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Home remedies for nausea vomiting dizziness


home remedies for nausea vomiting dizziness

Antihistamines. Antihistamines can be used to help relieve less severe nausea, vomiting and vertigo symptoms. They work by blocking the effects. Buy Cure Vertigo And Dizziness Naturally: Get Rid Of Dizziness, Nausea & Vomiting Without Medication: Read Kindle Store Reviews - Amazon.com. Nausea and vomiting are common signs and symptoms that can be caused by numerous conditions. Nausea and vomiting Book: Mayo Clinic Book of Home Remedies.
home remedies for nausea vomiting dizziness

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Home remedies for nausea vomiting dizziness
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Home remedies for nausea vomiting dizziness
Home remedies for nausea vomiting dizziness
Home remedies for nausea vomiting dizziness

Vertigo

What is vertigo?

Vertigo is a type of dizziness that can last just for a short period of time (minutes) or that can last for hours or even days. People who have vertigo have a false feeling of their surroundings moving or spinning. This is usually accompanied by a feeling of sickness (nausea) and a loss of balance. The condition can also cause someone with the condition to be sick (vomit). Vertigo is a symptom and not a condition in itself. In most cases there is a medical condition that causes vertigo. However, sometimes the cause is unknown.

Vertigo causes

The most common cause of vertigo is a problem with the inner part of the ear - for example, an infection or inflammation. When we move our head, the inner part of the ear tells us where our head is. It does this by sending signals to the brain and this helps us to keep our balance. If there are problems with the inner part of the ear then this causes us to feel sick (nausea) and dizzy.

Other conditions that can affect the inner ear and cause vertigo include Ménière's disease, motion sickness and toxicity of the ear caused by medicines. A common cause of vertigo in older people is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. This causes intense dizziness (short episodes of vertigo) when you move your head in certain directions. It it thought to be caused by tiny fragments of debris in the inner ear.

Less commonly, vertigo may be caused by conditions that make changes to certain parts of the brain - for example:

The treatment of vertigo depends on what has caused it. For example, if you have an ear infection your doctor may prescribe an antibiotic. For other causes of vertigo your doctor may give you special exercises to do. The rest of this leaflet only discusses medicines that help to ease the symptoms of dizziness and nausea caused by vertigo. There are separate leaflets called Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo, Ménière's Disease, Vestibular Neuritis and Labyrinthitis, Dizziness and Migraine.

Note: vertigo is sometimes referred to as a 'fear of heights' - this is not correct. The right term for the fear of heights is acrophobia.

What are medicines for vertigo and how do they work?

A number of medicines can be prescribed to help with the symptoms of vertigo. They include prochlorperazine or antihistamines such as cinnarizine, cyclizine or promethazine. These medicines are the same ones that are used to help treat any feeling of sickness (nausea) and motion sickness. They work by blocking certain chemicals in the brain. Prochlorperazine blocks a chemical called dopamine; this helps with severe sickness. Antihistamines block histamine, which helps with mild sickness and being sick (vomiting) as well as vertigo. Betahistine is an antihistamine that may be prescribed for patients with Ménière's disease, to prevent attacks from occurring. It is thought that this medicine improves the blood flow around the ear.

These medicines come in various brand names and are available as tablets, capsules, liquids and injections. Some are available as tablets that dissolve between the home remedies for nausea vomiting dizziness gum and lip (sublingual tablets).

How well do these medicines work?

There are no good studies that tell us how well these medicines work. However, they have been prescribed to treat vertigo for many years.

Which medicine is usually prescribed?

The choice of medicine depends on what is causing your vertigo and how severe your symptoms are. If you have a severe feeling of sickness (nausea), your doctor may prescribe prochlorperazine. The advantage of this medicine is that it is available as an injection or as a tablet to dissolve between the upper gum and lip (a sublingual tablet). It may be more suitable for people who are very sick and being sick (vomiting).

If you have mild nausea, your doctor may prescribe an antihistamine such as cinnarizine, cyclizine or promethazine. These will also help to treat dizziness.

What is the usual length of treatment?

Medicines to treat vertigo and sickness are usually only taken for a short time - normally from 3 to 14 days. If you have vertigo frequently, your doctor may prescribe a short supply of these medicines to keep at home, to use when you have another attack.

What about side-effects?

It is not possible to list all the possible side-effects of each of these medicines in this leaflet. However, as with all medicines, there are a number of side-effects that have been reported. If you want more information specific to your medicine, see the information leaflet that came with your medicine.

Most side-effects are not serious and each person may react differently to these medicines. Common side-effects include drowsiness, constipation, headaches, tiredness, trouble with sleeping (insomnia) and indigestion. Prochlorperazine can cause muscle twitching of the shoulders, face and neck. This usually goes away once this medicine is stopped.

Who cannot take medicines for vertigo?

There are very few people who cannot take a medicine for vertigo. If for some reason one medicine has caused a side-effect or there is a reason you cannot take one, your doctor can choose a different type of medicine that will suit you.

Can I buy medicines for vertigo?

You can buy cinnarizine from your pharmacy but the pharmacist can only sell it to people who have motion sickness.

How to use the Yellow Card Scheme

If you think you have had a side-effect to one of your medicines you can report this on the Yellow Card Scheme. You can do this online at www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard.

The Yellow Card Scheme is used to make pharmacists, doctors and nurses aware of any new side-effects that medicines or any other healthcare products may have caused. If you wish to report a side-effect, you will need to provide basic information about:

  • The side-effect.
  • The name of the medicine which you think caused it.
  • The person who had the side-effect.
  • Your contact details as the reporter of the side-effect.

It is helpful if you have your medication - and/or the leaflet that came with it - with you while you fill out the report.

Источник: https://patient.info/signs-symptoms/dizziness/vertigo

Why It's So Hard to Cure Your Hangover, According to Experts

Ask 10 people how they cure a hangover, and you’ll likely get 10 different answers.

Some go for greasy food and hair of the dog; others swig Pedialyte or Gatorade; and a motivated few hit the gym to sweat it out. But do any of these hangover remedies actually work?

Probably not, says Dr. Ed Boyer, a medical toxicologist at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital. “I don’t think anybody can really tell you with a great degree of honesty what causes a hangover,” he says, adding that theories run the gamut from dehydration to electrolyte imbalance to a buildup of alcohol byproducts. “The bottom line is nobody knows for sure what causes it, so we don’t have a good cure.”

“Nothing treats the entire hangover,” agrees Dr. David Aizenberg, an associate professor of clinical medicine at Penn Medicine. Hangovers affect nearly every organ system in your body, from your gastrointestinal tract to your brain to your heart. So there’s no “magic cure where one remedy will get rid of every single hangover symptom,” Aizenberg says. (Except, of course, drinking in moderation to avoid a hangover in the first place.)

That said, Aizenberg says certain remedies may improve certain symptoms. Here are the hangover cures that might have you feeling better, and the ones that are just myths.

Drinking water before bed

Hydration can reduce dehydration and the resulting headaches and dizziness, Aizenberg says, but doctors aren’t sure whether chugging water before bed will make any difference in the morning.

That’s because heavy drinking throws off the body’s levels of antidiuretic hormone, which typically regulates your water balance.

“That’s why a lot of people pee a lot when they’re drinking, because that regulatory system is going haywire,” Aizenberg explains. “It’s unclear whether [having water] after drinking, before drinking or when people have a hangover” is the best strategy, he says.

Drinking Pedialyte or Gatorade

Pedialyte has a cult following for its alleged hangover-busting abilities, and while it may reduce symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and dehydration, Aizenberg says it’s not any different from other electrolyte-rich beverages, which help the body recoup lost nutrients such as calcium, potassium and sodium.

“There’s no magic about Pedialyte. It’s just all the electrolytes that potentially were lost during and after the drinking period,” Aizenberg says.

Gatorade, which also contains electrolytes, likely does the same thing, though Aizenberg recommends watering it down since it’s high in sugar.

Sweating it out

Exercise may make you feel better, Boyer says, simply “because you’re out doing something.”

While that may be true, Aizenberg urges drinkers to remember that coordination, higher-level thinking and other key processes are thrown off by a hangover — so use caution if you decide to exercise, or complete other physically or mentally taxing tasks, the day after a bender.

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If a Bloody Mary at brunch has you feeling better, Aizenberg says that may be a red flag.

“We consider that a sign of addiction,” he says. “Some people say it does make them feel better, but if that’s the case, there could be a little bit of actual alcohol withdrawal going on.”

Eating greasy food

Greasy food won’t “soak up” alcohol, Aizenberg says, but it might help you feel better.

“By the time people are eating their greasy foods, none of the actual alcohol is left in the body; it’s all of the byproducts that are in the blood,” he says. Still, Aizenberg says getting something in your stomach may ease nausea and vomiting.

But healthy food, he notes, would work just as well, and quite possibly even better. “If the stomach is irritated, eating more bland foods that aren’t going to cause a lot of acid reflux would actually be better,” Aizenberg says.

Using IV bags

A number of startups now offer on-demand IV services that promise to bust hangover symptoms ranging from headaches to upset stomaches. But Aizenberg says to think twice before forking over the cash for your own personal fluid drip.

“I have no idea if it makes people feel better faster,” Aizenberg says. “It’s not all that comfortable to have an IV. It can bruise you up and you’re paying all that money. There’s also an IV fluid shortage because of the hurricanes, so these are precious resources I would hate to waste on that type of thing.”

Taking painkillers before bed

Some people swear they can comenity bjs account headaches by popping a few Advil before they drift off to sleep — but since ibuprofen only lasts four to six hours, Aizenberg says its painkilling effects likely won’t last until you wake up. Plus, the pills can make acid reflux worse, he says.

Consuming red ginseng

Recent research has shown that red ginseng, a root native to Korea, can clear alcohol byproducts from the blood, though Aizenberg says it’s less clear exactly what that means for your hangover symptoms.

The bottom line

Prevention, by way of drinking responsibly, is the only way to truly “treat” a hangover. While some strategies may help with isolated symptoms including nausea, vomiting and headaches, a breakfast sandwich or bottle of Gatorade isn’t going to wipe out a hangover entirely — and you may have the placebo effect to thank for any relief you do feel, Boyer says. As long as your preferred concoction is safe, though, that’s likely not a problem.

More Must-Read Stories From TIME

Write to Jamie Ducharme at [email protected]

Источник: https://time.com/5065236/best-hangover-cure-headache-nausea/

Sick With COVID-19? Here’s How to Treat Yourself at Home

The coronavirus has infected millions of people worldwide, but most who develop symptoms have a mild illness and can recover at home, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

“While some patients require inpatient care for their COVID-19 infection, most do not and are able to safely care for themselves at home,” says Dr. Judy Tung, section chief of Adult Internal Medicine at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and associate dean for Faculty Development at Weill Cornell Medicine. “Understanding the symptoms and how to monitor and treat them can help you manage your care safely.”

Here, Dr. Tung shares with Health Matters how to treat yourself at home if you have COVID-19.

Know the Symptoms

The range of symptoms that patients experience from COVID-19 home remedies for nausea vomiting dizziness quite wide, and we now understand that the majority of people will have mild to moderate symptoms that can be managed at home. Classic symptoms include fever, headache, sore throat, cough, shortness of breath, muscle aches, severe fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, and an altered sense of taste and smell. For older patients or people with conditions that compromise their immune systems, symptoms can home remedies for nausea vomiting dizziness more atypical, sometimes with fatigue and weakness the only signs, Dr. Tung says.

