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Is rice good for you to lose weight


is rice good for you to lose weight

But many health experts consider white rice to be “not okay” for your weight loss goals and it's not just about the calories or carb content. White rice is not the best choice when you're trying to lose weight. Since white rice is a refined grain, it is easily digested and absorbed, leading to blood. Brown and White Rice Nutrition; White vs Brown Rice Health Benefits; Is White or Brown Rice Better for Weight Loss? Which Type of Rice is Best.
is rice good for you to lose weight

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Is rice good for you to lose weight -

Can we eat brown rice at night for weight loss?

Rice encourage your body to store excess fat that it doesn't need and make it harder to lose weight. Quick Tip: Always opt for brown rice as it is full of fiber, vitamins and nutrients. Eating a bowl of brown rice will make you feel full for a long duration.

Click to see full answer.

Likewise, people ask, is brown rice good for losing belly fat?

Summary Brown rice contains more fiber than refined grains like white rice. Choosing fiber-rich whole grains like brown rice may reduce belly fat and help you lose weight.

Also, what is the best time to eat brown rice? The right timeTHE RIGHT TIME: As per studies, lunch time is the best time to have rice. This is due to two factors. Firstly, during daytime, our metabolism is faster and our body will digest all heavy healthy foods.

Subsequently, one may also ask, does brown rice make you fat?

People who eat whole grains like brown rice have repeatedly been shown to weigh less than those who don't, as well as be at a reduced risk of weight gain ( 7 , 8). This could be attributed to the fiber, nutrients and plant compounds found in whole grains.

Why should you not eat rice at night?

Despite the potential role that eating white rice may have in promoting sleep, it is best consumed in moderation due to its lack of fiber and nutrients. Summary: White rice may be beneficial to eat before bed due to its high glycemic index, which may promote better sleep.

Источник: https://askinglot.com/can-we-eat-brown-rice-at-night-for-weight-loss

Carbs are too often the first casualty of any weight-loss eating plan, but that ignores their crucial role in powering your progress in the gym. Concentrating your intake before and after exercise ensures you have enough fuel to push harder, lift heavier and last longer, while ensuring your stores of muscle glycogen are never depleted. But which to turn to? We pit them head to head:

For Your Health

Rice: Tuck into wholegrains. A review of 45 studies by Imperial College London found that choosing brown carbs over white can cut your heart disease risk by 18%.

Pasta: A portion of store-bought wholemeal pasta will contain more than half of your RDI of fertility-supporting selenium. Which makes your spag bol a true family meal.

For Weight Loss

Rice: Brown rice is full of fibre, which promotes satiety. Researchers from Iran found that ditching white rice for brown could help you shave more than an inch off your waistline.

Pasta: Even the white stuff could help you lose weight, according to a study in the British Medical Journal. Pasta controls your blood sugar better than other types of carbs.

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For Your Energy Levels

Rice: With 28g of carbs per portion, rice is your jet fuel. Plus, wild rice contains magnesium, which helps your body to create ATP energy, staving off fatigue during your HIIT class.

Pasta: Although it has fewer carbs, pasta is quickly digested, so feasting on a bowl two hours before training offers plenty of energy. Also, it’s far tastier than a can of pre-workout.

For Added Value

Rice: When gut bacteria ferment the fibre in brown rice, they produce short-chain fatty acids, which encourage proper colon function, lowering your risk of infection.

Pasta: Researchers at the Canadian Institute of Food Science and Technology found exorphins are released during digestion of pasta, which could have an opioid effect. This might explain your massive grin after a plate of mac’n’cheese.

The MH Verdict? Rice Wins!

This was a close one. In their refined forms, white pasta wins out versus white rice, so save that for your cheat days. In terms of true health, weight loss and performance benefits, however, the fibre and mineral content of brown rice makes it the perfect fuel to feed your fitness goals. Go with the grain.

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The Editors of Men's HealthThe editors of Men's Health are your personal conduit to the top experts in the world on all things important to men: health, fitness, style, sex, and more.

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Источник: https://www.menshealth.com/uk/nutrition/a30981081/better-rice-or-pasta/

I quit eating rice and roti for a month to lose weight and this is what happened

In my peanut-sized, super-experimental world of fitness and weight loss, I am both—the scientist and the rat that is subjected to experiments. From keto and GM Motors’ to low-carb to the Atkins diet—there is hardly any diet that I haven’t tried.

Some pleasant and some not-so-pleasant results later, I still haven’t lost my spirit to keep trying to find that one thing that really works for me. Though I will reveal the lesson I’ve learnt over the years, but more on that later. First, let’s just talk about my recent diet experiment first.

I quit wheat and rice for an entire month
For someone, who loves her morning paranthas and a bowl of dal-rice for lunch, this was quite a huge sacrifice to make. But, the extra weight gained from quarantine snacking pushed me to take this step as I thought to myself, “Let me get rid of the excess weight with a quick-fix diet first and then I’ll get back to my regular fitness regimen.”

Thus, I did what an ill-informed, self-proclaimed fitness-lover would do: I attacked the two main sources of carbohydrates in my diet—wheat and rice. The idea was to give a bit of a shock to my body by quitting these staples as well as cutting down on carbohydrates and calories to lose weight.

But did it work?
I would be lying if I said that the experiment failed. Because I did lose weight. However, what I had to lose completely shattered my confidence as a scientist and cut short my career as one too.

From my energy levels to concentration levels—I lost it all along with the weight. However, I did feel a certain lightness while I was at it, probably because I removed the most heavy source (wheat) of gluten (a protein that the body might find exceptionally hard to digest) from my diet.

So, I contacted an expert to figure out why my experiment bombed
“The main function of carbohydrates is to provide energy to the body to carry out various functions,” points out Diksha Chhabra, fitness expert, nutritionist, and founder, Diksha Chhabra Fitness consultation. 

She further explains that when you eat excess of carb-rich foods, the body derives its energy from them instead of using up its fat reserves. The high carbohydrate-content of these grains might mean that there’s still more unutilised energy left after it burns these grains. Now, this excess energy can get stored as fat, thus adding to your previously-existing fat reserves. 

“However, when  someone leaves or reduces the intake of wheat or rice, the body does not get enough amount of energy from an external food source. Thus, it usually attacks its protein sites and breaks them down to derive energy,” Chhabra adds.

Now, the one thing I gathered from her explanation is that there is a high chance that I lost weight due to muscle breakdown and not fat breakdown. FYI, losing muscle is linked with a slower metabolism, decreased weight-loss, and fatigue, which pretty much explains why my chain-wain-sab-ujda post this diet.

Additionally, several studies have found that our brain needs a healthy dose of carbohydrates to function properly. So, I am attributing the loss of concentration to these findings. 

What should I have done instead?
I promised I’d talk about the lesson I learnt in the end. So, here it is: Fad diets will come and fad diets will go, but weight-loss from them won’t remain forever. 

Thus, the best way is to lose weight slowly and in a healthy manner by making a few lifestyle changes such as working out, getting adequate sleep, not leading a sedentary lifestyle, and eating a balanced diet.

Also, listen:

“There are no side effects of eating rice or wheat unless you are allergic to them. If wheat and rice are consumed as per your body’s requirements along with a balanced diet comprising of all micro- and macro-nutrients, while you still maintain a calorie deficit, you will be able to lose weight without compromising on your overall health,” says Chhabra.

“Hence, instead of quitting completely, one should control the portion size of these grains,” she adds and signs off.

Sonakshi Kohli Sonakshi Kohli

Twenty kilos down and struggling to maintain the weight loss by preaching healthy eating, while eating unhealthy every now and then.

Источник: https://www.healthshots.com/healthy-eating/nutrition/i-quit-eating-rice-and-roti-for-a-month-to-lose-weight-and-this-is-what-happened/

Some Myths about Nutrition & Physical Activity

Are you overwhelmed by daily decisions about what to eat, how much to eat, when to eat, and how much physical activity you need to be healthy? If so, don’t be discouraged because you’re not alone. With so many choices and decisions, it can be hard to know what to do and which information you can trust.

