and wraps, pairs well with eggs, and is perfect on sausages. But it provides so much more than great flavor. Sauerkraut boasts some impressive health benefits, but only if you know which kind to buy. Here are some health benefits of sauerkraut and a guide to picking one with the best nutritional value.

Sauerkraut and fermentation

Sauerkraut is fermented cabbage that's used as a condiment or tasty side dish. It's made through a process known as fermentation, and uses relatively simple ingredients — just cabbage and salt. It's the fermentation process that's so important because it's what gives sauerkraut its distinct flavor and health benefits.

When cabbage and salt are packed into a container and left to ferment, the cabbage begins to release liquid and creates its own brine. Cabbage naturally has lactobacillus bacteria on its leafy surface. When in the brine solution, these bacteria start to convert the carbohydrates in cabbage into lactic acid, which act as a natural preservative for the sauerkraut. That's why there are no additives and preservatives needed in properly made sauerkraut.

After 3 to 20 days in the brine solution, the cabbage begins to ferment into a sour, salty side dish. The longer it ferments, the more the flavor will change. If you're making it at home, it's really up to your individual taste buds to decide when it's ready to eat. If you're buying a commercial brand, they will all taste a bit different depending on how they are made.

Nutrients in sauerkraut

As a side dish, a cup of sauerkraut contains just 30 calories, but boasts and impressive four grams of fiber, and is a source of vitamin C, vitamin K, iron, potassium and folate. Some brands are very high in salt, so read labels and compare.

In addition to vitamins and minerals, some types of sauerkraut may contain beneficial probiotics. These are live microorganisms that are being studied for their ability to confer health benefits to humans, including improved gut health and maintaining a well-functioning immune system.

Homemade sauerkraut in a jar

Health benefits of sauerkraut

Studies have shown that eating fermented foods may be associated with a reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease, and it's likely due to bacteria such as lactobacillus. Eating fermented foods may improve gut health and enhance immune and anti-inflammatory responses.

Fermented vegetables such as sauerkraut have also been studied for their ability to help lower blood pressure levels. In one study, researchers added sauerkraut to the diet of people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). They found that sauerkraut improved the symptoms of IBS, and led to changes in the gut microbiome.

Foods were traditionally fermented to prolong shelf life and keep them safely preserved, but researchers soon discovered that there also a host of health benefits from fermented foods. The benefits may be due to probiotics, or could come from some other benefit from the fermentation process.

During fermentation, lactic acid bacteria help synthesize vitamins and minerals, make the enzymes that help digest proteins, and help eliminate anti-nutrients from food, such as phytates in grains. These factors can all help aid digestion, and are some reasons why sauerkraut is good for gut health.

Does all sauerkraut contain probiotics?

It's important to clarify this here: All sauerkraut is made by fermentation, but not all sauerkraut contains high levels of active probiotics.

A review of studies shows that some types of sauerkraut may have a probiotic effect. One study looked specifically at 114 different lactic acid bacteria in sauerkraut, and the researchers identified three strains with probiotic potential. Of course, these strains are not found in all brands of sauerkraut.

Does cooking destroy sauerkraut's probiotics?

Using sauerkraut in recipes is delicious, but the heat used in cooking sauerkraut will kill probiotics. If you do cook your sauerkraut, serve a bit extra as a raw side dish or condiment to reap the most benefit!

How much sauerkraut should I eat?

If you're looking to eat sauerkraut for its health benefits, you may be wondering how much sauerkraut you should eat for gut health. To promote overall gut health, try incorporating regular amounts of naturally fermented raw sauerkraut into your diet on a consistent basis along with a variety of other fermented, probiotic-rich foods, such as yogurt, kimchi, kefir, and kombucha.

sandwiches with rye bread and sauerkraut
Enjoying sauerkraut on sandwiches is an easy way to eat it raw.

How to buy sauerkraut with probiotics

If you're buying sauerkraut to add flavor to meals, choose any brand you like. But if you're specifically looking for the health benefits from a fermented product that may contain probiotics, there's more you need to know.

A recent study properly defined 'fermented foods

Источник: https://www.allrecipes.com/article/sauerkraut-health-benefits/

Are fermented foods good for IBS?

 

Should you eat sauerkraut if you have IBS?

Eating fermented cabbage may help improve your IBS symptoms. A small study in 2018 showed eating sauerkraut for 6 weeks improved the IBS symptom severity and gut microbiome (it was only 34 people). This could be due to the positive effect of adding beneficial microbes into the gut.

Even the pasteurised version of sauerkraut (with no live bacteria) had a significant beneficial impact on the gut bacteria which is probably down to the pre-biotic content of the cabbage (fibre feeds the beneficial bacteria).

Is Kefir better than milk for IBS? 

Fermented dairy may be easier for you to digest if you struggle with dairy intolerance. Live bacteria break down lactose in the fermentation process. One study found yogurts and kefir reduced the perceived severity of flatulence by 54% to 71% compared to milk.

(This won’t help you if you have a dairy allergy though, you still need to avoid kefir.)

 

Low FODMAP fermented foods

Also – if you’re dairy free you can sometimes find coconut or soy kefir. However, some people with IBS will also react to these products as well.

Can I buy fermented foods for IBS?

  • It can be cheaper to make your own – and relatively easy.
  • If you buy fermented foods check your product isn’t pasteurised which means all the beneficial bacteria will be killed off. Look out for markings of Live bacteria or probiotic bacteria on the label.
How to start using fermented foods for IBS

Start slowly. Don’t eat a whole jar of sauerkraut or gulp down a whole carton of kefir if you haven’t tried it before. Start with a small amount, notice any reactions.

