Skip to content

Archives

Best home remedy for ear infection in adults


best home remedy for ear infection in adults

The ear can become infected by bacteria, fungi or viruses in the ear canal, or the Eustachian tube that connects the ear to the throat. Treatment depends on. These are helpful natural ear infection remedies for adults and kids. 1. Garlic Oil. There's a good reason why garlic ear oil is likely on the. That's why it's a good idea to treat an earache with natural remedies For kids and adults, acupressure can help relieve earache pain and.

Best home remedy for ear infection in adults -

Most earaches can be treated at home. Not all earaches are caused by infections. If your ear hurts when you chew, it could be caused by something in your jaw. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMJ) pain can mimic an earache. See a dentist if you think that you may have TMJ pain.

Swimming, bathing, allergies or even cleaning your ear with Q-tips can lead to discomfort, bacterial growth and infection in the ear. Earaches can also be triggered cold, wind, differences in presser, or by hair and other objects that get stuck in the ear.

Excessive earwax can also cause hearing problems and aches. Put a capful of hydrogen peroxide in each ear, let it set for a minute or two, and then let it drain out. One drop of alcohol after bathing can also prevent excessive earwax.

If wind bothers your aching ears, wear a scarf when you&#;re outside, or stuff with cotton, but avoid pushing it deep down from where you cannot retrieve it with your fingers.

If your ears hurt when the pressure changes, especially during descent and landing during an airplane flight, chew gum or suck on candy. The chewing or sucking will activate the muscles that send air to your inner ears, when you hear your ears &#;pop,&#; you&#;ll feel better. If chewing doesn&#;t work, close your mouth, relax your cheek muscles, hold your nose and blow one nostril at a time gently until you feel relief.

The microbes that cause earaches usually show up first as a respiratory infection in your nose or throat. All it takes is a little push: You blow your nose, you lie down and the viruses or bacteria move into your Eustachian tubes. These are tiny channels that connect your nasal passages to your inner ears. From there, it&#;s a short trip to the middle ear and your eardrum, which is laced with sensitive nerve endings. The infection creates pus, which creates pressure against your eardrum, causing pain. It can even make the eardrum burst.

Children get more earaches because they have more respiratory infections and because their Eustachian tubes are immature and unable to handle even a small infection. Children in daycare get more ear infections. The fall and winter months have the highest incidence. Children exposed to secondary cigarette smoke get more ear infections. Children who have a nighttime bottle in the crib or depend on a pacifier tend to have more ear infections. Children who are breast fed for at least six months get fewer ear infections than bottle-fed babies.

Tips to take the ache out of your ear. Get plenty of rest with your head elevated. Avoid scuba diving, coughing, sneezing, bending and attempts to equalize the ears.

Use warm oil. A few drops of olive or mineral oil can provide temporary relief. Put some in a glass and warm it up in hot tap water for a few minutes like a baby&#;s bottle. Test the oil first (it should be about body temperature) and apply it with an ear dropper. Make sure to use only enough to coat the inner lining of the ear. If you don&#;t have an ear dropper, use a drinking straw. Put the end of the straw in the oil and trap it by putting your finger over the exposed end. Do not use oil as drops in your ear if you suspect or have been told you have a ruptured ear drum.

Apply heat. The greatest pain reliever is the presence of warm, moist heat around the ache. A warm compress &#; such as a towel rung out in hot water and pressed against the ear, brings immediate relief. There are two approaches for using heat to help relieve the pain of an earache. A hot water bottle, a warmed up oven-safe plate, a heating pad on low, or a warmed gel pack relieve pain when placed on top of the sore ear. Be sure that these are only warm, not hot, and are wrapped in a towel. Do NOT lay a person&#;s head on heat if he is unable to move his head by himself or if he is asleep, like a child or invalid. Or you can turn a hair dryer on the lowest warm setting and direct the warm air down the ear canal, holding the dryer 6 to 12 inches from your ear. Do not use the hair dryer for more than three to five minutes. After you take a shower or bath; blow dry your ears with the warm setting of a hair dryer instead of rubbing them.

Prop yourself up. You&#;re better off sitting up in bed than lying flat on your back. Sitting up actually allows blood to drain away from the head so there&#;s less congestion in the Eustachian tube. That&#;s why babies with earaches will quit crying when you pick them up and start crying again when you lay them down. It&#;s not that they want to be held; it&#;s just that they feel better with their heads up.

Fill up on fluids. Drinking lots of water and juice not only helps soothe the symptoms, but repeated swallowing can also help clear your Eustachian tubes, Chewing and yawning are also good for clearing your Eustachian tubes.

Try a vasoconstrictor. Over-the-counter nasal sprays like Neo-Synephrine contain the ingredient phenylephrine, which helps return your Eustachian tube to normal functioning. The spray shrinks the lining of the nose and hopefully the region around the entrance of the Eustachian tube, allowing the tube to function better. If the Eustachian tube returns to normal, you&#;ll feel better. Don&#;t use phenylephrine-containing nose drops for more than a few days, and make sure you don&#;t exceed the daily dosage recommended on the label. Overuse of nasal sprays can actually make the problem worse.

Take painkiller. Another possible temporary remedy for ear pain is an over-the-counter analgesic like Advil or Tylenol, Pseudoephedrine (the active ingredient in OTC medications such as Sudafed) 30 mg tablets, one every six hours for two to three days, may ease ear pressure. (People with a history of high blood pressure should avoid this product.) The analgesic doesn&#;t kill the organisms, it just controls the pain. So don&#;t think because your ear doesn&#;t hurt anymore, you are cured. Your doctor may recommend neomycin, polymyxin B or hydrocortisone drops in the ear canal.

Antibiotics may be recommended. Home remedies include puncturing a piece of garlic and pouring the juice in the ear. Garlic is used by some as a natural antibiotic. Natural healers often recommend taking Goldenseal and Echinacea.

Ask your doctor about antibiotics. Because a bacterial infection is one of the common causes of earache, some doctors recommend taking antibiotics like Amoxil and Ceclor to beat the bug. Most ear infections will heal by themselves and don&#;t require antibiotics. Many doctors are reluctant to prescribe antibiotics because antibiotics are being over used. Just consider the name antibiotic. It means &#;anti&#; or against life (&#;bio&#;). Unfortunately, antibiotics kill off much more than just the offending &#;bad guys.&#; Too many of the &#;good guys&#; die too. Take probiotics after you are finished with a prescription of antibiotics. Do not tell the doctor that you or your child has an ear infection and insist on receiving antibiotics. The only way to diagnose the infection is by pneumatic otoscopy &#; this is the little bulb syringe attached to the otoscope that puffs air against the eardrum to check for mobility (the normal in-and-out movement of the eardrum). A doctor will look for abnormal color, opacity, and bulging (shape) of the eardrum. Middle ear infections are typically &#;bulging&#; and have a distinct red or yellow color, instead of shiny white.

Loud noises can cause pain. If you will be at a loud event like a car race or concert, wear earplugs.

Mimi Barre is the owner of International Day Spa, Cajon St., Redlands. Send your skin care questions to her at [email protected] She and her estheticians are available for personal consultations. Past columns of Ask Mimi are on the Web at traitortrump.us

Источник: traitortrump.us

Your Child's Earache: symptoms, treatment, and prevention

Earaches and ear infections are surprisingly common in babies and young children but can be quite a distressing experience if you’re not sure what’s wrong. It’s not always easy to spot the signs of an ear infection, but with a bit of knowledge, you’ll understand why your child gets earaches and what you can do to help.

Soothing Your Child’s Earache

Earaches can occur in the middle or outer ear. Middle ear earaches are most commonly caused by a bacterial or viral infection. For example, when your child has a cold, bacteria can grow in the passages that connect the middle ear to nose. If these passages block up, the middle ear becomes infected and inflamed. The build-up inside the ear places pressure on the eardrum, causing it to bulge and become painful for your child. 

Other causes of earaches such as:

  • Fluid building up inside the ear
  • Blocked ears from earwax or other objects
  • Injury to the ear canal from cotton buds or other objects
  • teething or a dental abscess (if accompanied by a toothache)
  • tonsillitis or a sore throat (if ear pain occurs with swallowing)
  • a perforated eardrum (hole in the eardrum)
  • altitude changes (such as during or after a plane trip)

If you’re not sure what’s causing their earache or if you’re worried about your child's’ hearing, speak to your GP.

What are some signs of an earache?

Earache and ear infections can be miserable for a child of any age and be worrying for you, as a parent or carer. The signs to look for include: 

  • Sharp, dull, or burning pain in one or both ears
  • Hearing problems
  • Scaly skin or discharge in or around the ear
  • Feeling pressure or fullness in the ear
  • Lack of energy
  • Feeling sick
  • Itching and irritation around the ear
  • Fever
  • Irritability or crying
  • Sleeping problems

For babies who can’t talk, be on the lookout if your baby is:

  • Pulling at their ear
  • Ignoring loud sounds
  • Being irritable
  • Not wanting to eat
  • Losing their balance

How can I help relieve my child's earache or ear infection?

Most earaches usually clear up within a few days. Symptoms of ear infections can sometimes last for up to a week, however.

Tips you can try at home include getting your child to rest in an upright position instead of lying down, to help relieve some of the pressure and place a warm flannel against the affected ear to help relieve the pain.

If your child is in pain you can also give them some pain relief medicine to soothe their earache. Nurofen for Children 3 months to 12 years contains ibuprofen which has anti-inflammatory properties.

In older children, nasal sprays can help to reduce the swelling in the nasal passages which leads to the middle ears. Using a nasal spray will not help the ear infection clear away any faster but if your child also has a stuffy nose, it can help to unblock it for a few hours. However; do not give this to your child except under the advice of your GP or pharmacist, and never for more than days in a row. Avoid using any over-the-counter ear drops without first seeing your GP, as they can cause problems if your child's eardrum has a perforation (holey).

Do you need antibiotics for an ear infection?

Most ear infections are caused by viruses which can't be treated with antibiotics. Many people believe that antibiotics will help to reduce ear pain, but this isn't the case. Aside from using painkillers and monitoring your child's wellness and body temperature, often the best course of action is to wait for the ear infection to clear on its own.

Your GP may decide to prescribe antibiotics, however, if:

  • the ear infection doesn't start to get better after three days
  • fluid is coming out of your child's ear
  • your child is under two and has an infection in both ears
  • your child has a condition (such as cystic fibrosis) which may increase the risk of complications 

Is it normal to have regular earaches and ear infections?

Regular ear infections in children can lead to a condition called glue ear. Glue ear occurs when sticky fluid builds up in your child's ear. This can lead to unclear speech or behavioural problems. Children with glue ear or regular ear infections may be treated with something called an ear tube - a narrow tube made of plastic or metal which allows air to flow to and from the middle ear. If your child is regularly suffering from ear infections, takes a long time to recover, or there is discharge coming out of the ear, see your GP.

How to prevent ear infections

Ear infections aren't fun so it's great to know that there are steps you can take to try and prevent them. Some ways you can prevent ear infections include:

  • make sure your child is up to date with vaccinations
  • avoid smoking around your child
  • avoid using a dummy after your child is six months old
  • don't stick cotton wool buds or your fingers in your child's ears
  • insert earplugs into your child's ears when they swim
  • avoid getting water or shampoo into your child's ears
  • when bathing your child, pull a shower cap over the ears
  • treat conditions that affect your child's ears, such as eczema or an allergy to hearing aids

As always, remember to see your doctor if your child's earache doesn't improve or if you have any concerns.

When to call a doctor

Sometimes, ear infections do not get better on their own or may signal something more serious.

See your GP if your child has any of the following:

  • a very high temperature
  • an earache that doesn't improve after 3 days
  • swelling or fluid coming out of the ear
  • hearing loss
  • a severe sore throat, vomiting, or dizziness
  • regular ear infections
  • a long-term medical condition or weakened immune system

If an ear infection is causing severe pain that cannot be relieved by medication, a doctor may decide to make a small cut inside the ear to drain away the excess fluid.

Источник: traitortrump.us

3 ways to safely remove ear wax at home without a Q-tip

This a was medically reviewed by Omid Mehdizadeh, MD, otolaryngologist and laryngologist at the Pacific Neuroscience Institute's Pacific Eye, Ear & Skull Base Center at Providence Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica, California.

Person with a liquid syringe near their ear.
Obencem/Getty Images
  • Try removing ear wax at home with ear drops, or with natural remedies like oils and baking soda.
  • Never pick out ear wax with certain objects, including Q-Tips, because it can impact your ear wax.
  • If you have impacted ear wax it may need to be treated by a doctor.
  • Visit Insider's Health Reference library for more advice.

Ear wax is a fatty substance produced in your ear canal. The wax — medically known as cerumen — cleans your ears, protects them from infection, and lubricates the ear canal to stop it from becoming too dry. 

Normally, ear wax will dry up and fall out of your ear over time. However, some people produce more than necessary, and the excess can accumulate in the ear canal and cause buildup or blockage. This is known as impacted ear wax. 

Impacted ear wax

Impacted ear wax is a common condition. It affects an estimated: 

  • 6% of the general population
  • 10% of children 
  • More than 30% of the elderly and cognitively impaired

Impacted ear wax is especially common among the elderly because wax tends to become harder and less mobile, so it's less likely to work its way out. Hearing aids or earplugs can also prevent extrusion and cause blockage. 