This information may help you make changes in your daily eating and physical activity habits so that you improve your well-being and reach or maintain a healthy weight.

Food Myths

Myth: To lose weight, you have to give up all your favorite foods.

Fact: You don’t have to give up all your favorite foods when you’re trying to lose weight. Small amounts of your favorite high-calorie foods may be part of your weight-loss plan. Just remember to keep track of the total calories you take in. To lose weight, you must burn more calories than you take in through food and beverages.

TIP: Limiting foods that are high in calories may help you lose weight. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015-2020 have estimated daily calorie needs based on a person’s age, sex, and physical activity level.

Myth: Grain products such as bread, pasta, and rice are fattening. You should avoid them when trying to lose weight.

Loaf of whole-wheat bread

Fact: Grains themselves aren’t necessarily fattening—or unhealthy–although substituting whole grains for refined-grain products is healthier and may help you feel fuller. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015-2020 recommend consuming grains as part of a healthy eating plan. At least half of the grains you eat should be whole grains. Examples of whole grains include brown rice and whole-wheat bread, cereal, and pasta. Whole grains provide iron, fiber, and other important nutrients.

TIP: Try to replace refined or white bread with whole-wheat bread and refined pasta with whole-wheat pasta. Or add whole grains to mixed dishes, such as brown instead of white rice to stir fry. Check out ChooseMyPlate for more tips to help you add whole grains to your eating plan.

Myth: Choosing foods that are gluten-free will help you eat healthier.

Fact: Gluten-free foods are not healthier if you don’t have celiac disease or are not sensitive to gluten. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye grains. A health care professional is likely to prescribe a gluten-free eating plan to treat people who have celiac disease or are sensitive to gluten. If you don’t have these health problems but avoid gluten anyway, you may not get the vitamins, fiber, and minerals you need. A gluten-free diet is not a weight-loss diet and is not intended to help you lose weight.

TIP: Before you decide to avoid a whole food group, talk with your health care professional if you believe you have problems after you consume foods or drinks with wheat, barley, or rye.

Myth: You should avoid all fats if you’re trying to be healthy or lose weight.

Fact: You do not have to avoid all fats if you’re trying to improve your health or lose weight. Fat provides essential nutrients and should be an important part of a healthy eating plan. But because fats have more calories per gram than protein or carbohydrates, or “carbs,” you need to limit fats to avoid extra calories. If you are trying to lose weight, consider eating small amounts of food with healthy fats, such as avocados, olives, or nuts. You also could replace whole-fat cheese or milk with lower-fat versions. Read about food portions and how much food is enough for you.

TIP: The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015-2020 recommend consuming less than 10 percent of your daily calories from saturated fats. Try cutting back on solid-fat foods. Use olive oil instead of butter in cooking.

Myth: Dairy products are fattening and unhealthy.

Fact: Dairy products are an important food group because they have protein your body needs to build muscles and help organs work well, and calcium to strengthen bones. Most dairy products, such as milk and some yogurts, have added vitamin D to help your body use calcium, since many Americans don’t get enough of these nutrients. Dairy products made from fat-free or low-fat milk have fewer calories than dairy products made from whole milk. Learn more about the dairy group.

TIP: Adults should have 3 servings a day of fat-free or low-fat dairy products, including milk or milk products such as yogurt and cheese, or fortified soy beverages, as part of a healthy eating plan. If you can’t digest lactose, the sugar found in dairy products, choose fortified soy products, lactose-free or low-lactose dairy products, or other foods and beverages with calcium and vitamin D:

  • Calcium—soy-based beverages or tofu made with calcium sulfate, canned salmon, or dark leafy greens such as collards or kale
  • vitamin D—cereals or soy-based beverages

Myth: “Going vegetarian” will help you lose weight and be healthier.

A couple cooking vegetables

Fact: Some research shows that a healthy vegetarian eating plan, or one made up of foods that come mostly from plants, may be linked to lower levels of obesity, lower blood pressure, and a reduced risk of heart disease. But going vegetarian will only lead to weight loss if you reduce the total number of calories you take in. Some vegetarians may make food choices that could lead to weight gain, such as eating a lot of food high in sugar, fats, and calories.

Eating small amounts of lean meats can also be part of a healthy plan to lose or maintain weight. The U.S. Dietary Guidelines 2015-2020 have more information about including meat as part of a healthy eating plan.

TIP: If you choose to follow a vegetarian eating plan, be sure you get enough of the nutrients your body needs to be healthy. Read Healthy Eating Tips for Vegetarians for more information.

Not all vegetarians are the same.
The types of vegetarian diets eaten in the United States can vary widely. For example, vegans do not consume any animal products, including milk and eggs. Lacto-ovo vegetarians eat milk and eggs along with plant foods. Some people have eating patterns that are mainly vegetarian but may include small amounts of meat, poultry, or seafood. Speak with a registered dietitian or health care professional if you are concerned about whether your eating plan is providing all of the nutrients you need.

Physical Activity Myths

Myth: Physical activity only counts if you do it for long periods of time.

Fact: You don’t need to be active for long periods to get the amount of regular physical activity recommended in the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition, (PDF, 14.2MB) which is at least 150 minutes, or 2 hours and 30 minutes, of moderate-intensity physical activity each week. An example of moderate-intensity activity is brisk walking. You can spread these sessions out over the week and even do short, 10-minute spurts of activity 3 times a day on 5 or more days a week.

TIP: Find ways to build short bursts of physical activity into your day. While at work, take a 10-minute walking break or have a “walking,” rather than a “sitting” meeting, if work and schedule permit. Use stairs instead of an elevator or escalator. Get off the bus one stop early. Meet a friend for a walk, instead of a meal.

Myth: Lifting weights is not a good way to improve your health or lose weight because it will make you “bulk up.”

A woman using hand weights

Fact: Lifting weights or doing other activities 2 or 3 days a week that may help you build strong muscles, such as push-ups and some types of yoga, will not bulk you up. Only intense strength training, along with certain genes, can build large muscles. Like other kinds of physical activity, muscle-strengthening activities will help improve your health and also may help you control your weight by increasing the amount of energy-burning muscle.

TIP: Using large rubber bands, or resistance bands, or doing sit-ups or household or yard chores that make you lift or dig, may help you build strong muscles.

Don’t just sit there!
Americans spend a lot of time sitting: at desks, in cars, and in front of computers, TVs, and other electronic gadgets. Break up your sitting time by getting up and moving around, even if it’s for only 10 minutes at a time. Those minutes will add up over days and weeks.

Clinical Trials

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct and support research into many diseases and conditions.

What are clinical trials, and are they right for you?

Clinical trials are part of clinical research and at the heart of all medical advances. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. Researchers also use clinical trials to look at other aspects of care, such as improving the quality of life for people with chronic illnesses. Find out if clinical trials are right for you.

What clinical trials are open?

Clinical trials that are currently open and are recruiting can be viewed at www.ClinicalTrials.gov.

Last Reviewed April 2017

This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public. Content produced by the NIDDK is carefully reviewed by NIDDK scientists and other experts.

The NIDDK would like to thank:
Dr. Catherine Loria, Senior Scientific Advisor, Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute; Dr. Richard P. Troiano, CAPT, U.S. Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Источник: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/weight-management/myths-nutrition-physical-activity

Healthy Fried Rice for Weight Loss

Fried and healthy? This loaded healthy fried rice will become your favourite if you love rice like me and are counting calories for weight loss. highly nutritious, low-fat and super filling meal you can eat for breakfast, lunch or dinner!Gluten-free and vegan options included!

a plate of healthy fried rice with salt and pepper in the background

My version of this healthy fried rice tastes as good as your Chinese takeout one, I promise but on a much healthier note. Fried rice often served in restaurants is surely tasty but high fat and sodium contents in it not, of course, suitable for weight loss goals. Also, they use fewer vegetables leaving your stomach empty very soon after consuming it. So skip the take out and make this real healthiest version of it in less than 30 minutes.