Fermented foods can be a great way to support a healthy balanced diet. If they don’t work for you, it’s not essential to include them.

Источник: https://www.goodnessme-nutrition.com/ibs/are-fermented-foods-good-for-ibs/

Top 5 health benefits of sauerkraut

Nutritional Profile of sauerkraut

A 50g serving of sauerkraut provides approximately:
4kcal / 18KJ
0.6g Protein
0.0g Fat
0.6g Carbohydrates
1.5g Fibre
25mg Calcium
90mg Potassium
5mg Vitamin C
0.74g Salt

If you buy sauerkraut off-the-shelf you should be aware that many varieties are pasteurised to extend their shelf-life, this kills the beneficial bacteria. Look for ‘unpasteurised’ products which should be kept chilled.

1. Source of beneficial nutrients

Sauerkraut is a good source of fibre as well as vitamins and minerals and being a fermented food it promotes the growth of beneficial probiotics which are important for digestive health. The nutritional value of food, like cabbage, can be enriched by fermentation and it makes the food easier for us to digest. This is because sauerkraut contains enzymes that help the body break down food into smaller, and more easily digestible molecules which in turn helps us absorb more of its nutrients.

Sauerkraut is, however, a source of salt – this is because a saline environment promotes the growth of beneficial Lactobaccili whilst inhibiting the types of bacteria which would lead to spoilage and deterioration.

2. May support the immune system

Most of our immune system is located in our gut, so it may come as no surprise that the gut-supporting properties of sauerkraut may also be of benefit. The good bacteria or probiotics, from sauerkraut, help to keep the lining of your digestive system healthy. A strong gut lining stops any unwanted substances or toxins from ‘leaking’ into your body and thereby causing an immune response. These same bacteria may also support your natural antibodies and reduce your risk of infections.

As well as being a source of probiotics, sauerkraut also provides vitamin C and iron, nutrients known to support a stronger immune response.

3. May support heart health

There are a number of factors supporting sauerkraut’s heart healthy properties. Firstly, being fibre-rich and a source of beneficial probiotic bacteria makes sauerkraut useful for balancing cholesterol levels. Cabbage is a good source of potassium, that and the probiotic content may promote lower blood pressure. Sauerkraut is also a source of vitamin K2 which helps prevent calcium deposits from accumulating in arteries, a possible cause of atherosclerosis.

4. May improve mood and behaviour

Our understanding of the gut and how it impacts our mood and behaviour is fast evolving and it would appear that fermented foods, like sauerkraut, may play an important part. Certain strains of probiotic bacteria, including Lactobacillis helveticus and Bifidobacteria, longum, commonly found in fermented foods, may improve symptoms of anxiety and depression. They do this by promoting a healthier balance in the gut and through their production of compounds called short chain fatty acids which help to reduce inflammation and promote a healthier gut environment.

Fermented food may also support mood and behaviour by promoting the gut’s uptake of mood-balancing micronutrients, like magnesium and zinc.

5. May reduce the risk of cancer

Rich in compounds like sulforaphane, cabbage is a valuable vegetable to add to your diet. That’s because these beneficial compounds, appear to prevent oxidative damage and possibly act in protective way against cancer including colorectal cancer. In a similar fashion, fermented cabbage and its juices appears to play an effective role.

Is sauerkraut safe for everyone?

Sauerkraut is safe for the majority of people, however, being rich in histamine those with a histamine intolerance, may experience side effects after consuming it. Furthermore, if fermented foods are new to you or you are not used to a fibre-rich diet you may experience symptoms such as bloating and flatulence.

Those on prescribed medication, such as monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI), should exercise caution when introducing sauerkraut to their diet. This is because sauerkraut may have high levels of tyramine, although amounts appear to vary widely.

Introducing fermented foods to someone who is critically ill or immune-compromised should be done with caution and under the guidance of a GP or healthcare professional.

When making your own sauerkraut, always follow a recipe and be sure to use sterile equipment, follow fermentation times and temperatures carefully.

Some sauerkrauts are high in salt, so if you follow a low salt diet, check labels or recipes to assess whether it is appropriate for you.


This article was last reviewed on 8 November 2021 by Kerry Torrens.

Kerry Torrens is a registered nutritionist (MBANT) with a postgraduate diploma in personalised nutrition and nutritional therapy. She is a member of the British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) and a member of the Guild of Food Writers. Over the last 15 years she has been a contributing author to a number of nutritional and cookery publications, including BBC Good Food.

Nicola Shubrook is a nutritional therapist and works with both private clients and the corporate sector. She is an accredited member of the British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy (BANT) and the Complementary & Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC). Find out more at urbanwellness.co.uk.

All health content on bbcgoodfood.com is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other healthcare professional. If you have any concerns about your general health, you should contact your local healthcare provider. See our website terms and conditions for more information.

Источник: https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/health-benefits-sauerkraut

Magical Sour Cabbage: How Sauerkraut Helped Save the Age of Sail

That’s right, sauerkraut. Not a traditional super-food by definition, this stringy, pale product of fermentation is the victim of a serious case of mistaken identity. Not only is sauerkraut really good for you, but it also changed the world.

Simple, fermented sauerkraut played an important role in helping prevent scurvy — an affliction known in its day as the scourge of the seas, responsible for an estimated two million deaths between 1500 and 1800 — on sailing ships around the world.

Scurvy, a disease caused by extreme vitamin C deficiency, plagued sailors aboard long-distance sailing ships for centuries. Also known as ascorbic acid, vitamin C helps the body produce important proteins and acts as an antioxidant helping to protect cell structures from damage caused by free radicals.

Not only is sauerkraut really good for you, but it also changed the world.