“The severity of symptoms can vary quite a bit and so can the duration, lasting days for some and weeks for others, which is very exhausting,” Dr. Tung says. “Additionally, some patients get initially better but then worsen precipitously in the second week, so stay vigilant, especially with regard to the respiratory symptoms like shortness of breath and chest pain.”

Contact a Doctor

Let your doctor know as soon as COVID-19 symptoms start so they can advise, test, and monitor you. This is especially important for people with a higher risk of complications, including older adults and people with conditions such as obesity, chronic lung disease, diabetes, or cardiovascular disease. If you don’t have a primary care physician, establish a relationship with a doctor, especially one who has telemedicine capability. If you have a specialist for a condition such as cancer, let them know you have COVID-19 symptoms. Keep your doctor’s number on hand.

Dr. Judy Tung, expert on how to treat yourself at home for COVID-19 and colds

Get Tested

Information is empowering and will allow you to accurately care for yourself and the people around you. There are several different tests to detect SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. To find out if you currently have COVID-19, you’ll want the viral test, of which there are two types. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) detects the genetic material from the virus and is highly sensitive, which means it is able to pick up even low levels of the virus’s genetic material, known as RNA. The second type, the antigen test, detects proteins from the virus particle and is typically less sensitive, so a false negative is possible, but it usually produces results in less than an hour. The optimal time to get tested is when you develop symptoms or around the fourth or fifth day after exposure. Antibody or serology testing, accomplished via a blood draw, helps you to understand whether you have had COVID-19 in the past. It is not a recommended test for the diagnosis of COVID-19 in someone with symptoms or recent exposure.

Rest and Drink Fluids

Get plenty of rest and stay well hydrated. Fever and diarrhea can lead to significant dehydration, which can make you feel worse. Keep a big bottle of water by your bed and drink from it frequently. Broth soups, tea with honey, and fruit juice are also good choices.

“You can tell that you are getting dehydrated if your mouth feels dry, you get lightheaded when you move from a seated or squatting position to a standing one, and if your urine output declines,” Dr. Tung says. “You should be urinating at least every four to five hours. Severe dehydration is one reason we hospitalize patients with COVID-19, because the body becomes too weak to fight off the infection.”

Monitor Your Health Closely

Keep a detailed log of your symptoms, and contact your doctor if you are getting sicker. Take your temperature at least twice daily and pay attention to your breathing, particularly if you feel short of breath just resting or with minimal activity. COVID-19 is primarily a respiratory condition, and people who become severely ill need oxygen or a ventilator. If you have a pulse oximeter, a device that clips to your fingertip, use it to measure your blood oxygen level. If it falls below 95%, consult a doctor. If it falls below 90%, call 911 or get emergency care immediately. Additionally, if you home remedies for nausea vomiting dizziness having trouble breathing, persistent pain or chest pressure, new confusion, an inability to wake or stay awake, or bluish lips or face, seek emergency medical care immediately.

Treat Your Symptoms

High or persistent fevers are dangerous because they worsen dehydration, cloud your thinking, and increase overall oxygen demands of your vital organs. Treating your fever is therefore important. Take an over-the-counter fever reducer such as acetaminophen (500 milligrams to 1,000 milligrams) every six to eight hours to keep your temperature under 100 degrees. A hot shower to breathe in steam can ease a sore throat and congestion; however, ensure that you are well hydrated and not running a high fever before you do this. Over-the-counter antidiarrheal medications can help, especially if stools are watery and episodes are up to eight to 10 a day. An inhaler is sometimes needed to ease chest tightness or wheezing associated with COVID-19 infection. Always consult your physician to tailor your treatment plan.

There are many treatments under investigation for COVID-19 and most, including remdesivir and corticosteroids, have proven to be helpful only in hospitalized patients. For certain outpatients, monoclonal antibodies, such as bamlanivimab or casirivimab and imdevimab, are available under FDA emergency use authorization, but these treatments are not considered standard of care; your doctor will let you know if you might benefit from them.

Ask for Help

Your household members should grocery shop, fill your prescriptions, and help with your other needs. If you live alone, reach out to a friend or family member and let them know you are sick so they can check in with you and keep their phones on at night. Ask someone who lives nearby if they could bring groceries and necessities to leave at your door. You could also use a delivery service. And it’s a good time to stock up on nonperishable food, medications, and household supplies. Create an emergency contact list of friends, family, neighbors, and your doctor.

Protect Others

It’s important to avoid spreading the virus. Stay home except for medical visits, and self-isolate in one room as much as possible, including eating in your room. Use a separate bathroom, if available. Avoid older or frail relatives with medical conditions. Wear a mask if you are around others (and they should wear a mask around you), and stay 6 feet apart.

If you have to share a room, your household member should try to sleep 6 feet away from you and head to foot. Open the windows of shared spaces and use a fan for good airflow. If sharing a bathroom, clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces after you use them; if you are too weak or unable to clean, your caregiver should wear a mask and wait as long as possible after you have used the bathroom before coming in to clean and use the bathroom, according to the CDC. Follow the CDC’s recommendations for how to safely do dishes and laundry, and care for someone with COVID-19.

Do not share cups, plates, utensils, electronics like a cell phone, towels, or bedding, and clean often-touched surfaces, such as telephones, doorknobs, and handles, daily. Everyone should wash their hands frequently for at least 20 seconds with soap and water or use a hand sanitizer.

Return to Normal Gradually

Recovery time can range from a few days to more than two weeks for severe cases. Even when you’re feeling well you can be contagious, so check with your doctor before leaving your sickroom and home. The CDC says you can discontinue your isolation after you’ve been fever-free for 24 hours without using a fever-reducing medicine, your other symptoms have improved, and 10 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared. The 10-day recommendation is based on research that shows that people with mild to moderate COVID-19 are not contagious 10 days following symptom onset. Loss of taste or smell may continue for weeks or months and need not delay the time when you can be around others. People who were severely ill with COVID-19 or are immunocompromised may have to stay home longer than 10 days, so check with your doctor.

Get Vaccinated

The good news is that COVID vaccines are now available and have thus far proved very effective in preventing COVID-19 illness. Both the Pfizer-BioNTech and the Moderna vaccines boast about 95% efficacy, even among individuals previously infected with COVID-19. Common reactions include pain, redness and swelling at the injection site, fatigue, and body aches. Severe allergic reactions appear to be very rare and occur shortly after vaccination, which means we are able to rapidly detect and treat these reactions.

“I highly recommend that eligible individuals get vaccinated as soon as they can,” encourages Dr. Tung.

Judy Tung, M.D., is section chief of Adult Internal Medicine in the Division of Internal Medicine at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and a primary care physician at NewYork-Presbyterian Lower Manhattan Hospital. She is also associate dean for Faculty Development at Weill Cornell Medicine.

Additional Resources

  • Learn about COVID-19 testing in our expert’s guide, including when to get tested and how accurate the tests are.

  • If you are not feeling well, consider using NewYork-Presbyterian’s Virtual Urgent Care for non-life-threatening symptoms, such as fever, cough, upset stomach, or nausea. Learn more at nyp.org/urgentcare.

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Источник: https://healthmatters.nyp.org/sick-with-covid-19-heres-how-to-treat-yourself-at-home/

6 natural home remedies to get rid of nausea

Nausea refers to feelings of queasiness — often with the urge to vomit. Symptoms of nausea include sweating, a rush of saliva in the mouth, fatigue, and loss of appetite. 

While it's often associated with acid reflux and over-eating, nausea can also occur during pregnancy, with motion sickness, or as a side effect of other medical disorders or common illnesses. 

There are many anti-nausea medications that can help with severe or persistent nausea. But if your nausea is mild or occasional, there are also a number of effective home remedies that can help relieve your symptoms naturally.  

1. Use ginger 

Ginger is an effective remedy for nausea, says Daniel Devine, MD, internal medicine doctor and geriatrician at Devine Concierge Medicine, a primary care practice in Philadelphia. 

That's because ginger has anti-inflammatory properties, which can support digestion, and its compounds are also thought to speed up the process of stomach contents moving into the small intestine, which can reduce symptoms of nausea. 

A 2014 analysis of six different studies published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine examining the use of ginger in pregnancy found that taking about one gram of home remedies for nausea vomiting dizziness once a day for at least five days decreased symptoms of nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy. Studies have also found that ginger can be effective in managing nausea and vomiting symptoms for chemotherapy patients. 

Ginger can be taken as a supplement, sold as capsules. You can also add pieces of whole, fresh ginger to your tea, or include it as a spice or seasoning in your food. 

2. Try peppermint

Peppermint has long been regarded as a traditional remedy for nausea, though the scientific evidence on its efficacy is not as robust as it is for ginger, Devine says. Still, many people swear by its calming properties. 

The main ingredient in peppermint, menthol, is thought to relax the stomach, which can alleviate cramping and nausea.

One small study from 2014 published in the Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing suggested that even the scent of peppermint oil can alleviate nausea, but more research is needed to determine whether it is an effective remedy. 

However, if you experience both nausea and vomiting, peppermint may not be very effective, since it is primarily used to treat nausea — and not episodes of vomiting.

If you want to give peppermint a try, you can buy it as a tea or diffuse peppermint essential oil for aromatherapy by adding two to three drops of peppermint oil to a diffuser filled with water. 

3. Eat smaller, bland meals

Eating too much can cause nausea, Devine says. That's because when you eat too much, it stretches the stomach, resulting in bloating, heartburn, and excessive digestive movement — all of which can lead to nausea.  

Eating small, frequent meals and consuming business savings account vs checking bland diet without strong flavors can be helpful in reducing episodes of nausea, Devine says. Bland foods are easy to digest and can help settle your stomach. 

Bland foods that can help with nausea include:

  • White bread or toast
  • Plain chicken 
  • Rice
  • Applesauce
  • Soup
  • Bananas
  • Saltine crackers

If you're feeling queasy, you should avoid spicy food and acidic beverages like soda, juice, or alcohol — all of which can exacerbate nausea symptoms. You may even want to consider trying the BRAT diet when you feel nauseous. 

4. Stay hydrated 

It may be hard to eat or drink anything when you have nausea — including water. But according to Devine, dehydration will only make your nausea worse. 

This can be especially important if you're experiencing nausea as a result of extreme heat or humidity. In fact, nausea and vomiting are some of the main symptoms of heat exhaustion and heatstroke. 

Overheating causes your blood vessels to dilate as your body tries to cool itself down — and this change in blood pressure can manifest as nausea or dizziness. But if you drink lots of first security bank and trust and stay hydrated, it will help you cool down and return to a normal body temperature. 

If drinking water is a challenge for you with nausea, you should take small sips throughout the day or try a soothing beverage like warm peppermint tea.

For more information, read about how much water you should be drinking each day to stay hydrated. 

5. Sit upright or lie down with your head propped

When you feel queasy, you might be tempted to lay down, but this actually isn't the best idea. Lying flat while nauseous could lead to vomiting, Devine says. 

"It is important to use gravity to your advantage and keep your head inclined above your stomach," Devine says. 