If you are too busy to stand and cook consider my oven-baked fried rice

This healthy fried rice is ideal for weight loss or calorie counting diets and is

  • super flavourful
  • nutrient-rich with many low-calorie vegetables.
  • loaded with proteins from eggs.
  • less fat using minimal sesame oil(high source of unsaturated fats)
  • Low on sodium levels.
  • Keeps you full with fewer calories.

Being a core rice lover and an ever needy weight loss aspirant and a fan of quick-cooking, this is the god-sent recipe for me if I may say so. Can you imagine I am so crazy that I can actually finish 5 bowls of plain white rice in less than 3 minutes? No kidding, the madness is real so as my pillowy stomach right now.

Ingredients and substitutes

Cold rice – the key to getting authentic restaurant-style fried rice is to use cold or leftover rice,.the texture of the cold rice will be little firmer s perfect for frying without getting mashed which is the key for perfect fried rice.

Eggs – obviously if you want to make egg fried rice or to even up your protein game. I use yolk as well and if you prefer just whites, go ahead.

Vegetables – now to the most interesting part. This fried rice becomes healthy and ideal for weight loss only when you add all the recommended vegetables. One trick to bulk up the fried rice is to add loads of finely chopped cabbage which acts as rice. I also used low-calorie vegetables like mushrooms, carrots and frozen green peas along with the mandatory spring onions. the more vegetables you add to the fried rice the more filling it becomes. You could also add tiny florets of broccoli too. A filling meal is a true best friend for weight loss, you know!

Oil – the best oil for fried rice I found good personally is sesame oil which is a good source of unsaturated fats. If you want to reduce your risk of heart disease, experts recommend it’s best to reduce your overall fat intake and swap saturated fats for unsaturated fats. I used very less amount possible 🙂

Soy Sauce – This one I opted for a low sodium version. If you want a gluten-free version of it, try coconut aminos.

ingredients for healthy fried rice - rice,vegetables, salt, pepper, oil,soy sauce

Brown Rice or White rice for Fried Rice?

I am a big fan of using brown rice for the fried rice as the firmness of the grains is more suitable for frying on high temperatures. also, it has more fibre content and is supposed to keep you fuller for a long time when compared to white rice. But I have no hard preference and I enjoy eating both equally.

How about using Cauliflower rice?

Why not if you can tolerate not having any actual rice in the fried rice! Make sure the cauli rice has no moisture in it and use the same recipe below. You could also use 50-50 of rice and cauliflower rice to get you started with.

Whatever variety you choose, try to bulk up the dish with more vegetables and less rice if you are trying to eat for weight loss, this is my most favourite way to eat fried rice in my healthy fitness journey.

You might want to check my other healthy rice recipes here

Instant Pot Brown Rice and Beans.

Fresh Green Peas Pulao

a plate f healthy fried rice with salt and pepper in the background

Trying to lose weight? Check out my popular barley fried rice and low-calorie emergency dump and oven-baked fried rice recipes too.

Tips for making the best fried rice

  • Long grain or basmati or short-grain? – my vote is to use short grain rice as basmati tends to break into pieces and also too tender to fry on high temperatures.(I have used basmati in the photos shown, need a food shop soon)
  • Using cold rice is a must in my opinion. Rice at least one day old kept in the fridge is the best even. If you don’t have any leftover rice, spread the freshly cooked in a plate evenly, allow it to cool down and keep in the fridge for at least 30 minutes. This will make the grains firmer.
  • Use loads of vegetables to increase the filling power and make it an ideal healthy fried rice for your weight loss needs.
  • Use a non-stick pan or a wide wok. Using non-stick pan helps as it needs less oil, but you can actually make it in a normal wok too if you are good at scraping 🙂 coz we are not using much oil here to fry the egg or veggies. I wish not to direct this discussion towards the disadvantages of using nonstick cookware etc to keep up with the current context.
  • Try to fry the rice and veggies in high flame as much as possible to give that smoky flavour to the dish. Also, we don’t want the veggies to become mushy or even too soft, but just soft enough yet crunchy.
  • I find using sesame oil gives the best taste to my egg and vegetables fried rice, it is also a good source of unsaturated fats. Whatever oil you use, try to stick to a teaspoon or two.
  • Good quality freshly ground pepper and sea salt or lightly crushed rock salt. I also tried using ground white pepper but I like the crushed black pepper version.

Video recipe for Healthy Fried Rice

Can I make this vegan and gluten-free?

  • Absolutely! To make this rice vegan, either skip the egg or use firm tofu pieces instead. Start with stir-frying tofu by seasoning with salt, pepper, red chilli flakes(option) and few drops of soy sauce. Keep them aside and proceed with the recipe as usual.
  • You can also use Quorn pieces that are completely a plant-based protein you get in the freezer section of the supermarkets. Few people have digestion issues with Quorn so you might want to try experimenting with little portions first to see if your gut can tolerate.
  • To make it gluten-free, use coconut aminos instead of soy sauce.

Storage Instructions

Fried stays goods in the fridge for 2 days. When you are ready to eat, just microwave it on full power for 1-2 minutes. I often do it in a skillet or pan with some additional cooking spray. Make sure the grains didn’t turn out very hard, if so please do not eat as it can lead to digestion issues.

How about Freezing fried rice?

You can indeed for upto a month, providing you cool it quickly and freeze it as soon as it’s cooled. Also, reheat it until it’s piping hot right through once it’s defrosted.

I personally don’t freeze anything made of egg though.

a plate f healthy fried rice with salt and pepper in the background

Serving Suggestions

  • Fried rice is usually best eaten as it is, but you can serve with a dollop of tomato ketchup if you like.
  • If you still have calorie allowances left for the day, serve with some infused chilli oil.
  • You can serve with some additional proteins like stir fried tofu and baked Manchurian balls etc(will post recipes)
  • This can be a great lunch box recipe too.

Weight Loss Tips

  • Use more chopped cabbage that gets blended with rice easily and bulk up the fried rice. Chop it very fine to make it resemble rice.
  • Use plenty of low-calorie vegetables like carrots, peas, broccoli, grated cauliflower, mushrooms.
  • Non-stick pan won’t demand you much oil, whatever fat you use, try to limit it.
  • Use brown rice instead of white to increase the fibre content which keeps you full for longer.
Print

Healthy Fried Rice for Weight Loss


  • Author:Siri of Fat Rainbow
  • Prep Time:5 min
  • Cook Time:15 min
  • Total Time:20 minutes
  • Yield:21x
  • Diet:Vegetarian

Description

Healthy fried rice loaded with plenty of vegetable ideal for any meal of the day. Simple to make and super filling, ideal for lunch box too.


  1. 1 Cup cooked cold White or Brown rice
  2. 2 Eggs
  3. 2 cloves of garlic finely chopped
  4. ½ Cup finely chopped Cabbage
  5. 1 Carrot finely chopped
  6. 5 Mushrooms sliced
  7. ¼ cup frozen green peas
  8. few florets of finely cut broccoli(optional)
  9. 2–3 spring onions chopped.
  10. 1.5 teaspoons sesame oil or vegetable oil(divided)
  11. 1 teaspoon crushed black pepper
  12. ½ teaspoon red chilli flakes(optional)
  13. Salt to taste
  14. 2 teaspoons low sodium soy sauce

  1. Heat ½ teaspoon of oil in a non-stick pan and crack open the eggs, allow to sit for a minute and using a wooden spatula start breaking them into small pieces. Fry well and keep them aside.
  2. Heat another teaspoon of oil, add in garlic and fry for few seconds, then add all the chopped vegetables and season with little salt and half of the crushed pepper.
  3. In high flame, allow the vegetables to get fried for a minute until they turn a bit soft but still remain crunchy.
  4. Reduce the flame to medium, Add in the rice, scrambled eggs and mix well. Increase the flame to high and fry the mixed rice for 1 minute making sure all of the rice is touching the surface of the pan.
  5. Now make a small well in the middle and pour in the soy sauce and remaining pepper powder and adjust any salt too. Mix the rice well and continue to fry for another 2 minutes on medium to the high flame by adjusting in between.
  6. Add red chilli flakes if using and garnish with spring onions before switching off the flame.
  7. Serve piping hot with little ketchup if preferred or eat as it is.