Jonathan Lamb, a humanities professor at Vanderbilt University and author of the upcoming book, “Scurvy: The Disease of Discovery,” says the disease took its toll on nearly every voyage during the Age of Sail — the period of global exploration by sailing ships lasting from the 16th to the mid-19th century.

Lamb’s research details the loss of life on many famous expeditions throughout the period. For instance, commodore George Anson, who set sail with six ships for the Pacific in 1740 with 2,000 able seamen, returned to England with less than 700, the rest consumed by the disease. (And it wasn’t a pretty death: According to Anson’s chaplain, “those affected have skin as black as ink, ulcers, difficult respiration, rictus of the limbs, teeth falling out and, perhaps most revolting of all, a strange plethora of gum tissue sprouting out of the mouth, which immediately rotted and lent the victim’s breath an abominable odor.”)

Anson’s voyage brought scurvy to the public’s attention and after studying historical accounts of the disease, in 1753, Scottish naval surgeon James Lind noticed scurvy was invariably linked to those whose diet had been severely limited. He began testing various foods and noted that citrus fruits provided the quickest and most effective cure for the disease.

However, this brought about another problem. How do you keep fruit fresh on a sailing ship that could be at sea for months at a time? You don’t.

With no real cure available, the British crown outfitted four captains during the 1760s with various potential cures in an attempt to find a reliable method to prevent scurvy through trial and error.

How do you keep fruit fresh on a sailing ship that could be at sea for months at a time? You don’t.

Captain James Cook, one of these four captains, was given several different experimental foods to try aboard his ship the HM Bark Endeavor when he left England for the South Pacific in 1768. Among them, as noted in the victualing minutes — the log of provisions put aboard — was 7,860 pounds of sauerkraut.

Made by fermenting thinly sliced cabbage in its own natural juices, sauerkraut is rich in vitamin C, which — although unknown at the time — is the key to preventing and curing scurvy.

While raw cabbage contains moderate levels of the vitamin, the process of fermentation sees these levels rise considerably.

“The bacteria create vitamin C and certain B vitamins as by-products of their metabolism. They digest parts of the cabbage and as part of their digestion the vitamins are made,” says Alex Lewin, fermented food guru and author of “Real Food Fermentation.” “So you get more vitamin C from sauerkraut than just from cabbage, it’s sort of a super raw food in that way.”

‘You get more vitamin C from sauerkraut than just from cabbage, it’s sort of a super raw food in that way.’

Three years after leaving England with his store of Sour Kroutt (as it was spelled then) and with not a single death attributed to scurvy, Cook returned home to report his findings. Although sour cabbage alone did not rid the seas of the disease — Cook’s crew also dined on such delicacies as spruce beer, malt and portable soup (think 18th century powdered beef stock) — it certainly played a major part.

It must be noted, though, while captains were sure to stock kraut on future voyages because of its nutritious qualities, Cook was far from the first to find out the curative powers of the dish: Asian cultures have relied on fermented cabbage to survive long winters between fruit seasons for thousands of years. Kimchi, sauerkraut’s Korean cousin, was historically used during winter to stave off vitamin deficiencies, while early records show workers building the Great Wall of China ate fermented cabbage regularly when fruit was not available. In fact, the earliest sauerkraut recipes found in Eastern Europe are thought to have come by way of the hordes of Genghis Khan.

So next time you are craving an orange or a lemon, try a mouthful of sauerkraut. It might be just what your body needs.

Источник: https://modernfarmer.com/2014/04/magical-sour-cabbage-sauerkraut-helped-save-age-sail/

Magical Sour Cabbage: How Sauerkraut Helped Save the Age of Sail

That’s right, sauerkraut. Not a traditional super-food by definition, this stringy, pale product usa t mobile imei check fermentation is the victim of a serious case of mistaken identity. Not only is sauerkraut really good for you, but it also changed the world.

Simple, fermented sauerkraut played an important role in helping prevent scurvy — an affliction known in its day as the scourge of the seas, responsible for an estimated two million deaths between 1500 and 1800 — on sailing ships around the world.

Scurvy, a disease caused by extreme vitamin C deficiency, plagued sailors aboard long-distance sailing ships for centuries. Also known as ascorbic acid, vitamin C helps the body produce important proteins and acts as an antioxidant helping to protect cell structures from damage caused by free radicals.

Not only is sauerkraut really good for you, but it also changed the world.

Jonathan Lamb, a humanities professor at Vanderbilt University and author of the upcoming book, “Scurvy: The Disease of Discovery,” says how to activate walmart prepaid debit card disease took its toll on nearly every voyage during the Age of Sail — the period of global exploration by sailing ships lasting from the 16th to the mid-19th century.

Lamb’s research details the loss of life on many famous expeditions throughout the period. For instance, commodore George Anson, who set sail with six ships for the Pacific in 1740 with 2,000 able seamen, returned to England with less than 700, the rest consumed by the disease. (And it wasn’t a pretty death: According to Anson’s chaplain, “those affected have is fermented cabbage good for you as black as ink, ulcers, difficult respiration, rictus of the limbs, teeth falling out and, perhaps most revolting of all, a strange plethora of gum tissue sprouting out of the mouth, which immediately rotted and lent the victim’s breath an abominable odor.”)

Anson’s voyage brought scurvy to the public’s attention and after studying historical accounts of the disease, in 1753, Scottish naval surgeon James Lind noticed scurvy was invariably linked to those whose diet had been severely limited. He began testing various foods and noted that citrus fruits provided the quickest and most effective cure for the disease.

However, this brought about another problem. How do you keep fruit fresh on a sailing ship that could be at sea for months at a time? You don’t.

With no real cure available, the British crown outfitted four captains during the 1760s with various potential cures in an attempt to find a reliable method to prevent scurvy through trial and error.