By staying upright, gravity helps keep your stomach contents down. Sitting down in an upright position — or lying down with your head propped up on a couple pillows — is the best choice if you're hoping to relieve nausea. 

6. Practice acupressure 

Acupressure is an alternative medicine practice of applying pressure to certain points on the body, known as meridians. The idea is that by putting pressure on these places, you send a message to the body to turn on its self-healing mechanisms, which may alleviate pain or nausea. 

A 2006 review of doc holliday wynonna earp than 40 trials published in the journal Autonomic Neuroscience found that acupressure can reduce some symptoms of nausea.

One of the main pressure points for nausea is called the Pericardium 6, or Neiguan, located near your wrist. This pressure point is thought to alleviate nausea because the meridian pathway of this point travels up the arm, into the chest and upper abdomen, near the stomach.

Here's how to locate P6 and use this pressure point: 

P6 nei guan pressure point acupressure
Crystal Cox/Insider
  1. To access the P6 point, extend your arm out with your palm facing you. Place three fingers (pointer, middle and ring) from your opposite hand right under your wrist. 
  2. Put your thumb in the spot just below your index finger. If you feel two large tendons, or bumps on your skin, then you have identified the P6 spot. 
  3. Once you locate P6, slowly apply pressure to this point with your opposite thumb. 
  4. Press firmly on the point for two to three minutes, while moving your thumb in a small circle. Don't press so hard that you feel severe pain, but you should feel a dull ache. 
  5. Repeat this on the other wrist. 

For more information, read about these other pressure points for nausea. 

When to see a doctor 

If nausea is associated with frequent episodes of vomiting, chest pain, or comes with dark stools or dark vomit, you should reach out to your doctor, Devine says. And if nausea persists for more than a couple days, or if the symptoms are quickly worsening, that could also be a sign that something more serious is going on. 

For example, conditions like pancreatitis, bowel obstructions, or even a heart attack can cause nausea and will require medical attention. 

Some people are also more prone to nausea due to certain conditions. These include: 

The bottom line 

Nausea can feel uncomfortable, but it is generally very manageable with the right approach. If you can't get rid of nausea with these natural home remedies, check in with your doctor, who can work with you to develop a treatment plan. 

Related articles from Health Reference:

Источник: https://www.insider.com/home-remedies-for-nausea

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Treatment for vertigo depends on the cause and severity of your symptoms.

During a vertigo attack, lying still in a quiet, darkened room may help to ease any symptoms of nausea and reduce the sensation of spinning. You may be advised to take medication.

You should also try to avoid stressful situations, as anxiety can make the symptoms of vertigo worse.

Read more about what to do if you're struggling with stress

Labyrinthitis

Labyrinthitis is an inner ear infection that causes the labyrinth (a delicate structure deep inside your ear) to become inflamed. It's usually caused by a viral infection and clears up on its own without treatment. In rare cases, where labyrinthitis is caused by a bacterial infection, antibiotics may be prescribed.

If you've experienced any hearing loss, your GP may refer you to an ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialist or an audiovestibular physician. This is a doctor who specialises in hearing and balance disorders. You may need emergency treatment to restore your hearing.

Labyrinthitis may also be treated with vestibular rehabilitation – also called vestibular rehabilitation training or VRT (see below).

See treating labyrinthitis for more information

Vestibular neuronitis

Vestibular neuronitis, also known as vestibular neuritis, is inflammation of the vestibular nerve (one of the nerves in your ear that's used for balance). It's usually caused by a viral infection.

The symptoms of vestibular neuronitis often get better without treatment over several weeks. However, you may need to rest in bed if your symptoms are severe. See your GP if your symptoms get worse or don't start to improve after a week.

You may find your balance is particularly affected if you:

  • drink alcohol
  • are tired
  • have another illness

Avoiding these can help to improve your condition.

Vestibular neuronitis can also be treated with vestibular rehabilitation and medication.

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV)

Like vestibular neuronitis, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) often clears up without treatment after several weeks or months. It's thought that the small fragments of debris in the ear canal that cause vertigo either dissolve or become lodged in a place where they no longer cause symptoms. BPPV can sometimes return.

Until the symptoms disappear or the condition is treated, you should:

  • get out of bed slowly
  • avoid activities that involve looking upwards, such as painting and decorating or looking for something on a high shelf

BPPV can be treated using a procedure called the Epley manoeuvre.

The Epley manoeuvre

The Epley manoeuvre involves performing four separate head movements to move the fragments that cause vertigo to a place where they no longer cause symptoms. Each head position is held for at least 30 seconds. You may experience some vertigo during the movements.

Your symptoms should improve shortly after the Epley manoeuvre is performed, although it may take up to two weeks for a complete recovery. Return to your GP if your symptoms haven't improved after four weeks. The Epley manoeuvre isn't usually a long-term cure and may need to be repeated.

Brandt-Daroff exercises

If the Epley manoeuvre doesn't work, or if it's not suitable – for example, because you have neck or back problems – you can also try Brandt-Daroff exercises. These are a series of movements you can do unsupervised at home.

Your GP will need to teach you how to do the exercises. You repeat them three or four times a day for two days in a row. Your symptoms may improve for up to two weeks.

Referral to a specialist

Your GP may refer you to a specialist, such as an ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialist if:

  • the Epley manoeuvre doesn't work or can't be performed
  • you still have symptoms after four weeks
  • you have unusual signs or symptoms

In rare cases, where the symptoms of vertigo last for months or years, surgery may be recommended. This may involve blocking one of the fluid-filled canals in your ear. Your ENT specialist can give more advice on this.

Ménière's disease

If your vertigo is caused by Ménière's disease, there are a number of treatment options for both the vertigo and other symptoms caused by the condition.

Possible treatments for Ménière's disease include:

  • dietary advice – particularly a low-salt diet
  • medication to treat attacks of Ménière's disease
  • medication to prevent attacks of Ménière's disease
  • treatment for tinnitus (ringing in your ears) – such as sound therapy, which works by reducing the difference between tinnitus sounds and background sounds, to make the tinnitus sounds less intrusive
  • treatment for hearing loss – such as using hearing aids
  • physiotherapy to deal with balance problems
  • treatment for the secondary symptoms of Ménière's disease – such as stress, anxiety and depression

See treating Ménière's disease for more information

Central vertigo

Central vertigo is caused by problems in part of your brain, such as the cerebellum (which is located at the bottom of the brain) or the brainstem (the lower part of the brain that's connected to the spinal cord).

Causes of central vertigo include migraines and, less commonly, brain tumours.

If your GP suspects you have central vertigo, they may organise a scan or refer you to a hospital specialist, such as a neurologist or an ENT (ear, nose and throat specialist) or audiovestibular physician.

Treating your migraine should relieve your vertigo if it's caused by a migraine.

Vertigo with an unknown cause

If the cause of your vertigo is unknown, you may be admitted to hospital if:

  • you have severe nausea and vomiting, and can't keep fluids down
  • your vertigo comes on suddenly and wasn't caused by you changing position
  • you possibly have central vertigo
  • you have sudden hearing loss, but it's not thought to be Ménière's disease

Alternatively, you may be referred to a specialist, such as:

  • a neurologist – a specialist in treating conditions that affect the nervous system
  • an ENT specialist – a specialist in conditions that affect the ear, nose or throat
  • an audiovestibular physician – a specialist in hearing and balance disorders

While waiting to see a specialist, you may be treated with medication. 

Vestibular rehabilitation

Vestibular rehabilitation, also called vestibular rehabilitation training or VRT, is a form of "brain retraining". It involves carrying out a special programme of exercises that encourage your brain to adapt to the abnormal messages sent from your ears.

During VRT, you keep moving despite feelings of dizziness and vertigo. Your brain should eventually learn to rely on the signals coming from the rest of your body, such as your eyes and legs, rather than the confusing signals coming from your inner ear. By relying on other signals, your brain minimises any dizziness and helps you to maintain your balance.

An audiologist (hearing specialist) or a physiotherapist may provide VRT. Your GP may be able to refer you for VRT, members 1st mobile login it depends on availability in your area.

In some cases, it may be possible to use VRT without specialist help. Research has shown that people with some types of vertigo can improve their symptoms best home remedy for ear infection in adults a self-help VRT booklet. However, you should discuss this with your doctor first.

Medicines

Medication can be used to treat episodes of vertigo caused by vestibular neuronitis or Ménière's disease. It may also be used for central vertigo or vertigo with an unknown cause.

The medicines are usually prescribed for 3 to 14 days, depending on which condition they're for. The two medicines that are usually prescribed are:

  • prochlorperazine
  • antihistamines

If these medicines are successful in treating your symptoms, you may be given a supply to keep at home, so you can take them the next time you have an episode of vertigo.

In some cases you may be advised to take long-term medication, such as betahistine, for conditions like Ménière's disease.

Prochlorperazine

Prochlorperazine can help relieve severe nausea and vomiting associated with vertigo. It works by blocking the effect of a chemical in the brain called dopamine.

Prochlorperazine can cause side effects, including tremors (shaking) and abnormal or involuntary body and facial movements.

It can also make some people feel sleepy. For the full list of possible side effects, check the patient information leaflet that comes with your medicine.

Antihistamines

Antihistamines can be used to help relieve less severe nausea, vomiting and vertigo symptoms. They work by blocking the effects of a chemical called histamine.

Possible antihistamines that may be prescribed include:

  • cinnarizine
  • cyclizine
  • promethazine teoclate

Like prochlorperazine, antihistamines can also make you feel sleepy. Headaches and an upset stomach are also possible side effects. Check the patient information leaflet that comes with your medicine for the full list of possible side effects.

A medication called betahistine works in a similar way to antihistamines. It has been used to treat Ménière's disease and may also be used for other balance problems. It may have to be taken for a long period of time. The beneficial effects vary from person to person.

Safety

If you have vertigo, there are some safety issues to consider. For example:

  • you should inform your employer if your job involves operating machinery or climbing ladders
  • you may be at increased risk of falls – see preventing falls for advice on making your home safer and reducing your risk

Vertigo could also affect your ability to drive. You should avoid driving if you've recently had episodes of vertigo and there's a chance you may have another episode while you're driving.

It's your legal obligation to inform the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) about a medical condition that could affect your driving ability. Visit the GOV.UK website for more information on driving with a disability.

Источник: https://www.nhsinform.scot/illnesses-and-conditions/ears-nose-and-throat/vertigo

Home Remedies for Dizziness

Feeling dizzy is an incredibly common sensation. While there are different types of dizziness, the general definition is that dizziness is a feeling of disorientation, lightheadedness, or unsteadiness. Dizziness affects your sense of balance and can increase your risk of falling. This feeling can be unpleasant in and of itself, and it can also cause nausea, make your body feel weak, and lead to fainting.

Here is everything you need to know about dizziness including the types and the causes as well as some home remedies. Please keep in mind that if feeling dizzy is something you consistently experience, you should talk to a healthcare provider.

Types city bank lubbock texas phone number Dizziness

The two overarching types of dizziness are lightheadedness and vertigo. Lightheadedness is a type of dizziness that may make you feel disoriented and like you are about to faint, but not like your surroundings are actually moving. It typically improves or disappears if you sit or lie down.

Vertigo, on the other hand, makes it feel like your surroundings are moving when they are actually not. It is more likely to affect balance and cause you to fall. Both types of dizziness can lead to nausea or vomiting.