Notes

  • Long grain or basmati or short-grain – my vote is to use short grain rice as basmati tends to break into pieces and also too tender to fry on high temperatures.(I ave used basmati in the photos shown)
  • Using cold rice is a must in my opinion. Rice at least one day old kept in the fridge is the best. If you don’t have any leftover rice, spread the freshly cooked in a plate evenly, allow it to cool down and keep in the fridge for at least 30 minutes. This will make the grains firmer.
  • Use sesame oil if you can for getting the best flavour for fried rice.
  • If eating for weight loss, always bulk up the rice with more vegetables especially chopped cabbage.
  • Category:Lunch
  • Method:Cook
  • Cuisine:Chinese

Keywords: fried rice, egg, Chinese,

This post may contain affiliate links which means if you buy the product I will earn a small commission that goes into the maintenance of this website. Your purchase price will not get impacted at all.

If you ever try this recipe, please consider rating it and tag me on Instagram with the hashtag #fatrainbowcooks.

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Источник: https://www.fatrainbow.com/healthy-fried-rice/

Is couscous healthy? Couscous nutrition facts and benefits

  • We earn a commission for products purchased through some links in this article.

  • We regard this versatile ingredient as a staple but is couscous healthy? 

    Traditionally made by women who used the heel of their palms to roll a paste of ground wheat and water to create “grains”, couscous derives from North Africa, where it’s been eaten since at least the 13th century.

    It’s particularly prevalent in classic Moroccan dishes such as this root tagine recipe and is a brilliant addition to a salad (we love this easy couscous salad). Over time, it’s become integrated into other cuisines and is especially popular in Africa, the Middle East, Italy, French and Spain – in part, because it’s cheap, relatively nutritious, has a long shelf life and easily absorbs flavours in cooking.

    There are different types of couscous, too. The most common is Moroccan couscous, which is made up of small grains. Then there’s pearl couscous, which is made from larger spheres and is softer and chewier. If you’re unsure about what to do with it, here’s how to cook couscous at home.

    Is couscous healthy? Nutrition facts and benefits

    The nutritional breakdown of 50g couscous (125g cooked):

    • 184 calories
    • Low in fat: 1.1g
    • Low in saturated fat: 0.2g
    • A good source of protein: 6.6g
    • A good source of B vitamins: B1 (13% RI); B3 (17% RI); folate (7% RI)
    • A good source of magnesium (8% RI); iron (7% RI); zinc (9%RI); potassium (7% RI)

    ‘Couscous is a good source of carbohydrate, our main source of energy,’ says Karine. ‘And wholegrain couscous is a good source of fibre, which helps to reduce cholesterol, manage blood sugar levels, regulate stools and can reduce your risks of colon cancer,’ says Karine Patel, Dietitian and Head of Nutrition at Nutrition Synergy

    ‘Couscous is also an excellent source of selenium. Selenium is a mineral with powerful antioxidant properties, which may help in reducing cancer risk and heart disease risk by reducing inflammation and build-up of plaque in your arteries. And it is also a good source of B vitamins, and contains some calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc and vitamin E,’ adds Karine.

    Clearspring Gluten Free Couscous

    There are gluten free versions of couscous. (Credit: Ocado)

    Is couscous gluten free?

    ‘No, couscous is made from a type of flour called semolina, a flour derived from wheat, so it naturally contains gluten,’ explains Karine.

    ‘However, you can get gluten-free couscous made from corn,’ says Rob Hobson, Head of Nutrition at Healthspan. If you’re gluten intolerant, try Clearspring Organic Instant Gluten Free Couscous (£1.99 for 200g, Ocado).

    How many calories are in couscous?

    ‘Couscous contains about 112 calories in 100g of prepared [cooked] couscous,’ says Karine. ‘Therefore, the calorie content is similar to other grains like quinoa, but its calorie content is slightly lower than rice.’

    While this isn’t particularly calorific, neither is couscous considered low calorie meals. This is because ‘couscous is a staple food offering calories mostly in the form of carbohydrate,’ says Rob.

    Treat couscous as you would any other carb on your plate which, according to the NHS Eatwell Guide, should make up just over a third of the food we eat.

    Crazy Jacks wholewheat couscous

    You could try a wholewheat version. (Credit: Sainsbury’s)

    Is couscous a carb or a grain?

    It’s both! ‘Couscous is a processed grain derived from durum wheat semolina,’ says Karine. ‘And it consists mainly of carbohydrates – roughly 23g of carbohydrates per 100g of prepared couscous.’

    But if couscous is processed does that mean it isn’t good for us? ‘The definition of processed – with respect to food – simply means a food has been altered in some way during its preparation so, yes, couscous is processed as the grain has been milled,’ explains Rob. ‘We have become so used to the narrative that all processed foods are bad for us and almost everyone associates the term with foods high in fat, salt and sugar. However, foods like couscous are healthy and a staple in the diet of many countries around the globe, especially North Africa.’

    ‘You can get wholewheat couscous,’ adds Rob (try Crazy Jack Organic Wholewheat Couscous, £1 for 250g, Sainsbury’s). ‘Although the term “wholewheat” may have you thinking it’s not processed it is – the wholewheat durum wheat is still milled down to make couscous.’

    Is couscous healthier than rice?

    ‘If you compare white rice to couscous, then the calories are pretty much the same,’ says Rob. ‘However, couscous contains more protein and higher amounts of vitamins and minerals so you could say it was slightly healthier. If you compare brown rice to couscous, again it contains roughly the same number of calories but higher levels of nutrients such as B vitamins and magnesium. However, couscous still contains more protein than brown rice,’ he explains.

    ‘Couscous is a better source of fibre than white rice,’ adds Karine. ‘And wholewheat couscous is a better source of fibre than brown rice. But rice is a gluten-free grain; therefore, it’s suitable for those with coeliac disease or with a gluten or wheat intolerance.’

    ‘Both couscous and rice are healthy foods to include as part of a balanced diet,’ says Rob. ‘Interestingly, basmati rice scores lower on the glycaemic index than both couscous and brown rice, so if you’re trying to follow a lower GI diet then this may be the better choice of carbohydrates.’

    Источник: https://www.goodto.com/food/is-couscous-healthy-nutrition-facts-benefits-599729

    Is Brown Rice Good for You to Lose Weight?

    Losing weight means adjusting your lifestyle to burn more calories than you take in each day. And while you can increase your calorie burn through getting active throughout the day and putting in time at the gym, reducing your calorie intake and eating the right foods goes a long way, too. Brown rice is a moderate source of calories, and it has a place in a healthy and balanced weight loss diet.

    Brown Rice Calorie Basics

    Rice is a staple starch in many cultures, so not surprisingly, most of its calories come from carbs. A cup of cooked long grain brown rice has 52 grams of total carbohydrates, which contribute 196 calories to its 248-calorie total. Those carbs might be high in calories, but they're also energizing for your muscles, so the carbs in brown rice can keep your energy levels up to burn calories during your workouts. You'll also get a small amount of protein in brown rice — about 6 grams — along with 2 grams of fat.

    Weight Loss Benefits from Fiber

    What separates brown rice from white rice is its fiber content. It's primarily found within the germ and brown of each rice grain, which are removed to make white rice. Fiber supports your overall good health, with benefits ranging from lower cholesterol to better digestive health. But it's also beneficial for weight loss, because fiber helps you feel full, so you're less likely to get hungry and overeat later on in the day. A cup of long-grain brown rice has 3 grams of fiber — a little over 10 percent of the daily fiber needs for women, and 8 percent for men.

    Evidence for Brown Rice and Weight Loss

    In addition to the weight loss benefits of fiber, there's some scientific evidence linking brown rice specifically to better weight control. A study published in the "International Journal of Preventative Medicine" in 2014 reported that simply switching out white rice for brown rice was enough to trigger a significant difference in weight loss. The researchers found that, over the six-week study period, the subjects who ate brown rice lost weight, reduced their waist and hip sizes, and may have even benefited their cardiovascular health by lowering blood pressure.