How do you keep fruit fresh on first savings bank mortgage sailing ship that could be at sea for months at a time? You don’t.

Captain James Cook, one of these four captains, was given several different experimental foods to try aboard his ship the HM Bark Endeavor when he left England for the South Pacific in 1768. Among them, as noted in the victualing minutes — the log of provisions put aboard — was 7,860 pounds of sauerkraut.

Made by fermenting thinly sliced cabbage in its own natural juices, sauerkraut is rich in vitamin C, which — although unknown at the time — is the key to preventing and curing scurvy.

While raw cabbage contains moderate levels of the vitamin, the process of fermentation sees these levels rise considerably.

“The bacteria create vitamin C and certain B vitamins as by-products of their metabolism. They digest parts of the cabbage and as part of their digestion the vitamins are made,” says Alex Lewin, fermented food guru and author of “Real Food Fermentation.” “So you get more vitamin C from sauerkraut than just from cabbage, it’s sort of a super raw food in that way.”

‘You get more vitamin C from sauerkraut than just from cabbage, it’s sort of a super raw food in that way.’

Three years after leaving England with his store of Sour Kroutt (as it was spelled then) and with not a single death attributed to scurvy, Cook returned home to report his findings. Although sour cabbage alone did not rid the seas of the disease — Cook’s crew also dined on such delicacies as spruce beer, malt and portable soup (think 18th century powdered beef stock) — it certainly played a major part.

It must be noted, though, while captains were sure to stock kraut on future voyages because of its nutritious qualities, Cook was far from the first to find out the curative powers of the dish: Asian cultures have relied on fermented cabbage to survive long winters between fruit seasons for thousands of years. Kimchi, sauerkraut’s Korean cousin, was historically used during winter to stave off vitamin deficiencies, while early records show workers building the Great Wall of China ate fermented cabbage regularly when fruit was not available. In fact, the earliest sauerkraut recipes found in Eastern Europe are thought to have come by way of the hordes of Genghis Khan.

So next time you are craving an orange or a lemon, try a mouthful of sauerkraut. It might be just what your body needs.

Источник: https://modernfarmer.com/2014/04/magical-sour-cabbage-sauerkraut-helped-save-age-sail/

Why You Should Be Eating Fermented Foods

Fermented foods have long been a staple in many traditional diets, but are now enjoying an increase in popularity. Why? Because eating fermented foods could be a wonderful way to naturally enhance the health of your digestive and immune systems. Fermented foods are filled with probiotics, and there is fermented cabbage good for you a growing awareness of the benefits of these "friendly" bacteria in maintaining optimal health. They may sound too exotic for you, but don't be put off. Here you will learn more about fermented foods and why they should become a regular part of your diet.

Overview

Fermented foods are foods that have been prepared in such a way that the bacteria naturally found within them starts to ferment. Fermentation is a chemical process in which microorganisms, such as bacteria and yeasts, and their enzymes break down starches and sugars within the foods, possibly making them easier to digest. The end result is a product that is filled with helpful organisms and enzymes. This process of fermentation is a natural preservative, which means that fermented foods can last a long time.

Health Benefits

Fermented foods, because they are filled with healthy probiotics and enzymes, are thought to:

There are several advantages of consuming fermented foods, as opposed to taking a probiotic supplement:

  • You are getting probiotics in a natural way.
  • You are guaranteed to get live strains.
  • You are getting more strains than those isolated in a laboratory.
  • You are getting a variety of strains, thus improving the likelihood that you are giving your system what it needs.
  • Fermented foods are significantly more affordable than many probiotic formulations.

Role in Addressing Digestive Symptoms

If you have chronic digestive problems, including IBS, some people believe that fermented foods may be a great dietary option: they enhance the digestive process and have a positive effect on gut flora, thus reducing problematic digestive symptoms. In addition, because the sugars in the vegetables or milk products are already fermented, consuming these products may result in less gas and bloating.

If you are following a low FODMAP diet, you'll want to check the Monash University app or website to learn about the FODMAP content of specific fermented foods.

It has been theorized that eating fermented foods may reduce the risk of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), a condition that results in IBS-like symptoms.

How Are Foods Fermented?

Many fermented foods are made by adding a starter culture of bacteria to food. Thus, yogurt and kefir are service credit union branches near me when a culture is added to milk, while kombucha is made when a culture is added to a sweetened tea.

Fermented vegetables are created by shredding or cutting the vegetable into small pieces, which are then packed into an airtight container with some saltwater.

Recommended Foods

The best fermented foods are the ones that you enjoy! There's a wide variety to choose from.

Cultured Dairy Products

Even if you are lactose intolerant, you may be able to enjoy cultured dairy products, since the bacteria within these products have already broken down the offending lactose:

  • Cultured buttermilk
  • Fermented cottage cheese
  • Kefir
  • Yogurt

Non-Dairy Alternatives

These products are a good option if you think you have a sensitivity to dairy products:

  • Coconut kefir
  • Coconut yogurt
  • Soy kefir
  • Soy yogurt

Fermented Beverages

Note: Some fermented beverages contain trace amounts of alcohol. Read labels carefully so is fermented cabbage good for you you know what you are drinking.

Fermented Vegetables

Here are some examples of popular vegetables for fermenting—make your own: fermented carrots, lacto-fermented green beans, sauerkraut (fermented cabbage), fermented radishes, and natoo (fermented soybeans).