Feelings of dizziness occur in 70% home remedies for nausea vomiting dizziness the U.S. population at some point in their lives, and almost half of people speak to their healthcare provider about feeling dizzy. This issue increases in likelihood with age.

Causes of Dizziness

While dizziness is disorienting and can be scary, a dizzy spell does not always indicate an underlying issue. Dizziness is a widespread sensation, so it is common to feel lightheaded from time to time.

Evaluating the causes of dizziness can help you determine if it is a more serious problem as well as help you decide what you need to do or if you need to contact a healthcare provider. Here are some possible causes of dizziness.

Dehydration

Being dehydrated—whether from being sick, overheated, or not drinking enough fluids—lowers the volume of your blood along with your blood pressure. When this occurs, it prevents your brain from getting enough blood, thus leading to a feeling of lightheadedness.

Drinking a glass of water may make you feel better right away. But if you have not had much to eat or drink in a few days, it may take some time to rehydrate your body.

Why Water Is Essential for Optimal Fitness

Exercise-Related

Sometimes dizziness is a side-effect of working out. Exercising harder or faster than usual can cause you to feel lightheaded, particularly if you have been breathing rapidly.

Not giving your body a cooldown period after a cardio workout can lead to dizziness because your heart did not home remedies for nausea vomiting dizziness a chance to slow down. Being dehydrated or working out on an empty stomach can also cause you to feel shaky or dizzy.

Additionally, feeling dizzy when standing up quickly can actually come from working out, too. Exercising regularly makes your heart stronger, and a stronger heart has a larger stroke volume.

This means that the amount of blood pumped out during each beat is greater, so the heart doesn't have to beat as often. While this is healthy, a slow heart rate can sometimes lead to dizziness when you change position because it makes your heart rate speed up.

What Causes Dizziness During or After Exercise?

Low Blood Sugar

Low blood sugar is one of the top five reasons why you might feel woozy. Drinking or eating can help counteract this.

When your blood sugar is low, every system in your body goes on home remedies for nausea vomiting dizziness to use as little energy as possible. Even your brain is trying to conserve energy, which is the reason you may feel lightheaded or confused.

What is the Hypoglycemia Diet?

Side Effect of Medication

Dizziness can be a side discover online banking bonus of many different medications, including anti-seizure drugs, antidepressants, sedatives, and tranquilizers. Medications that lower blood pressure, in particular, may cause faintness if they lower it too much.

If you experience dizziness while on a medication, talk to your healthcare provider. They may decide that adjusting the dose or switching prescriptions may help alleviate this issue.

Drug or Alcohol Use

Prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and alcohol can all lead to dizziness. Plus, the interaction between alcohol and drugs can be a problem, particularly for older adults. Make sure you are reading the labels of all prescription and nonprescription drugs to determine if you should avoid alcohol while taking them.

Additionally, alcohol or drug intoxication, as well as withdrawal from each (including nicotine), home remedies for nausea vomiting dizziness also cause dizziness. In fact, alcohol use can become a serious issue, so make sure you drink in moderation. The USDA indicates that men should not drink more than 2 drinks in a day and women should not have more than 1 drink in a day.

Inner Ear Problems

Your sense of balance is developed through inputs from your eyes, your sensory nerves, and your inner ear. Your inner ear has sensors that detect gravity and back-and-forth motion, both of which feel out of sorts when experiencing vertigo.

Inner ear problems can be caused by an infection, Meniere's disease, migraines, and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV)—which is the most common cause of vertigo. Mild ear infections, and the dizziness that accompanies them, often clear up on their own, but if you have experienced severe or lengthy ear pain it is best to contact a doctor to diagnose the root of the problem and explore treatment options.

5 Exercises for Better Balance

Circulation Problems

If your heart is not pumping enough blood to your brain it may cause you to feel dizzy or faint. This may occur due to a drop in blood pressure like when standing up too quickly, or due to poor blood circulation.

Circulation issues can be caused by conditions such as cardiomyopathy, heart attack, heart arrhythmia, and transient ischemic attack. While dizziness from changing position quickly is not a serious problem, other circulation problems are. If your dizziness is accompanied by any other symptoms related to the heart, seek treatment immediately.

Why You Get Dizzy or Lightheaded When You Stand Up

Various Conditions and Disorders

Traumatic brain injury and migraines can lead to feelings of dizziness. Likewise, some neurological disorders, city bank lubbock texas phone number Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis, can also lead to progressive loss of balance. Even anxiety can cause lightheadedness, particularly panic attacks.

Along with these standalone factors, there are conditions or situations that contribute to an increased likelihood of experiencing dizziness. These include pregnancy, diabetes, menstruation, anemia, and even allergies—the last of which can be an indication of a serious anaphylactic reaction and requires immediate medical attention.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are commonly referred to as “flu-like" symptoms and include dizziness as well as headache, weakness, nausea, vomiting, chest pain, and confusion. Carbon monoxide poisoning is incredibly serious and can be fatal.

If you believe your dizziness is caused by carbon monoxide poisoning or if you smell gas in your home, call 911 and leave the area immediately. You will likely need immediate medical attention.

Home Remedies to Treat Dizziness

There are medications, therapies, and surgical treatments for dizziness, depending on the severity of the episodes and the underlying cause. If you are not suffering from a serious issue of which dizziness is a symptom, there are simple home remedies that can help prevent dizziness. Here are some ways you can treat dizziness.

Strive for a Healthy Lifestyle

A healthy diet can help combat dizziness, which includes drinking plenty of fluids. Limit your use of caffeine, alcohol, and tobacco, as these substances can worsen the causes and symptoms of dizziness. Getting enough sleep and avoiding stress also helps prevent lightheadedness.

If you have diabetes or struggle with low blood sugar, focus on regulating your blood sugar. Some research indicates that drinking apple cider vinegar also may help regular blood sugar. If it seems that your dizziness is related to your food intake, consult a healthcare provider to ensure that you identify and manage any pre-existing conditions.

New Guidelines Aim to Help People With Diabetes Exercise Safely

Stay Hydrated

To steer clear of dizziness caused by exercising, stay hydrated. Hydration—specifically drinking water before eating—is also very important in older adults who have postprandial hypotension, which means an excessive decrease in blood pressure that occurs after a meal.

It often results in dizziness, lightheadedness, and even falls. Research has shown that drinking water prior to eating, as well as eating small, low-carb meals frequently, helps manage these symptoms.

How Much Water Do You Need to Drink?

Practice At-Home Maneuvers

Because dizziness can lead to loss of balance, practicing balance exercises such as tai chi or yoga can help you improve balance and keep symptoms, particularly of vertigo, in control. If you experience vertigo caused by BPPV, you can follow the Epley or Semont-Toupet maneuvers—exercises that help shift the calcium crystals in your inner ear back to their correct positions.

Most experts recommend performing these maneuvers with a healthcare provider but an adapted exercise can be done safely at home. Some researchers recommend restricting movement following these maneuvers, including minimizing head movement, lying in bed with at least three pillows, not lying on the side, and avoiding cervical extension or rotation.

Another option is to practice regulating your breathing. Pick a spot to hold your gaze steady—instead of allowing your eyes to jump around which can lead to feelings of disorientation— and practice breathing. You want to make sure you don’t hold your breath.

Avoid Hot Baths and Showers

If you are prone to dizzy spells, avoiding prolonged time spent in hot water can help avoid them. Low blood pressure and an overworked heart can lead to feelings of light-headedness and dizziness. Limiting the time spent in hot showers and baths can eliminate this cause of dizziness.

High temperatures cause your blood vessels to dilate, which lowers blood pressure. What's more, the hot water causes the volume of blood your heart pumps to rise. This increased blood volume causes the heart's workload to increase.

Is Hot or Cold Water Better for Post-Run Recovery?

Take Ginkgo Biloba Extract

Ginkgo biloba is a Chinese herb known as a natural remedy for many maladies, including resolving the symptoms of vertigo. Most ginkgo products are made with an extract derived from the leaves of the maidenhair tree.

Ginkgo biloba treats vertigo by managing blood flow to the brain, which relieves dizziness and balance issues. One study concluded that using ginkgo biloba to treat vertigo was just as effective as betahistine, a medicine prescribed for balance disorders like vertigo. Betahistine is the world's most-prescribed medication for vertiginous syndromes.

Try Ginger

Ginger has long been used as a combattant for motion sickness and nausea. While research has not completely explained why ginger can counteract dizziness, it is home remedies for nausea vomiting dizziness that it prevents the development of gastric dysrhythmias and the elevation of plasma vasopressin, which leads to nausea associated with motion sickness.

Ginger can be consumed in many different forms. From ginger tea and supplements to ginger chews and more, there are a lot of different options to experiment with.

How to Make Homemade Ginger Tea

Take It Easy

If you do experience a dizzy spell, sit or lie down immediately and hydrate as soon as possible. Avoid activities that put you in a situation where an accident or fall could be likely.

You want to avoid driving, standing in high places, climbing a ladder, walking in the dark, or wearing high-heeled shoes—until you are certain the feeling has passed.

When to Contact a Healthcare Provder

Sometimes experiencing dizziness is an indication of a more serious condition. Call 911 or go to an emergency room if you are dizzy and:

  • Experience chest pain
  • Notice an irregular heart rate or your heart is skipping beats
  • Have shortness of breath
  • Experience weakness
  • Are unable to move an arm or leg
  • Notice a change in vision or speech
  • Faint or lose alertness for more than a few minutes
  • Experience a head injury
  • Have a fever over 101 degrees Fahrenheit, a headache, or a very stiff neck
  • Experience seizures
  • Have trouble keeping fluids down

A Word From Verywell

While experiencing the occasional brief period of dizziness is likely not a major concern, frequently recurring dizzy spells, instances lasting longer than 15 minutes, or those accompanied by other significant symptoms should be shared with a healthcare provider.

And, if you are considering trying any of these home remedies be sure to talk to a healthcare provider first. They can help you determine what is right for you. You also want to ensure that the remedy you select will not interfere citi bank credit login any medications you are taking.

9 Natural Remedies for Anxiety

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Verywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Cleveland Clinic. Dizziness. Updated June 25, 2020.