    Including Brown Rice in a Weight Loss Diet

    Though brown rice deserves a place in your meal plan, it's essential to measure your portions and stick to a half-cup to one-cup serving size. Because it's a calorie-dense food, even subtly increasing your portion size can add up to lots of extra calories over time, which can sabotage your weight loss.

    Include brown rice in your diet by using it as the base for veggie bowls, loaded up with your favorite raw, sauteed or roasted veggies along with lean proteins, like shrimp or chicken breast. Mix a spoonful or two into a leafy green salad for a shot of healthy carbs, or add a half cup of cooked rice to a vegetable soup to turn it into a meal.

    References

    Writer Bio

    Sylvie Tremblay holds a Master of Science in molecular and cellular biology and has years of experience as a cancer researcher and neuroscientist. Based in Ontario, Canada, Tremblay is an experienced journalist and blogger specializing in nutrition, fitness, lifestyle, and health.

    Источник: https://healthyeating.sfgate.com/brown-rice-good-lose-weight-2435.html
    is rice good for you to lose weight

    Is rice good for you to lose weight -

    Some Myths about Nutrition & Physical Activity

    Are you overwhelmed by daily decisions about what to eat, how much to eat, when to eat, and how much physical activity you need to be healthy? If so, don’t be discouraged because you’re not alone. With so many choices and decisions, it can be hard to know what to do and which information you can trust.

    This information may help you make changes in your daily eating and physical activity habits so that you improve your well-being and reach or maintain a healthy weight.

    Food Myths

    Myth: To lose weight, you have to give up all your favorite foods.

    Fact: You don’t have to give up all your favorite foods when you’re trying to lose weight. Small amounts of your favorite high-calorie foods may be part of your weight-loss plan. Just remember to keep track of the total calories you take in. To lose weight, you must burn more calories than you take in through food and beverages.

    TIP: Limiting foods that are high in calories may help you lose weight. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015-2020 have estimated daily calorie needs based on a person’s age, sex, and physical activity level.

    Myth: Grain products such as bread, pasta, and rice are fattening. You should avoid them when trying to lose weight.

    Loaf of whole-wheat bread

    Fact: Grains themselves aren’t necessarily fattening—or unhealthy–although substituting whole grains for refined-grain products is healthier and may help you feel fuller. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015-2020 recommend consuming grains as part of a healthy eating plan. At least half of the grains you eat should be whole grains. Examples of whole grains include brown rice and whole-wheat bread, cereal, and pasta. Whole grains provide iron, fiber, and other important nutrients.

    TIP: Try to replace refined or white bread with whole-wheat bread and refined pasta with whole-wheat pasta. Or add whole grains to mixed dishes, such as brown instead of white rice to stir fry. Check out ChooseMyPlate for more tips to help you add whole grains to your eating plan.

    Myth: Choosing foods that are gluten-free will help you eat healthier.

    Fact: Gluten-free foods are not healthier if you don’t have celiac disease or are not sensitive to gluten. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye grains. A health care professional is likely to prescribe a gluten-free eating plan to treat people who have celiac disease or are sensitive to gluten. If you don’t have these health problems but avoid gluten anyway, you may not get the vitamins, fiber, and minerals you need. A gluten-free diet is not a weight-loss diet and is not intended to help you lose weight.

    TIP: Before you decide to avoid a whole food group, talk with your health care professional if you believe you have problems after you consume foods or drinks with wheat, barley, or rye.

    Myth: You should avoid all fats if you’re trying to be healthy or lose weight.

    Fact: You do not have to avoid all fats if you’re trying to improve your health or lose weight. Fat provides essential nutrients and should be an important part of a healthy eating plan. But because fats have more calories per gram than protein or carbohydrates, or “carbs,” you need to limit fats to avoid extra calories. If you are trying to lose weight, consider eating small amounts of food with healthy fats, such as avocados, olives, or nuts. You also could replace whole-fat cheese or milk with lower-fat versions. Read about food portions and how much food is enough for you.

    TIP: The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015-2020 recommend consuming less than 10 percent of your daily calories from saturated fats. Try cutting back on solid-fat foods. Use olive oil instead of butter in cooking.

    Myth: Dairy products are fattening and unhealthy.

    Fact: Dairy products are an important food group because they have protein your body needs to build muscles and help organs work well, and calcium to strengthen bones. Most dairy products, such as milk and some yogurts, have added vitamin D to help your body use calcium, since many Americans don’t get enough of these nutrients. Dairy products made from fat-free or low-fat milk have fewer calories than dairy products made from whole milk. Learn more about the dairy group.

    TIP: Adults should have 3 servings a day of fat-free or low-fat dairy products, including milk or milk products such as yogurt and cheese, or fortified soy beverages, as part of a healthy eating plan. If you can’t digest lactose, the sugar found in dairy products, choose fortified soy products, lactose-free or low-lactose dairy products, or other foods and beverages with calcium and vitamin D:

    • Calcium—soy-based beverages or tofu made with calcium sulfate, canned salmon, or dark leafy greens such as collards or kale
    • vitamin D—cereals or soy-based beverages

    Myth: “Going vegetarian” will help you lose weight and be healthier.

    A couple cooking vegetables

    Fact: Some research shows that a healthy vegetarian eating plan, or one made up of foods that come mostly from plants, may be linked to lower levels of obesity, lower blood pressure, and a reduced risk of heart disease. But going vegetarian will only lead to weight loss if you reduce the total number of calories you take in. Some vegetarians may make food choices that could lead to weight gain, such as eating a lot of food high in sugar, fats, and calories.

    Eating small amounts of lean meats can also be part of a healthy plan to lose or maintain weight. The U.S. Dietary Guidelines 2015-2020 have more information about including meat as part of a healthy eating plan.

    TIP: If you choose to follow a vegetarian eating plan, be sure you get enough of the nutrients your body needs to be healthy. Read Healthy Eating Tips for Vegetarians for more information.

    Not all vegetarians are the same.
    The types of vegetarian diets eaten in the United States can vary widely. For example, vegans do not consume any animal products, including milk and eggs. Lacto-ovo vegetarians eat milk and eggs along with plant foods. Some people have eating patterns that are mainly vegetarian but may include small amounts of meat, poultry, or seafood. Speak with a registered dietitian or health care professional if you are concerned about whether your eating plan is providing all of the nutrients you need.

    Physical Activity Myths

    Myth: Physical activity only counts if you do it for long periods of time.

    Fact: You don’t need to be active for long periods to get the amount of regular physical activity recommended in the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition, (PDF, 14.2MB) which is at least 150 minutes, or 2 hours and 30 minutes, of moderate-intensity physical activity each week. An example of moderate-intensity activity is brisk walking. You can spread these sessions out over the week and even do short, 10-minute spurts of activity 3 times a day on 5 or more days a week.

    TIP: Find ways to build short bursts of physical activity into your day. While at work, take a 10-minute walking break or have a “walking,” rather than a “sitting” meeting, if work and schedule permit. Use stairs instead of an elevator or escalator. Get off the bus one stop early. Meet a friend for a walk, instead of a meal.

    Myth: Lifting weights is not a good way to improve your health or lose weight because it will make you “bulk up.”

    A woman using hand weights

    Fact: Lifting weights or doing other activities 2 or 3 days a week that may help you build strong muscles, such as push-ups and some types of yoga, will not bulk you up. Only intense strength training, along with certain genes, can build large muscles. Like other kinds of physical activity, muscle-strengthening activities will help improve your health and also may help you control your weight by increasing the amount of energy-burning muscle.

    TIP: Using large rubber bands, or resistance bands, or doing sit-ups or household or yard chores that make you lift or dig, may help you build strong muscles.

    Don’t just sit there!
    Americans spend a lot of time sitting: at desks, in cars, and in front of computers, TVs, and other electronic gadgets. Break up your sitting time by getting up and moving around, even if it’s for only 10 minutes at a time. Those minutes will add up over days and weeks.

    Clinical Trials

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct and support research into many diseases and conditions.

    What are clinical trials, and are they right for you?

    Clinical trials are part of clinical research and at the heart of all medical advances. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. Researchers also use clinical trials to look at other aspects of care, such as improving the quality of life for people with chronic illnesses. Find out if clinical trials are right for you.

    What clinical trials are open?

    Clinical trials that are currently open and are recruiting can be viewed at www.ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Last Reviewed April 2017

    This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public. Content produced by the NIDDK is carefully reviewed by NIDDK scientists and other experts.

    The NIDDK would like to thank:
    Dr. Catherine Loria, Senior Scientific Advisor, Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute; Dr. Richard P. Troiano, CAPT, U.S. Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

    Источник: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/weight-management/myths-nutrition-physical-activity

    Is Brown Rice Good for You to Lose Weight?

    Losing weight means adjusting your lifestyle to burn more calories than you take in each day. And while you can increase your calorie burn through getting active throughout the day and putting in time at the gym, reducing your calorie intake and eating the right foods goes a long way, too. Brown rice is a moderate source of calories, and it has a place in a healthy and balanced weight loss diet.

    Brown Rice Calorie Basics

    Rice is a staple starch in many cultures, so not surprisingly, most of its calories come from carbs. A cup of cooked long grain brown rice has 52 grams of total carbohydrates, which contribute 196 calories to its 248-calorie total. Those carbs might be high in calories, but they're also energizing for your muscles, so the carbs in brown rice can keep your energy levels up to burn calories during your workouts. You'll also get a small amount of protein in brown rice — about 6 grams — along with 2 grams of fat.

    Weight Loss Benefits from Fiber

    What separates brown rice from white rice is its fiber content. It's primarily found within the germ and brown of each rice grain, which are removed to make white rice. Fiber supports your overall good health, with benefits ranging from lower cholesterol to better digestive health. But it's also beneficial for weight loss, because fiber helps you feel full, so you're less likely to get hungry and overeat later on in the day. A cup of long-grain brown rice has 3 grams of fiber — a little over 10 percent of the daily fiber needs for women, and 8 percent for men.

    Evidence for Brown Rice and Weight Loss

    In addition to the weight loss benefits of fiber, there's some scientific evidence linking brown rice specifically to better weight control. A study published in the "International Journal of Preventative Medicine" in 2014 reported that simply switching out white rice for brown rice was enough to trigger a significant difference in weight loss. The researchers found that, over the six-week study period, the subjects who ate brown rice lost weight, reduced their waist and hip sizes, and may have even benefited their cardiovascular health by lowering blood pressure.

    Including Brown Rice in a Weight Loss Diet

    Though brown rice deserves a place in your meal plan, it's essential to measure your portions and stick to a half-cup to one-cup serving size. Because it's a calorie-dense food, even subtly increasing your portion size can add up to lots of extra calories over time, which can sabotage your weight loss.

    Include brown rice in your diet by using it as the base for veggie bowls, loaded up with your favorite raw, sauteed or roasted veggies along with lean proteins, like shrimp or chicken breast. Mix a spoonful or two into a leafy green salad for a shot of healthy carbs, or add a half cup of cooked rice to a vegetable soup to turn it into a meal.

    References

    Writer Bio

    Sylvie Tremblay holds a Master of Science in molecular and cellular biology and has years of experience as a cancer researcher and neuroscientist. Based in Ontario, Canada, Tremblay is an experienced journalist and blogger specializing in nutrition, fitness, lifestyle, and health.

    Источник: https://healthyeating.sfgate.com/brown-rice-good-lose-weight-2435.html

    Can we eat brown rice at night for weight loss?

    Rice encourage your body to store excess fat that it doesn't need and make it harder to lose weight. Quick Tip: Always opt for brown rice as it is full of fiber, vitamins and nutrients. Eating a bowl of brown rice will make you feel full for a long duration.

    Click to see full answer.

    Likewise, people ask, is brown rice good for losing belly fat?

    Summary Brown rice contains more fiber than refined grains like white rice. Choosing fiber-rich whole grains like brown rice may reduce belly fat and help you lose weight.

    Also, what is the best time to eat brown rice? The right timeTHE RIGHT TIME: As per studies, lunch time is the best time to have rice. This is due to two factors. Firstly, during daytime, our metabolism is faster and our body will digest all heavy healthy foods.

    Subsequently, one may also ask, does brown rice make you fat?

    People who eat whole grains like brown rice have repeatedly been shown to weigh less than those who don't, as well as be at a reduced risk of weight gain ( 7 , 8). This could be attributed to the fiber, nutrients and plant compounds found in whole grains.

    Why should you not eat rice at night?

    Despite the potential role that eating white rice may have in promoting sleep, it is best consumed in moderation due to its lack of fiber and nutrients. Summary: White rice may be beneficial to eat before bed due to its high glycemic index, which may promote better sleep.

    Источник: https://askinglot.com/can-we-eat-brown-rice-at-night-for-weight-loss

    6 myths about carbs that are preventing you from losing weight

    The minute a beach vacation, a high school reunion or a friend’s wedding pops up on the calendar, we immediately wage war on carbohydrates.

    No bagels

    No pasta.

    Definitely no potatoes.

    But is banishing carbs really the best plan of attack to slim down, tone up and feel your best? Not to mention, where do carbs come into play when it comes to our overall health? And why have they become the scapegoat for our muffin top?

    “People love to say things like ‘I am on a low-carb diet’ or ‘I'm not eating carbs right now.’ Typically, they're referring to pasta and bread, but what many don't know is that dairy, fruit and vegetables have naturally occurring carbohydrates!” says Courtney Ferreira, RD, owner of Real Food Court nutrition consulting. “If you are eating broccoli, you are eating carbs.”

    So before you ban every carbohydrate from the menu — know the facts.

    Carbohydrates are a actually a macronutrient (along with protein and fat) and they play a very vital role to your overall health, productivity and yes, your weight-loss success.

    “It’s really important for people to understand that the body’s preferred source of fuel for most everyday activity is carbohydrate. And your brain and red blood cells rely on carbohydrate almost exclusively for fuel,” says Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD, director of Worldwide Nutrition Education and Training at Herbalife Nutrition. “So following a very low-carbohydrate diet can really shortchange your physical and mental performance; you cut down (or out) so many healthy foods … and that limits your intake of many important vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients and fiber that are critically important to good health.”

    The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that 45 to 65 percent of the calories we eat come from carbs. Since it makes up such a large chunk of our diet, it's worth it to school yourself on the myths that are misinforming how you consume this important nutrient.

    MYTH: Banning carbs means giving up bread and pasta

    Fact: Yes … but it would also mean nixing fruits, vegetables and whole grains

    Yes, that plate of steamed veggies you ate for lunch contained carbs.

    “Carbohydrates vary widely in terms of their nutrient density, so everything from a green bean, which is a good source of fiber, protein [and other vitamins and minerals] to a slice of white bread, which does not offer much other than carbohydrates, is considered a carbohydrate,” says Pegah Jalali, MS, RD, CDN, an NYC-based pediatric dietitian.

    Instead of saying, ‘I can't eat that,’ ask, what is a source of carbs that will provide me with more nutrition?

    She recommends that people move away from the obsession with banning all carbs and focus on the types of food they’re eating. “If you are eating mostly fruits and vegetables, then it is fine if your diet is high in carbohydrates,” says Jalali. “On the flip side, if your diet is high in carbohydrates, but you are eating mostly processed foods like packaged breads, cookies and chips then that is a completely different diet.”

    Ferreira advises her clients to think about the different foods that contain carbohydrates on a spectrum. On one side are the foods you can eat in unlimited quantities — nutrient-dense, fiber-rich and whole-food carb sources like green veggies and fruit. Towards the middle are nutrient-dense, but also carbohydrate-dense, foods such as white potatoes, that should be balanced out with those at the ‘eat as much as you can’ end, she says. On the other end of the spectrum are foods like breads and pasta. "While these still have a place in the diet, they require balancing out in order to create a diet that provides nutrients we need," says Ferreira "I really urge people to start looking at carbs in this new way. Instead of saying, ‘I can't eat that,’ [ask] what is a source of carbs that will provide me with more nutrition?”

    Myth: All carbs are created equal

    Fact: There are simple and complex carbohydrates

    “The main reason [carbs get a bad rap] is that when people think ‘carbs’ they think ‘starch’, like white rice, pasta, potatoes or white bread,” says Bowerman. “While many refined carbs don’t offer up much nutritionally, there are lots of ‘good carbs’ — healthy foods that provide carbohydrates your body absolutely needs every day to function properly.”

    In actuality there are three types of carbohydrates: fiber, sugar and starch. Where things get confusing is when we look at specific foods, which can contain different types of carbohydrates. They can either be labeled simple or complex based on their chemical makeup. Complex carbs “contain a complex chain of sugars as well as some fiber, protein and/or healthy fats, vitamins and minerals,” says Rebecca Lewis, registered dietitian at HelloFresh. “The presence of fiber, protein and fats is important because it slows digestion, prevents a spike in our blood-sugar levels, and helps us to feel full and satisfied for longer (i.e. curbs cravings).”

    That’s why carbohydrate-containing foods like starchy vegetables, legumes and whole grains are included in many healthy diet plans.

    Follow the 10:1 rule: Choose foods where for every 10 grams of carbs, there is 1 gram of fiber.

    The simple carbs, often found in processed foods and drinks, are easier for the body to break down, meaning they don’t keep you full as long and can lead to erratic blood sugar levels.

    That’s not to say that simple carbs are always bad for us.

    “Simple carbohydrates are found in fruits, veggies and dairy — all of which are healthy choices as they also contain good stuff like vitamins, minerals, and fiber,” says Lewis. “However, simple carbs are also found in less healthy foods like refined grains, processed snacks, sweets, soda and juice, which lack extra nutrients. These foods are very quickly digested, which can cause swings in our blood sugar levels and often leave us hungry for more.”

    The trick is to look for foods that have a more robust nutritional profile. That apple may have simple carbs, but it also contains a hefty dose of fiber to slow down the digestion of the sugars.

    Myth: Carbs are fattening

    Fact: It’s not the carbs making you fat, it’s the sugar and calories

    “Anything is fattening if you eat too much of it, and not all carbohydrate-containing foods have the same calorie density,” says Bowerman. “This myth persists because many people who eat a lot of refined carbs and sugar do lose weight when they cut back on these foods. But it isn’t because they’ve cut out all of the carbs, it’s because they have cut out a lot of the calorie-dense foods.”

    Research actually shows that while low-carb eaters tend to lose more weight at first, after one year, that weight loss levels out and is no different than those who eat a low-fat (moderate carb) diet.

    That being said, when it comes to carbohydrate-containing foods and weight gain, sugar and excess calories tend to be the culprit.

    “Really the secret behind carbohydrates is to identify and limit the amount of added sugar in your carbohydrate sources; highlight whole foods like fruits, vegetables, beans and whole grains; and pay attention to portion sizing carbohydrates along with your protein and fat sources,” says Amanda Markie, MS, RDN, LD, Outpatient Dietitian at UM Baltimore Washington Medical Center. “Sugar can be found naturally in foods like fruits and milk products, as well as being more concentrated into your processed foods like sodas, candy or baked goods,” explains Markie.

    Research shows that while low-carb eaters tend to lose more weight at first, after one year, that weight loss levels out and is no different than those who eat a moderate carb diet.

    So you want to ensure that you’re choosing sources of carbohydrates that have this naturally-occurring sugar.

    “Also look for higher dietary fiber with a lower amount of added sugar, which you can identify if it is one of the first ingredients on the ingredients list,” says Markie. “Limit those foods that have sugar within the first two to three ingredients."

    And just because you’re choosing the higher-fiber, low-sugar options doesn’t mean you can eat them in unlimited qualities: portions matter.

    “Four cups of quinoa will make anyone gain weight. The quantity is the key strategy,” said Monica Auslander, MS, RDN, the founder of Essence Nutrition. “For example, I'll eat steel cut oatmeal, but only 1/3 cup a day. I'll eat beans, but only 1/2 cup at a time. I'm a petite person and not an athlete, so I can't afford to have three slices of Ezekiel bread for breakfast, a sweet potato at lunch, and three cups of quinoa at dinner.”

    Myth: Carbohydrates spike your blood sugar

    Fact: The right carbs stabilize blood-sugar levels for sustained energy

    A 2014 study published in the Nutrition Journal found that participants who ate a high-carbohydrate, high-fiber, vegan diet (they got 80 percent of their calories from carbs) actually saw a drop in average blood sugar, plus lost weight and had significant improvements in blood pressure.

    Plus, that glucose that our bodies gleans from digestible carb is needed for the functioning of multiple organs, including the brain. So that sugar in the blood stream isn’t just okay — it’s necessary. The problem is when they are released all at once in high doses.

    “One thing that we must all remember is that carbohydrates are essential to fuel your brain, boost our energy and maintain our metabolism. The key is to eat the right kinds of food that contain carbohydrates,” says Meghan Daw, RD, LDN, from Fresh Thyme Farmers Market. “These foods contain carbohydrates that are more complex, meaning they contain fiber and other nutrients that take time to digest and allow a slow release of sugar into the body. This slow release does increase blood sugar levels over time but not all at once, preventing some unwanted blood sugar level spikes and symptoms that come along with those spikes.”

    MYTH: You can determine whats carbs are healthy by using the Glycemic Index

    Fact: Not always ... you also need to use common sense.

    The Glycemic Index is a system that rank foods based on how much a certain portion increases blood sugar when compared to pure glucose.

    "One major setback [to the use of the Glycemic Index when choosing what carbohydrates are best] is that this index measures the body’s response when the carbohydrate is eaten without other foods, but how often are we eating a carbohydrate at a meal on its own?" says Markie.

    You may have a baked potato for dinner, but there's a good chance it's accompanied by a piece of salmon and some veggies. "Having these foods together can change the speed of digestion and your body’s response," says Markie.

    The Glycemic Index can be a guide in determining which foods are the better choices, she adds. Those lower on the scale may be higher in fiber, which slows digestion. But you need to use common sense to make the final judgement.

    "There are other cases in which the Glycemic Index does not direct the consumer toward the most healthful choice," says Markie. "For example, a soda has a Glycemic Index of 63, while raisins have a Glycemic Index of 64, however that does not mean raisins and soda have the same nutritional value."

    It's a tool you can use, but it should be one tool out of many, as it doesn't take into account the other nutritional values of the food, she adds.

    Myth: You should look for net carbs on the nutrition label

    Fact: The source of those carbs matter

    At the end of the day, all carbs are not created equal. So blindly counting net carbs isn’t the best way to establish a healthy diet. But food labels in their current state can be tricky to decode.

    “Reading labels will provide you with the quantity of carbohydrate that is in the food, but it doesn’t necessarily tell you about the quality,” says Bowerman. “For example, I have patients who don’t drink milk because of the carbohydrate content, but the carbohydrate in milk is not added, it’s simply the natural sugar (lactose). But it’s hard to tell from a label which carbs are natural and which are added, and unless you read the ingredients list as well, you won’t know the source of the carbohydrate.”

    For most packaged items, a high fiber count can be a good sign that a food is a healthy choice. Lewis recommends following the “10:1 rule: Choose foods where for every 10 grams of carbs, there is 1 gram of fiber.”

    However, Bowerman caveats that manufacturers can also add fiber to products afterwards, so you should check the ingredients list for a whole food source to ensure the fiber is naturally occurring.

    Luckily, deciphering the label is about to get a bit easier. The new food label to be implemented in July 2018 will specifically call out how much of the total sugar in a food is added, making it easier to distinguish between the unhealthy sugars you’ll find in many processed foods and the natural-occurring sugar in whole foods like fruit and milk.

    Until then, you can’t go wrong by choosing whole-food sources of carbohydrates that only have one ingredient — themselves!