Kimchi

Kimchi is a fermented dish that is an important part of a traditional Korean diet. Kimchi consists of a mix of a variety of vegetables and spices. Cabbage is typically the main ingredient, as is some fish. Here are some dish ideas citi credit card customer service in india kimchi:

  • Homemade Kim Chee
  • Baechu Kimchi
  • Oi Sobaegi

How to Incorporate Fermented Foods Into Your Diet

You can choose to make your own fermented foods, or purchase them from stores that specialize in natural foods. Make sure to purchase products that are raw and unpasteurized, sincethe pasteurization process kills the very bacteria that you are seeking!

Typically, fermented foods are consumed with meals as a condiment. When adding fermented foods to your diet, start slowly to allow your body time to adjust. No need to rush—fermented foods can be stored in your refrigerator for six to eight months.

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Melini F, Melini V, Luziatelli F, Ficca AG, Ruzzi M. Health-Promoting Components in Fermented Foods: An Up-to-Date Systematic Review. Nutrients. 2019;11(5). doi:10.3390/nu11051189

  2. Harvard Medical School. Fermented foods can add depth to your diet. July 2018.

  3. Monash University. Your complete on-the-go guide to the FODMAP diet.

  4. Harper A, Naghibi MM, Garcha D. The Role of Bacteria, Probiotics and Diet in Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Foods. 2018;7(2) doi:10.3390/foods7020013

  5. Silanikove N, Leitner G, Merin U. The Interrelationships between Lactose Intolerance and the Modern Dairy Industry: Global Perspectives in Evolutional and Historical Backgrounds. Nutrients. 2015;7(9):7312-31. doi:10.3390/nu7095340

  6. Kim MS, Yang HJ, Kim SH, Lee HW, Lee MS. Effects of Kimchi on human health: A protocol of systematic review of controlled clinical trials. Medicine (Baltimore). 2018;97(13):e0163. doi:10.1097/MD.0000000000010163

Additional Reading
  • Galland, L. & Barrie, S. "Intestinal Dysbiosis and the Causes of Disease" The Environmental Illness Resource Website.
  • Mullins, G. & Swift, K. "The Inside Tract" Rodale 2011.
Источник: https://www.verywellhealth.com/best-fermented-foods-1945004

Homemade sauerkraut is the simplest way to populate your gut with a variety of nourishing probiotics for robust gut health and immune systems!

Probiotic Rich Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage} :: 2 Ingredients, Quick Prep, Real Food!

Product links in this post are affiliate links. It does not cost you anything and helps maintain the free information on this site, as well as answer the questions of “what brand do you use?” Please know I never personally recommend any product I wouldn’t use on my own family.

The status of your gut determines just about everything…

At this point most people know that just about everything in is fermented cabbage good for you body relies on the 2019 lexus gs 350 f sport awd of your gut health. And that the status of your gut health is tied to the type of flora (bacteria) dominating the territory.

Probiotic Rich Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage} :: 2 Ingredients, Quick Prep, Real Food!If the good bacteria reigns “king,” digestion is sound, the immune system works more effectively, and the brain is clear.

When the bad bacteria is more prevalent, digestion is disrupted in a myriad of different ways (YES we should be pooping daily – if you are not you are constipated. NO your poop shouldn’t be runny, it shouldn’t hurt to poop, and indigestion, heartburn, and tummy aches are not normal!), the immune system is completely off (ie getting sick often, autoimmune disease, cancer, etc), and the brain is a foggy mess (the gut-brain connection is tied to many brain/neurological disorders from depression and Alzheimer’s to ADHD, autism, and everything in between.)

Probiotic Rich Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage} :: 2 Ingredients, Quick Prep, Real Food!Infiltrate and populate!

Traditionally fermented foods provide easy to absorb probiotics to our guts to use for battle every day. Whether you are generally healthy or have a few health issues, fermented vegetables such as sauerkraut can populate your gut with the bacteria it needs to sustain a robust immune system, healthy digestive system, and sound mind.

Probiotic Rich Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage} :: 2 Ingredients, Quick Prep, Real Food!The simplest prep – let nature do the work!

Sauerkraut prep is so simple, and yet what actually happens as the fermentation happens takes place is so interesting and complex. Just a few teaspoons of sea salt sprinkled over shredded cabbage lends the the cabbage its own brine to ferment. Over the course of a few days to a week, the sauerkraut increases in beneficial digestive enzymes, vitamins C and B, as well as a variety of strains of beneficial bacterial for the gut to flourish. It’s as simple (and as complex!) as that!

Probiotic Rich Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage} :: 2 Ingredients, Quick Prep, Real Food!How to add sauerkraut to your meal plan

My favorite way to eat sauerkraut is as a brine-y, pickled bite to a sandwich wrap, burger, or a salad. Think of anything you like to add a salty, brined bite to! If you are eating sauerkraut in a medicinal way, such as if you are on the GAPS protocol, sometimes it’s just best to eat a tablespoon or so before you eat your meal to get the digestive enzymes in your gut to help you digest your meal – and to get it over with if you don’t particularly care for the taste. I have to admit, not growing up on sauerkraut, it took me some time to get used to. I ate it because I knew I needed it, and over time I have grown to love it!

Probiotic Rich Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage} :: 2 Ingredients, Quick Prep, Real Food!Ok, but what about the kids?!

Let’s start with the little guys first! If you have little ones at home, say between the ages of 6 months to 1 year old, jump on it!You are at a really great window of time to introduce new flavors and textures where baby is willing and open – and hasn’t really learned or tested the word *no* yet 😉 I served my babies teaspoons of the brine from fermented vegetables not only to get the health benefits from it, but to get them used to the sour bite! I was always really surprised at how my babies took to ferments after the initial pucker! The cabbage softens during fermentation, so small pieces of the sauerkraut makes great finger food material for the little ones chasing food around their tray or table. Out of my 3 {very} different personality kids, they all willingly eat sauerkraut, and I truly believe it is because their palates were trained for it young.