Although it's possible to have impacted ear wax and experience no symptoms, it may cause the following:

  • A feeling of fullness in the ear
  • Earache 
  • Difficulty hearing or hearing loss
  • Ringing in the ear, known as tinnitus
  • A feeling of itchiness in the ear
  • Discharge from the ear
  • Odor coming from the ear
  • Dizziness

If you struggle to hear or repeatedly feel ear pain, you should check in with a doctor, says Jerry Lin, MD, PhD, an ear, nose, and throat specialist at the University of Louisville, who can recommend the best course of treatment for you. 

Sometimes, you will have to visit the doctor, who can perform clinical irrigation or manually remove ear wax with a special instrument. 

Other times, you can use ear drops to remove ear wax at home. Below are three ways to remove ear wax at home, naturally.

1. Use ear drops

Ear drops are liquid solutions — known scientifically as cerumenolytic agents — which help thin, soften, break up, or dissolve ear wax, so it can leave the ear. 

Important: Anyone who has a suspected or known eardrum perforation or hole should avoid placing any liquid into the ear, and seek medical attention for proper treatment.  

Drops are available over the counter, and common name-brand ear drops include Debrox, Hylands, and Similasan. Typically, it's recommended to use up to five drops at a time, one to two times daily, for three to seven days. 

How to use ear drops to clear out ear wax in 7 steps 

  1. Check the label first to see how many drops are required.
  2. Wash your hands with soap and water. Make sure you rinse the soap off and completely dry your hands to avoid getting soap and water into your ear. 
  3. Carefully remove the dropper from the bottle. Be sure the plastic part of the dropper does not touch anything.
  4. Lie on your side or back with the impacted ear facing upward.
  5. Put the correct number of drops into your ear, according to the instructions. 
  6. Gently pull the earlobe up and down to allow the drops to run into the ear. 
  7. Remain lying down with the infected ear upward, according to how long the instructions say, which is usually two to five minutes.

Lin says that ear drops work immediately after use, though they may require a few tries to remove especially stubborn ear wax. 

While there is limited published evidence on the effectiveness of drops, one study suggests that using them for five days is more likely to completely clear the excessive wax than no treatment at all. 

2. Try oil

There are other ways you can remove ear wax at home with natural substances, though they will likely take longer to work than ear drops. 

Oils, such as baby oil, mineral oil, coconut oil, olive oil, or glycerin — a natural compound derived from vegetable oils or animal fats — can be used to soften and remove ear wax. 

Here's how to do it:   

  • Apply the oil. Tilt your head to the side and — using an eyedropper, or dropper bottle — apply a few drops of your oil of choice into the ear canal.
  • Drain it out using warm water. After a day or two, when the wax is softened, use a rubber-bulb syringe to gently squirt warm water into your ear canal. Tilt your head and pull your outer ear up and back to straighten your ear canal. When finished irrigating, tip your head to the side to let the water drain out.
  • Dry your ear canal. Use either a towel or hair-dryer on low or no heat to gently dry your ear canal. This is optional, according to Lin.
  • Repeat, if necessary. You can try this method multiple times every few days until the excess ear wax is removed. 

3. Make a baking soda solution

Alternatively, you may also be able to remove ear wax with a baking soda solution: 

  • Create the baking soda solution. Dissolve half a teaspoon of baking soda in two ounces of warm water. If you have a dropper bottle, pour the solution into it. 
  • Apply to your ears. Tilt your head to the side, and using an eyedropper or dropper bottle, drop five to ten drops of the solution into your ear. 
  • Drain it out using warm water. After about an hour or so, when the wax is softened, use a rubber-bulb syringe to gently squirt warm water into your ear canal. Tilt your head and pull your outer ear up and back to straighten your ear canal. When finished irrigating, tip your head to the side to let the water drain out.
  • Dry your ear canal. Use either a towel or hair-dryer on low or no heat to gently dry your ear canal. This is optional, according to Lin. 
  • Repeat, if necessary. You can try this method once a day until the ear wax clears up, but for no longer than two weeks. It can clear up within a couple of days.

It's important to note that these natural softening agents can sometimes have adverse effects, because they may only loosen the outer layer of the wax, which can then lodge deeper into the ear canal. 

Note: If your impacted ear wax symptoms don't improve after using these methods for a week or two, check in with your healthcare provider.

What not to do when trying to remove ear wax

Trying to manually remove the wax yourself with your finger or other objects can make the blockage worse. 

"Picking out wax that is visible just at the entrance into the ear canal is OK," says Lin. "Anything deeper should either be allowed to work its way out on its own or be removed by a physician." 

In fact, some blockages can occur when you try to clean your ears with cotton swabs and accidentally push the wax deeper. While Q-Tips are commonly used, they should be avoided. 

"Q-Tips are a bad idea," Lin says. "They take up much of the canal diameter. Therefore, using them packs the wax deeper into the ear canal. In the worst-case scenario, the wax could be packed against the eardrum and possibly even create an eardrum perforation." 

In addition, you should not attempt home remedies like ear candling, which drip hot wax into your ear and are marketed — incorrectly — as miracle cures. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) strongly recommends against ear candling, as it is both ineffective and dangerous. 

Insider's takeaway

While it can feel good to stick things like Q-tips in your ears, you should be very selective about what you put in there. Otherwise, you risk impacting the ear wax, which can lead to uncomfortable symptoms like earache and dizziness. 

Instead of a Q-tip try using ear drops, oil, or a baking soda solution to loosen up ear wax and remove it. And if you are suffering from chronic ear pain, it's important to see a doctor for treatment options.

Hannah Roberts

Ad/Tech reporter, Business Insider UK

More:HealthHealth ExplainersEar WaxENT
Источник: traitortrump.us

Otitis Media (Middle Ear Infection) in Adults

Otitis Media (Middle Ear Infection) in Adults

Otitis media is another name for a middle ear infection. It means an infection behind your eardrum. This kind of ear infection can happen after any condition that keeps fluid from draining from the middle ear. These conditions include allergies, a cold, a sore throat, or a respiratory infection.

Middle ear infections are common in children, but they can also happen in adults. An ear infection in an adult may mean a more serious problem than in a child. So you may need additional tests. If you have an ear infection, you should see your healthcare provider for treatment. If they happen repeatedly, you should see an otolaryngologist (ear, nose, and throat specialist) or an otologist (ear subspecialist).

What are the types of middle ear infections?

Infections can affect the middle ear in several ways. They are:

  • Acute otitis media- This middle ear infection occurs suddenly. It causes swelling and redness. Fluid and pus become trapped under the eardrum (tympanic membrane). You can have a fever and ear pain.
  • Chronic otitis media- This is a middle ear infection that does not go away, or happens repeatedly, over months to years. The ear may drain (have liquid coming out of the ear canal). It can often be accompanied by a tympanic membrane perforation and hearing loss. Usually chronic otitis media is not painful.
  • Otitis media with effusion- Fluid (effusion) and mucus build up in the middle ear after an infection goes away. You may feel like your middle ear is full. This can continue for months and may affect your hearing. This is also sometimes called serous otitis media.
  • Chronic otitis media with effusion- Fluid (effusion) remains in the middle ear for a long time. Or it builds up again and again, even though there is no infection. It may also affect your hearing

Who is more likely to get a middle ear infection?

You are more likely to get an ear infection if you:

  • Smoke or are around someone who smokes
  • Have seasonal or year-round allergy symptoms
  • Have a cold or other upper respiratory infection

What causes a middle ear infection?

The middle ear connects to the throat by a canal called the eustachian tube. This tube helps even out the pressure between the outer ear and the inner ear. A cold or allergy can irritate the tube or cause the area around it to swell. This can keep fluid from draining from the middle ear. The fluid builds up behind the eardrum. Bacteria and viruses can grow in this fluid. The bacteria and viruses cause the middle ear infection.

What are the symptoms of a middle ear infection?

Common symptoms of a middle ear infection in adults are:

  • Pain in 1 or both ears
  • Drainage from the ear
  • Muffled hearing
  • Sore throat 

You may also have a fever. Rarely, your balance can be affected.

These symptoms may be the same as for other conditions. It’s important to talk with your health care provider if you think you have a middle ear infection. If you have a high fever, severe pain behind your ear, or paralysis in your face, see your provider as soon as you can.

How is a middle ear infection diagnosed?

Your health care provider will take a medical history and do a physical exam. He or she will look at the outer ear and eardrum with an otoscope or an otomicroscope. These are lighted tools that let your provider see inside the ear. A pneumatic otoscope blows a puff of air into the ear to check how well your eardrum moves. If your eardrum doesn’t move well, it may mean you have fluid behind it.

Your provider may also do a test called tympanometry. This test tells how well the middle ear is working. It can find any changes in pressure in the middle ear. Your provider may test your hearing with an audiogram (hearing test) or tuning fork.

How is a middle ear infection treated?

A middle ear infection may be treated with:

  • Antibiotics, taken by mouth or as ear drops
  • Medication for pain
  • Decongestants, antihistamines, or nasal steroids
  • For chronic otitis media with effusion, an ear tube (tympanostomy tube) may help (see below)

Your health care provider may also have you try autoinsufflation. This helps adjust the air pressure in your ear. For this, you pinch your nose and gently exhale. This forces air back through the eustachian tube.

The exact treatment for your ear infection will depend on the type of infection you have. In general, if your symptoms don’t get better in 48 to 72 hours, contact your health care provider.

Middle ear infections can cause long-term problems if not treated. They can lead to:

  • Infection in other parts of the head
  • Permanent hearing loss
  • Paralysis of a nerve in your face

Occasionally, you may need CT scan or MRI to check for rare causes such as a cholesteatoma or tumors. If you have a middle ear infection that doesn’t get better, you should see an ear, nose, and throat specialist (otolaryngologist) or a specialized otologist.

Ear tubes

Sometimes fluid stays in the middle ear even after you take antibiotics and the infection goes away. In this case, your health care provider may suggest that a small tube (also called a tympanostomy tube) be placed in your ear. The tube is put at the opening of the eardrum. The tube keeps fluid from building up and relieves pressure in the middle ear. It can also help you hear better. This procedure is sometimes called a myringotomy. It is done more commonly in children but is also performed in adults. In adults, it is a routine procedure that takes under 5 minutes in the office. The tubes usually fall out on their own after 6 months to a year. Ear tubes can be placed by an otolaryngologist or a specialized otologist.

Источник: traitortrump.us

Although ear infections are more common in children than they are in seniors, elderly adults are still susceptible to them. Unlike ear infections that occur in children (which are often minor and clear up quickly), ear infections in seniors are typically a sign of a more serious health problem.

If your elder loved one has an ear infection or gets frequent ear infections, pay close attention to the symptoms and know when to contact a doctor.

Types of Ear Infections

There are three main types of ear infections, which correspond to the three main parts of the ear: inner, middle, and outer.

Inner Ear Infections

An infection of the inner ear may be a case of inflammation rather than an actual infection.

Symptoms of Inner Ear Infections

In addition to ear pain, symptoms of an inner ear infection can include:

  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

Problems with the inner ear may also be a sign of a more serious condition including meningitis.

Middle Ear Infections

The middle ear is located in the area directly behind the eardrum. An infection in the middle ear is also known as Otitis Media and is caused by fluid trapped behind the eardrum.

Symptoms of Middle Ear Infections

In addition to pain in the ear, symptoms include:

  • Sense of fullness in the ear
  • Fluid drainage from the ear

A middle ear infection can cause fever as well as trouble hearing until the infection clears.

Outer Ear Infections

The outer ear is the part of the ear extending from the eardrum to the outside of the head. An outer ear infection is known as Otitis Externa and typically starts as an itchy rash.

Symptoms of Outer Ear Infections

In addition to a rash, symptoms include:

  • Pain
  • Tenderness
  • Redness
  • Swelling

Ear Infection Causes

Ear infections are typically caused by bacterial infections, but the type depends on how the infection started.

For example, infection of the middle ear typically stems from a cold or other respiratory issues. The infection can move to one or both ears through the eustachian tubes which regulate air pressure inside the ear and connect to the back of the nose and throat.

Infection can irritate the eustachian tubes, causing them to swell. When swelling occurs, it can impede proper drainage. The buildup of fluid within the ear puts pressure on the eardrum and causes pain.

Outer ear infections, on the other hand, are often caused by water that remains in the ear after bathing or swimming, therefore outer ear infections are sometimes called swimmer’s ear. The moisture trapped in the ear becomes a breeding ground for bacteria.

How Are Ear Infections Diagnosed?

Physical Exam: If your doctor suspects an ear infection, they will use an otoscope for a detailed look at the eardrum and the outer ear. This handheld device has a light and magnifying lens that allows the doctor to check the health of the ears.

A Pneumatic Otoscope administers a puff of air into the ear to evaluate the eardrum’s reaction when the air is pushed up against it. This can help to diagnose an ear infection or other ear issues.

Tympanometry: Tympanometry simply evaluates how well the ear is working by testing the movement of the eardrum.

Simple Hearing Test: A simple hearing test may also be performed to help the doctor pinpoint an infection, especially if hearing loss has occurred.

Ear Infection Risk Factors

Cigarette Smoke: People who smoke or those who are around a lot of second-hand smoke are more likely to develop ear infections.