  2. University of Michigan Health. Dizziness: Lightheadedness and vertigo. Updated February 26, 2020.

  3. The Hearing and Balance Clinic. Facts about dizziness.

  4. Harvard Medical School. Lightheaded? Top five reasons you might feel woozy.

  5. USDA. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2020-2025.

  6. Johnston CS, Kim CM, Buller AJ. Vinegar improves insulin sensitivity to a high-carbohydrate meal in subjects with insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2004;27(1):281-282. doi:10.2337/diacare.27.1.281

  7. Grobéty B, Grasser EK, Yepuri G, Dulloo AG, Montani JP. Postprandial hypotension in older adults: Can it be prevented by drinking water before the meal? Clinical Nutrition. 2015;34(5):885-891. doi:10.1016/j.clnu.2014.09.009

  8. Johns Hopkins Medicine. Home Epley maneuver.

  9. Harvard Medical School. Hot baths and saunas: Beneficial for your heart?

  10. Sokolova L, Hoerr R, Mishchenko T. Treatment of Vertigo: A Credit one offer com, Double-Blind Trial Comparing Efficacy and Safety of Ginkgo biloba Extract EGb 761 and Betahistine. Int J Otolaryngol. 2014;2014:682439. doi:10.1155/2014/682439

  11. Lien HC, Sun WM, Chen YH, Kim H, Hasler W, Owyang C. Effects of ginger on motion sickness and gastric slow-wave dysrhythmias induced by circular vection. American Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology. 2003;284(3):G481-G489. doi:10.1152/ajpgi.00164.2002

  12. U.S. National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus. Dizziness. Updated May 13, 2019.

Источник: https://www.verywellfit.com/home-remedies-for-dizziness-5209216

Home remedies for nausea vomiting dizziness -

Sick With COVID-19? Here’s How to Treat Yourself at Home

The coronavirus has infected millions of people worldwide, but most who develop symptoms have a mild illness and can recover at home, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

“While some patients require inpatient care for their COVID-19 infection, most do not and are able to safely care for themselves at home,” says Dr. Judy Tung, section chief of Adult Internal Medicine at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and associate dean for Faculty Development at Weill Cornell Medicine. “Understanding the symptoms and how to monitor and treat them can help you manage your care safely.”

Here, Dr. Tung shares with Health Matters how to treat yourself at home if you have COVID-19.

Know the Symptoms

The range of symptoms that patients experience from COVID-19 is quite wide, and we now understand that the majority of people will have mild to moderate symptoms that can be managed at home. Classic symptoms include fever, headache, sore throat, cough, shortness of breath, muscle aches, severe fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, and an altered sense of taste and smell. For older patients or people with conditions that compromise their immune systems, symptoms can be more atypical, sometimes with fatigue and weakness the only signs, Dr. Tung says.

“The severity of symptoms can vary quite a bit and so can the duration, lasting days for some and weeks for others, which is very exhausting,” Dr. Tung says. “Additionally, some patients get initially better but then worsen precipitously in the second week, so stay vigilant, especially with regard to the respiratory symptoms like shortness of breath and chest pain.”

Contact a Doctor

Let your doctor know as soon as COVID-19 symptoms start so they can advise, test, and monitor you. This is especially important for people with a higher risk of complications, including older adults and people with conditions such as obesity, chronic lung disease, diabetes, or cardiovascular disease. If you don’t have a primary care physician, establish a relationship with a doctor, especially one who has telemedicine capability. If you have a specialist for a condition such as cancer, let them know you have COVID-19 symptoms. Keep your doctor’s number on hand.

Dr. Judy Tung, expert on how to treat yourself at home for COVID-19 and colds

Get Tested

Information is empowering and will allow you to accurately care for yourself and the people around you. There are several different tests to detect SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. To find out if you currently have COVID-19, you’ll want the viral test, of which there are two types. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) detects the genetic material from the virus and is highly sensitive, which means it is able to pick up even low levels of the virus’s genetic material, known as RNA. The second type, the antigen test, detects proteins from the virus particle and is typically less sensitive, so a false negative is possible, but it usually produces results in less than an hour. The optimal time to get tested is when you develop symptoms or around the fourth or fifth day after exposure. Antibody or serology testing, accomplished via a blood draw, helps you to understand whether you have had COVID-19 in the past. It is not a recommended test for the diagnosis of COVID-19 in someone with symptoms or recent exposure.

Rest and Drink Fluids

Get plenty of rest and stay well hydrated. Fever and diarrhea can lead to significant dehydration, which can make you feel worse. Keep a big bottle of water by your bed and drink from it frequently. Broth soups, tea with honey, and fruit juice are also good choices.

“You can tell that you are getting dehydrated if your mouth feels dry, you get lightheaded when you move from a seated or squatting position to a standing one, and if your urine output declines,” Dr. Tung says. “You should be urinating at least every four to five hours. Severe dehydration is one reason we hospitalize patients with COVID-19, because the body becomes too weak to fight off the infection.”

Monitor Your Health Closely

Keep a detailed log of your symptoms, and contact your doctor if you are getting sicker. Take your temperature at least twice daily and pay attention to your breathing, particularly if you feel short of breath just resting or with minimal activity. COVID-19 is primarily a respiratory condition, and people who become severely ill need oxygen or a ventilator. If you have a pulse oximeter, a device that clips to your fingertip, use it to measure your blood oxygen level. If it falls below 95%, consult a doctor. If it falls below 90%, call 911 or get emergency care immediately. Additionally, if you are having trouble breathing, persistent pain or chest pressure, new confusion, an inability to wake or stay awake, or bluish lips or face, seek emergency medical care immediately.

Treat Your Symptoms

High or persistent fevers are dangerous because they worsen dehydration, cloud your thinking, and increase overall oxygen demands of your vital organs. Treating your fever is therefore important. Take an over-the-counter fever reducer such as acetaminophen (500 milligrams to 1,000 milligrams) every six to eight hours to keep your temperature under 100 degrees. A hot shower to breathe in steam can ease a sore throat and congestion; however, ensure that you are well hydrated and not running a high fever before you do this. Over-the-counter antidiarrheal medications can help, especially if stools are watery and episodes are up to eight to 10 a day. An inhaler is sometimes needed to ease chest tightness or wheezing associated with COVID-19 infection. Always consult your physician to tailor your treatment plan.

There are many treatments under investigation for COVID-19 and most, including remdesivir and corticosteroids, have proven to be helpful only in hospitalized patients. For certain outpatients, monoclonal antibodies, such as bamlanivimab or casirivimab and imdevimab, are available under FDA emergency use authorization, but these treatments are not considered standard of care; your doctor will let you know if you might benefit from them.

Ask for Help

Your household members should grocery shop, fill your prescriptions, and help with your other needs. If you live alone, reach out to a friend or family member and let them know you are sick so they can check in with you and keep their phones on at night. Ask someone who lives nearby if they could bring groceries and necessities to leave at your door. You could also use a delivery service. And it’s a good time to stock up on nonperishable food, medications, and household supplies. Create an emergency contact list of friends, family, neighbors, and your doctor.

Protect Others

It’s important to avoid spreading the virus. Stay home except for medical visits, and self-isolate in one room as much as possible, including eating in your room. Use a separate bathroom, if available. Avoid older or frail relatives with medical conditions. Wear a mask if you are around others (and they should wear a mask around you), and stay 6 feet apart.

If you have to share a room, your household member should try to sleep 6 feet away from you and head to foot. Open the windows of shared spaces and use a fan for good airflow. If sharing a bathroom, clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces after you use them; if you are too weak or unable to clean, your caregiver should wear a mask and wait as long as possible after you have used the bathroom before coming in to clean and use the bathroom, according to the CDC. Follow the CDC’s recommendations for how to safely do dishes and laundry, and care for someone with COVID-19.

Do not share cups, plates, utensils, electronics like a cell phone, towels, or bedding, and clean often-touched surfaces, such as telephones, doorknobs, and handles, daily. Everyone should wash their hands frequently for at least 20 seconds with soap and water or use a hand sanitizer.

Return to Normal Gradually

Recovery time can range from a few days to more than two weeks for severe cases. Even when you’re feeling well you can be contagious, so check with your doctor before leaving your sickroom and home. The CDC says you can discontinue your isolation after you’ve been fever-free for 24 hours without using a fever-reducing medicine, your other symptoms have improved, and 10 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared. The 10-day recommendation is based on research that shows that people with mild to moderate COVID-19 are not contagious 10 days following symptom onset. Loss of taste or smell may continue for weeks or months and need not delay the time when you can be around others. People who were severely ill with COVID-19 or are immunocompromised may have to stay home longer than 10 days, so check with your doctor.

Get Vaccinated

The good news is that COVID vaccines are now available and have thus far proved very effective in preventing COVID-19 illness. Both the Pfizer-BioNTech and the Moderna vaccines boast about 95% efficacy, even among individuals previously infected with COVID-19. Common reactions include pain, redness and swelling at the injection site, fatigue, and body aches. Severe allergic reactions appear to be very rare and occur shortly after vaccination, which means we are able to rapidly detect and treat these reactions.

“I highly recommend that eligible individuals get vaccinated as soon as they can,” encourages Dr. Tung.

Judy Tung, M.D., is section chief of Adult Internal Medicine in the Division of Internal Medicine at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and a primary care physician at NewYork-Presbyterian Lower Manhattan Hospital. She is also associate dean for Faculty Development at Weill Cornell Medicine.

Additional Resources

  • Learn about COVID-19 testing in our expert’s guide, including when to get tested and how accurate the tests are.

  • If you are not feeling well, consider using NewYork-Presbyterian’s Virtual Urgent Care for non-life-threatening symptoms, such as fever, cough, upset stomach, or nausea. Learn more at nyp.org/urgentcare.

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Источник: https://healthmatters.nyp.org/sick-with-covid-19-heres-how-to-treat-yourself-at-home/

17 Natural Ways to Get Rid of Nausea

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Nausea is something most people are familiar with. It is never pleasant and can arise in a variety of situations, including pregnancy and travel.

Anti-nausea medications are commonly used to help relieve it. Unfortunately, such medications can have negative side effects of their own, including drowsiness.

Here are 17 home remedies that help you get rid of nausea without using medications.

1. Eat Ginger

Ginger is a popular natural remedy commonly used to treat nausea.

The way it works is not yet fully understood. However, experts believe that compounds in ginger may work in a similar way to anti-nausea medications (, ). In fact, several studies agree that ginger is effective at reducing nausea in various situations.

For instance, consuming ginger may be an effective way to reduce nausea during pregnancy (, , , ).

Ginger may also be effective at reducing the nausea people commonly experience after chemotherapy treatment or an operation (, , , ).

Some studies even report ginger to be as effective as some prescription medications, with fewer negative side effects (, ).

There is no consensus regarding the most effective dosage, but most of the studies above provided participants with 0.5 to 1.5 grams of dried ginger root per day.

Ginger use is safe for most people. However, you may need to limit your ginger intake if you’re prone to low blood pressure or low blood sugar, or if you’re taking blood thinners ().

Some experts also question the safety of eating dried ginger during pregnancy ().

While there are only a small number of studies on ginger, the ones performed on healthy pregnant women report a low risk of side effects. Thus, most experts consider ginger to be a safe, effective remedy during pregnancy (, , , ).

Summary:

A daily dose of ginger may be an effective alternative to anti-nausea medications in a variety of situations, including during pregnancy and after chemotherapy or an operation.

2. Peppermint Aromatherapy

Peppermint aromatherapy is another alternative likely to help reduce nausea.

One study assessed its effects in women who had just given birth by C-section.

Those exposed to a peppermint smell rated their level of nausea significantly lower than those given anti-nausea medications or a placebo ().

In another study, peppermint aromatherapy was effective at reducing nausea in 57% of cases ().

In a third study, using an inhaler containing peppermint oil at the onset of nausea reduced symptoms — within two minutes of treatment — in 44% of cases ().

Some propose that sipping on a cup of peppermint tea may have similar anti-nausea effects. Yet while you have little to lose by giving peppermint tea a try, there are currently no studies that confirm its effectiveness.

Peppermint oil taken in pill form has shown mixed results. Some studies show benefits, while others find no effects (18, ).

What’s more, little information exists on the safety of ingesting peppermint oil.