But don’t give up on those toddlers and big kids! My biggest advice would be not to make a big deal out of it. If you have toddlers, give them bites of YOUR food first. They love eating off your plate. Set the example and eat it yourself and maybe give them bites of it straight up, or get it into a yummy sandwich and let them have at it. If you have older, school aged kids and teens I would start with just serving it in a sandwich. If they question it or turn it down, discuss the why. Talk to the school aged kids about what the bacteria in their gut is for. Let the teens read this post! Let them see the why behind it. Talk about how much better they will feel if there are some gut issues or gut related issues (from ADD to anxiety, allergies to frequent colds and on and on!). Some kids might just prefer to get a spoonful in and over-with and then enjoy their meal. Go for it! This is such an inexpensive way to get probiotics in!

Probiotic Rich Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage} :: 2 Ingredients, Quick Prep, Real Food!How do I begin eating fermented vegetables if I have never tried them before?

Fermented vegetables are teeming with good bacteria, and, especially for those with sensitive tummies, food allergies, or digestive disorders, fermented vegetables make the entire eating process easier on the gut by acting as a digestive aide! Eating even a tablespoon or so of ferment with each meal will aide in digesting your food as well as provide stability to your immune system and brain health.

Start with 1 tablespoon or so per day to begin with to allow the friendly bacteria to make their home in your gut. Starting out with too much all at once can lead to tummy upset as the good bacteria takes over the bad. Increase to 1 tablespoon 3x per day as you feel comfortable. Once your body is used to the ferments, you can eat as much as you like and tolerate. My school aged girls eat around 2 or so tablespoons of sauerkraut at a time when they eat it.

Probiotic Rich Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage} :: 2 Ingredients, Quick Prep, Real Food!Fermenting tools

While you can definitely get your ferments going today with just glass jar and a plastic lid (metal lids will corrode over time so plastic is recommended), as you get going you may want to take a look at fermenting tools that make the process even easier and stress free.

Vegetable ferments do best in an anaerobic environment (that is, “no oxygen” using an air tight seal). Plastic lids work fine, though some air does get through, and as the gasses build up in the ferment you need to “release” them by opening the lid here and there. The air that gets through also makes it easier for stray airborne microbes and molds to get in which can make the whole jar go bad.

There are a couple of sealing options you can choose from, and I really have found these to give the best fermenting results. The one that I use is the first recommendation, the Pickle Pipe.

    • The Pickle Pipe :: I am convinced a busy, “every day” mom invented this fermenting tool! Talk about zero fuss, *easy to clean,* and affordable!The Pickle Pipe creates a seal with a simple (easy to wash!) silicone disk, and the metal ring your jar comes with. The “pipe” part of the silicone disk has a special opening that only pressures open when the gasses build up in the jar and need to be released. So basically…set it and forget it! You don’t have to check for pressure everyday at all. I also am in love with their Pickle Pebbles which weight down the ferment at the top so you don’t have to worry about molding or the tips of the veggies going bad from being out of the brine. Invaluable! I have never had a ferment go bad or mold using my Pickle Pipes and Pebbles.
    • Fido Jar :: Fido jars create an incredible anaerobic sealed environment and are super easy to clean and take care of. No crazy parts to clean, and they are beautiful lined up in the kitchen to ferment! You will need to “burp” these every day or so to let the gasses out but they work very well! They are pricier than mason jars (especially if you already have a lot of mason jars at home, and can just get some Pickle Pipes to top them off), but they will last forever and, again, they are beautiful!
    • Traditional Fermentation Crock :: I have to be honest…I love these! I really do! They are on my foodie dream list and when I can afford a really beautiful new fermenting crock I really, really want one for my kitchen! They are gorgeous, easy to clean and work fantastic. They come with a weight to keep the veggies down to prevent molding and they create a perfect anaerobic environment.
    • Air-Lock Lids:: These are a really great, inexpensive option – especially if you already have a lot of mason jars at home. I think the Pickle Pipes are easier to clean and use, but if you have some of these lying around don’t let them go to waste – they work great!

One last equipment note!Many people find these Pickle Packersuseful for squeezing the cabbage for making the natural brine. I have use a wooden spoon for years but think these are great too! {My birthday is in the fall if anyone wants to send me a wishlist gift! 🙂 }. Please keep in mind not to use metal spoons as it messes with the fermenting process – only wooden utensils.

Probiotic Rich Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage} :: 2 Ingredients, Quick Prep, Real Food!

Probiotic Rich Homemade Sauerkraut {Fermented Cabbage}

Homemade sauerkraut is the simplest way to populate your gut with a variety of nourishing probiotics for robust gut health and immune systems!

Course: Condiment

Cuisine: American

Keyword: fermented cabbage recipe, homemade sauerkraut, sauerkraut recipe

Servings: 8servings

Author: Renee - www.raisinggenerationnourished.com

  • 1/2 medium head of cabbage sliced thin or shredded
  • 2-3 tsp sea salt
  • 1-2 cloves of garlic smashed (Optional. I love is fermented cabbage good for you flavor and sweetness the garlic gives to sauerkraut - it is the only is fermented cabbage good for you I like it!)
  • Put a big handful of the sliced cabbage into a clean pint jar, and sprinkle the sea salt over citibank credit card bill payment through icici net banking. Using a wooden spoon or a vegetable pounder, press and stir the cabbage, squeezing the cabbage down. The salt will draw out the natural juices in the cabbage and it will create it's own brine with the sea salt. (It takes a few minutes for the juices to develop so be patient!)

  • Keep adding cabbage into the jar, packing it down into the jar, letting the salt soften the cabbage until you reach the top of the jar (Leaving about 1 inch of head-space at the top). Allow the salt to draw out enough juices in the cabbage to be fully submerged in the brine.