Allergies: If an individual has seasonal or year-round allergies their risk of developing ear infections is higher.

Ear Infection Treatment

Ear infection treatment depends on the type and location of the infection. In most cases, antibiotics are necessary.

Middle Ear Infections Treatment

For these types of ear infections, antibiotics are typically prescribed. Most antibiotics can be taken orally but others can be applied directly to the site of infection as ear drops. Over the counter pain relievers and anti-inflammatory drugs may also be used for pain management.

If the ear infection was caused by a cold or respiratory infection, the doctor may prescribe antihistamines, decongestants, or nasal steroids.

Outer Ear Infections Treatment

If an infection occurs in the outer ear, the area should be carefully cleaned. Once the area is clean, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory medications can be applied.

If the infection is bacterial, antibiotics will typically be prescribed. Viral infections may simply require time to heal.

Can an Ear Infection Go Away On Its Own?

Most ear infections will go away on their own, so a minor earache may be nothing to worry about. However, if your elderly loved one has symptoms that don’t improve within three days, and if the symptoms include a loss of balance or a fever, see a doctor right away.

Any sign of discharge coming from the ear should also be addressed by a medical professional as soon as possible.

Home Remedies for Ear Infections

Although home remedies can’t treat or cure ear infections, they may help relieve pain and other symptoms.

  • Apply a warm compress to the affected ear
  • Keep the head upright while sitting; this can help drain the ear
  • Avoid smoking
  • Limit alcohol intake
  • Gargle with salt water; this may help clear the Eustachian tubes
  • Manage stress; stress can worsen symptoms

Alternative Treatments for Ear Infections

Some have found that using alternative treatments like garlic oil or tea tree oil ear drops have helped to improve symptoms. Apple cider vinegar, basil, olive oil, and hydrogen peroxide may help as well, however, scientific studies do not show any of these to be effective.

Ear Infection Prevention

No matter the type, many ear infections can be prevented by following these tips:

  • Clean your ears using a cotton swab
  • After taking a shower or swimming, be sure to completely dry your ears
  • Manage allergies and avoid triggers by taking your allergy medications
  • Thoroughly wash your hands and try to avoid people who have a cold or respiratory problem
  • Don’t smoke and avoid secondhand smoke whenever possible

Contact Sonas for Home Health Care Services in Florida

When it comes to managing your loved one’s health, we can help. From addressing symptoms of ear infections to providing reminders for when and how to take medication, we’re here every step of the way. This can mean a more active and engaged quality of life and more peace of mind for your family.

If you or an aging loved one are considering home health care services in Florida, contact the caring staff at Sonas Home Health Care. Call today () .

Enjoy this article? Share it!

Источник: traitortrump.us

7 Home Remedies for a Sore Throat

Does it feel like your throat is burning or on fire? Or, are you experiencing pain, irritation, or discomfort that gets worse when you swallow? Sometimes a sore throat is the only symptom you notice. But, more often than not, a sore throat happens along with other symptoms such as a runny nose, swollen glands, coughing, a fever, swollen tonsils, a hoarse voice, and more.

What Causes Sore Throats?

Most sore throats are symptoms of viral infections, such as the flu or the common cold. These upper respiratory infections can be treated at home, and the symptoms will usually subside after a few days with rest and hydration.

Occasionally, a sore throat is caused by a strep infection. Strep throat is the diagnosis when the streptococcal bacteria is the cause of an infection, and usually requires antibiotic treatment to avoid complications. 

Other causes of sore throats can include allergies, dry weather, muscle strain, gastroesophageal reflux disease, or cancer.

Treatment Options: Home Remedies for a Sore Throat

Minor or moderate sore throats can be treated at home. Since a sore throat is often a symptom of another health concern (such as a virus), the treatments are designed to reduce your discomfort and promote overall healing. Here are a few treatment options you can try:

1.     Saltwater Gargle: Add ½ teaspoon table salt to 8 ounces of warm water. Stir to dissolve, then gargle the solution. Spit out the saltwater solution and repeat every three hours. An alternative is to gargle a baking soda solution instead of saltwater.

2.     Throat Lozenges: Buy throat lozenges from a local drugstore, or suck on hard candy. This remedy keeps the saliva flowing to soothe the throat. Don’t give hard candy to children under the age of 4.

3.     Pain Medication: Acetaminophen or ibuprofen are common over-the-counter medications that can be used to manage pain. These medications are also beneficial if a fever is present with a sore throat. You can also find lidocaine sprays that can be used to numb the throat and provide temporary relief.

4.     Dietary Recommendations: Choose comforting foods that soothe the throat, such as broth, soup, tea, or popsicles. Avoid crunchy or hard foods that might irritate the throat, such as chips or cold cereal.

5.     Honey: Add honey to a cup of tea, or swallow a small spoonful. Choose raw, unfiltered honey for the best benefits for pain relief and fighting infection.

6.     Stay Hydrated: Drinking plenty of fluids is important to keep the throat moist and comfortable. Choose teas that soothe the throat and boost the immune system, such as licorice root, peppermint, ginger, or marshmallow root. Lemon water can be another option to reduce throat pain; add a bit of honey to lemon water for a delicious, healing drink. Try warm and cold drinks to see what works best for you.

7.     Humidifier: Sore throat symptoms can be intensified by dry weather. Avoid this irritation by using a cool-air humidifier in your bedroom. It can also be helpful to steam the upper respiratory tract by taking a warm bath or shower. Sitting in the steamy bathroom can provide relief.

Also, don’t overlook the importance of basic self-care such as sleep, a healthy diet, and taking it easy for a few days. A sore throat is an indication that your body is fighting an illness, so you should give yourself time to recover. It is smart to take a few days away from work or school, especially with a viral or bacterial illness that could be contagious.

When to See a Doctor for Sore Throat Treatment

If the sore throat symptoms intensify or don’t go away after a few days, then it might be time to talk to a doctor for a diagnosis. Determining the cause of the sore throat is important in choosing the right treatment plan. A doctor can use a simple throat swab test to determine if it is strep throat or culture to look for other types of bacteria. 

Here are a few signs that it is time to schedule an appointment with an ENT:

  • The sore throat lasts longer than a week
  • Visible white patches in the back of the throat
  • Difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • Earache
  • Rash
  • Swelling in the neck or face
  • Blood in your phlegm or saliva
  • A lump in the neck
  • Hoarseness lasting for more than weeks
  • Sore throats that occur frequently

If you need a medical consultation for a sore throat, or any other health condition affecting your ears, nose, or throat, then our team is here to assist. Contact us to schedule a consultation with an experienced ENT.

Are you located in the Dallas area? Collin County Ear, Nose, and Throat is a reputable provider in the community. We have several offices nearby in the Frisco and Plano areas: ()

Источник: traitortrump.us

Best home remedy for ear infection in adults -

Although ear infections are more common in children than they are in seniors, elderly adults are still susceptible to them. Unlike ear infections that occur in children (which are often minor and clear up quickly), ear infections in seniors are typically a sign of a more serious health problem.

If your elder loved one has an ear infection or gets frequent ear infections, pay close attention to the symptoms and know when to contact a doctor.

Types of Ear Infections

There are three main types of ear infections, which correspond to the three main parts of the ear: inner, middle, and outer.

Inner Ear Infections

An infection of the inner ear may be a case of inflammation rather than an actual infection.

Symptoms of Inner Ear Infections

In addition to ear pain, symptoms of an inner ear infection can include:

  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

Problems with the inner ear may also be a sign of a more serious condition including meningitis.

Middle Ear Infections

The middle ear is located in the area directly behind the eardrum. An infection in the middle ear is also known as Otitis Media and is caused by fluid trapped behind the eardrum.

Symptoms of Middle Ear Infections

In addition to pain in the ear, symptoms include:

  • Sense of fullness in the ear
  • Fluid drainage from the ear

A middle ear infection can cause fever as well as trouble hearing until the infection clears.

Outer Ear Infections

The outer ear is the part of the ear extending from the eardrum to the outside of the head. An outer ear infection is known as Otitis Externa and typically starts as an itchy rash.

Symptoms of Outer Ear Infections

In addition to a rash, symptoms include:

  • Pain
  • Tenderness
  • Redness
  • Swelling

Ear Infection Causes

Ear infections are typically caused by bacterial infections, but the type depends on how the infection started.

For example, infection of the middle ear typically stems from a cold or other respiratory issues. The infection can move to one or both ears through the eustachian tubes which regulate air pressure inside the ear and connect to the back of the nose and throat.

Infection can irritate the eustachian tubes, causing them to swell. When swelling occurs, it can impede proper drainage. The buildup of fluid within the ear puts pressure on the eardrum and causes pain.

Outer ear infections, on the other hand, are often caused by water that remains in the ear after bathing or swimming, therefore outer ear infections are sometimes called swimmer’s ear. The moisture trapped in the ear becomes a breeding ground for bacteria.

How Are Ear Infections Diagnosed?

Physical Exam: If your doctor suspects an ear infection, they will use an otoscope for a detailed look at the eardrum and the outer ear. This handheld device has a light and magnifying lens that allows the doctor to check the health of the ears.

A Pneumatic Otoscope administers a puff of air into the ear to evaluate the eardrum’s reaction when the air is pushed up against it. This can help to diagnose an ear infection or other ear issues.

Tympanometry: Tympanometry simply evaluates how well the ear is working by testing the movement of the eardrum.

Simple Hearing Test: A simple hearing test may also be performed to help the doctor pinpoint an infection, especially if hearing loss has occurred.

Ear Infection Risk Factors

Cigarette Smoke: People who smoke or those who are around a lot of second-hand smoke are more likely to develop ear infections.

Allergies: If an individual has seasonal or year-round allergies their risk of developing ear infections is higher.

Ear Infection Treatment

Ear infection treatment depends on the type and location of the infection. In most cases, antibiotics are necessary.

Middle Ear Infections Treatment

For these types of ear infections, antibiotics are typically prescribed. Most antibiotics can be taken orally but others can be applied directly to the site of infection as ear drops. Over the counter pain relievers and anti-inflammatory drugs may also be used for pain management.

If the ear infection was caused by a cold or respiratory infection, the doctor may prescribe antihistamines, decongestants, or nasal steroids.

Outer Ear Infections Treatment

If an infection occurs in the outer ear, the area should be carefully cleaned. Once the area is clean, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory medications can be applied.

If the infection is bacterial, antibiotics will typically be prescribed. Viral infections may simply require time to heal.

Can an Ear Infection Go Away On Its Own?

Most ear infections will go away on their own, so a minor earache may be nothing to worry about. However, if your elderly loved one has symptoms that don’t improve within three days, and if the symptoms include a loss of balance or a fever, see a doctor right away.

Any sign of discharge coming from the ear should also be addressed by a medical professional as soon as possible.

Home Remedies for Ear Infections

Although home remedies can’t treat or cure ear infections, they may help relieve pain and other symptoms.

  • Apply a warm compress to the affected ear
  • Keep the head upright while sitting; this can help drain the ear
  • Avoid smoking
  • Limit alcohol intake
  • Gargle with salt water; this may help clear the Eustachian tubes
  • Manage stress; stress can worsen symptoms

Alternative Treatments for Ear Infections

Some have found that using alternative treatments like garlic oil or tea tree oil ear drops have helped to improve symptoms. Apple cider vinegar, basil, olive oil, and hydrogen peroxide may help as well, however, scientific studies do not show any of these to be effective.

Ear Infection Prevention

No matter the type, many ear infections can be prevented by following these tips:

  • Clean your ears using a cotton swab
  • After taking a shower or swimming, be sure to completely dry your ears
  • Manage allergies and avoid triggers by taking your allergy medications
  • Thoroughly wash your hands and try to avoid people who have a cold or respiratory problem
  • Don’t smoke and avoid secondhand smoke whenever possible

Contact Sonas for Home Health Care Services in Florida

When it comes to managing your loved one’s health, we can help. From addressing symptoms of ear infections to providing reminders for when and how to take medication, we’re here every step of the way. This can mean a more active and engaged quality of life and more peace of mind for your family.

If you or an aging loved one are considering home health care services in Florida, contact the caring staff at Sonas Home Health Care. Call today () .

Enjoy this article? Share it!

Источник: traitortrump.us

Your Child's Earache: symptoms, treatment, and prevention

Earaches and ear infections are surprisingly common in babies and young children but can be quite a distressing experience if you’re not sure what’s wrong. It’s not always easy to spot the signs of an ear infection, but with a bit of knowledge, you’ll understand why your child gets earaches and what you can do to help.

Soothing Your Child’s Earache

Earaches can occur in the middle or outer ear. Middle ear earaches are most commonly caused by a bacterial or viral infection. For example, when your child has a cold, bacteria can grow in the passages that connect the middle ear to nose. If these passages block up, the middle ear becomes infected and inflamed. The build-up inside the ear places pressure on the eardrum, causing it to bulge and become painful for your child. 

Other causes of earaches such as:

  • Fluid building up inside the ear
  • Blocked ears from earwax or other objects
  • Injury to the ear canal from cotton buds or other objects
  • teething or a dental abscess (if accompanied by a toothache)
  • tonsillitis or a sore throat (if ear pain occurs with swallowing)
  • a perforated eardrum (hole in the eardrum)
  • altitude changes (such as during or after a plane trip)

If you’re not sure what’s causing their earache or if you’re worried about your child's’ hearing, speak to your GP.