    Источник: https://www.nbcnews.com/better/health/6-myths-about-carbs-are-preventing-you-losing-weight-ncna790901

    Carbs are too often the first casualty of any weight-loss eating plan, but that ignores their crucial role in powering your progress in the gym. Concentrating your intake before and after exercise ensures you have enough fuel to push harder, lift heavier and last longer, while ensuring your stores of muscle glycogen are never depleted. But which to turn to? We pit them head to head:

    For Your Health

    Rice: Tuck into wholegrains. A review of 45 studies by Imperial College London found that choosing brown carbs over white can cut your heart disease risk by 18%.

    Pasta: A portion of store-bought wholemeal pasta will contain more than half of your RDI of fertility-supporting selenium. Which makes your spag bol a true family meal.

    For Weight Loss

    Rice: Brown rice is full of fibre, which promotes satiety. Researchers from Iran found that ditching white rice for brown could help you shave more than an inch off your waistline.

    Pasta: Even the white stuff could help you lose weight, according to a study in the British Medical Journal. Pasta controls your blood sugar better than other types of carbs.

    This content is imported from {embed-name}. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

    For Your Energy Levels

    Rice: With 28g of carbs per portion, rice is your jet fuel. Plus, wild rice contains magnesium, which helps your body to create ATP energy, staving off fatigue during your HIIT class.

    Pasta: Although it has fewer carbs, pasta is quickly digested, so feasting on a bowl two hours before training offers plenty of energy. Also, it’s far tastier than a can of pre-workout.

    For Added Value

    Rice: When gut bacteria ferment the fibre in brown rice, they produce short-chain fatty acids, which encourage proper colon function, lowering your risk of infection.

    Pasta: Researchers at the Canadian Institute of Food Science and Technology found exorphins are released during digestion of pasta, which could have an opioid effect. This might explain your massive grin after a plate of mac’n’cheese.

    The MH Verdict? Rice Wins!

    This was a close one. In their refined forms, white pasta wins out versus white rice, so save that for your cheat days. In terms of true health, weight loss and performance benefits, however, the fibre and mineral content of brown rice makes it the perfect fuel to feed your fitness goals. Go with the grain.

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    Источник: https://www.menshealth.com/uk/nutrition/a30981081/better-rice-or-pasta/

    10 foods that will help you lose weight — and 5 that will make you gain it

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    • If you're looking to drop a few pounds, you need to find the right foods for creating weight loss and avoiding the bad ones.
    • Chickpeas are great for losing weight since they're loaded with fiber, which keeps you feeling fuller longer.
    • Foods like corn have higher glycemic loads, which can prompt weight gain.

    You won't find cottage cheese or rice cakes anywhere on this list — just real foods that keep you fuller longer.

    Yogurt

    yogurt
    Getty Images/Joe Raedle

    Kick off your weight-loss efforts beginning with breakfast. A study in the "New England Journal of Medicine" found that eating a serving of yogurt daily was associated with weight loss over the four-year study span. It may be that the good bacteria in yogurt get your gut in shape, which may protect against weight gain. For best results, stick to plain, unsweetened yogurts and add your own healthful yogurt toppings — chopped-up fruit and nuts, cinnamon, nutmeg, or vanilla. Besides yogurt, these seven foods can boost your good gut bacteria even more!

    Berries

    02_superfoods berries
    photo-graf/Shutterstock

    When you want something pleasantly sweet, grab a handful of strawberries and blueberries. These fruits are rife with antioxidants called undefined, which can keep the numbers on the scale from rising. Research from a 2016 issue of the "British Medical Journal" suggests that people who ate the most of these flavonoid-packed foods gained the least amount of weight over a 24-year period. You'll get all you need in a half-cup serving of berries a day. For a bigger boost, don't forget to eat peaches, grapes, and these eight other fruits packed with nutrients.

    Cauliflower

    cauliflower dish
    AnemoneProjectors - Peter O'Connor/Wikimedia Commons

    You probably know the prescription to eat a rainbow of fruits and veggies every day — and that includes white cauliflower. In a 2015 "PLOS Medicine" study, eating more of this non-starchy veggie was linked to weighing 1.37 pounds less after four years. If cauliflower leaves you uninspired, try one of these trendy new ways to cook it up: Look for bags of "cauliflower rice" at the grocery store (it's simply ground-up cauliflower), and use it as a carb substitute. Or, steam, freeze, and blend the mild vegetable into your morning smoothie. (Seriously!) Try these easy-to-follow tricks for making the most delicious — and healthiest — smoothie you've ever had!

    Tofu

    tofu fried pan
    mush m./Flickr

    Soy is high on the list of foods that can help you shed pounds, so consider a veggie-heavy stir fry for dinner tonight. In the "PLOS Medicine" study previously mentioned, eating more tofu or soy foods helped study participants weigh 2.5 pounds less at the study's end. One reason: It's packed with protein (9 grams) and contains just 80 calories per serving. Tofu is a favorite for vegetarians and vegans! (Here's what happens to your body when you eat a vegan diet.)

    Grapefruit

    grapefruit citrus fruit
    Sean Gallup/Getty Images

    You may have heard of the Grapefruit Diet, a super low-cal diet that requires eating grapefruit at each meal. It's actually not recommended because your body needs more calories than that to thrive. However, there may be something to regularly noshing on citrus fruits. In a 2006 study, people who ate half of a fresh grapefruit before each meal lost about 3.5 pounds after 12 weeks. The placebo group, on the other hand, lost only about a half pound. Researchers aren't sure why, but it may be that grapefruit helps reduce insulin levels after eating. And grapefruits don't just aid in weight loss, they can also combat oily skin and wrinkles, including these other surprising health benefits.

    Walnuts

    walnuts
    PlayMistyForMe/Wikimedia Commons

    You probably know that nuts like almonds, pecans, and cashews, are nutritional superstars, but you may still be wary of them because of all the fat and calories they pack in. But worry no more! In a 2014 review in the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition," researchers found that eating a handful of nuts every day can help prevent both obesity and type 2 diabetes. The winning combo of fat, protein, and fiber may boost satiety and satisfaction to help you stick with a healthy eating plan. Follow this dietitian's advice for the top five healthiest nuts you can snack on right now.

    Water

    Drinking water hydrate bloating
    Getty

    Okay, we admit: It's not the most exciting choice, and you've probably heard it already. But until now, there hasn't been really good evidence that H20 can help get you to a healthy weight. New research in the "Annals of Family Medicine" sheds some light. Per the study, adults who are dehydrated have a 59% greater odds of being obese compared to those who drink enough every day. Notice, though, that doesn't necessarily mean you need to chug a gallon of water — just don't get dehydrated. (Watch out for these seven unexpected signs you need to drink more water.)  You can do just that by sipping when you're thirsty and eating a diet filled with H20-filled fruits and veggies.

    Chickpeas

    chickpeas
    Diana House/Flickr

    Time to load up on the legumes! A 2016 analysis of 21 previous research trials discovered that people who ate one serving of beans, lentils, chickpeas, or dried peas per day lost about one pound after six weeks compared to those who didn't pack in these pulses — whether they were dieting or not. With loads of fiber, legumes keep bellies fuller longer and may also reduce fat absorption. An added bonus? Chickpeas and these two other foods may even rev up your sex drive!

    Wild rice

    Rice
    Aly Weisman/Business Insider

    Wild rice, an aquatic grass seed, offers up more fiber and protein than brown rice, according to the Whole Grains Council. It's also — you guessed it — considered a whole grain. If you're cutting calories in an effort to lose weight, incorporating whole grains helped dieters lose more belly fat over 12 weeks compared to those who ate the same amount of calories in refined grains, per 2008 research. Thank the filling power of fiber in grains for the waist-whittling benefits. Other whole grain options include quinoa, amaranth, and rye. And if you're still confused over what "whole grain" actually means, here's the difference between whole wheat and whole grain.

    Olive oil

    Olive oil
    Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/foods-that-will-help-you-lose-weight-and-that-will-make-you-gain-it-2018-3

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