  • Put your fermenting weight on top of the cabbage/brine if you are using one, and wipe the rim of the jar clean.

  • Close up your jar (Put on your Pickle Pipe, or close the lid of your Fido Jar, or lid and use your Air-Lock. A simple plastic lid can work for your first time until you get the hang of things and want to invest in something to make your fermenting process easier.).

  • Set the jar at room temperature for 1-3 weeks depending on the taste you are going for. The longer it sits, the more flavor will develop. You can open and taste along the way until you are satisfied. I ferment mine for about 2 weeks, and that is the taste my kids enjoy best. Keep in mind that if you live in a warmer climate, you may not need as much time to ferment.

Tips on recipe size

This recipe makes 1 pint of sauerkraut. It is a great amount to get started on. I typically double this the skeleton key in hindi download into 2 pint jars (you could double into a quart jar, but I like to use the 2 smaller jars so my kids can get it out of the fridge to help themselves).

A quick note for those with histamine sensitivities!

If you have a hard time tolerating fermented foods or have a histamine sensitivity/allergy, sauerkraut is not recommended. Don’t beat yourself up! I have been there (and healed from!) histamine sensitivity, and it is worth avoiding foods that bother you. I used this soil based probiotic while I was healing and tolerated it well. (UPDATE 2021 – Amazon does not seem to have the probiotic I used anymore, but Perfect Supplements does have it!) (I am not a doctor or an expert in this area, so if you have questions I can try to answer them, but the Healing Obstructed view seats at bank of america stadium website is my favorite resource for is fermented cabbage good for you topic!)

More real food recipes you might like ::

Источник: https://www.raisinggenerationnourished.com/2017/01/probiotic-rich-sauerkraut/

Sauerkraut health benefits: Fermented cabbage shown to have anti-cancer properties

The health benefits of probiotics explained

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Considered one of the oldest ways to preserve cabbage, sauerkraut can be traced back to fourth century BC. Perhaps one of the reasons this food item has remained popular is due to its tasty flavour and properties. Overflowing with lactic acid and tyramines, sauerkraut is said to be low in calories and high in vitamins and minerals. Specifically, the fermented foods contains vitamins A, B, C, and K.

Benefits of vitamin A

The NHS pointed out that vitamin A (i.e. retinol) strengthens the immune system.

In addition, vitamin A is useful for improving vision and keeping the skin healthy.

Benefits of vitamin B

There are many different types of B vitamins, which all play a part in improving a person's health.

For example, vitamin B1 can help keep the nervous system healthy and can help the body to release energy from food.

READ MORE: How to live longer: Walking speed can influence your life expectancy

Sauerkraut has numerous health benefits (Image: Getty)

Meanwhile, vitamin B6 helps to form haemoglobin – the substance in red blood cells that carry oxygen around the body.

Benefits of vitamin C

Also known as ascorbic acid, vitamin C can help aid wound healing, and it protects cells in the body.

In addition, vitamin C maintains healthy skin, blood vessels, bone and cartilage.

Benefits of vitamin K

Vitamin K is needed for blood clotting, helping wounds to heal and may keep bones healthy.

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The Witten/Herdecke research team analysed data from 139 research papers ranging from 1921 to 2012, mostly from Europe, America and Asia about the benefits of sauerkraut.

Studies pointed out that sauerkraut had "anti-carcinogenic effects", suggesting it has anti-cancer properties.

Citing research from Penas et al, fermented cabbage was said to provide "highly beneficial antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic compounds".

Overall, the papers found that "regular sauerkraut consumption can contribute to a healthy digestive flora".

Cancer symptoms to be aware of (Image: Express)

Ways to reduce risk of cancer

The cancer charity Maggie's warned that "not all cancer can be prevented".

However, you can control some risk factors to minimise the chances of developing certain types of cancer.

This includes being "safe in the sun" by wearing SPF 30 – even on cloudy days.

Maggie's also advises to "dispose of last year's bottle or tube of sunscreen as older sunscreen loses its beneficial effects".

Mouth cancer warnings (Image: Express)

To minimise the chance of skin cancer developing, try to avoid being out of the sunshine between 10am to 3pm.

This may not be possible for everybody, so wearing wide-brimmed hats and long-sleeved loose-fitting clothes can help keep your skin covered.

Skin cancer is directly caused by the sun's ultraviolet rays causing DNA damage.

It'll also help to not smoke, to avoid smoky environments, and to reduce the amount of alcohol you might drink.

Источник: https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1429269/sauerkraut-health-benefits-fermented-cabbage-anti-cancer-properties

Are fermented foods good for IBS?

 

Should you eat sauerkraut if you have IBS?

Eating fermented cabbage may help improve your IBS symptoms. A small study in 2018 showed eating sauerkraut for 6 weeks improved the IBS symptom severity and gut microbiome (it was only 34 people). This could be due to the positive effect of adding beneficial microbes into the gut.

Even the pasteurised version of sauerkraut (with no live bacteria) had a significant beneficial impact on the gut bacteria which is probably down to the pre-biotic content of the cabbage (fibre feeds the beneficial bacteria).

Is Kefir better than milk for IBS? 

Fermented dairy may be easier for you to digest if you struggle with dairy intolerance. Live bacteria break down lactose in the fermentation process. One study found yogurts and kefir reduced the perceived severity of flatulence by 54% to 71% compared to milk.

(This won’t help you if you have a dairy allergy though, you still need to avoid kefir.)

 

Low FODMAP fermented foods

Also – if you’re dairy free you can sometimes find coconut or soy kefir. However, some people with IBS will also react to these products as well.