What are some signs of an earache?

Earache and ear infections can be miserable for a child of any age and be worrying for you, as a parent or carer. The signs to look for include: 

  • Sharp, dull, or burning pain in one or both ears
  • Hearing problems
  • Scaly skin or discharge in or around the ear
  • Feeling pressure or fullness in the ear
  • Lack of energy
  • Feeling sick
  • Itching and irritation around the ear
  • Fever
  • Irritability or crying
  • Sleeping problems

For babies who can’t talk, be on the lookout if your baby is:

  • Pulling at their ear
  • Ignoring loud sounds
  • Being irritable
  • Not wanting to eat
  • Losing their balance

How can I help relieve my child's earache or ear infection?

Most earaches usually clear up within a few days. Symptoms of ear infections can sometimes last for up to a week, however.

Tips you can try at home include getting your child to rest in an upright position instead of lying down, to help relieve some of the pressure and place a warm flannel against the affected ear to help relieve the pain.

If your child is in pain you can also give them some pain relief medicine to soothe their earache. Nurofen for Children 3 months to 12 years contains ibuprofen which has anti-inflammatory properties.

In older children, nasal sprays can help to reduce the swelling in the nasal passages which leads to the middle ears. Using a nasal spray will not help the ear infection clear away any faster but if your child also has a stuffy nose, it can help to unblock it for a few hours. However; do not give this to your child except under the advice of your GP or pharmacist, and never for more than days in a row. Avoid using any over-the-counter ear drops without first seeing your GP, as they can cause problems if your child's eardrum has a perforation (holey).

Do you need antibiotics for an ear infection?

Most ear infections are caused by viruses which can't be treated with antibiotics. Many people believe that antibiotics will help to reduce ear pain, but this isn't the case. Aside from using painkillers and monitoring your child's wellness and body temperature, often the best course of action is to wait for the ear infection to clear on its own.

Your GP may decide to prescribe antibiotics, however, if:

  • the ear infection doesn't start to get better after three days
  • fluid is coming out of your child's ear
  • your child is under two and has an infection in both ears
  • your child has a condition (such as cystic fibrosis) which may increase the risk of complications 

Is it normal to have regular earaches and ear infections?

Regular ear infections in children can lead to a condition called glue ear. Glue ear occurs when sticky fluid builds up in your child's ear. This can lead to unclear speech or behavioural problems. Children with glue ear or regular ear infections may be treated with something called an ear tube - a narrow tube made of plastic or metal which allows air to flow to and from the middle ear. If your child is regularly suffering from ear infections, takes a long time to recover, or there is discharge coming out of the ear, see your GP.

How to prevent ear infections

Ear infections aren't fun so it's great to know that there are steps you can take to try and prevent them. Some ways you can prevent ear infections include:

  • make sure your child is up to date with vaccinations
  • avoid smoking around your child
  • avoid using a dummy after your child is six months old
  • don't stick cotton wool buds or your fingers in your child's ears
  • insert earplugs into your child's ears when they swim
  • avoid getting water or shampoo into your child's ears
  • when bathing your child, pull a shower cap over the ears
  • treat conditions that affect your child's ears, such as eczema or an allergy to hearing aids

As always, remember to see your doctor if your child's earache doesn't improve or if you have any concerns.

When to call a doctor

Sometimes, ear infections do not get better on their own or may signal something more serious.

See your GP if your child has any of the following:

  • a very high temperature
  • an earache that doesn't improve after 3 days
  • swelling or fluid coming out of the ear
  • hearing loss
  • a severe sore throat, vomiting, or dizziness
  • regular ear infections
  • a long-term medical condition or weakened immune system

If an ear infection is causing severe pain that cannot be relieved by medication, a doctor may decide to make a small cut inside the ear to drain away the excess fluid.

Источник: traitortrump.us

Otitis Media (Middle Ear Infection) in Adults

Otitis Media (Middle Ear Infection) in Adults

Otitis media is another name for a middle ear infection. It means an infection behind your eardrum. This kind of ear infection can happen after any condition that keeps fluid from draining from the middle ear. These conditions include allergies, a cold, a sore throat, or a respiratory infection.

Middle ear infections are common in children, but they can also happen in adults. An ear infection in an adult may mean a more serious problem than in a child. So you may need additional tests. If you have an ear infection, you should see your healthcare provider for treatment. If they happen repeatedly, you should see an otolaryngologist (ear, nose, and throat specialist) or an otologist (ear subspecialist).

What are the types of middle ear infections?

Infections can affect the middle ear in several ways. They are:

  • Acute otitis media- This middle ear infection occurs suddenly. It causes swelling and redness. Fluid and pus become trapped under the eardrum (tympanic membrane). You can have a fever and ear pain.
  • Chronic otitis media- This is a middle ear infection that does not go away, or happens repeatedly, over months to years. The ear may drain (have liquid coming out of the ear canal). It can often be accompanied by a tympanic membrane perforation and hearing loss. Usually chronic otitis media is not painful.
  • Otitis media with effusion- Fluid (effusion) and mucus build up in the middle ear after an infection goes away. You may feel like your middle ear is full. This can continue for months and may affect your hearing. This is also sometimes called serous otitis media.
  • Chronic otitis media with effusion- Fluid (effusion) remains in the middle ear for a long time. Or it builds up again and again, even though there is no infection. It may also affect your hearing

Who is more likely to get a middle ear infection?

You are more likely to get an ear infection if you:

  • Smoke or are around someone who smokes
  • Have seasonal or year-round allergy symptoms
  • Have a cold or other upper respiratory infection

What causes a middle ear infection?

The middle ear connects to the throat by a canal called the eustachian tube. This tube helps even out the pressure between the outer ear and the inner ear. A cold or allergy can irritate the tube or cause the area around it to swell. This can keep fluid from draining from the middle ear. The fluid builds up behind the eardrum. Bacteria and viruses can grow in this fluid. The bacteria and viruses cause the middle ear infection.

What are the symptoms of a middle ear infection?

Common symptoms of a middle ear infection in adults are:

  • Pain in 1 or both ears
  • Drainage from the ear
  • Muffled hearing
  • Sore throat 

You may also have a fever. Rarely, your balance can be affected.

These symptoms may be the same as for other conditions. It’s important to talk with your health care provider if you think you have a middle ear infection. If you have a high fever, severe pain behind your ear, or paralysis in your face, see your provider as soon as you can.

How is a middle ear infection diagnosed?

Your health care provider will take a medical history and do a physical exam. He or she will look at the outer ear and eardrum with an otoscope or an otomicroscope. These are lighted tools that let your provider see inside the ear. A pneumatic otoscope blows a puff of air into the ear to check how well your eardrum moves. If your eardrum doesn’t move well, it may mean you have fluid behind it.

Your provider may also do a test called tympanometry. This test tells how well the middle ear is working. It can find any changes in pressure in the middle ear. Your provider may test your hearing with an audiogram (hearing test) or tuning fork.

How is a middle ear infection treated?

A middle ear infection may be treated with:

  • Antibiotics, taken by mouth or as ear drops
  • Medication for pain
  • Decongestants, antihistamines, or nasal steroids
  • For chronic otitis media with effusion, an ear tube (tympanostomy tube) may help (see below)

Your health care provider may also have you try autoinsufflation. This helps adjust the air pressure in your ear. For this, you pinch your nose and gently exhale. This forces air back through the eustachian tube.

The exact treatment for your ear infection will depend on the type of infection you have. In general, if your symptoms don’t get better in 48 to 72 hours, contact your health care provider.

Middle ear infections can cause long-term problems if not treated. They can lead to:

  • Infection in other parts of the head
  • Permanent hearing loss
  • Paralysis of a nerve in your face

Occasionally, you may need CT scan or MRI to check for rare causes such as a cholesteatoma or tumors. If you have a middle ear infection that doesn’t get better, you should see an ear, nose, and throat specialist (otolaryngologist) or a specialized otologist.

Ear tubes

Sometimes fluid stays in the middle ear even after you take antibiotics and the infection goes away. In this case, your health care provider may suggest that a small tube (also called a tympanostomy tube) be placed in your ear. The tube is put at the opening of the eardrum. The tube keeps fluid from building up and relieves pressure in the middle ear. It can also help you hear better. This procedure is sometimes called a myringotomy. It is done more commonly in children but is also performed in adults. In adults, it is a routine procedure that takes under 5 minutes in the office. The tubes usually fall out on their own after 6 months to a year. Ear tubes can be placed by an otolaryngologist or a specialized otologist.

Источник: traitortrump.us

Home Remedies for Ear Infections

While ear infections are more common in children, people of any age can get them.

Because ear infections often clear up on their own, healthcare professionals are hesitant to jump to prescribing antibiotics as a first course of treatment unless the infection is severe, the child is very young, or there are other mitigating circumstances.

This has many people turning to home remedies for ear infections. Many home remedy recommendations—often passed from one person to another through word of mouth—are not backed by scientific evidence and may even be harmful. It's important to evaluate home remedy recommendations for ear infections for accuracy and safety before trying them out. And as always, when in doubt, ask your healthcare provider.

Ice Compress

Commercial pre-made ice packs can be used, or an ice compress or cold compress can be made at home.

How to Make an Ice Towel:

  1. Using cold water, wet a towel and squeeze out excess moisture.
  2. Fold the towel.
  3. Place the folded towel in a leak-proof, sealable bag such as a Ziploc freezer bag.
  4. Place the sealed bag in the freezer for 15 minutes.

How to Make an Ice Pack or Cool Compress

  1. Place ice cubes in a leak-proof, sealable bag such as a Ziploc bag.
  2. Partially fill with water.
  3. Seal the bag, squeezing air out as you go.
  4. Wrap the bag with a damp towel.

How to Use It

Apply it to the affected ear for 10 to 15 minutes at a time. Some people find it helpful to alternate between cold and warm compresses.

Does It Help?

Cold compresses won't cure an ear infection, but they can help ease ear pain.

Cold can numb the area and help reduce inflammation.

Warnings

Never put ice or a cold pack directly on the skin, as this can cause tissue damage. Wrap it in a towel, paper towel, or another suitable barrier before applying it to the skin.

Be mindful of temperature and time. To avoid damage such as frostbite, don't make the compress too cold, and never leave it on for more than 20 minutes at a time.

Heat Compress

Commercial heat compresses or heating pads can be used, or heat compresses can be made at home.

To make a homemade heat compress, simply wet a towel with warm water and squeeze out the excess.

How to Use It

Apply the warm compress or heating pad to the affected ear for no more than 20 minutes at a time.

Hot compresses can also be alternated with cold compresses.

Does It Help?

Heat compresses bring more blood to the area. As with cold compresses, heat compresses will not cure an ear infection but can help with pain relief.

Warnings

Be very careful to avoid burns, especially when applying heat compresses to children.

Make sure the compress or heating pad is not too hot, and do not apply it for more than 20 minutes at a time.

If using a heating pad or similar device, do not apply directly to the skin, and keep it on for 20 minutes or less. Never sleep with a heating pad, and always supervise a child who is using one.

Heat compresses are not recommended for infants.

Over-the-Counter Pain Relievers

Over-the-counter (OTC) medications are the most recommended treatment for ear pain and for fever that sometimes accompanies ear infections.

For infants over 2 months: Acetaminophen (Tylenol) can be given if the baby's healthcare provider gives the okay.

Fever In Young Infants

If a baby younger than 3 months old has a rectal temperature or forehead (temporal artery) temperature of F (38 C) or higher, they need to go to the emergency room, even if there are no other symptoms.

For infants age 6 months or older, toddlers, and older children: Acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin) are options.

For adults: Acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen (Aleve) can help. Neither aspirin nor naproxen should be given to children unless directed by a healthcare provider.

How to Use Them

The dosage, type, and frequency of doses depend on the type of medication, the age of the person, their weight, and other mitigating factors such as medical history.

If a child is under age 2 or has never taken this medication before, contact their healthcare provider before administering it.

For children and adults, follow the directions on the package carefully.

Does It Help?

OTC medications can be quite effective for pain and/or fever.

They won't cure an ear infection, but they can make you much more comfortable while your body fights the infection.

In addition to relieving pain and fever, NSAIDs (aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen) can help reduce inflammation.

Warnings

Children under 6 months who are showing symptoms of an ear infection should see a healthcare provider before starting any treatment.

Read all directions before administering medications to children or taking medications yourself. If dosing children by weight, make sure you have an up-to-date and accurate weight calculation for them.

Check for drug interactions with other medications you are taking before taking OTC medications.

Contact a healthcare provider if you notice any adverse effects.

Hydrogen Peroxide

Hydrogen peroxide can be used on its own or in OTC ear drops, typically for removing excess ear wax or for treating or preventing swimmer's ear (an infection of the ear canal).

How to Use It

  1. Apply about half an ear dropper full of 3% hydrogen peroxide solution into the ear canal.
  2. Let it bubble and fizz.
  3. Allow it to drain properly by turning your head to the side and pulling back on the top of your ear.
  4. Use drying drops or a hairdryer to eliminate any moisture that is left behind in the ear.

If using OTC drops, follow the directions on the label.

Does It Help?