For this reason, more studies on peppermint pills are needed before strong conclusions can be made. However, smelling peppermint oil should be perfectly safe and seems to work in about half of people.

Purchase peppermint oil online.

Summary:

Smelling peppermint oil at the onset of nausea may help reduce your symptoms.

3. Try Acupuncture or Acupressure

Acupuncture and acupressure are two techniques commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat nausea and vomiting.

During acupuncture, thin needles are inserted into specific points on the body. Acupressure aims to stimulate the same points of the body, but uses pressure instead of needles to do so.

Both techniques stimulate nerve fibers, which transmit signals to the brain and spinal cord. These signals are thought to have the ability to decrease nausea (, ).

For instance, two recent reviews report that acupuncture and acupressure reduce the risk of developing nausea after an operation by 28–75% (, ).

What’s more, studies show that both forms are as effective as anti-nausea medications at reducing symptoms, with virtually no negative side effects ().

Similarly, two other reviews report that acupressure lowers the severity of nausea and the risk of developing it after chemotherapy (, 25).

There is also some evidence that acupuncture may reduce nausea during pregnancy, but more research is needed on this ().

Most studies that report a benefit stimulated the Neiguan acupuncture point, also known as the P6 or inner frontier gate point ().

You can stimulate this nerve on your own simply by placing your thumb 2–3 finger widths down from your inner wrist, between the two prominent tendons.

Here is an illustration showing how you can find this point yourself.

Illustration by Diego Sabogal

Once you’ve located it, press down with your thumb for about one minute before repeating the same procedure on your other arm. Repeat if needed.

Summary:

Acupuncture and acupressure are two scientifically proven techniques to reduce nausea.

4. Slice a Lemon

Citrusy smells, such as those from a freshly sliced lemon, may help reduce nausea in pregnant women.

In one study, a group of 100 pregnant women were instructed to inhale either lemon or almond essential oils as soon as they felt nausea.

At the end of the 4-day study, those in the lemon group rated their nausea up to 9% lower than those given the almond oil placebo ().

Slicing a lemon or simply scratching its peel may work in a similar way because it helps release its essential oils into the air. A vial of lemon essential oil may be a practical alternative to use when you’re away from home.

Summary:

Citrusy smells, whether from a freshly cut lemon or from store-bought essential oils, may help reduce pregnancy-related nausea.

5. Control Your Breathing

Taking slow, deep breaths can also help reduce nausea.

In one study, researchers attempted to determine which aromatherapy scent was most effective at reducing nausea following surgery.

They instructed participants to breathe in slowly through the nose and exhale through the mouth three times, while exposed to various scents ().

All participants, including those in the placebo group, reported a decrease in nausea. This made the researchers suspect that the controlled breathing may have provided the relief ().

In a second study, researchers confirmed that aromatherapy and controlled breathing both independently relieve nausea. In this study, the controlled breathing reduced it in 62% of cases ().

The breathing pattern used in this last study required participants to inhale through their nose to a count of three, hold their breath to a count of three, then exhale to a count of three ().

Summary:

Specific controlled breathing techniques are a free and effective home remedy for nausea.

6. Use Certain Spices

Several spices are popular home remedies often recommended to combat nausea.

Most of these spices are supported solely by anecdotal evidence. However, the nausea-fighting power of these three spices is backed by some scientific evidence:

  • Fennel powder: May reduce menstrual symptoms, including nausea, and help women experience shorter periods ().
  • Cinnamon: May reduce the severity of nausea that women experience during menstruation ().
  • Cumin extract: May help improve symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, constipation and diarrhea in individuals suffering from IBS ().

Although these three spices may help relieve nausea in certain individuals, very few studies exist and more are needed before strong conclusions can be drawn.

It’s also worth noting that the studies above used doses ranging from 180–420 mg per day. These mega-doses are difficult to achieve through normal, everyday use of these spices.

SUMMARY:

Certain spices may successfully reduce the frequency or severity of nausea. However, large doses may be required and more studies are needed to confirm these effects.

7. Try Relaxing Your Muscles

Relaxing your muscles may help relieve nausea.

One technique people have used to achieve this effect is known as progressive muscle relaxation (PMR). It requires individuals to tense and relax their muscles in a continuous sequence as a way to achieve physical and mental relaxation ().

One recent review found that PMR is an effective way to reduce the severity of nausea resulting from chemotherapy ().

Another way to relieve muscle tension is through massage.

In one study, a group of chemotherapy patients were given a 20-minute lower arm or lower leg massage during their treatment.

Compared to those given no massage, the massaged participants were about 24% less likely to get nauseous afterward ().

Summary:

Relaxing your muscles, whether through massage or PMR techniques, may help relieve nausea.

8. Take a Vitamin B6 Supplement

Vitamin B6 is increasingly recommended as an alternative treatment for pregnant women preferring to avoid anti-nausea medications.

Several studies report that supplements of vitamin B6, also known as pyridoxine, successfully reduce nausea during pregnancy (, , , ).

For this reason, several experts suggest taking vitamin B6 supplements during pregnancy as a first-line treatment against mild nausea (, 41).

Vitamin B6 doses up to 200 mg per day are generally considered safe during pregnancy and produce virtually no side effects. Therefore, this alternative therapy may be worth a try (41, ).

Nevertheless, there haven’t been very many studies on this topic, and some report no effects (, ).

Purchase vitamin B6 online.

Summary:

For pregnant women who are experiencing nausea, vitamin B6 is a safe and potentially effective alternative to anti-nausea medications.

9–17. Additional Tips to Reduce Nausea

In addition to the tips above, a few other recommendations may decrease the likelihood of nausea or help relieve its symptoms. The most common include (44, 45):

  1. Avoid spicy or fatty foods: A blander diet made up of foods such as bananas, rice, applesauce, crackers or baked potatoes may relieve nausea and decrease the likelihood of an upset stomach.
  2. Add protein to your meals: Protein-rich meals may fight off nausea better than meals high in fat or carbs ().
  3. Avoid large meals: Opting for smaller, more frequent meals when you’re feeling nauseated may help reduce your symptoms.
  4. Stay upright after you eat: Some people are more likely to experience reflux or become nauseous if they lie down within 30 to 60 minutes following a meal.
  5. Avoid drinking with meals: Drinking any liquids with meals may increase feelings of fullness, which may worsen nausea in some individuals.
  6. Stay hydrated: Dehydration can worsen nausea. If your nausea is accompanied by vomiting, replace your lost fluids with electrolyte-rich fluids such as flat mineral water, vegetable broth or a sports drink.
  7. Avoid strong smells: These may worsen nausea, especially during pregnancy.
  8. Avoid iron supplements: Pregnant women with normal iron levels should avoid taking iron supplements during the first trimester because they may worsen feelings of nausea ().
  9. Exercise: Aerobic exercise and yoga may be particularly helpful ways to reduce nausea in some individuals (, ).

It’s worth noting that most of these last tips are only supported by anecdotal evidence. That said, they pose little risk and may be worthy trying.

SUMMARY:

The tips above may prevent or relieve nausea, according to anecdotal evidence. Most of these treatments haven’t been studied.

The Bottom Line

Nausea can happen in many situations and often makes you feel terrible.

The natural tips above can help reduce nausea without using medications.

That said, if your nausea persists, you should definitely seek additional advice from your healthcare practitioner.

Read this article in Spanish.

Источник: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/nausea-remedies

6 natural home remedies to get rid of nausea

Nausea refers to feelings of queasiness — often with the urge to vomit. Symptoms of nausea include sweating, a rush of saliva in the mouth, fatigue, and loss of appetite. 

While it's often associated with acid reflux and over-eating, nausea can also occur during pregnancy, with motion sickness, or as a side effect of other medical disorders or common illnesses. 

There are many anti-nausea medications that can help with severe or persistent nausea. But if your nausea is mild or occasional, there are also a number of effective home remedies that can help relieve your symptoms naturally.  

1. Use ginger 

Ginger is an effective remedy for nausea, says Daniel Devine, MD, internal medicine doctor and geriatrician at Devine Concierge Medicine, a primary care practice in Philadelphia. 

That's because ginger has anti-inflammatory properties, which can support digestion, and its compounds are also thought to speed up the process of stomach contents moving into the small intestine, which can reduce symptoms of nausea. 

A 2014 analysis of six different studies published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine examining the use of ginger in pregnancy found that taking about one gram of ginger once a day for at least five days decreased symptoms of nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy. Studies have also found that ginger can be effective in managing nausea and vomiting symptoms for chemotherapy patients. 

Ginger can be taken as a supplement, sold as capsules. You can also add pieces of whole, fresh ginger to your tea, or include it as a spice or seasoning in your food. 

2. Try peppermint

Peppermint has long been regarded as a traditional remedy for nausea, though the scientific evidence on its efficacy is not as robust as it is for ginger, Devine says. Still, many people swear by its calming properties. 

The main ingredient in peppermint, menthol, is thought to relax the stomach, which can alleviate cramping and nausea.

One small study from 2014 published in the Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing suggested that even the scent of peppermint oil can alleviate nausea, but more research is needed to determine whether it is an effective remedy. 

However, if you experience both nausea and vomiting, peppermint may not be very effective, since it is primarily used to treat nausea — and not episodes of vomiting.

If you want to give peppermint a try, you can buy it as a tea or diffuse peppermint essential oil for aromatherapy by adding two to three drops of peppermint oil to a diffuser filled with water. 

3. Eat smaller, bland meals

Eating too much can cause nausea, Devine says. That's because when you eat too much, it stretches the stomach, resulting in bloating, heartburn, and excessive digestive movement — all of which can lead to nausea.  

Eating small, frequent meals and consuming a bland diet without strong flavors can be helpful in reducing episodes of nausea, Devine says. Bland foods are easy to digest and can help settle your stomach. 

Bland foods that can help with nausea include:

  • White bread or toast
  • Plain chicken 
  • Rice
  • Applesauce
  • Soup
  • Bananas
  • Saltine crackers

If you're feeling queasy, you should avoid spicy food and acidic beverages like soda, juice, or alcohol — all of which can exacerbate nausea symptoms. You may even want to consider trying the BRAT diet when you feel nauseous. 

4. Stay hydrated 

It may be hard to eat or drink anything when you have nausea — including water. But according to Devine, dehydration will only make your nausea worse. 

This can be especially important if you're experiencing nausea as a result of extreme heat or humidity. In fact, nausea and vomiting are some of the main symptoms of heat exhaustion and heatstroke. 

Overheating causes your blood vessels to dilate as your body tries to cool itself down — and this change in blood pressure can manifest as nausea or dizziness. But if you drink lots of water and stay hydrated, it will help you cool down and return to a normal body temperature. 

If drinking water is a challenge for you with nausea, you should take small sips throughout the day or try a soothing beverage like warm peppermint tea.

For more information, read about how much water you should be drinking each day to stay hydrated. 

5. Sit upright or lie down with your head propped

When you feel queasy, you might be tempted to lay down, but this actually isn't the best idea. Lying flat while nauseous could lead to vomiting, Devine says. 

"It is important to use gravity to your advantage and keep your head inclined above your stomach," Devine says. 

By staying upright, gravity helps keep your stomach contents down. Sitting down in an upright position — or lying down with your head propped up on a couple pillows — is the best choice if you're hoping to relieve nausea. 