Can I buy fermented foods for IBS?

  • It can be cheaper to make your own – and relatively easy.
  • If you buy fermented foods check your product isn’t pasteurised which means all the beneficial bacteria will be killed off. Look out for markings of Live bacteria or probiotic bacteria on the label.
How to start using fermented foods for IBS

Start slowly. Don’t eat a whole jar of sauerkraut or gulp down a whole carton of kefir if you haven’t tried it before. Start with a small amount, notice any reactions.

Fermented foods can be a great way to support a healthy balanced diet. If they don’t work for you, it’s not essential to include them.

Источник: https://www.goodnessme-nutrition.com/ibs/are-fermented-foods-good-for-ibs/
Heads of cabbage.

The word sauerkraut means "sour cabbage" in German; it's naturally fermented cabbage. Natural fermentation is one of the oldest means of food preservation and it reduces the risk of foodborne illness and food spoilage.

Nutritional value of sauerkraut

Sauerkraut is a low-calorie food; only 42 calories per cup. It's a good source of vitamin C. It's high in sodium because of the salt used in fermentation. Reduce the sodium content, as well as the tartness, by rinsing sauerkraut in cold water before using.

Ingredients: high-quality cabbage and canning salt

Sauerkraut can easily be made and preserved at home with its basic ingredients of cabbage and salt. Use a researched tested recipe, as the proportion of salt to cabbage is the critical to quality and safety of sauerkraut.

To make good sauerkraut begin by selecting disease-free, firm, sweet, mature heads of cabbage from mid- and late-season crops. Plan to begin cleaning and shredding the cabbage within 24 to 48 hours of harvest. A kraut cutter is the traditional way to shred the cabbage, but a modern-day food processor moves the process along and saves on the fingers.

A kraut cutter is the traditional way to shred the cabbage, but a modern-day food processor moves the process along and saves on the fingers.
Fermentation supplies, cabbage, crock, canning salt and brine.

Canning or pickling salt draws out the cabbage juice so it can be fermented. Using too little salt not only softens the cabbage but also yields a product lacking in flavor. Too much salt delays the natural fermentation process. For every 5 pounds of shredded cabbage, mix in 3 tablespoons of canning salt.

Choose the right container to ferment the cabbage

The choice of container to pack the cabbage in is important. Old-fashioned earthenware crocks are traditional and are still a good choice as long as they are not cracked or chipped. Food-grade plastic pails that are sturdy and rigid make excellent containers. You do not want to make sauerkraut in metal containers of any type or in plastic containers that were never intended for food use.

Pack tightly and cover the cabbage

Sauerkraut brining.

Once the cabbage and salt mixture is packed tightly into a suitable container, it's essential that you cover the cabbage and liquid to exclude air, since the fermentation process requires an anaerobic (air-tight) condition. A salt-water (brine-filled), food-grade plastic bag is one of the easiest and best ways to both cover and weigh down the cabbage.

Temperature range needed for fermentation

Store the container at 70 to 75 F while fermenting. At these temperatures, the sauerkraut will be ready in 3 to 4 weeks.

  • At 70 to 75 F, kraut will be fully fermented in about 3 to 4 weeks.
  • At 60 to 65 F, fermentation may take 5 to 6 weeks.
  • At temperatures lower than 60 F, kraut may not ferment.
  • Above 75 F, kraut may become soft.

Sauerkraut recipe

Yield: about 9 quarts

Ingredients

  • 25 lbs. cabbage.
  • 3/4 cup canning or pickling salt.

Procedure

Work with about 5 pounds of cabbage at a time.

  1. Discard outer leaves.
  2. Rinse heads under cold running water and drain.
  3. Cut heads in quarters and remove cores.
  4. Shred or slice to a thickness of a quarter.
Adding salt into cabbage.

Put in containers and add salt.

  1. Put cabbage in a suitable fermentation container and add 3 tablespoons of salt.
  2. Mix thoroughly, using clean hands.
  3. Pack firmly until salt draws juices from cabbage.

Repeat shredding, salting and packing until all cabbage is in the container.

  • Be sure container is usps office open today enough so that its rim is at least 4 or 5 inches above the cabbage.
  • If juice does not cover cabbage, add boiled and cooled brine (1-1/2 tablespoons of salt per quart of water).

Add plate and weights, cover container with a clean bath towel.

Store at 70 to 75 F while fermenting.

During fermentation:

  • If you weigh the cabbage down with a brine-filled bag, don't disturb the crock until normal fermentation is completed (when bubbling ceases).
  • If you use a plate and jars as weights, you will have to check the kraut 2 to 3 times each week and remove scum if it forms.

Fully fermented sauerkraut may be canned or frozen

To can sauerkraut:

  • Hot pack: Bring kraut and liquid slowly to a boil in a large kettle, stirring frequently. Remove from heat and fill jars rather firmly with kraut and juices, leaving ½ inch headspace.
  • Raw pack: Fill jars firmly with kraut and cover with juices, leaving ½ inch headspace.
  • Wipe jar rim and adjust lids.
  • Process in a boiling water bath.
    • Raw pack: process pints for 25 minutes and quarts for 30 minutes.
    • Hot pack: process pints for 15 minutes and quarts for 20 minutes.

To freeze first national bank severna park pint- or quart-size freezer bags or reusable ridge plastic freezer containers.

  • Fill to 1 - 2 inches from their tops, squeeze out air, seal and label.
  • Freeze for 8 - 12 months.
  • Debbie Botzek-Linn, former Extension educator; William Schafer, emeritus Extension specialist; and Suzanne Driessen, Extension educator

    Источник: https://extension.umn.edu/preserving-and-preparing/how-make-your-own-sauerkraut

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