Cleaning your ears occasionally with hydrogen peroxide can help keep bacteria out of your ear canals and stop ear wax from building up. This could help prevent infection, but it won't treat a middle ear infection as it can't reach the middle ear.

The only way for it to reach the site of infection with a middle ear infection is if there is a hole in the eardrum, in which case it would be unsafe to use hydrogen peroxide.

Warnings

Do not use if there is a suspected perforated eardrum.

Garlic

Garlic has become an area of interest for study for its potential health benefits. The current research does not have a consensus as to its efficacy, but some studies show promising results depending on how it is used.

Raw Garlic

Freshly crushed raw garlic has shown promising results as an antimicrobial in part because of a defense molecule contained within it called allicin.

Allicin has been shown, at least in vitro (outside of a living organism), to have strong antimicrobial properties. Animal studies suggest it may also help fight infection inside the body. But more research, particularly on humans, is needed.

Some studies suggest that garlic supplements can reduce the occurrence and/or duration of colds, a common cause of ear infections. But these studies are small, and more research needs to be done.

Warning

Do not put garlic, or any foreign objects, into your ear.

Garlic Oil

Garlic oil has antimicrobial properties and is sometimes suggested as an ear drop for ear infections.

This is advised against, as it won't reach the source of the infection behind the eardrum unless the eardrum has a hole in it. If the eardrum is perforated, it still has not been shown that garlic oil is safe to use in the middle ear.

Garlic May Interact With Some Medications

Garlic supplements should not be taken with medications that are transported by P-gp. This includes:

  • Colchicine
  • Digoxin
  • Doxorubicin [Adriamycin]
  • Quinidine
  • Rosuvastatin [Crestor]
  • Tacrolimus [Prograf]
  • Verapamil

Because of the increased risk of bleeding associated with garlic supplements, talk to your healthcare provider about their use if you take an anticoagulant (blood thinner) such as warfarin (Coumadin) or if you need surgery.

Garlic supplements may interfere with the effectiveness of saquinavir (a drug used to treat HIV infection) and other medications, dietary herbs, or supplements.

Talk to your healthcare provider before taking any supplements, including garlic.

Ginger

Ginger is a root that is commonly used as a spice in foods and is considered to have antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties.

How to Use It

Ginger juice or ginger infused oil can be applied on the outer ear. Do not put ginger in the ear.

Does It Help?

Ginger has been used for generations as a health remedy and appears to have several health benefits, but those results are mostly observational and anecdotal. Studies have been performed, particularly animal studies, but without strong, conclusive results.

More research is needed on the health benefits of ginger both taken orally and applied to the skin.

Warnings

Do not put ginger, ginger juice, ginger infused oil, or any other forms of ginger into the ear.

While ginger is largely considered safe, it is best to consult a healthcare provider before applying or consuming it outside our typical use as a food spice.

Tea Tree Oil

Tea tree oil comes from the evergreen leaves of the Australian Melaleuca alternifolia tree.

How to Use It

Tea tree oil is used topically to help with skin conditions and can be added to a bath or vaporizer (if supported by the manufacturer) to help with lung problems.

It should never be taken internally and should not be placed into the ears.

Does It Help?

While tea tree oil does appear to have antibacterial and antifungal properties, it is not safe to be used in the ear and should not be used to treat ear infections.

Warnings

Tea tree oil is toxic when swallowed and must be kept away from children and pets.

Allergic rashes from tea tree oil are possible, so testing on a small area before use is advised.

Do not put it in the ear, as this can cause damage to the inner ear.

Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar is made from fermented apple juice. Some studies indicate it has antibacterial properties.

How to Use It

  1. Mix equal parts warm water and apple cider vinegar or equal parts rubbing alcohol (isopropyl alcohol) and apple cider vinegar.
  2. Using a dropper, add a few (five to 10) drops into the affected ear, with the head tilted to keep the mixture in the ear.
  3. Let the mixture sit in the ear for five minutes before allowing it to drain out.

Does It Help?

Because of its antibacterial properties, it may help with an outer ear infection such as swimmer's ear, but it will not help a middle ear infection.

Warnings

Do not use for a middle ear infection.

Do not use if there are tubes in the ears or there is a perforated eardrum or one is suspected.

Breast Milk

Breastfeeding passes infection-fighting agents from parent to baby, but the amount of these agents vary.

One study found that after the first one to two weeks after birth, the amount of white blood cells found in the breastmilk is low when both breastfeeding parent and baby are healthy.

The number of white blood cells in the breastmilk increased significantly if either the nursing parent and/or the infant had an infection. The increase was larger when the parent had an infection than when the infant did, particularly if the infection was in the breast (mastitis).

Breastfed babies are less likely to get ear infections than those who are formula-fed. Breastfeeding exclusively for the first six months and continuing to breastfeed for at least a year is recommended for several reasons, including reducing the risk of ear infections.

When to See a Doctor

See a healthcare provider if:

  • A child younger than 6 months has a fever (even as the only symptom) or shows signs of an ear infection.
  • Symptoms do not improve within 2 to 3 days.
  • Symptoms get worse.
  • Symptoms are severe.
  • There is hearing loss.
  • There is a fever of F (39 C) or higher.
  • There is pus, discharge, or fluid coming from the ear.
  • Severe pain suddenly stops (may mean a ruptured eardrum).
  • There is swelling behind the ear.
  • New symptoms appear (especially severe headache, dizziness, swelling around the ear, or twitching of the face muscles).
  • You think medical attention is necessary.

See a healthcare provider immediately if:

  • An infant under 3 months has a temperature of F (38 C) or higher.
  • There is a fever over F (40 C).
  • There is a stiff neck.
  • A child acts sluggish, looks or acts very sick, or does not stop crying despite all efforts.
  • The child’s walk is not steady/they are physically very weak.
  • There are signs of weakness in the face (like a crooked smile).
  • There is bloody or pus-filled fluid draining from the ear.
  • Ear pain is severe.
  • You think immediate medical attention is necessary.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need to see a doctor for an ear infection?

Most middle ear infections are fought off by the body without treatment within a few days. If your ear infection does not require antibiotics, further treatment is not necessary. But some home remedies may help with comfort and symptom relief.

How do you get rid of an earache fast?

The most effective method of relieving ear pain is OTC pain relievers such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin). Adults can also try aspirin or naproxen (Aleve), but neither of these should be given to children unless directed by a healthcare provider.

A Word From Verywell

While antibiotics are sometimes necessary for an ear infection, especially in children less than 2 years old, ear infections usually go away on their own within a few days.

To help with symptom management while your ears heal, some home remedies can be helpful. That said, others are unproven or possibly harmful.

Always check with your healthcare provider before starting a treatment for yourself or for your child, and never put anything in your ear or your child's ear without the guidance of a healthcare provider.

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Johns Hopkins Medicine. Ice packs vs. warm compresses for pain.

  2. Cleveland Clinic. How to steer clear of swimmer's ear. Updated December 18,

  3. Arreola R, Quintero-Fabián S, López-Roa RI, et al. Immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory effects of garlic compounds. J Immunol Res. ; doi//

  4. AMA Borlinghaus J, Albrecht F, Gruhlke MC, Nwachukwu ID, Slusarenko AJ. Allicin: chemistry and biological properties. Molecules. ;19(8) Published Aug doi/molecules

  5. Cleveland Clinic. 3 home remedies for an ear infection. Updated January 2,

  6. Asher GN, Corbett AH, Hawke RL. Common herbal dietary supplement—drug interactions. AFP. ;96(2)

  7. National Center for Complimentary and Integrative Health. Garlic. Updated December

  8. Karuppiah P, Rajaram S. Antibacterial effect of Allium sativum cloves and Zingiber officinale rhizomes against multiple-drug resistant clinical pathogens. Asian Pac J Trop Biomed. ;2(8) doi/S(12)X

  9. Bode AM, Dong Z. The amazing and mighty ginger. In: Benzie IFF, Wachtel-Galor S, eds. Herbal Medicine: Biomolecular and Clinical Aspects. 2nd ed. CRC Press/Taylor & Francis;

  10. Michigan Medicine. Tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia). Updated September 23,

  11. Fraise AP, Wilkinson MAC, Bradley CR, Oppenheim B, Moiemen N. The antibacterial activity and stability of acetic acid. Journal of Hospital Infection. ;84(4) doi/traitortrump.us

  12. Hassiotou F, Hepworth AR, Metzger P, et al. Maternal and infant infections stimulate a rapid leukocyte response in breastmilk. Clin Transl Immunology. ;2(4):e3. Published Apr doi/cti

  13. Harvard Health. Earache. Updated January

  14. Cleveland Clinic. Ear infection (otitis media). Updated April 16,

Источник: traitortrump.us

Your kiddo is tugging on her ear again. Uh-oh. Or maybe ear pain is keeping you up at night. No matter the age, ear infections are no fun. ENT-otolaryngologist Anh Nguyen-Huynh, MD, explains all about ear infections, and the earache remedies you can try at home.

Advertising Policy

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

What type of ear infection is it?

There are two common types of ear infections:

  • Otitis media: This ear infection affects the middle ear (right behind the eardrum). Middle ear infections are common in kids and tend to cause trouble hearing, fevers, and pain without much outward signs such as ear drainage or swelling.
  • Otitis externa: This infection affects the ear canal, and is commonly known as swimmer’s ear because water exposure is a risk factor for it. Swimmer’s ear is painful, too, and tends to have more visible signs such as a swollen ear canal or pus drainage.

“There are several home remedies for earaches,” says Dr. Nguyen-Huynh. “Try these for the first two or three days if symptoms are mild.”

Earache remedies you can try

1. Hot or cold compress

The skinny: Grab an ice or heat pack and put it on the affected ear to help with the pain.

Doctor’s advice: The temperature you use is up to you. Wrap it in a towel to make sure it’s not too cold or too hot. You don&#;t want to cause any burns.

2.Over-the-counter (OTC) pain relievers

Advertising Policy

The skinny: Pain relievers work as advertised, helping take the edge off the pain.

Doctor’s advice:Both adults and kids can rest easier when they take acetaminophen or ibuprofen at the right dosage. These medications reduce pain and fever, making you feel more comfortable.

3. Sleep position

The skinny: How you sleep can affect ear pain. Rest with your head on two or more pillows, so the affected ear is higher than the rest of your body. Or if the left ear has an infection, sleep on your right side. Less pressure = less ear pain.

Doctor’s advice: It could be effective, though a few inches may not make a big difference in pressure measurement. But if it makes you feel better, go for it.

Two home remedies for earaches that are best left on the shelf

1.OTC numbing drops

Advertising Policy

Dr. Nguyen-Huynh recommends avoiding numbing drops. “The effect is very brief, and sometimes it does the opposite and stings the ear.”

2.Oils

Be it garlic, tea tree or olive — people swear by putting oil in the ear to help with ear infections. While garlic does have antibacterial properties, Dr. Nguyen-Huynh urges caution. If you’re using it for a middle ear infection, it won’t get to the source of the problem. And even if you do have a hole in your eardrum, there aren’t studies showing it&#;s safe to put garlic in there.

When to see a doctor about an earache

Dr. Nguyen-Huynh recommends seeing a doctor if:

  • Your symptoms remain after two or three days, even if you’ve tried over-the-counter or home remedies.
  • Your ear is very painful, or you have other symptoms that bother you.

Other common conditions, such as temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ), can masquerade as earache infections. TMJ causes ear pain because the ear canal and the jaw joint share a nerve. “If you have ear pain along with trouble chewing, talking or yawning, then you should see a dentist or TMJ expert to be sure you&#;re treating the right condition,” notes Dr. Nguyen-Huynh.

The good news? Hot and cold compresses and OTC pain relievers can also help relieve TMJ pain until you sort things out.

Источник: traitortrump.us

watch the video

best home remedy for ear infection in adults
best home remedy for ear infection in adults
best home remedy for ear infection in adults

7 Home Remedies for a Sore Throat

Does it feel like your throat is burning or on fire? Or, are you experiencing pain, irritation, or discomfort that gets worse when you swallow? Sometimes a sore throat is the only symptom you notice. But, more often than not, a sore throat happens along with other symptoms such as a runny nose, swollen glands, coughing, a fever, swollen tonsils, a hoarse voice, and more.

What Causes Sore Throats?

Most sore throats are symptoms of viral infections, such as the flu or the common cold. These upper respiratory infections can be treated at home, and the symptoms will usually subside after a few days with rest and hydration.

Occasionally, a sore throat is caused by a strep infection. Strep throat is the diagnosis when the streptococcal bacteria is the cause of an what is the routing number for first interstate bank, and usually requires antibiotic treatment to avoid complications. 

Other causes of sore throats can include allergies, dry weather, muscle strain, gastroesophageal reflux disease, or cancer.

Treatment Options: Home Remedies for a Sore Throat

Minor or moderate sore throats can be treated at home. Since a sore throat is often a symptom of another health concern (such as a virus), the treatments are designed to reduce your discomfort and promote overall healing. Here are a few treatment options you can try:

1.     Saltwater Gargle: Add ½ teaspoon table salt to 8 ounces of warm water. Stir to dissolve, then gargle the solution. Spit out the saltwater solution and repeat every three hours. An alternative is to gargle a baking soda solution instead of saltwater.

2.     Throat Lozenges: Buy throat lozenges from a local drugstore, or suck on hard candy. This remedy keeps the saliva flowing to soothe the throat. Don’t give hard candy to children under the age of 4.