6. Practice acupressure 

Acupressure is an alternative medicine practice of applying pressure to certain points on the body, known as meridians. The idea is that by putting pressure on these places, you send a message to the body to turn on its self-healing mechanisms, which may alleviate pain or nausea. 

A 2006 review of more than 40 trials published in the journal Autonomic Neuroscience found that acupressure can reduce some symptoms of nausea.

One of the main pressure points for nausea is called the Pericardium 6, or Neiguan, located near your wrist. This pressure point is thought to alleviate nausea because the meridian pathway of this point travels up the arm, into the chest and upper abdomen, near the stomach.

Here's how to locate P6 and use this pressure point: 

P6 nei guan pressure point acupressure
Crystal Cox/Insider
  1. To access the P6 point, extend your arm out with your palm facing you. Place three fingers (pointer, middle and ring) from your opposite hand right under your wrist. 
  2. Put your thumb in the spot just below your index finger. If you feel two large tendons, or bumps on your skin, then you have identified the P6 spot. 
  3. Once you locate P6, slowly apply pressure to this point with your opposite thumb. 
  4. Press firmly on the point for two to three minutes, while moving your thumb in a small circle. Don't press so hard that you feel severe pain, but you should feel a dull ache. 
  5. Repeat this on the other wrist. 

For more information, read about these other pressure points for nausea. 

When to see a doctor 

If nausea is associated with frequent episodes of vomiting, chest pain, or comes with dark stools or dark vomit, you should reach out to your doctor, Devine says. And if nausea persists for more than a couple days, or if the symptoms are quickly worsening, that could also be a sign that something more serious is going on. 

For example, conditions like pancreatitis, bowel obstructions, or even a heart attack can cause nausea and will require medical attention. 

Some people are also more prone to nausea due to certain conditions. These include: 

The bottom line 

Nausea can feel uncomfortable, but it is generally very manageable with the right approach. If you can't get rid of nausea with these natural home remedies, check in with your doctor, who can work with you to develop a treatment plan. 

Related articles from Health Reference:

Источник: https://www.insider.com/home-remedies-for-nausea

Nausea and vomiting in adults

Nausea (feeling sick) and vomiting (being sick) in adults isn't usually a sign of anything serious. In most cases, you won't need any specific treatment and can take care of yourself at home until you feel better.

About vomiting

One of the most common causes of vomiting in adults is a gut infection (gastroenteritis), which usually only lasts one or two days.

Vomiting can occasionally be a sign of a more serious problem and may require emergency help.

See section below on more of the most common causes of nausea and vomiting in adults.

When to get medical advice

Try to avoid going to your GP because if your vomiting is caused by an infection it can spread to others very easily.

If you're feeling very unwell or are worried about your vomiting, call your GP or GP out of hours service.

You should also get medical advice if:

  • you've been vomiting repeatedly for more than 48 hours and it's not improving
  • you're unable to keep down any fluids
  • you have signs of severe dehydration – such as dizziness and passing little or no urine
  • your vomit is green or greenish yellow (this could mean you're bringing up bile, which is usually because your stomach is empty with nothing else left to vomit, however, sometimes it can suggest that you may have a blockage in your bowel, and need to get checked to make sure that you do not have a blockage)
  • you've lost a lot of weight since you became ill
  • you experience episodes of vomiting regularly

When to get emergency help

Call 999 for an ambulance, or go to your nearest emergency department if you also have:

You should also get emergency help if you think you've swallowed something poisonous.

Looking after yourself at home

The most important thing you can do is to keep taking small sips of water so you don't become dehydrated.

A sweet drink such as fruit juice can be useful for replacing lost sugar, although you should avoid sweet drinks if they make you feel sick. Salty snacks, such as crisps, can help replace lost salt.

You may also find ginger helps to relieve your nausea and vomiting.

This is available as supplements, or can be found in ginger biscuits and ginger tea. Check with your pharmacist or GP before using ginger supplements.

Common causes of vomiting in adults

The most common causes of nausea and vomiting in adults include:

  • gastroenteritis – this is most likely to be the cause if you also have diarrhoea; read about treating gastroenteritis
  • pregnancy – pregnant women often have nausea and vomiting during the early stages of pregnancy; read about morning sickness, including things you can do to help reduce your symptoms
  • migraines – intense, throbbing headaches that last for a few hours to days at a time, read about treating migraines
  • labyrinthitis – which also causes dizziness and a feeling of spinning (vertigo)
  • motion sickness – nausea and vomiting associated with travelling

Vomiting in adults can also be caused by a number of other things, including:

More useful links

The information on this page has been adapted from original content from the NHS website.

For further information see terms and conditions.

Источник: https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/conditions/nausea-and-vomiting-adults

Home Remedies for Dizziness

Feeling dizzy is an incredibly common sensation. While there are different types of dizziness, the general definition is that dizziness is a feeling of disorientation, lightheadedness, or unsteadiness. Dizziness affects your sense of balance and can increase your risk of falling. This feeling can be unpleasant in and of itself, and it can also cause nausea, make your body feel weak, and lead to fainting.

Here is everything you need to know about dizziness including the types and the causes as well as some home remedies. Please keep in mind that if feeling dizzy is something you consistently experience, you should talk to a healthcare provider.

Types of Dizziness

The two overarching types of dizziness are lightheadedness and vertigo. Lightheadedness is a type of dizziness that may make you feel disoriented and like you are about to faint, but not like your surroundings are actually moving. It typically improves or disappears if you sit or lie down.

Vertigo, on the other hand, makes it feel like your surroundings are moving when they are actually not. It is more likely to affect balance and cause you to fall. Both types of dizziness can lead to nausea or vomiting.

Feelings of dizziness occur in 70% of the U.S. population at some point in their lives, and almost half of people speak to their healthcare provider about feeling dizzy. This issue increases in likelihood with age.

Causes of Dizziness

While dizziness is disorienting and can be scary, a dizzy spell does not always indicate an underlying issue. Dizziness is a widespread sensation, so it is common to feel lightheaded from time to time.

Evaluating the causes of dizziness can help you determine if it is a more serious problem as well as help you decide what you need to do or if you need to contact a healthcare provider. Here are some possible causes of dizziness.

Dehydration

Being dehydrated—whether from being sick, overheated, or not drinking enough fluids—lowers the volume of your blood along with your blood pressure. When this occurs, it prevents your brain from getting enough blood, thus leading to a feeling of lightheadedness.

Drinking a glass of water may make you feel better right away. But if you have not had much to eat or drink in a few days, it may take some time to rehydrate your body.

Why Water Is Essential for Optimal Fitness

Exercise-Related

Sometimes dizziness is a side-effect of working out. Exercising harder or faster than usual can cause you to feel lightheaded, particularly if you have been breathing rapidly.

Not giving your body a cooldown period after a cardio workout can lead to dizziness because your heart did not have a chance to slow down. Being dehydrated or working out on an empty stomach can also cause you to feel shaky or dizzy.

Additionally, feeling dizzy when standing up quickly can actually come from working out, too. Exercising regularly makes your heart stronger, and a stronger heart has a larger stroke volume.

This means that the amount of blood pumped out during each beat is greater, so the heart doesn't have to beat as often. While this is healthy, a slow heart rate can sometimes lead to dizziness when you change position because it makes your heart rate speed up.

What Causes Dizziness During or After Exercise?

Low Blood Sugar

Low blood sugar is one of the top five reasons why you might feel woozy. Drinking or eating can help counteract this.

When your blood sugar is low, every system in your body goes on reserve to use as little energy as possible. Even your brain is trying to conserve energy, which is the reason you may feel lightheaded or confused.

What is the Hypoglycemia Diet?

Side Effect of Medication

Dizziness can be a side effect of many different medications, including anti-seizure drugs, antidepressants, sedatives, and tranquilizers. Medications that lower blood pressure, in particular, may cause faintness if they lower it too much.

If you experience dizziness while on a medication, talk to your healthcare provider. They may decide that adjusting the dose or switching prescriptions may help alleviate this issue.

Drug or Alcohol Use

Prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and alcohol can all lead to dizziness. Plus, the interaction between alcohol and drugs can be a problem, particularly for older adults. Make sure you are reading the labels of all prescription and nonprescription drugs to determine if you should avoid alcohol while taking them.

Additionally, alcohol or drug intoxication, as well as withdrawal from each (including nicotine), can also cause dizziness. In fact, alcohol use can become a serious issue, so make sure you drink in moderation. The USDA indicates that men should not drink more than 2 drinks in a day and women should not have more than 1 drink in a day.

Inner Ear Problems

Your sense of balance is developed through inputs from your eyes, your sensory nerves, and your inner ear. Your inner ear has sensors that detect gravity and back-and-forth motion, both of which feel out of sorts when experiencing vertigo.

Inner ear problems can be caused by an infection, Meniere's disease, migraines, and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV)—which is the most common cause of vertigo. Mild ear infections, and the dizziness that accompanies them, often clear up on their own, but if you have experienced severe or lengthy ear pain it is best to contact a doctor to diagnose the root of the problem and explore treatment options.

5 Exercises for Better Balance

Circulation Problems

If your heart is not pumping enough blood to your brain it may cause you to feel dizzy or faint. This may occur due to a drop in blood pressure like when standing up too quickly, or due to poor blood circulation.

Circulation issues can be caused by conditions such as cardiomyopathy, heart attack, heart arrhythmia, and transient ischemic attack. While dizziness from changing position quickly is not a serious problem, other circulation problems are. If your dizziness is accompanied by any other symptoms related to the heart, seek treatment immediately.

Why You Get Dizzy or Lightheaded When You Stand Up

Various Conditions and Disorders

Traumatic brain injury and migraines can lead to feelings of dizziness. Likewise, some neurological disorders, including Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis, can also lead to progressive loss of balance. Even anxiety can cause lightheadedness, particularly panic attacks.

Along with these standalone factors, there are conditions or situations that contribute to an increased likelihood of experiencing dizziness. These include pregnancy, diabetes, menstruation, anemia, and even allergies—the last of which can be an indication of a serious anaphylactic reaction and requires immediate medical attention.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are commonly referred to as “flu-like" symptoms and include dizziness as well as headache, weakness, nausea, vomiting, chest pain, and confusion. Carbon monoxide poisoning is incredibly serious and can be fatal.

If you believe your dizziness is caused by carbon monoxide poisoning or if you smell gas in your home, call 911 and leave the area immediately. You will likely need immediate medical attention.

Home Remedies to Treat Dizziness

There are medications, therapies, and surgical treatments for dizziness, depending on the severity of the episodes and the underlying cause. If you are not suffering from a serious issue of which dizziness is a symptom, there are simple home remedies that can help prevent dizziness. Here are some ways you can treat dizziness.

Strive for a Healthy Lifestyle

A healthy diet can help combat dizziness, which includes drinking plenty of fluids. Limit your use of caffeine, alcohol, and tobacco, as these substances can worsen the causes and symptoms of dizziness. Getting enough sleep and avoiding stress also helps prevent lightheadedness.

If you have diabetes or struggle with low blood sugar, focus on regulating your blood sugar. Some research indicates that drinking apple cider vinegar also may help regular blood sugar. If it seems that your dizziness is related to your food intake, consult a healthcare provider to ensure that you identify and manage any pre-existing conditions.

New Guidelines Aim to Help People With Diabetes Exercise Safely

Stay Hydrated

To steer clear of dizziness caused by exercising, stay hydrated. Hydration—specifically drinking water before eating—is also very important in older adults who have postprandial hypotension, which means an excessive decrease in blood pressure that occurs after a meal.

It often results in dizziness, lightheadedness, and even falls. Research has shown that drinking water prior to eating, as well as eating small, low-carb meals frequently, helps manage these symptoms.

How Much Water Do You Need to Drink?

Practice At-Home Maneuvers

Because dizziness can lead to loss of balance, practicing balance exercises such as tai chi or yoga can help you improve balance and keep symptoms, particularly of vertigo, in control. If you experience vertigo caused by BPPV, you can follow the Epley or Semont-Toupet maneuvers—exercises that help shift the calcium crystals in your inner ear back to their correct positions.

Most experts recommend performing these maneuvers with a healthcare provider but an adapted exercise can be done safely at home. Some researchers recommend restricting movement following these maneuvers, including minimizing head movement, lying in bed with at least three pillows, not lying on the side, and avoiding cervical extension or rotation.

Another option is to practice regulating your breathing. Pick a spot to hold your gaze steady—instead of allowing your eyes to jump around which can lead to feelings of disorientation— and practice breathing. You want to make sure you don’t hold your breath.

Avoid Hot Baths and Showers

If you are prone to dizzy spells, avoiding prolonged time spent in hot water can help avoid them. Low blood pressure and an overworked heart can lead to feelings of light-headedness and dizziness. Limiting the time spent in hot showers and baths can eliminate this cause of dizziness.

High temperatures cause your blood vessels to dilate, which lowers blood pressure. What's more, the hot water causes the volume of blood your heart pumps to rise. This increased blood volume causes the heart's workload to increase.

Is Hot or Cold Water Better for Post-Run Recovery?

Take Ginkgo Biloba Extract

Ginkgo biloba is a Chinese herb known as a natural remedy for many maladies, including resolving the symptoms of vertigo. Most ginkgo products are made with an extract derived from the leaves of the maidenhair tree.

Ginkgo biloba treats vertigo by managing blood flow to the brain, which relieves dizziness and balance issues. One study concluded that using ginkgo biloba to treat vertigo was just as effective as betahistine, a medicine prescribed for balance disorders like vertigo. Betahistine is the world's most-prescribed medication for vertiginous syndromes.

Try Ginger

Ginger has long been used as a combattant for motion sickness and nausea. While research has not completely explained why ginger can counteract dizziness, it is suggested that it prevents the development of gastric dysrhythmias and the elevation of plasma vasopressin, which leads to nausea associated with motion sickness.

Ginger can be consumed in many different forms. From ginger tea and supplements to ginger chews and more, there are a lot of different options to experiment with.

How to Make Homemade Ginger Tea

Take It Easy

If you do experience a dizzy spell, sit or lie down immediately and hydrate as soon as possible. Avoid activities that put you in a situation where an accident or fall could be likely.

You want to avoid driving, standing in high places, climbing a ladder, walking in the dark, or wearing high-heeled shoes—until you are certain the feeling has passed.

When to Contact a Healthcare Provder

Sometimes experiencing dizziness is an indication of a more serious condition. Call 911 or go to an emergency room if you are dizzy and:

  • Experience chest pain
  • Notice an irregular heart rate or your heart is skipping beats
  • Have shortness of breath
  • Experience weakness
  • Are unable to move an arm or leg
  • Notice a change in vision or speech
  • Faint or lose alertness for more than a few minutes
  • Experience a head injury
  • Have a fever over 101 degrees Fahrenheit, a headache, or a very stiff neck
  • Experience seizures
  • Have trouble keeping fluids down

A Word From Verywell

While experiencing the occasional brief period of dizziness is likely not a major concern, frequently recurring dizzy spells, instances lasting longer than 15 minutes, or those accompanied by other significant symptoms should be shared with a healthcare provider.

And, if you are considering trying any of these home remedies be sure to talk to a healthcare provider first. They can help you determine what is right for you. You also want to ensure that the remedy you select will not interfere with any medications you are taking.

9 Natural Remedies for Anxiety

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Verywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

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  2. University of Michigan Health. Dizziness: Lightheadedness and vertigo. Updated February 26, 2020.

  3. The Hearing and Balance Clinic. Facts about dizziness.

  4. Harvard Medical School. Lightheaded? Top five reasons you might feel woozy.

  5. USDA. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2020-2025.

  6. Johnston CS, Kim CM, Buller AJ. Vinegar improves insulin sensitivity to a high-carbohydrate meal in subjects with insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2004;27(1):281-282. doi:10.2337/diacare.27.1.281

  7. Grobéty B, Grasser EK, Yepuri G, Dulloo AG, Montani JP. Postprandial hypotension in older adults: Can it be prevented by drinking water before the meal? Clinical Nutrition. 2015;34(5):885-891. doi:10.1016/j.clnu.2014.09.009

  8. Johns Hopkins Medicine. Home Epley maneuver.

  9. Harvard Medical School. Hot baths and saunas: Beneficial for your heart?

  10. Sokolova L, Hoerr R, Mishchenko T. Treatment of Vertigo: A Randomized, Double-Blind Trial Comparing Efficacy and Safety of Ginkgo biloba Extract EGb 761 and Betahistine. Int J Otolaryngol. 2014;2014:682439. doi:10.1155/2014/682439

  11. Lien HC, Sun WM, Chen YH, Kim H, Hasler W, Owyang C. Effects of ginger on motion sickness and gastric slow-wave dysrhythmias induced by circular vection. American Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology. 2003;284(3):G481-G489. doi:10.1152/ajpgi.00164.2002

  12. U.S. National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus. Dizziness. Updated May 13, 2019.

Источник: https://www.verywellfit.com/home-remedies-for-dizziness-5209216

Vomiting After Head Injury: What It Means and How to Treat It

Is vomiting after head injury a dangerous sign?

While dizziness and nausea are normal side effects of head injury, vomiting can be a sign of a worsening condition. However, a single episode of vomiting is not usually a cause for alarm.

Today you will learn what causes vomiting after head injury and what it means for recovery. Plus, we’ll show you some helpful home remedies that can treat persistent nausea and vomiting.

Causes of Vomiting After Head Injury

There are several possible causes of vomiting after head injury. These include:

  • Vestibular dysfunction. An injury to the cerebellum or inner ear can cause balance and dizziness problems, which can trigger vomiting in some people.
  • Migraines. Some head injuries cause severe headaches or migraines, which again can trigger vomiting.
  • Skull fracture. A skull fracture will also cause extreme pain which can lead to vomiting.
  • Hematoma. A hematoma is a dangerous collection of blood on the surface of the brain. One of the signs of a hematoma is repeated vomiting.

Although vomiting can be a sign of a hematoma, a hematoma is usually accompanied by more than one symptom. Some other signs of a hematoma include:

  • Steadily worsening headache
  • One dilated pupil
  • Weakness
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Slurred speech
  • Seizures

Therefore, if a person vomits after a head injury but does not display these other symptoms, they most likely do not have a hematoma. However, it is still a good idea to have them checked by a doctor.

What Does Vomiting After Head Injury Mean?

woman sitting by window, closing eyes and looking sick because she is experiencing nausea and vomiting after head injury

Some studies have found that vomiting after a concussion is frequently associated with a skull fracture.

In fact, in a comprehensive study that examined over 5000 head injury patients, post-traumatic vomiting increased the risk of skull fracture by four-fold.

However, other studies have also shown that a single, isolated incidence of vomiting after a head injury does not increase the risk of an intracranial injury.

In other words, vomiting on its own is not an indicator of serious injury, but rather if it is combined with other symptoms.

How Long Does Vomiting Last?

Vomiting can occur several days or weeks after a head injury, depending on how severe the concussion was. However, it should decrease in frequency as time passes.

If it does not decrease, call your doctor immediately.

Violent, persistent vomiting that occurs directly after a head injury is a more serious sign than one or two vomiting incidents separated by several hours.

If the person cannot stop vomiting and cannot keep any food or liquids down, get them to the hospital immediately.

Treating Vomiting After Head Injury

Once your doctor has ruled out any serious conditions causing your nausea, there are some home remedies for nausea that you can try. These can help you reduce vomiting.

1. Deep Breaths

man sitting on bench in park taking deep breaths to relieve vomiting after head injury

Research has shown that taking deep, controlled breaths activates the parasympathetic nervous system. This reduces the biological response that triggers vomiting and nausea.

Deep breathing can also calm anxiety, which in turn can reduce nausea.

To practice deep breathing, simply close your eyes, and slowly inhale through your nose. Let the air completely fill your lungs, then hold for three seconds.

Finally, exhale slowly through your mouth. Repeat several times until you feel the nausea subside.

2. Acupressure

Many people find that acupressure helps reduce nausea and vomiting. Acupressure is based on the traditional Chinese medicine practice of acupuncture, which uses specific pressure points on the body to alleviate symptoms.

One effective pressure point for vomiting is located on your inner wrist. To find the pressure point, follow these steps:

  • Hold your hand so that your fingers are pointing up and your palm is facing your face.
  • Place your first three fingers of your opposite hand across your wrist.
  • Place your thumb just below these three fingers. You should be able to feel two tendons beneath your thumb. That is the pressure point.
  • Press your thumb on this point and move it in a circle for two minutes. Pressure should be firm but not so hard that it hurts.

For a visual demonstration of using acupressure points, check out this video:

Another pressure point that can help relieve nausea is the ear lobes. Rub both ear lobes in a circular direction for two minutes or until the nausea subsides. This point also may reduce anxiety.

3. Fluids and Ginger Root

It’s crucial to stay hydrated, especially if you’re vomiting frequently. Make sure you sip fluids slowly so as not to upset your stomach.

Some drinks that can keep you hydrated and calm your stomach include:

  • Mint tea
  • Lemonade
  • Ginger ale or ginger tea
  • Water

In addition to fluids, chewing on ginger root is an effective way to reduce nausea.

4. Aromatherapy

essential oils for treating vomiting after head injury

Aromatherapy can also reduce nausea and vomiting after head injury. To practice aromatherapy, try breathing an open essential oil bottle. You can also add the oil to a diffuser.

One of the most effective essential oils to use for nausea is lavender since it offers many other benefits to brain injury patients. Other oils you can use include:

  • Lemon oil
  • Frankincense
  • Clove
  • Chamomile
  • Peppermint
  • Rose

5. Medications

Finally, there are medications that may reduce nausea and vomiting. Some common over-the-counter drugs that can help include Pepto-Bismol and Dramamine. If you need something stronger, there are also prescription anti-nausea medications your doctor may prescribe.

Vomiting After Head Injury: Key Points

Vomiting is a fairly common side effect of head injury. While isolated incidents of vomiting do not usually signal something serious, vomiting can be associated with skull fractures and hematomas.

Therefore, the best course of action if someone is vomiting after a head injury is to have them seen by a physician. Doctors may perform various scans to determine if a serious injury has occurred.

Even if no serious brain damage is found, you can still experience nausea and vomiting for several days after a head injury. The home remedies in this article may decrease your symptoms and speed up your recovery.

Источник: https://www.flintrehab.com/vomiting-after-head-injury/

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