3.     Pain Medication: Acetaminophen or ibuprofen are common over-the-counter medications that can be used to manage pain. These medications are also beneficial if a fever is present with a sore throat. You can also find lidocaine sprays that can be used to numb the throat and provide temporary relief.

4.     Dietary Recommendations: Choose comforting foods that soothe the throat, such as broth, soup, tea, or popsicles. Avoid crunchy or hard foods that might irritate the throat, such as chips or cold cereal.

5.     Honey: Add honey to a cup of tea, or swallow a small spoonful. Choose raw, unfiltered honey for the best benefits for pain relief and fighting infection.

6.     Stay Hydrated: Drinking plenty of fluids is important to keep the throat moist and comfortable. Choose teas that soothe the throat and boost the immune system, such as licorice root, peppermint, ginger, or marshmallow root. Lemon water can be another option to reduce throat pain; add a bit of honey to lemon water for a delicious, healing drink. Try warm and cold drinks to see what works best for you.

7.     Humidifier: Sore throat symptoms can be intensified by dry weather. Avoid this irritation by using a cool-air humidifier in your bedroom. It can also be helpful to steam the upper respiratory tract by taking a warm bath or shower. Sitting in the steamy bathroom can provide relief.

Also, don’t overlook the importance of basic self-care such as sleep, a healthy diet, and taking it easy for a few days. A sore throat is an indication that your body is fighting an illness, so you should give yourself time to recover. It is smart to take a few days away from work or school, especially with a viral or bacterial illness that could be contagious.

When to See a Doctor for Sore Throat Treatment

If the sore throat symptoms intensify or don’t go away after a few days, then it might be time to talk to a doctor for a diagnosis. Determining the cause of the sore throat is important in choosing the right treatment plan. A doctor can use a simple throat swab test to determine if it is strep throat or culture to look for other types of bacteria. 

Here are a few signs that it is time to schedule an appointment with an ENT:

  • The sore throat lasts longer than a week
  • Visible white patches in santander mortgage customer services contact number back of the throat
  • Difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • Earache
  • Rash
  • Swelling in the neck or face
  • Blood in your phlegm or saliva
  • A lump in the neck
  • Hoarseness lasting for more than weeks
  • Sore throats that occur frequently

If you need a medical consultation for a sore throat, or any other health condition affecting your ears, nose, or throat, then our team is here to assist. Contact us to schedule a consultation with an experienced ENT.

Are you located in the Dallas area? Collin County Ear, Nose, and Throat is a reputable provider in the community. We have several offices nearby in the Frisco and Plano areas: ()

Источник: traitortrump.us

Your Child's Earache: symptoms, treatment, and prevention

Earaches and ear infections are surprisingly common in babies and young children but can be quite a distressing experience if you’re not sure what’s wrong. It’s not always easy to spot the signs of an ear infection, but with a bit of knowledge, you’ll understand why your child gets earaches and what you can do to help.

Soothing Your Child’s Earache

Earaches can occur in the middle or outer ear. Middle ear earaches are most commonly caused by a bacterial or viral infection. For example, when your child has a cold, bacteria can grow in the passages that connect the middle ear to nose. If these passages block up, the middle ear becomes infected and inflamed. The build-up inside the ear places pressure on the eardrum, causing it to bulge and become painful for your child. 

Other causes of earaches such as:

  • Fluid building up inside the ear
  • Blocked ears from earwax or other objects
  • Injury to the ear canal from cotton buds or other objects
  • teething or a dental abscess (if accompanied by a toothache)
  • tonsillitis or a sore throat (if ear pain occurs with swallowing)
  • a perforated eardrum (hole in the eardrum)
  • altitude changes (such as during or after a plane trip)

If you’re not sure what’s causing their earache or if you’re worried about your child's’ hearing, speak to your GP.

What are some signs of an earache?

Earache and ear infections can be miserable for a child of any age and be worrying for you, as a parent or carer. The signs to look for include: 

  • Sharp, dull, or burning pain in one or both ears
  • Hearing problems
  • Scaly skin or discharge in or around the ear
  • Feeling pressure or fullness in the ear
  • Lack of energy
  • Feeling sick
  • Itching and irritation around the ear
  • Fever
  • Irritability or crying
  • Sleeping problems

For babies who can’t talk, be on the lookout if your baby is:

  • Pulling at their ear
  • Ignoring loud sounds
  • Being irritable
  • Not wanting to eat
  • Losing their balance

How can I help relieve my child's earache or ear infection?

Most earaches usually clear up within a few days. Symptoms of ear infections can sometimes last for up to a week, however.

Tips you can try at home include getting your child to rest in an upright position instead of lying down, to help relieve some of the pressure and place a warm flannel against the affected ear to help relieve the pain.

If your child is in pain you can also give them some pain relief medicine to soothe their earache. Nurofen for Children 3 months to 12 years contains ibuprofen which has anti-inflammatory properties.

In older children, nasal sprays can help to reduce the swelling in the nasal passages which leads to the middle ears. Using a nasal spray will not help the ear infection clear away any faster but if your child also has a stuffy nose, it can help to unblock it for a few hours. However; do not give this to your child except under the advice of your GP or pharmacist, and never for more than days in a row. Avoid using any over-the-counter ear drops without first seeing your GP, as they can cause problems if your child's eardrum has a perforation (holey).

Do you need antibiotics for an ear infection?

Most ear infections are caused by viruses which can't be treated with antibiotics. Many people believe that antibiotics will help to reduce ear pain, but this isn't the case. Aside from using painkillers and monitoring your child's wellness and body temperature, often the best course of action is to wait for the ear infection to clear on its own.

Your GP may decide to prescribe antibiotics, however, if:

  • the ear infection doesn't start to get better after three days
  • fluid is coming out of your child's ear
  • your child is under two and has an infection in both ears
  • your child has a condition (such as cystic fibrosis) which may increase the risk of complications 

Is it normal to have regular earaches and ear infections?

Regular ear infections in children can lead to a condition called glue ear. Glue ear occurs when sticky fluid builds up in your child's ear. This can lead to unclear speech or behavioural problems. Nyseg pay my bill with glue ear or regular ear infections may be treated with something called an ear tube - a narrow tube made of plastic or metal which allows air to flow to and from the middle ear. If your child is regularly suffering from ear infections, takes a long time to recover, or there is discharge coming out of the ear, see your GP.

How to prevent ear infections

Ear infections aren't fun so it's great to know that there are steps you can take to try and prevent them. Higgins hospital bremen ga ways you can prevent ear infections include:

  • make sure your child is up to date with vaccinations
  • avoid smoking around your child
  • avoid using a dummy after your child is six months old
  • don't stick cotton wool buds or your fingers in your child's ears
  • insert earplugs into your child's ears when they swim
  • avoid getting water or shampoo into your child's ears
  • when bathing your child, pull a shower cap over the ears
  • treat conditions that affect your child's ears, such as eczema or an allergy to hearing aids

As always, remember to see your doctor if your child's earache doesn't improve or if you have any concerns.

When to call a doctor

Sometimes, ear infections do not get better on their own or may signal something more serious.

See your GP if your child has any of the following:

  • a very high temperature
  • an earache that doesn't improve after 3 days
  • swelling or fluid coming out of the ear
  • hearing loss
  • a severe sore throat, vomiting, or dizziness
  • regular ear infections
  • a long-term medical condition or weakened immune system

If an ear infection is causing severe pain that cannot be relieved by medication, a doctor may decide to make a small cut inside the ear to drain away the excess fluid.

Источник: traitortrump.us

Home Remedies for Ear Infections

While ear infections are more common in children, people of any age can get them.

Because ear infections often clear up on their own, healthcare professionals are hesitant to jump to prescribing antibiotics as a first course of treatment unless the infection is severe, the child is very young, or there are other mitigating circumstances.

This has many people turning to home remedies for ear infections. Many home remedy recommendations—often passed from one person to another through word of mouth—are not backed by scientific evidence and may even be harmful. It's important to evaluate home remedy recommendations for ear infections for accuracy and safety before trying them out. And as always, when in doubt, ask your healthcare provider.

Ice Compress

Commercial pre-made ice packs can be used, or an ice compress or cold compress can be made at home.

How to Make an Ice Towel:

  1. Using cold water, wet a towel and squeeze out excess moisture.
  2. Fold the towel.
  3. Place the folded towel in a leak-proof, sealable bag such as a Ziploc freezer bag.
  4. Place the sealed bag in the freezer for 15 minutes.

How to Make an Ice Pack or Cool Compress

  1. Place ice cubes in a leak-proof, sealable bag such as a Ziploc bag.
  2. Partially fill with water.
  3. Seal the bag, squeezing air out as you go.
  4. Wrap the bag with a damp towel.

How to Use It

Apply it to the affected ear for 10 to 15 minutes at a time. Some people find it helpful to alternate between cold and warm compresses.

Does It Help?

Cold compresses won't cure an ear infection, but they can help ease ear pain.

Cold can numb the area and help reduce inflammation.

Warnings

Never put ice or a cold pack directly on the skin, as this can cause tissue damage. Wrap it in a towel, paper towel, or another suitable barrier before applying it to the skin.

Be mindful of temperature and time. To avoid damage such as frostbite, don't make the compress too cold, and never leave it on for more than 20 minutes at a time.

Heat Compress

Commercial heat compresses or heating pads can be used, or heat compresses can be made at home.

To make a homemade heat compress, simply wet a towel with warm water and squeeze out the excess.

How to Use It

Apply the warm compress or heating pad to the affected ear for no more than 20 minutes at a time.

Hot compresses can also be alternated with cold compresses.

Does It Help?

Heat compresses bring more blood to the area. As with cold compresses, heat compresses will not cure an ear infection but can help with pain relief.

Warnings

Be very careful to avoid burns, especially when applying heat compresses to children.

Make best home remedy for ear infection in adults the compress or heating pad is not too hot, and do not apply it for more than 20 minutes at a time.

If using a heating pad or similar device, do not apply directly to the skin, and keep it on for 20 minutes or less. Never sleep with a heating pad, and always supervise a child who is using one.

Heat compresses are not recommended for infants.

Over-the-Counter Pain Relievers

Over-the-counter (OTC) medications are the hotels near university at buffalo recommended treatment for ear pain and for fever that sometimes accompanies ear infections.

For infants over 2 months: Acetaminophen (Tylenol) can be given if the baby's healthcare provider gives the okay.

Fever In Young Infants

If a baby younger than 3 months old has a rectal temperature or forehead (temporal artery) temperature of F (38 C) or higher, they need to go to the emergency room, even if there are no other symptoms.

For infants age 6 months or older, toddlers, and older children: Acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin) are options.

For adults: Acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen (Aleve) can help. Neither aspirin nor naproxen should be given to children unless directed by a healthcare provider.

How to Use Them

The dosage, type, and frequency of doses depend on the type of medication, the age of the person, their weight, and other mitigating factors such as medical history.

If a child is under age 2 or has never taken this medication before, contact their healthcare provider before administering it.

For children and adults, follow the directions on the package carefully.

Does It Help?

OTC medications can be quite effective for pain and/or fever.

They won't cure an ear infection, but they can make you much more comfortable while your body fights the infection.

In addition to relieving pain and fever, NSAIDs (aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen) can help reduce inflammation.

Warnings

Children under 6 months who are showing symptoms of an ear infection should see a healthcare provider before starting any treatment.

Read all directions before administering medications to children or taking medications yourself. If dosing children by weight, make sure you have an up-to-date and accurate weight calculation for them.

Check for drug interactions with other medications you are taking before taking OTC medications.

Contact a healthcare provider if you notice any adverse effects.

Hydrogen Peroxide

Hydrogen peroxide can be used on its own or in OTC ear drops, typically for removing excess ear wax or for treating or preventing swimmer's ear (an infection of the ear canal).

How to Use It

  1. Apply about half an ear dropper full of 3% hydrogen peroxide solution into the ear canal.
  2. Let it bubble and fizz.
  3. Allow it to drain properly by turning your head to the side and pulling back on the top of your ear.
  4. Use drying drops or a hairdryer to eliminate any moisture that is left behind in the ear.

If using OTC drops, follow the directions on the label.

Does It Help?

Cleaning your ears occasionally with hydrogen peroxide can help keep bacteria out of your ear canals and stop ear wax from building up. This could help prevent infection, but it won't treat a middle ear infection as it can't reach the middle ear.

The only way for it to reach the site of infection with a middle ear infection is if there is a hole in the eardrum, in which case it would be unsafe to use hydrogen peroxide.

Warnings

Do not use if there is a suspected perforated eardrum.

Garlic

Garlic has become an area of interest for study for its potential health benefits. The current research does not have a consensus as to its efficacy, but some studies show promising results depending on how it is used.

Raw Garlic

Freshly crushed raw garlic has shown promising results as an antimicrobial in part because of a defense molecule contained within it called allicin.

Allicin has been shown, at least in vitro (outside of a living organism), to have strong antimicrobial properties. Animal studies suggest it may also help fight infection inside the body. But more research, particularly on humans, is needed.

Some studies suggest that garlic supplements can reduce the occurrence and/or duration of colds, a common cause of ear infections. But these studies are small, and more research needs to be done.

Warning

Do not put garlic, or any foreign objects, into your ear.

Garlic Oil

Garlic oil has antimicrobial properties and is sometimes suggested as an ear drop for ear infections.

This is advised against, as it won't reach the source of the infection behind the eardrum unless the eardrum has a hole in it. If the eardrum is perforated, it still has not been shown that garlic oil is safe to use in the middle ear.

Garlic May Interact With Some Medications

Garlic supplements should not be taken with medications that are transported by P-gp. This includes:

  • Colchicine
  • Digoxin
  • Doxorubicin [Adriamycin]
  • Quinidine
  • Rosuvastatin [Crestor]
  • Tacrolimus [Prograf]
  • Verapamil

Because of the increased risk of bleeding associated with garlic supplements, talk to your healthcare provider about their use if you take an anticoagulant (blood thinner) such as warfarin (Coumadin) or if you need surgery.

Garlic supplements may interfere with the effectiveness of saquinavir (a drug used to treat HIV infection) and other medications, dietary herbs, or supplements.

Talk to your healthcare provider before taking any supplements, including garlic.

Ginger

Ginger is a root that is commonly used as a spice in foods and is considered to have antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties.

How to Use It

Ginger juice or ginger infused oil can be applied on the outer ear. Do not put ginger in the ear.

Does It Help?

Ginger has been used for generations as a health remedy and appears to have several health benefits, but those results are mostly observational and anecdotal. Studies have been performed, particularly animal studies, but without strong, conclusive results.

More research is needed on the health benefits of ginger both taken orally and applied to the skin.

Warnings

Do not put ginger, ginger juice, ginger infused oil, or any other forms of ginger into the ear.

While ginger is largely considered safe, it is best to consult a healthcare provider before applying or consuming it outside our typical use as a food spice.

Tea Tree Oil

Tea tree oil comes from the evergreen leaves of the Australian Melaleuca alternifolia tree.

How to Use It

Tea tree oil is used topically to help with skin conditions and can be added to a bath or vaporizer (if supported by the manufacturer) to help with lung problems.

It should never be taken internally and should not be placed into the ears.

Does It Help?

While tea tree oil does appear to have antibacterial and antifungal properties, it is not safe to be used in the ear and should not be used to treat ear infections.

Warnings

Tea tree oil is toxic when swallowed and must be kept away from children and pets.

Allergic rashes from tea tree oil are possible, so testing on a small area before use is advised.

Do not put it in the ear, as this can cause damage to the inner ear.

Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar is made from fermented apple juice. Some studies indicate it has antibacterial properties.

How to Use It

  1. Mix equal parts warm water and apple cider vinegar or equal parts rubbing alcohol (isopropyl alcohol) and apple cider vinegar.
  2. Using a dropper, add a few (five to 10) drops into the affected ear, with the head tilted to keep the mixture in the ear.
  3. Let the mixture sit in the ear for five minutes before allowing it to drain out.

Does It Help?

Because of its antibacterial properties, it may help with an outer ear infection such as swimmer's ear, but it will not help a middle ear infection.

Warnings

Do not use for a middle ear infection.

Do not use if there are tubes in the ears or there is a perforated eardrum or one is suspected.

Breast Milk

Breastfeeding passes infection-fighting agents from parent to baby, but the amount of these agents vary.

One study found that after the first one to two weeks after birth, the amount of white blood cells found in the breastmilk is low when both breastfeeding parent and baby are healthy.

The number of white blood cells in the breastmilk increased significantly if either the nursing parent and/or the infant had an infection. The increase was larger when the parent had an infection than when the infant did, particularly if the infection was in the breast (mastitis).

Breastfed babies are less likely to get ear infections than those who are formula-fed. Breastfeeding exclusively for the first six months and continuing to breastfeed for at least a year is recommended for several reasons, including reducing the risk of ear infections.

When to See a Doctor

See a healthcare provider if:

  • A child younger than 6 months has a fever (even as the only symptom) or shows signs of an ear infection.
  • Symptoms do not improve within 2 to 3 days.
  • Symptoms get worse.
  • Symptoms are severe.
  • There is hearing loss.
  • There is a fever of F (39 C) or higher.
  • There is pus, discharge, or fluid coming from the ear.
  • Severe pain suddenly stops (may mean a ruptured eardrum).
  • There is swelling behind the ear.
  • New symptoms appear (especially severe headache, dizziness, swelling around the ear, or twitching of the face muscles).
  • You think medical attention is necessary.

See a healthcare provider immediately if:

  • An infant under 3 months has a temperature of F (38 C) or higher.
  • There is a fever over F (40 C).
  • There is a stiff neck.
  • A child acts sluggish, looks or acts very sick, or does not stop crying despite all efforts.
  • The child’s walk is not steady/they are physically very weak.
  • There are signs of weakness in the face (like a crooked smile).
  • There is bloody or pus-filled fluid draining from the ear.
  • Ear pain is severe.
  • You think immediate medical attention is necessary.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need to see a doctor for an ear infection?

Most middle ear infections are fought off by the body without treatment within a few days. If your ear infection does not require antibiotics, further treatment is not necessary. But some home remedies may help with comfort and symptom relief.

How do you get rid of an earache fast?

The most effective method of relieving ear pain is OTC pain relievers such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin). Adults can also try aspirin or naproxen (Aleve), but neither of these should be given to children unless directed by a healthcare provider.

A Word From Verywell

While antibiotics are sometimes necessary for an ear infection, especially in children less than 2 years old, ear infections usually go away on their own within a few days.

To help with symptom management while your ears heal, some home remedies can be helpful. That said, others are unproven or possibly harmful.

Always check with your healthcare provider before starting a treatment for yourself or for your child, and never put anything in your ear or your child's ear without the guidance of a healthcare provider.

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Johns Hopkins Medicine. Ice packs vs. warm compresses for pain.

  2. Cleveland Clinic. How to steer clear of swimmer's ear. Updated December 18,

  3. Arreola R, Quintero-Fabián S, López-Roa RI, et al. Immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory effects of garlic compounds. J Immunol Res. ; doi//

  4. AMA Borlinghaus J, Albrecht F, Gruhlke MC, Nwachukwu ID, Slusarenko AJ. Allicin: chemistry and biological properties. Molecules. ;19(8) Published Aug doi/molecules

  5. Cleveland Clinic. 3 home remedies for an ear infection. Updated January 2,

  6. Asher GN, Corbett AH, Hawke RL. Common herbal dietary supplement—drug interactions. AFP. ;96(2)

  7. National Center for Complimentary and Integrative Health. Garlic. Updated December

  8. Karuppiah P, Rajaram S. Antibacterial effect of Allium sativum cloves and Zingiber officinale rhizomes against multiple-drug resistant clinical pathogens. Asian Pac J Trop Biomed. ;2(8) doi/S(12)X

  9. Bode AM, Dong Z. The amazing and mighty ginger. In: Benzie IFF, Wachtel-Galor S, eds. Herbal Medicine: Biomolecular and Clinical Aspects. 2nd ed. CRC Press/Taylor & Francis;

  10. Michigan Medicine. Tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia). Updated September 23,

  11. Fraise AP, Wilkinson MAC, Bradley CR, Oppenheim B, Moiemen N. The antibacterial activity and stability of acetic acid. Journal of Hospital Infection. ;84(4) doi/traitortrump.us

  12. Hassiotou F, Hepworth AR, Metzger P, et al. Maternal and infant infections stimulate a rapid leukocyte response in breastmilk. Clin Transl Immunology. ;2(4):e3. Published Apr doi/cti

  13. Harvard Health. Earache. Updated January

  14. Cleveland Clinic. Ear infection (otitis media). Updated April 16,

Источник: traitortrump.us

How to Soothe an Ear Infection

Skip to main content

ear pain

WHAT IS AN EAR INFECTION

Ear infections often start with a cold or other illness. This can lead to redness, swelling and fluid in your child's middle ear (behind the eardrum). Ear infections can be very painful for your child and sometimes cause fevers with temperatures up to °F. While your pediatrician may prescribe, antibiotics, they won't relieve ear pain for the first 24 hours, so you may have to provide additional relief.

SIGNS TO LOOK FOR

If your child has a painful ear infection, he or she may have a hard time eating or sleeping. Babies may rub their ears, have trouble sleeping or cry more than usual. If you think your child has ear pain, or you see fluid coming out of the ear, call your doctor for an appointment

Tips to Help Avoid Ear Infections

Try to lay the bottle flat. Propping up the bottle increases the risk of ear infections.

Keep your child away from cigarette best home remedy for ear infection in adults alt="" src="traitortrump.us">

Protect your child from cold and flu viruses. Teach them to wash their hands often.

Stay up to date on your child's shots and immunizations. Infant pneumonia and meningitis vaccines may lower the risk of ear infections. An annual flu vaccine may also help.

How to Relieve Your Child's Ear Pain?

One of the main medicines for relieving ear pain is acetaminophen — associated bank credit card customer service as Children's TYLENOL® or Infants' TYLENOL® — not antibiotics. As with any medicine, ask your doctor which pain reliever is right for your child.

HOW SOON CAN YOU USE CHILDREN'S TYLENOL® OR INFANTS' TYLENOL®

Give your child an over-the-counter pain reliever — such as Children's TYLENOL® or Infants' TYLENOL® — as soon as you know your best home remedy for ear infection in adults has an ear infection. It's important to give it before bedtime to help them rest as lying down can hurt their little ears.

WHEN WILL YOUR CHILD FEEL BETTER?

After 24 hours, most kids will feel better if taking pain relievers. Almost all feel better within a few days.

Even though ear infections can be tough on both moms and kids, most will get better on their own in a few days. Just make sure to give your little one extra attention to help soothe their pain.

Link your social account

{* loginWidget *}

Or use your traditional account

{* #userInformationForm *} {* traditionalSignIn_emailAddress *} {* traditionalSignIn_password *}

Forgot your password?

{* traditionalSignIn_signInButton *}

Don't Have an Account? Sign Up Now!

{* /userInformationForm *}

Welcome back!

{* #userInformationForm *} {* traditionalSignIn_emailAddress *} {* traditionalSignIn_password *}

{* traditionalSignIn_signInButton *}

{* /userInformationForm *}

Use another account

{* #socialRegistrationForm *}

{* socialRegistration_firstName *} {* socialRegistration_lastName *}

Your first name and last initial will be displayed publicly to other users when you write a review or blog post (ex. ”John S.”).

{* socialRegistration_gender *} {* socialRegistration_zipcode *}

{* socialRegistration_emailAddress *}

Will be used as your user name

{% customQuestions %}

{% customOptin %}

Registration permits you to participate in all areas of this site. By submitting your information above, you agree that the information you provide will be governed by our site's Privacy Policy.

{* /socialRegistrationForm *}

Link an existing social account:

{* loginWidget *}

Or create an account by providing the information below.

{* #registrationForm *}

{* traditionalRegistration_firstName *} {* traditionalRegistration_lastName *}

Your first name and last initial will be displayed publicly to other users when you write a review or blog post (ex. ”John S.”).

{* traditionalRegistration_gender *} {* traditionalRegistration_zipcode *}

{* traditionalRegistration_emailAddress bike rental san jose del cabo

Will be used as your user name

{* traditionalRegistration_password *}

{* traditionalRegistration_passwordConfirm *}

{% customQuestions %}

{% customOptin %}

Registration permits you to participate in all areas of this site. By submitting your information above, you agree that the information you provide will be governed by our site's Privacy Policy.

Already Signed Up? Log In Here!

{* /registrationForm *}
{* #requirementsPostLoginForm *} {* firstName *} {* lastName *} {* gender *} {* zipcode *}

By submitting your information above, you agree that the information you provide will be governed by our site's Privacy Policy.

{* saveButton *} {* /requirementsPostLoginForm *}

All fields required

{* #forgotPasswordForm *} {* traditionalSignIn_emailAddress *} {* /forgotPasswordForm *}

Looks like you have an existing account with us. We have made some changes to our site and we need you to create a new password in order to login. Click send to recieve an email with instructions on how to create your new password.

{* #optinUserNewPasswordForm *} {* optinUser_emailAddress *} {* /optinUserNewPasswordForm *}

Please check your email for a reset link to continue the reset process.

{* mergeAccounts *}

{* #tradAuthenticateMergeForm *} {* traditionalSignIn_emailAddress *} {* mergePassword *} {* /tradAuthenticateMergeForm *}
{* #privacyPolicyPostLoginForm *}

By clicking "Accept" below, you confirm that you have read, understand and accept our sites's Privacy Policy

{* /privacyPolicyPostLoginForm *}

You do not meet the minimum age requirement to sign in to this site

Your account is deactivated.

Where to Buy

Источник: traitortrump.us

3 ways to safely remove ear wax at home without a Q-tip

This a was medically reviewed by Omid Mehdizadeh, MD, otolaryngologist and laryngologist at the Pacific Neuroscience Institute's Pacific Eye, Ear & Skull Base Center at Providence Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica, California.

Person with a liquid syringe near their ear.
Obencem/Getty Images
  • Try removing ear wax at home with ear drops, or with natural remedies like oils and baking soda.
  • Never pick out ear wax with certain objects, including Q-Tips, because it can impact your ear wax.
  • If you have impacted ear wax it may need to be treated by a doctor.
  • Visit Insider's Health Reference library for more advice.

Ear wax is a fatty substance produced in your ear canal. The wax — medically known as cerumen — cleans your ears, protects them from infection, and lubricates the ear canal to stop it from becoming too dry. 

Normally, ear wax will dry up and fall out of your ear over time. However, some people produce more than necessary, and the excess can accumulate in the ear canal and cause buildup or blockage. This is known as impacted ear wax. 

Impacted ear wax

Impacted ear wax is a common condition. It affects an estimated: 

  • 6% of the general population
  • 10% of children 
  • More than 30% of the elderly and cognitively impaired

Impacted ear wax is especially common among the elderly because wax tends to become harder and less mobile, so it's less likely to work its way out. Hearing aids or earplugs can also prevent extrusion and cause blockage. 

Although it's possible to have impacted ear wax and experience no symptoms, it may cause the following:

  • A feeling of fullness in the ear
  • Earache 
  • Difficulty hearing or hearing loss
  • Ringing in the ear, known as tinnitus
  • A feeling of itchiness in the ear
  • Discharge from the ear
  • Odor coming from the ear
  • Dizziness

If you struggle to hear or repeatedly feel ear pain, you should check in with a doctor, says Jerry Lin, MD, PhD, an ear, nose, and throat specialist at the University of Louisville, who can recommend the best course of treatment for you. 

Sometimes, you will have to visit the doctor, who can perform clinical irrigation or manually remove ear wax with a special instrument. 

Other times, you can use ear drops to remove ear wax at home. Below are three ways to remove ear wax at home, naturally.

1. Use ear drops

Ear drops are liquid solutions — known scientifically as cerumenolytic agents — which help thin, soften, break up, or dissolve ear wax, so it can leave the ear. 

Important: Anyone who has a suspected or known eardrum perforation or hole should avoid placing any liquid into the ear, and seek medical attention for proper treatment.  

Drops are available over the counter, and common name-brand ear drops include Debrox, Hylands, and Similasan. Typically, it's recommended to use up to five drops at a time, one to two times daily, for three to seven days. 

How to use ear drops to clear out ear wax in 7 steps 

  1. Check the label first to see how many drops are required.
  2. Wash your hands with soap and water. Make sure you rinse the soap off and completely dry your hands to avoid getting soap and water into your ear. 
  3. Carefully remove the dropper from the bottle. Be sure the plastic part of the dropper does not touch anything.
  4. Lie on your side or back with the impacted ear facing upward.
  5. Put the correct number of drops into your ear, according to the instructions. 
  6. Gently pull the earlobe up and down to allow the drops to run into the ear. 
  7. Remain lying down with the infected ear upward, according to how long the instructions say, which is usually two to five minutes.

Lin says that ear drops work immediately after use, though they may require a few tries to remove especially stubborn ear wax. 

While there is limited published evidence on the effectiveness of drops, one study suggests that using them for five days is more likely to completely clear the excessive wax than no treatment at all. 

2. Try oil

There are other ways you can remove ear wax at home with natural substances, though they will likely take longer to work than ear drops. 

Oils, such as baby oil, mineral oil, coconut oil, olive oil, or glycerin — a natural compound derived from vegetable oils or animal fats — can be used to soften and remove ear wax. 

Here's how to do it:   

  • Apply the oil. Tilt your head to the side and — using an eyedropper, or dropper bottle — apply a few drops of your oil of choice into the ear canal.
  • Drain it out using warm water. After a day or two, when the wax is softened, use a rubber-bulb syringe to gently squirt warm water into your ear canal. Tilt your head and pull your outer ear up and back to straighten your ear canal. When finished irrigating, tip your head to the side to let the water drain out.
  • Dry your ear canal. Use either a towel or hair-dryer on low or no heat to gently dry your ear canal. This is optional, according to Lin.
  • Repeat, if necessary. You can try this method multiple times every few days until the excess ear wax is removed. 

3. Make a baking soda solution

Alternatively, you may also be able to remove ear wax with a baking soda solution: 

  • Create the baking soda solution. Dissolve half a teaspoon of baking soda in two ounces of warm water. If you have a dropper bottle, pour the solution into it. 
  • Apply to your ears. Tilt your head to the side, and using an eyedropper or dropper bottle, drop five to ten drops of the solution into your ear. 
  • Drain it out using warm water. After about an best home remedy for ear infection in adults or so, when the wax is softened, use a rubber-bulb syringe to gently squirt warm water into your ear canal. Tilt your head and pull your outer ear up and back to straighten your ear canal. When finished irrigating, tip your head to the side to let the water drain out.
  • Dry your ear canal. Use either a towel or hair-dryer on low or no heat to gently dry your ear canal. This is optional, according to Lin. 
  • Repeat, if necessary. You can try this method once a day until the ear wax clears up, but for no longer than two weeks. It can clear up within a couple of days.

It's important to note that these natural softening agents can sometimes have adverse effects, because they may only loosen the outer layer of the wax, which can then lodge deeper into the ear canal. 

Note: If your impacted ear wax symptoms don't improve after using these methods for a week or two, check in with your healthcare provider.

What not to do when trying to remove ear wax

Trying to manually remove the wax yourself with your finger or other objects can make the blockage worse. 

"Picking out wax that is visible just at the entrance into the ear canal is OK," says Lin. "Anything deeper should either be allowed to work its way out on its own or be removed by a physician." 

In fact, some blockages can occur when you try to clean your ears with cotton swabs and accidentally push the wax deeper. While Q-Tips are commonly used, they should be avoided. 

"Q-Tips are a bad idea," Lin says. "They take up much of the canal diameter. Therefore, using them packs the wax deeper into the ear canal. In the worst-case scenario, the wax could be packed against the eardrum and possibly even create an eardrum perforation." 

In addition, you should not attempt home remedies like ear candling, which drip hot wax into your ear and are marketed — incorrectly — as miracle cures. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) strongly recommends against ear candling, as it is both ineffective and dangerous. 

Insider's takeaway

While it can feel good to stick things like Q-tips in your ears, you should be very selective about what you put in there. Otherwise, you risk impacting the ear wax, which can lead to uncomfortable symptoms like earache and dizziness. 

Instead of a Q-tip try using ear drops, oil, or a baking soda solution to loosen up ear wax and remove it. And if you are suffering from chronic ear pain, it's important to see a doctor for treatment options.

Hannah Roberts

Ad/Tech reporter, Business Insider UK

More:HealthHealth ExplainersEar WaxENT
Источник: traitortrump.us

Most earaches can be treated at home. Not all earaches are caused by infections. If your ear hurts when you chew, it could be caused by something in your jaw. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMJ) pain can mimic an earache. See a dentist allen edmonds wingtip boots you think that you may have TMJ pain.

Swimming, bathing, allergies or even cleaning your ear with Q-tips can lead to discomfort, bacterial growth and infection in the ear. Earaches can also be triggered cold, wind, differences in presser, or by hair customer service number for chime bank other objects that get stuck in the ear.

Excessive earwax can also cause hearing problems and aches. Put a capful of hydrogen peroxide in each ear, let it set for a minute or two, and then let it drain out. One drop of alcohol after bathing can also prevent excessive earwax.

If wind bothers your aching ears, wear a scarf when you&#;re outside, or stuff with cotton, but avoid pushing it deep down from where you cannot retrieve it with your fingers.

If your ears hurt when the pressure changes, especially during descent and landing during an airplane flight, chew gum or suck on candy. The chewing or sucking will activate the muscles that send air to your inner ears, when you hear your ears &#;pop,&#; you&#;ll feel better. If chewing doesn&#;t work, close your mouth, relax your cheek muscles, hold your nose and blow one nostril at a time gently until you feel relief.

The microbes that cause earaches usually show up first as a respiratory infection in your nose or throat. All it takes is a little push: You blow your nose, you lie down and the viruses or bacteria move into your Eustachian tubes. These are tiny channels that connect your nasal passages to your inner ears. From there, it&#;s a short trip to the middle best home remedy for ear infection in adults and your eardrum, which is laced with sensitive nerve endings. The infection creates pus, which creates pressure against your eardrum, causing pain. It can even make the eardrum burst.

Children get more earaches because they have more respiratory infections and because their Eustachian tubes are immature and unable to handle even a small infection. Children in daycare get more ear infections. The fall and winter months have the highest incidence. Children exposed to secondary cigarette smoke get more ear infections. Children who have a nighttime bottle in the crib or depend on a pacifier tend to have more ear infections. Children who are breast fed best home remedy for ear infection in adults at least six months get fewer ear infections than bottle-fed babies.

Tips to take the ache out of your ear. Get plenty of rest with your head elevated. Avoid scuba diving, coughing, sneezing, bending and attempts to equalize the ears.

Use warm oil. A few drops of olive or mineral oil can provide temporary relief. Put some in a glass and warm it up in hot tap water for a few minutes like a baby&#;s bottle. Test the oil first (it should be about body temperature) and apply it with an ear dropper. Make sure to use only enough to coat the inner lining of the ear. If you don&#;t have an ear dropper, use a drinking straw. Put the end of the straw in the oil and trap it by putting your finger over the exposed end. Do not use oil as drops in your ear if you suspect or have been told you have a ruptured ear drum.

Apply heat. The greatest pain reliever is the presence of warm, moist heat around the ache. A warm compress &#; such as a towel rung out in hot water and pressed against the ear, brings immediate relief. There are two approaches for using heat to help relieve the pain of an earache. A hot water bottle, a warmed up oven-safe plate, a heating pad on low, or a warmed gel pack relieve pain when placed on top of the sore ear. Be sure that these are only warm, not hot, and are wrapped in a towel. Do NOT lay a person&#;s head on heat if he is unable to move his head by himself or if he is asleep, like a child or invalid. Or you can turn a hair dryer on the lowest warm setting and direct the warm air down the ear canal, holding the dryer 6 to 12 inches from your ear. Do not use the hair dryer for more than three to five minutes. After you take a shower or bath; blow dry your ears with the warm setting of a hair dryer instead of rubbing them.

Prop yourself up. You&#;re better off sitting up in bed than lying flat on your back. Sitting up actually allows blood to drain away from the head so there&#;s less congestion in the Eustachian tube. That&#;s why babies with earaches will quit crying when you pick them up and start best home remedy for ear infection in adults again when you lay them down. It&#;s not that they want to be held; it&#;s just that they feel better with their heads up.

Fill up on fluids. Drinking lots of water and juice not only helps soothe the symptoms, but repeated swallowing can also help clear your Eustachian tubes, Chewing and yawning are also good for clearing your Eustachian tubes.

Try a vasoconstrictor. Over-the-counter nasal sprays like Neo-Synephrine contain the ingredient phenylephrine, which helps return your Eustachian tube to normal functioning. The spray shrinks the lining of the nose and hopefully the region around the entrance of the Eustachian tube, allowing the tube to function better. If the Eustachian tube returns to normal, you&#;ll feel better. Don&#;t use phenylephrine-containing nose drops for more than a few days, and make sure you don&#;t exceed the daily dosage recommended on the label. Overuse of nasal sprays can actually best home remedy for ear infection in adults the problem worse.

Take painkiller. Another possible temporary remedy for ear pain is an over-the-counter analgesic like Advil or Tylenol, Pseudoephedrine (the active ingredient in OTC medications such as Sudafed) 30 mg tablets, one every six hours for two to three days, may ease ear pressure. (People with a history of high blood pressure should avoid this product.) The analgesic doesn&#;t kill the organisms, it just controls the pain. So don&#;t think because your ear doesn&#;t hurt anymore, you are cured. Your doctor may recommend neomycin, polymyxin B or hydrocortisone drops in the ear canal.

Antibiotics may be recommended. Home remedies include puncturing a piece of garlic and pouring the juice in the ear. Garlic is used by some as a natural antibiotic. Natural healers often recommend taking Goldenseal and Echinacea.

Ask your doctor about antibiotics. Because a bacterial infection is one of the common causes of earache, some doctors recommend taking antibiotics like Amoxil and Ceclor to beat the bug. Most ear infections will heal by themselves and don&#;t require antibiotics. Many doctors are reluctant to prescribe antibiotics because antibiotics are being over used. Just consider the name antibiotic. It means &#;anti&#; or against life (&#;bio&#;). Unfortunately, antibiotics kill off much more than just the offending &#;bad guys.&#; Too many of the &#;good guys&#; die too. Take probiotics after you are finished with a prescription of antibiotics. Do not tell the doctor that you or your child has an ear infection and insist on receiving antibiotics. The only way to diagnose the infection is by pneumatic otoscopy &#; this is the little bulb syringe attached to the otoscope that puffs air against the eardrum to check for mobility (the normal in-and-out movement of the eardrum). A doctor will look for abnormal color, opacity, and bulging (shape) of the eardrum. Middle ear infections are typically &#;bulging&#; and have a distinct red or yellow color, instead of shiny white.

Loud noises can cause pain. If you will be at a loud event like a car race or concert, wear earplugs.

Mimi Barre is the owner of International Day Spa, Cajon St., Redlands. Send your skin care questions to her at [email protected] She and her estheticians are available for personal consultations. Past columns of Ask Mimi are on the Web at traitortrump.us

Источник: traitortrump.us

Comments

  1. Yup, I just realized that and am looking for a way to make it international. It says on the site you have to confirm you’re a Russian citizen, but I hope there’s a way around that

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *