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Home remedies for nipple yeast infection


home remedies for nipple yeast infection

Breastfeeding pain in the breast and home remedies to help However, it's possible to get this yeast infection on our skin – especially. Burning/painful nipples during and/or after breastfeeding Put Vaseline on baby's lips before using this treatment to avoid purple stains. Can you give your baby pumped breast milk if you have thrush? Mothers are encouraged to keep up their nursing routine during the treatment of.

Home remedies for nipple yeast infection -

Breastfeeding pain relief: Home remedies and ways to deal with discomfort

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  • Breastfeeding pain is extremely common among new mothers. While it’s usually nothing to worry about, don’t ignore the symptoms – especially if they persist for more than a couple of days.

    What you shouldn’t do is suffer in silence. Whether you’re unsure about whether you’re breastfeeding properly, what foods to eat or avoid during breastfeeding, or you’re surprised by the unexpected aspects of breastfeeding, the early motherhood experience can only be bettered by good, tried-and-tested advice.

    ‘There is an abundance of support available to mums during their breastfeeding journey,’ says Harriet Hickey, a midwife at The Pregnancy Clinic, which has clinics in Kent and Surrey. ‘It’s really important to remember that breastfeeding is a new skill for both you and your baby. Over time you will learn what works out best for you.’ These breastfeeding accessories can make the process more comfortable.

    Here, our experts highlight the most common reasons for breastfeeding pain, and what the best breastfeeding pain relief home remedies are.

    What causes breastfeeding pain?

    There are numerous reasons for breastfeeding pain – most of which are benign and easily treated.

    ‘It’s very common for women to experience breastfeeding pain, especially first-time mothers,’ says Eleni Mavrides, a consultant in obstetrics and gynaecology. ‘It’s normal for your body to take a few days when first starting to breastfeed to adjust and in that time, you may feel discomfort or pain,’ she explains.

    ‘This is usually because your breasts over-produce milk at the beginning,’ she continues. ‘You can help prevent this through massaging your breasts regularly, letting your baby finish their feeds, and making sure your baby is attaching to the breast properly during feeding. Using over-the-counter medication, such as paracetamol, will manage the pain if you’re in need of pain relief.’

    Woman with her sleeping baby

    Treat breastfeeding pain quickly so it doesn’t affect you bonding with your baby. (Credit: Getty)

    Breastfeeding pain in the breast and home remedies to help

    Breast engorgement

    While breast engorgement is typical for new mums as they adjust to the arrival of milk, it can be very uncomfortable.Breast engorgement happens when your breasts become overly full. This can be quite painful, with symptoms such as tight or hard breasts, pain in your armpit and sometimes difficulty in attaching baby to the breast,’ explains Harriet.

    ‘If breast engorgement happens in the first few days of your baby’s life this may be due to your baby simply establishing their feeds. If this is the case support with positioning and attachment can make all the difference,’ she says. ‘The symptoms of breast engorgement should settle once you gain further confidence in positioning and attachment.’

    If your baby is yet to latch properly, try expressing some breast milk by hand. Avoid the use of nipple shields, though. ‘They can restrict the amount of milk the baby is able to get, which can lead to the breasts becoming more engorged and sore,’ warns Daniel Brash, a pharmacist and co-director of Healthcare 4 All.

    Then there’s the old wives’ tale of placing chilled cabbage leaves in your bra after feeding or expressing. While it seems a little eccentric the cooling effect on your breast really can help to reduce the pain and swelling. You can also wrap a towel around a small bag of frozen vegetables and place it on the swollen area to relieve swelling and numb the pain.

    Wearing a well-fitting bra designed for breastfeeding, so it doesn’t restrict your breasts, could also benefit you.

    Your midwife, health visitor or a breastfeeding specialist should also be able to help you deal with engorged breasts, or any other breastfeeding pain or concerns.

    A woman with breastfeeding pain because of mastits

    Mastitis can be very painful and will usually need medical treatment. (Credit: Getty)

    Mastitis

    Mastitis can happen as a consequence of a blocked milk duct,’ says Harriet. ‘The breast becomes inflamed and often very painful,’ she says. This inflammation may quickly become an infection if not treated, which means that bacteria can grow in the milk.

    Here, Harriet explains the main symptoms of mastitis:

    • A noticeable red area on the breast
    • Tender and hot-to-the-touch breast
    • Flu like symptoms/generally feeling unwell
    • High temperature

    Often mastitis is a reaction to poor positioning, which – once rectified – can ease the problem. ‘However, if symptoms of mastitis are not relieved after you’ve checked your baby’s positioning and attachment, much like when relieving symptoms of breast engorgement, then it’s important to get checked out by your GP,’ advises Harriet.

    Eleni agrees: ‘If your breasts feel inflamed, red, hot, tender or lumpy, and you feel unwell with flu-like symptoms, such as fever, chills and tiredness, make sure you ask for help straight away.’ If left untreated mastitis can become a breast abscess.

    If you’re not feeling better within 12-24 hours, or if you feel worse, see a doctor. You may need antibiotics, which will be fine to take while you are breastfeeding. To control the pain, over-the-counter medicines such as ‘paracetamol or ibuprofen may also help,’ she says.

    It’s important to keep feeding your baby from the affected breast. Although this may be painful and miserable for you, it can make the mastitis worse if you stop feeding from your affected breast.

    Breast abscess

    When mastitis is untreated it can cause a breast abscess,’ warns Harriet. An abscess is a very painful, swollen, pus-filled lump inside the breast. You can also develop a breast abscess after a prolonged period of breast engorgement.

    A breast abscess needs immediate treatment by a medical professional. The abscess may be drained, or you may be prescribed antibiotics. Although it seems counter-intuitive, it’s important to keep breastfeeding. This keeps the breast well-drained. If it’s too painful to breastfeed you can pump or express by hand instead. “If the affected breast is too painful or the incision is close to your nipple you may need to express your milk for a day or two. Keeping your milk flowing will help your breast heal,” recommends the La Leche League Great Britain website, which provides mother-to-mother support for breastfeeding mums.

    A baby latching on to its mother's breast

    Not latching on correctly is one of the main causes of breastfeeding pain. (Credit: Getty)

    Breastfeeding pain in the nipples and home remedies to help

    Problems with latching

    If your baby is poorly attached to your breast during a feed, your nipple may become pinched between your baby’s tongue and the roof of their mouth (the hard palate). This will make your nipples sore. Before long your nipples can crack and bleed, which makes breastfeeding uncomfortable and even painful. When your baby is effectively attached, your nipple rests comfortably against the soft palate at the back of their mouth. This makes a huge difference in comfort.

    ‘It’s really quite common to have issues with latching. As a result there’s a lot of help available,’ says Harriet. ‘Some important points to remember – especially when you are struggling with the latch – are:

    • Being comfortable and making sure you are in a position you can sustain for some time i.e. utilising a comfy chair and cushions to support your arms and shoulders. Nursing cushions are really useful.
    • Holding your baby close and ensuring you’re not leaning over to feed your baby.
    • Ensuring your baby’s head and body are in a straight line, their chin to your breast with their head free to tilt backwards.
    • Aiming to place your baby’s nose level to your nipple to encourage a wide-open mouth when attaching.’

    As well as Harriet’s advice, Eleni suggests that ‘mothers change the position of their baby frequently when breastfeeding. One position to try involves putting your baby tummy-down on your body with their head near your breast. This is also a great position to try and get your baby to self-latch as they bob their head and move towards the breast with minimal help from mum, usually resulting in a pain-free latch,’ she says.

    Don’t keep trying on your own if it still hurts – find a lactation consultant or speak to your doctor, health visitor or midwife.

    Tongue tie

    If your baby is suffering from tongue tie, it can make latching onto your breast correctly impossible, which is distressing for both mum and baby. Tongue tie means your baby can’t lift its tongue or stick it out so is unable to cup the breast to extract milk. This can mean a lot of pain for mum as the tongue can rub against the end of nipple, causing it to crack.

    ‘Tongue tie occurs when the skin between your baby’s tongue and mouth are shorter than expected,’ says Harriet. ‘This can sometimes affect breastfeeding and should always be considered when there’s difficulty with attachment and latch,’ she advises.

    Because tongue tie can be difficult to diagnose, it helps to get expert support. ‘Ask your midwife or health visitor to check for tongue tie. Tongue tie is often picked up soon after birth but can be difficult to detect,’ advises Daniel.

    ‘Your midwife, health visitor or GP will be able to guide you, with referral to an expert,’ says Harriet. A health professional will snip the thin flap of skin on the baby’s tongue so it’s able to move more freely. This quick and almost painless procedure will make breastfeeding more effective and less painful.

    Woman with breast pain touching her breast

    Blocked milk ducts, thrush and pain in the armpit are all possible while breastfeeding. (Credit: Getty)

    Blocked ducts

    Ducts are another potential breast issue. ‘The breasts are made of milk-producing glands. Tubes known as milk ducts transport the milk from these glands to your nipple. This is so you’re able to feed your baby,’ explains Harriet. ‘It’s not uncommon for these ducts to become blocked. They don’t always drain properly during a feed, particularly in those early days of establishing feeds,’ she says. These ducts can also become blocked if you’re making breast milk faster than you can express it.

    If you have blocked ducts you’re likely to feel ‘a small lump just under the breast, which can sometimes feel quite tender,’ says Harriet. Check under your breasts regularly – if you suspect a blocked duct Harriet recommends the following:

    • ‘Feed your baby from the area where you can feel a blocked duct. Massage the lump gently towards the nipple at the same time.
    • A warm bath, shower or flannel on the breast may relieve any discomfort.’

    The La Leche League GB website also recommends “avoiding saturated fats and taking one or two 1200mg capsules of lecithin three or four times a day to reduce the risk of blocked ducts.”

    Thrush

    Most of us know thrush as a vaginal condition. However, it’s possible to get this yeast infection on our skin – especially warm, moist areas such as the armpits, groin, between the fingers and the breasts.

    ‘Some women develop thrush in their breasts when feeding. Symptoms include painful breastfeeding in both breasts, and pain which does not pass immediately following feeding,’ explains Harriet. The NHS website also says to look out for “a red, itchy or painful rash that scales over with white or yellow discharge. The rash may not be so obvious on darker skin.”

    Even mild thrush needs checking. ‘It’s important to treat thrush, as it can be passed from mum to baby and vice versa.’ You can learn more about breastfeeding and thrush here but it’s also recommended that you speak to your GP if you think you have it. Thrush is treated with over-the-counter creams or prescribed anti-fungal medication for mums, and drops for babies.

    Breastfeeding pain in the armpit and home remedies to help

    Some mums will feel pain under the arms. ‘The breast tissue is present not only in breasts but also extends into the armpit,’ says Harriet.

    ‘It’s not unusual to have swelling and engorgement of a small area in the armpit while breastfeeding,’ she adds. ‘Engorgement is common as breastfeeding is being established. It usually goes away once feeding is established.’

    Blonde woman breastfeeding her baby

    Breastfeeding pain is normal but don’t ignore it. (Credit: Getty)

    Is breastfeeding pain normal?

    It’s easy, as a sleep-deprived new mum, to think the worst but breastfeeding pain is common. ‘There are a number of reasons why breastfeeding causes discomfort,’ says Harriet. ‘While quickly resolved, it’s important to understand why you’re in discomfort and to not ignore any pain.’

    Top tips for soothing painful breasts when nursing

    ‘Breastfeeding pain is not uncommon,’ says Harriet reassuringly. ‘And discomfort can be prevented and treated.’ This will allow for successful feeding until you’re ready to stop breastfeeding.

    The main thing is to speak up. ‘Seek advice from your midwife or a breastfeeding specialist – also called a lactation consultant. They can discuss simple measures to prevent breastfeeding pain. For example, ensuring there’s proper latching when baby is feeding as the inability to do so leads to breast milk not draining properly, which causes sore nipples, lumps and engorged breasts,’ adds Harriet. If you grapple with dry nipples or breasts ‘use breastfeeding-friendly ointments to keep them moist,’ advises Harriet. We like Mama Mio’s Keep Calm Nipple Balm.

    ‘At times, a cold compress helps with soreness and pain from swollen breasts,’ advises Harriet. ‘It’s okay to use simple painkillers such as paracetamol to relieve pain.’

    However, ‘if those measures don’t relieve symptoms seek advice from your doctor or midwife to rule out infection,’ she says.

    Источник: https://www.goodto.com/family/babies/breastfeeding-pain-388738

    Breastfeeding and thrush

    Breast and nipple pain in breastfeeding women is sometimes caused by a thrush (candida) infection in the breast. Breastfed babies can also develop thrush in their mouths.

    Thrush infections sometimes happen when your nipples become cracked or damaged. This means the candida fungus that causes thrush can get into your nipple or breast. 

    Thrush infections can also happen after you or your baby has had a course of antibiotics. Antibiotics may reduce the number of helpful bacteria in the body and allow the candida fungus that causes thrush to flourish.

    Signs of thrush in breastfeeding women

    You may have a thrush infection in your breasts if:

    • you start to feel pain in both nipples or breasts after feeds, having previously had no pain after feeding
    • the pain is quite severe and lasts for up to an hour after every feed

    It's not likely to be thrush if:

    • you have always experienced pain while breastfeeding
    • the pain only affects 1 nipple or breast
    • you have a fever
    • there is a warm, red patch on 1 of your breasts

    Symptoms of oral thrush in breastfed babies 

    Signs to look for include:

    • creamy white spots or patches on the tongue, gums, roof of the mouth or insides of the cheeks – if you gently wipe these patches with a clean cloth, they won't come off
    • your baby being unsettled when feeding
    • a white film on the lips
    • in some babies, nappy rash that won't clear up

    If you suspect you or your baby has a thrush infection, see your health visitor or GP. They can arrange for swabs to be taken from your nipples and your baby's mouth to see if thrush is present. It's important other causes of breast pain are ruled out before you start treatment for thrush. 

    If no thrush is present, the pain may be caused by something else, such as poor positioning and attachment. It's important for your midwife, health visitor or a breastfeeding specialist to watch you do a full breastfeed and give advice if needed.

    Read more about other possible causes of breast pain.

    If either you or your baby does have thrush, you'll need to be treated at the same time as the infection can easily spread between you. It can also spread to other members of the family. 

    Washing your hands carefully after nappy changes and using separate towels will help prevent the infection spreading. You'll also need to wash and sterilise any dummies, teats or toys your baby puts in their mouth.

    You'll need to wash any breastfeeding bras at a high temperature and change your breast pads frequently while you're both being treated.

    If you express any breast milk while you have thrush, you'll need to give the milk to your baby while you're still having treatment. Freezing it and using it may mean the thrush comes back at a later date.

    Treating thrush when you're breastfeeding

    You can carry on breastfeeding while you and your baby are treated for thrush. 

    Oral thrush in babies is usually treated with an anti-fungal gel or liquid. This is safe for your baby to have. It's important to wash your hands carefully after treating your baby. 

    See more about treating oral thrush in babies.

    Thrush in breastfeeding women is usually treated with a cream that you sparingly spread on and around your nipples after feeds. You'll need to wash your hands thoroughly after treating yourself. Some women may need to take anti-fungal tablets to clear the infection. 

    Once you and your baby start treatment, your symptoms should improve within 2 to 3 days. It will take a little longer for the infection to clear completely. 

    If you don't see any improvement within 7 days, speak to your health visitor or GP.

    Источник: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/baby/breastfeeding-and-bottle-feeding/breastfeeding-problems/thrush/

    About oral thrush

    Oral thrush is a fungal infection of the throat, tongue or the lining of the mouth. In bad cases, it can spread down the food pipe.

    Oral thrush is mostly caused by a fungal yeast called Candida albicans. We all have this yeast in our bodies, and our immune systems keep it in balance with the other bacteria and funguses that live in our bodies. If the balance is upset, the yeast can multiply and produce an infection.

    Things that can upset the balance include:

    Some babies pick up oral thrush when they pass through their mothers’ vaginas during birth. This is because the vagina often has small amounts of candida naturally.

    Babies might also develop oral thrush if they suck on objects already infected with thrush, like nipples, teats or dummies.

    Oral thrush is very common in the first two years of life. It doesn’t easily spread between children.

    Symptoms of oral thrush

    If your child has oral thrush, you might notice that they have white spots and patches that look like cottage cheese on their tongue, inner cheeks, lips, gums or roof of their mouth. These patches don’t rub off with gentle pressure. If the patches are removed, they leave inflamed areas that can bleed.

    A child with oral thrush might also have cracking and inflammation at the corners of their mouth. They might not be able to taste things as well as usual.

    Oral thrush generally doesn’t irritate babies and young children. But it might cause irritation if the areas get very inflamed. In this case, your child might not want to feed or eat. They might also drool. And if the infection spreads to your child’s food pipe, it can be painful and make it hard for them to swallow.

    If a baby is breastfeeding, they can pass on thrush, which can cause a nipple infection. This kind of infection causes inflamed, sensitive and cracked nipples. Your breast might hurt during feeding, and you might have a stabbing pain deep in your breast.

    Does your child need to see a doctor about oral thrush?

    Yes. You should take your child to the GP if your child:

    • has white patches on the inside of their mouth
    • suffers from thrush infections that keep coming back, even though you’re using treatment recommended by a health professional
    • has difficulty or pain swallowing.

    Oral thrush treatment

    If your child has oral thrush and is otherwise well, your GP might not need to treat the oral thrush. It will go away on its own.

    But if your baby is having difficulty feeding or is irritable, your GP will probably prescribe antifungal drops or oral gel, which you use after each feed or meal for 10 days.

    Sometimes oral thrush goes along with thrush in the nappy area, which will need treatment at the same time.

    You can still breastfeed if your child has oral thrush. Your doctor might advise you to put some antifungal cream on your nipples as well, but you should wipe this off before feeding.

    Prevention of oral thrush

    There are several things you can do to prevent oral thrush:

    • If you’re bottle-feeding your baby, sterilise teats and bottles after each use.
    • If you’re breastfeeding, clean your nipples gently between feeds.
    • Sterilise dummies and teething rings regularly.
    • If your baby gets nappy rash, make sure you treat it properly.
    • Use antibiotics only when necessary and prescribed by a doctor for your child.
    • If your child has asthma, make sure they wash their mouth with water after asthma preventer medications.
    • If your child has diabetes, try to keep their blood sugar level within its target range.
    • Wash clothing at 60°C to kill fungus.
    Источник: https://raisingchildren.net.au/guides/a-z-health-reference/oral-thrush

    Rashes under the breasts are quite common. Blame it on the summers or seasonal allergies, these rashes are often unavoidable. Breast rashes can also be an embarrassing affair at public gatherings due to the constant itching. How do you deal with this ordeal? Are there any natural remedies available to get rid of them? Read on to know more.

    Causes And Symptoms Of Rashes Under The Breast

    If you notice irritation or redness of the skin under your breasts, you have most probably developed a breast rash. Several factors can cause rashes under your breasts. While one of the most common causes is a heat rash, other triggers can be classified into four categories. They are:

    The skin folds under your breasts as well as other body parts may for the ideal breeding ground for bacterial, fungal, and yeast infections. Candidiasis, which is caused by a type of yeast called Candida, and ringworm, which is a fungal infection caused by a group of fungi called dermatophytes, can both result in rashes under the breasts.

    Itchy blisters, cracks, and red, round patches of skin that look like a ring are some of the common signs associated with such infections.

    Subscribe

    If you have developed red or skin-colored bumps under your breasts that itch a lot, it could be hives. Hives are formed as a result of an allergic response of your body to certain foods, medications, pollen, plants, and insect bites. Hives will usually blanch and turn white when pressed.

    Autoimmune conditions like eczema, inverse psoriasis, hyperhidrosis, and Hailey-Hailey disease can also cause rashes to form on different parts of your body, including the folds under your breasts.

    Eczema is characterized by small, fluid-filled blisters that eventually ooze and crust over. The symptoms of inverse psoriasis include smoothened, red patches of skin in the affected area.

    Hyperhidrosis causes frequent sweating that leads to the formation of rashes. Hailey-Hailey disease triggers blistering rashes in the affected body parts.

    Another cause of rashes under your breasts could be inflammatory breast cancer, which is a rare but rapidly spreading type of cancer. Its symptoms may include:

    • Pink or red discoloration of the skin
    • Pitted skin that may resemble an orange peel
    • A pimple-like rash
    • An inverted nipple that points inward rather than outward

    The causes of rashes under the breast may vary in their gravity. While such rashes are hardly a cause of concern most of the times, they may also be a result of life-threatening diseases like cancer.

    If your symptoms are similar to that of any serious medical conditions, it is best to avail medical intervention immediately to rule out any complications. However, if the rashes are due to microbial infections or allergies, here are some amazing home remedies that will help.

    11 Natural Remedies To Get Rid Of Rashes Under The Breast

    1. Baking Soda

    Shutterstock

    The alkalinity of baking soda increases the pH of your skin and helps relieve itchiness associated with rashes under your breasts. It can also help in the removal of scales from the skin if any (1).

    You Will Need
    • 1 teaspoon of baking soda
    • A few drops of water
    What You Have To Do
    1. Add a few drops of water to a teaspoon of baking soda.
    2. Mix well and apply the mixture to the affected areas.
    3. Leave it on for 20-30 minutes.
    4. Rinse it off with water.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You may do this once daily.

    2. Coconut Oil

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    The anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of coconut oil can help in getting rid of rashes under the breasts (2). The antimicrobial potential of coconut oil against Candida can be used to treat yeast infections that could be causing the rashes (3).

    You Will Need
    • 1-2 teaspoons of virgin coconut oil
    What You Have To Do
    1. Rub virgin coconut oil in your palms and apply it over the affected area.
    2. Leave it on until it dries.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You may do this 1-2 times daily.

    3. Tea Tree Essential Oil

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    Tea tree oil exhibits antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties (4). These properties can help in getting rid of rashes under the breast by eliminating the infection-causing microbes and reducing swelling and itching.

    You Will Need
    • 2-3 drops of tea tree oil
    • 2-3 teaspoons of any carrier oil (coconut or olive oil)
    What You Have To Do
    1. Add two to three drops of tea tree oil to two to three teaspoons of any carrier oil.
    2. Mix well and apply to the affected area.
    3. Leave it on overnight.
    4. Rinse it off the next morning.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You can do this once daily.

    4. Apple Cider Vinegar

    Shutterstock

    Apple cider vinegar exhibits antimicrobial properties that work effectively against multiple microbes, including Candida. Hence, this remedy may be useful if the rashes under your breasts are the result of a yeast infection (5).

    You Will Need
    • 1-2 tablespoons of organic apple cider vinegar
    • ½ cup of water
    • Cotton balls
    What You Have To Do
    1. Add one to two tablespoons of raw apple cider vinegar to half a cup of water.
    2. Mix well and soak a cotton ball in it.
    3. Apply the mixture to the affected area and allow it to dry.
    4. Rinse it off with water.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You can do this multiple times daily.

    5. Cold Compress

    Shutterstock

    A cold compress numbs the affected area, thereby helping in reducing the itchiness that often occurs in the case of rashes under the breast (6).

    You Will Need
    What You Have To Do
    1. Apply a cold compress to the affected area.
    2. Leave it on for 5-10 minutes and remove it.
    3. Repeat twice.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You may do this multiple times daily.

    6. Garlic

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    Garlic offers multiple benefits for your skin. It has both anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties, which can help in treating skin infections that cause rashes under the breasts (7), (8).

    You Will Need
    • 1-2 garlic cloves
    • 1 tablespoon of olive oil
    What You Have To Do
    1. Mince the garlic cloves.
    2. Add a tablespoon of olive oil to the minced garlic and heat it slightly.
    3. Strain the garlic cloves out.
    4. Apply the oil to the affected area.
    5. Leave it on overnight.
    6. Rinse it off the next morning.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You may do this once daily.

    7. Aloe Vera

    Shutterstock

    The anti-inflammatory activity of aloe vera extracts can be used in soothing the itchiness and inflammation associated with rashes under the breast (9).

    You Will Need
    • Freshly extracted aloe vera gel
    What You Have To Do
    1. Extract the gel from an aloe leaf.
    2. Whisk the gel using a fork and apply it to the affected area.
    3. Leave it on for 20-30 minutes and then rinse it off with water.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You may do this 1-2 times daily.

    8. Neem

    Shutterstock

    Neem exhibits many therapeutic benefits, including its ability to reduce inflammation and fight infections (10). These properties can also help reduce breast rashes and prevent their recurrence.

    You Will Need
    • A handful of neem leaves
    • Water (as required)
    What You Have To Do
    1. Wash the neem leaves thoroughly.
    2. Grind the leaves with a little water to form a thick paste.
    3. Apply the neem paste to the affected skin and leave it on for 20-30 minutes.
    4. Rinse it off with water.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You may do this once daily.

    9. Oatmeal

    Shutterstock

    Oatmeal has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may be used in the treatment of rashes under the breasts (11).

    You Will Need
    • 1 cup of ground oats
    • Water
    What You Have To Do
    1. Fill your bath with water.
    2. Add a cup of ground oats to it and mix well.
    3. Soak in the oatmeal bath for 20-30 minutes.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You may do this once daily.

    10. Witch Hazel

    Shutterstock

    The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of witch hazel can help in the treatment of rashes under the breasts and alleviate itching and inflammation (12).

    You Will Need
    • Witch hazel (as required)
    • Cotton balls
    What You Have To Do
    1. Take some witch hazel on a cotton ball and apply it to the affected area.
    2. Allow it to dry on its own.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You may do this 1-2 times daily.

    11. Turmeric

    Shutterstock

    The major component of turmeric is curcumin. This compound has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which can help in treating the rashes under the breasts (13).

    You Will Need
    • 1-2 teaspoons of turmeric powder
    • Water (as required)
    What You Have To Do
    1. Mix one to two teaspoons of turmeric powder with a few drops of water.
    2. Mix well to form a thick paste.
    3. Apply the paste to the affected area and leave it on for 15-20 minutes.
    4. Rinse it off with water.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You may do this once daily or every alternate day.

    While you allow these remedies to work on those stubborn rashes under your breasts, here are some beneficial tips that can prevent the rashes from recurring.

    How To Prevent Rashes Under The Breast

    • Clean the affected area with antibacterial soap and water daily.
    • Use only fragrance-free moisturizers.
    • Avoid scratching the affected area.
    • Wear soft clothing that does not irritate your skin.
    • Change out of sweaty clothing right away.
    • Limit wearing your bra as much as possible until the rash begins clearing.
    • Wear bra liners to absorb excess sweat.
    • Apply Calamine lotion on the affected area.

    Try a combination of these tips and remedies to get rid of rashes under the breasts for good. In case your symptoms do not show any improvement despite treatment, make an appointment with a dermatologist as soon as possible to find out the root cause of the rashes.

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    Frequently Asked Questions

    Does a yeast infection under the breast smell?

    Yes, if left untreated, yeast infections under the breasts can give off a foul odor.

    Can I use deodorant under my breasts?

    Yes, you can use a deodorant or antiperspirant under your breasts. However, this is not recommended if you are breastfeeding.

    How long should a breast rash last?

    A breast rash should ideally disappear in a few days or weeks. However, if it doesn’t, it is best to see a doctor immediately.

    How do I stop sweating between my breasts?

    You can stop excessive sweating between your breasts by using any deodorizing talc and wearing soft and breathable clothing. Sweat or moisture-wicking bras are also available to tackle this problem.

    Will going braless affect your breast health?

    There is no scientific proof that suggests that going braless will affect your breast health in any way. It may, however, cause your breasts to sag in the long run.

    Can a breast rash be a sign of breast cancer?

    Yes, a breast rash can also be a sign of inflammatory breast cancer. Its symptoms may include:

    • Pink or red discoloration of the skin
    • Pitted skin that may resemble an orange peel
    • A pimple-like rash
    • An inverted nipple that points inward rather than outward

    What doctor to visit for rashes under the breasts?

    You can visit a dermatologist for rashes under the breasts. Depending on your symptoms, your dermatologist may either prescribe the required treatment or refer you to another specialist.

    When to visit a doctor for rashes under the breasts?

    You can visit a doctor for rashes under the breasts if your symptoms turn severe or do not go away despite availing treatment and taking the necessary precautions.

    Sources

    Articles on StyleCraze are backed by verified information from peer-reviewed and academic research papers, reputed organizations, research institutions, and medical associations to ensure accuracy and relevance. Check out our editorial policy for further details.

    • Scaly skin and bath pH: Rediscovering baking soda, Journal Of The American Academy Of Dermatology.
      https://www.jaad.org/article/S0190-9622(09)00493-9/fulltext
    • Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic activities of virgin coconut oil. Pharmaceutical Biology, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/20645831/
    • In vitro evaluation of the antifungal activity of monolaurin against Candida albicans biofilms. PeerJ, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/27366648/
    • Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree) Oil: a Review of Antimicrobial and Other Medicinal Properties, Clinical Microbiology Reviews, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1360273/
    • Antimicrobial activity of apple cider vinegar against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans; downregulating cytokine and microbial protein expression, Scientific Reports, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5788933/
    • Effects of menthol and cold on histamine-induced itch and skin reactions in man. Neuroscience Letters, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/7624016/
    • [Ajoene the main active compound of garlic (Allium sativum): a new antifungal agent]. Ibero-American Journal of Mycology, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/16854181/
    • Anti-Wrinkle and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Active Garlic Components and the Inhibition of MMPs via NF-κB Signaling, PLoS ONE, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3774756/
    • Anti-inflammatory activity of extracts from Aloe vera gel. Journal Of Ethnopharmacology, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/9121170/
    • Therapeutics Role of Azadirachta indica (Neem) and Their Active Constituents in Diseases Prevention and Treatment, Evidence-based Complementary And Alternative Medicine, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4791507/
    • Anti-inflammatory activities of colloidal oatmeal (Avena sativa) contribute to the effectiveness of oats in the treatment of itch associated with dry, irritated skin. Journal of Drugs in Dermatology, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/25607907/
    • Antioxidant and potential anti-inflammatory activity of extracts and formulations of white tea rose, and witch hazel on primary human dermal fibroblast cells, Journal Of Inflammation, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3214789/
    • Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of curcumin. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/17569207/

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    Nipple Thrush

    Thrush is a common, harmless yeast infection found in many different parts of the body, affecting both men and women. This blog post will discuss breastfeeding thrush, its causes, symptoms, and treatments.

    What Is Thrush?

    Thrush is an overgrowth of the yeast organism candida albicans. This organism is always present in our bodies but has a tendency to overgrow when we are ill, tired, pregnant or using antibiotics.

    It thrives in warm, moist environments such as the vagina, nappy area, mouth, and nipple (in lactating women). Overgrowth may also happen when our microbiome is out of balance.

    What Causes Nipple Thrush?

    Nipple thrush is likely to occur when the infection is affecting other parts of the body, usually the vagina. There may be a higher chance of breastfeeding thrush if you have the tendency to vaginal yeast infections.

    The infection can also be caused if any other family remember has the infection such as a nappy rash or athlete’s foot. Antibiotics are another cause of thrush as they kill good bacteria, giving room to bad bacteria to flourish. If a mother has experienced recent nipple trauma, that can also lead to thrush.

    Nipple Thrush Symptoms

    Thrush in breastfeeding mothers can be painful, and problems can start after a period of breastfeeding without issues sometimes affecting both breasts. It’s therefore important to look out for the following symptoms when identifying whether you have thrush on your nipples:

    • Itching, burning or shooting pain on the nipple or deep within the breast, often towards the end of a feed, and for quite some time after. It’s important that other causes of breast pain should always be ruled out before a thrush diagnosis is made.
    • Nipple trauma that won’t heal.
    • A white ‘plaque’ or residue may be present in the crease around the nipple.
    • Pain does not reduce with improved latch.
    • There is NO related pyrexia.
    • There are NO red areas on the breast.

    If you think you might be suffering from cracked and sore nipples try our HPA Lanolin Nipple Cream.

    What Does Thrush on a Nipple Look Like?

    When you have nipple thrush, your nipple appearance may change to being shiny in appearance, sometimes chapped, blistered with white patches but may also look completely normal. You may also experience itchy, flaky and red nipples or areola.

    Breastfed Baby Thrush Symptoms

    Babies can also display symptoms of thrush (though they may not) these can consist of:

    • White patches in baby’s mouth
    • White coating on the tongue that does not go away when cleaned
    • A pearl-like sheen to lips
    • Nappy rash
    • Fussiness and windiness when breastfeeding

    All of these signs and symptoms can help confirm diagnosis but are not necessarily present in their entirety which can make differential diagnosis difficult. However, a swab can confirm diagnosis (using a charcoal swab).  

    Nipple Thrush Treatment

    You can carry on breastfeeding while you and your baby are being treated for this fungal infection. However, it’s essential to get full treatment to kill the bacteria. The first route consists of a thrush cream that can be applied to the skin of the nipple, the baby’s mouth, and bottom.

    Miconazole cream 2% can be prescribed to apply to nipples in minimal quantities, after every feed. If nipples appear very sore topically, miconazole 2% in combination with hydrocortisone 1% may be most effective (such as Dactacort cream).

    The second route, is systematic/oral treatment for deep breast pain that does not improve with topical treatment. As a drug unlicensed for breastfeeding women, physicians take responsibility for prescribing this. The amounts of fluconazole getting through to baby from the breastmilk would be less than that prescribed for a baby.

    However, fluconazole has a half-life of 88 hours in babies under 6 weeks therefore the risk of accumulating doses needs to be considered when planning this treatment. Treatment generally comes as a loading dose of 150-400mg and maintenance doses of 100-200mg for at least 10 days.

    Fluconazole does not kill off yeast as such but stops overgrowth, which is why shortened treatment courses may well be ineffective and could arguably cause sensitisation.

    It is also recommended to keep your nipples as dry as possible by regularly changing your breast pads to avoid any moist environment.

    Baby Thrush Treatment

    Miconazole oral gel for thrush seems to be the most effective treatment for babies. Gel does not penetrate the skin and is not suitable for nipples. Nystatin suspension is also sometimes prescribed for baby’s oral use.

    Additionally, make sure to:

    • Clean teats and dummies after use by boiling them for five minutes.
    • Wash your hands thoroughly after applying the cream on babies and nappy changes.
    • Wash anything that comes in contact with the fungal area, such as clothes, bedding etc.

    Preventing Recurring Nipple Thrush

    A recurring thrush while breastfeeding can be prevented by:

    • Ongoing support with attachment and positioning.
    • Considering a good quality probiotic to support a healthy microbiome.
    • Having good hygiene as candida albicans can thrive in shared towels, laundry, clothes, breast pump parts, hands, toys etc.
    • Changing breast pads/bras frequently and washing them as hot as possible to kill off yeast. Disposable breast pads may be preferable to washable ones during an outbreak of thrush.
    • Making dietary adjustments such as reducing sugar, processed foods, carbohydrates, dairy and increasing iron intake may be helpful.
    • If thrush seems recurring, consider testing for diabetes.

    Sometimes, nipple thrush pain is quite similar to other health issues – some of the most popular issues that get mistaken as a yeast infection are:

    • Vasospasm/Raynaud’s Phenomenon
    • Micro-fissures due to suboptimal attachment.
    • Tongue tie in baby.
    • Nipple eczema.
    • Bacterial infection (staphylococcus aureus possibly).
    • Other skin conditions like psoriasis or dermatitis.

    Bibliography.

    1. Amir L, Hoover K. (2002) “Candidiasis and Breastfeeding.” LLLI Schaumberg
    2. Chetwynd EM, Ives TJ, Payne PM et al. (2002) “Fluconazole for postpartum candidal mastitis and infant thrush.” J Hum Lact;18:168-71.
    3. Hale T. (2012) “Medications and Mothers Milk” (15th Ed), Hale Publications
    4. Hoppe JE, et al (1997) “Treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis in immunocompetent infants: a randomised multicentre study of miconazole gel vs nystatin suspension.” Paed Infec Dis. 1997; 16:288-93
    5. Mohrbacher, N., Stock J. (2008) “La Leche League International: The Breastfeeding Answer Book” 3rd revised edition, LLLI.
    6. Weiner S. (2006)” Diagnosis and Management of Candida of the Nipple and Breast.” J.Midwif. Women Health; 51:125-128
    7. (2002) “Breastfeeding and Maternal Medication” WHO.
    8. http://www.who.ch/child-adolescent-health
    Источник: https://lansinoh.co.uk/blogs/breastfeeding/thrush

    Thrush While Breastfeeding

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    by Amy O’Connor

    Medically Reviewedby Jesil Pazhayampallil, M.D., F.A.A.P.

    Medical Review Policy

    All What to Expect content that addresses health or safety is medically reviewed by a team of vetted health professionals. Our Medical Review Board includes OB/GYNs, pediatricians, infectious disease specialists, doulas, lactation counselors, endocrinologists, fertility specialists and more. 

    We believe you should always know the source of the information you're reading. Learn more about our editorial and medical review policies.

     on July 23, 2021

    When breastfeeding becomes painful, or your baby suddenly goes on strike and won't feed, thrush could be the culprit. Here's how to manage feeding your baby when you're both dealing with thrush.

    Back to Top

    If your baby has white patches in his mouth, or breastfeeding is suddenly more painful for him, you and/or your baby could have a yeast infection — but not the vaginal kind you may have gotten in the past. This harmless-but-annoying fungus known as oral thrush sports cottage cheese-like spots in and around your baby's mouth, and can make breastfeeding difficult for all parties involved.

    Don't panic! Here's what you need to know about thrush and breastfeeding, including treatment and prevention tips so you can both get through this temporary rough patch.

    What is thrush?

    Thrush is a fungus that's present on just about everyone's body, but often flares up in babies under 6 months old, because their developing immune systems aren't yet able to fight off many infections.

    Thrush is caused by an overgrowth of the yeast fungus called Candida albicans, which your newborn may have picked up while traveling through the birth canal. Thrush can also appear in babies who are born prematurely (before 37 weeks), in those with a very low birth weight and in infants who have been treated with antibiotics.

    Thrush is common and easy to treat, but may make breastfeeding difficult for you and your baby. It thrives in warm, damp conditions, which is why it sometimes also appears as diaper rash.

    Signs of thrush while breastfeeding

    Breastfeeding is skin to skin, so nursing a baby with thrush could mean the infection gets passed along to you — and, in turn, it can travel right back to your baby. Here are the signs of thrush in both breastfeeding mothers and their babies. 

    Thrush symptoms in breastfeeding people

    If you have a case of candida on your nipples, breasts or areolas, you may experience:

    Continue Reading Below

    • Sensitive or itchy skin
    • Red or cracked nipples
    • Flaky skin around the areola
    • Sharp pain in your breasts or nipples between feedings

    It's also possible to develop thrush under your breasts, as candida loves a dark, moist place to grow — and this is an ideal spot. If you have an infection under your breast, you may note some of the same signs as above, including an itchy or burning sensation as well as red or flaky skin.

    Thrush symptoms in babies

    If your baby has thrush, you may notice the following:

    • The main symptom of oral thrush is white spots on your baby's mouth, tongue and sometimes the corners of the mouth. These spots will look a bit like cottage cheese, and won't come off easily if you wipe his mouth with your finger or a soft cloth.
    • Fussiness is another common sign, so if your infant starts to suck and then turns away or cries, it could be thrush.

    Be careful not to confuse thrush with an oral coating of your breast milk, which can also show up as white spots. How to tell the difference: Milk curds wipe away, but thrush does not.

    Treatments for thrush while breastfeeding

    Treatments for thrush in breastfeeding people

    Thrush can be passed back and forth, so your practitioner may recommend that both you and your baby get treated. If you have thrush on your nipples, areolas or breasts, your doctor will likely recommend that you apply a prescription antifungal cream. The infection should clear up after about a week, but let your doctor know if it doesn't.

    Treatments for thrush in babies

    Oral thrush in babies can be treated with an antifungal medication (such as Nystatin), which can be applied topically to the inside of the mouth and tongue. Oral fluconazole (Diflucan) given by dropper may also be prescribed in tough cases. (If thrush is on your breasts or your baby's bottom, you may use a different kind of medication.)

    Common questions about thrush and breastfeeding

    • Can your baby still breastfeed if he gets thrush? Your baby can breastfeed during an outbreak of thrush, but if he has sore patches in his mouth, he may avoid latching on or be reluctant to feed at all (if your baby is on a "nursing strike," check to see if thrush could be the cause). Others aren't bothered by thrush, and happily nurse away. The challenge comes if your baby's thrush passes to your breasts and makes them sore, too. If breastfeeding is your baby's primary source of nourishment, and he's turning his head or crying when it comes time to nurse, call your practitioner to see how you can speed up healing.
    • Can your baby give you thrush if you're breastfeeding?Yes, oral thrush from your baby can be transmitted to your breasts from your baby's mouth or skin during feeds, but you can also potentially get it in sneakier ways, like changing diapers, touching his pacifier to your skin or wiping his drool. If you are susceptible to getting vaginal yeast infections or have one already, you may be more likely to get thrush from your baby while breastfeeding.
    • Can breastfeeding cause thrush in your baby? Candida can live on your breasts, in your nipples or in your breast milk, making it easy for it to pass to your baby through feedings. Candida can also spread to anything that touches your baby's mouth, including your hands, milk, burp cloths or your clothing, and can potentially end up causing thrush in your baby. The presence of candida can result in an overgrowth — oral thrush. Those with relatively weak immune systems — such as newborns, premature babies, very low birth weight babies and children with cancer — are more susceptible to developing it. Taking antibiotics can also result in a loss of "good" bacteria that help fight off fungal infections.  On the other hand, if your breastfeeding baby has oral thrush, it's possible you got the infection from him.
    • What if thrush makes breastfeeding too painful? If breastfeeding is too painful while you or your baby has thrush, check in with your pediatrician to get treatment, fast. You may find it more comfortable to pump rather than breastfeed. It might also help to talk to a breastfeeding or lactation consultant to help you find ways to continue that aren’t too uncomfortable.
    • Can you give your baby pumped breast milk if you have thrush? Mothers are encouraged to keep up their nursing routine during the treatment of thrush — and some prefer to continue pumping and serving stored or frozen milk, too. There’s some research that indicates using frozen pumped milk while having thrush doesn’t pose a risk to healthy babies, especially if the milk is scalded before serving it. However, since freezing your milk won’t kill yeast, discuss the best approach with your pediatrician, especially if you’re an exclusive pumper. They may recommend scalding the pumped milk and allowing it to cool before offering it to your baby as a conservative approach.

    How to prevent thrush while breastfeeding

    It's not always possible to prevent your baby from getting thrush. But you can try to avoid it by keeping things as clean, dry and unconducive to fungus growth as possible using these tactics:

    • Wash your hands thoroughly after changing your baby's diaper, as thrush can be spread through the digestive system and thrives in the warm folds of his bottom. You can also make sure to change your baby’s diaper frequently and keep his bottom and thigh folds as clean and dry as possible.
    • Thoroughly clean your bottles (including bottle nipples), your pumping equipment, pacifiers and toys (especially the ones that might go in baby's mouth) between uses. 
    • Practice nipple and breast hygiene, such as by wearing cotton bras and tanks, which are less likely to trap moisture, and allowing your nipples to dry completely between feedings. Change nipple pads and shields often.
    • Have a separate towel for each family member. Wash all linens in hot water, and dry well.

    From the What to Expect editorial team and Heidi Murkoff, author of What to Expect When You're Expecting. What to Expect follows strict reporting guidelines and uses only credible sources, such as peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions and highly respected health organizations. Learn how we keep our content accurate and up-to-date by reading our medical review and editorial policy.

    • What to Expect the First Year, 3rd edition, Heidi Murkoff.
    • WhatToExpect.com, What is Thrush in Babies?, November 2020.
    • WhatToExpect.com, How to Change a Baby’s Diaper, March 2021.
    • WhatToExpect.com, How to Treat Sore Nipples and Breastfeeding Pain, August 2020.
    • WhatToExpect.com, Most Common Breastfeeding Problems and Solutions, August 2020.
    • WhatToExpect.com, Nursing Strikes: Why Baby May Be Refusing to Breastfeed, August 2020.
    • WhatToExpect.com, Exclusive Pumping Guide, July 2020.
    • American Academy of Pediatrics, Thrush and Other Candida Infections, October 2020.
    • American Academy of Pediatrics, Thrush, 2020.
    • National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus, Thrush in Newborns, October 2017.
    • Mayo Clinic, Oral Thrush, March 2018.
    • La Leche League International, Storing Human Milk, 2021. 
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Candidiasis, October 2020.
    • Merck Manual, Candidiasis, 2021.
    • National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, Effect of Probiotics on Oral Candidiasis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis, October 2019.
    • National Institutes of Health, Candida Infection of the Skin, December 2020.
    • National Organization for Rare Disorders, Candidiasis, 2021.
    • Stanford Children’s Health, Thrush (Oral Candida Infection) in Children, 2021.
    • Leigh Anne O’Connor, IBCLC, LCCE, lactation consultant.

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    Blog

    Sore nipples are very common, especially if you’re ovulating or breastfeeding. However, just as with most reproductive health issues, many women feel bashful about discussing them openly.

    What you need to know, however, is that there is nothing to be embarrassed about. Nipples are highly sensitive areas, and as such, are easily irritated.

    5 Home Remedies for Sore Nipples

    1. Aloe Vera

    Fresh Aloe vera delivers soothing relief and natural healing for sore nipples. Rub some clear gel from the inside of an aloe leaf onto the affected area and allow it to air dry. The cooling relief starts almost immediately.

    2. Coconut Oil

    Coconut oil is great for soothing your skin. Apply a small amount to nipples in a gentle massage. It can bring relief to sore, cracked or itchy nipples. It’s also a moisturizing agent, so it’s particularly welcoming if you’re breastfeeding.

    3. Basil Leaves

    Grind up some leaves into a paste, and apply to the nipples, then allow to air dry. Before breastfeeding your little one, remember to wash off the paste.

    4. Witch Hazel

    Applying witch hazel to your nipples will help reduce inflammation, and eliminate itching.

    5. Cold and Warm therapy

    Applying ice (wrapped in a towel) for a few minutes will help reduce any swelling in the area, while applying a heat pack promotes healing. Just make sure not to apply heat directly to the skin.

    Natural Nipple Soreness Treatment for Nursing Moms

    For the nursing mother, just applying a few drops of your own breast milk to the nipple before breastfeeding will provide healing. Breast milk is known to contain antibacterial properties. After breastfeeding, apply more milk to your affected nipple and allow it to air dry.

    7 Sore Nipple Symptoms

    Every woman is different, so it’s possible that you may not experience every symptom, but you might experience some of the following symptoms:

    • Mild soreness
    • Breast pain
    • Tenderness
    • Swelling
    • Nipples or breasts feel heavy
    • Itchiness
    • Discharge from nipples

    These issues do not need to send anyone into panic mode, but if you are curious about more information or are starting to worry, please contact a medical professional.

    10 Causes of Sore Nipples

    There are many reasons for experiencing sore nipples. Some of the most common reasons include the following:

    1. Ovulation. When you’re ovulating, the levels of estrogen and progesterone in your body fluctuate: Estrogen causes breasts to enlarge, while progesterone causes milk ducts to engorge. This causes the nipples to become very tender and sore. It usually occurs about a week to ten days before your period.

    2. Menstruation. Just as when you’re ovulating, estrogen levels change, causing reactions while you’re on your period: bloating, mood swings, breast pain, and nipple soreness. Sometimes the breast tissue around the nipple will look lumpy.

    3. Pregnancy. Sore nipples during pregnancy are due to a rise in estrogen. This hormone promotes breast growth for the production of milk. In addition, while your body prepares to deliver your baby, you receive additional blood flow to your breasts. The combination of both factors often results in sore nipples.

    4. Breastfeeding. Newborns need constant feeding, and the constant latching onto your breasts eventually stretches tissue in the areola. As a result, you may experience tenderness, chafing, pain, and soreness in your nipples.

    5. Mastitis. Mastitis is an inflammation of breast tissue. It can be caused by bacteria entering your system through cracked skin. It’s often experienced by women who are lactating. Another common cause is a blocked milk duct, which occurs when a breast isn’t completely emptied during a feeding.

    6. Eczema. Certain chemicals found in soaps or laundry detergent can cause irritation to the skin. If irritation occurs in the areolas, the nipples can become itchy and sore.

    7. Menopause. The same way an increase in estrogen and progesterone cause nipple soreness during ovulation and menstruation, a decrease in these hormones also results in breast pain and tenderness. This is especially so during menopause, when the fluctuation is so drastic. In addition to soreness, you may feel a burning or throbbing sensation around the nipples.

    8. Paget’s Disease of the nipple. This condition occurs when cancer cells collect in the tissue surrounding the nipples. In addition to soreness, the nipple becomes itchy, red, scaly, and irritated. It’s usually diagnosed in women in their 50s or 60s.

    9. Yeast infection of the nipples. Yeast infections are skin infections. While it is commonly known to occur in the vagina, it can also happen on nipples. This is common when a woman is breastfeeding, since the baby can pass thrush through their mouth into the nipples. This type of yeast thrives on breast milk.

    10. Running long distances. Sometimes, nipple soreness doesn’t have anything to do with your reproductive health. If you’re a new runner, it’s essential to wear a good sports bra that fits well and is specifically designed for high-impact activity. A regular bra can allow your breasts to bounce around while you run, causing friction with the material you’re wearing. You can also apply Body Glide around your sports bra line to avoid chafing and irritation.

    Call OB-GYN Women’s Centre of Lakewood Ranch Today

    Our highly skilled and compassionate doctors offer support with kindness. Sore nipples are a common occurrence. If you would like more information about tender breasts or have general gynecological inquiries, please contact OB-GYN Women’s Centre of Lakewood Ranch today. Let us advise you further.

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    Источник: https://obgynwc.com/home-remedies-for-sore-nipples/

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    How To Treat Vaginal Yeast Infection At Home - Natural Remedy

    Home remedies for nipple yeast infection -

    Breastfeeding FAQs: Pain and Discomfort

    Whether you're a new mom or a seasoned parenting pro, breastfeeding often comes with its fair share of questions. Here are answers to some common queries that mothers — new and veteran — may have.

    Questions More on Breastfeeding

    Is it normal to have cramps while nursing?

    Yes. During the first few days to weeks after delivery, you may feel strong, menstrual-like cramps in your uterus when your milk lets down. This is your uterus shrinking back to a smaller size.

    Is it normal to feel pain during or after nursing?

    If your baby is latched on properly, you may have 30 to 60 seconds of pain (from the nipple and areola being pulled into your baby's mouth), then the pain should ease. But if you continue to feel pain, stop feeding momentarily and reposition your baby on your breast. If the pain persists, something else might be going on.

    If your baby consistently latches on wrong, sucking on your nipple without getting much of your areola in the mouth, you'll probably feel discomfort throughout each feeding. Some moms say it's painful or feels like a pinch as their babies nurse. And you'll probably have sore, cracked nipples in no time. Consulting with your doctor or lactation consultant can help with these situations.

    p

    What else can cause breast pain?

    If your breasts are sore and you have flu-like symptoms, fever, chills, a hard or red area of the breast, or red streaks on your breast, you may have an infection in your milk ducts called mastitis. If you have any of these symptoms, call your doctor. If he or she finds that you have mastitis, the infection can be easily treated with antibiotics.

    You may also have a yeast (or thrush) infection of your breast. It's important that you call your doctor if you have any of these symptoms:

    • shooting or burning breast pain either during or after feedings
    • pain deep within your breast
    • strong pain in the breasts or nipples that doesn't get better after properly latching on and positioning your baby
    • nipples that are cracked, itchy, burning, or are pink, red, shiny, flaky, or have a rash with little blisters

    Babies with oral thrush may have cracked skin in the corners of the mouth, and whitish or yellowish patches on the lips, tongue, or inside the cheeks.

    Sore breasts with a lump also may be a sign of a plugged milk duct, in which a particular duct gets clogged. To help unclog the duct and ease your pain:

    • Take warm showers or use warm compresses on the area, massaging the area, several times a day. Then, breastfeed your baby immediately.
    • When breastfeeding, position the baby so the nose is pointed toward the clogged area.
    • If that doesn't work, try using a manual (hand) or electric pump for a few minutes to help draw out the clogged milk.
    • If the lump doesn't go away within a couple of days, or if you have any fever, chills, aches, or red streaking, call the doctor.

    Women who have inverted nipples (that turn inward rather than protrude out) or flat nipples (that don't become erect as they should when your baby is nursing) also may have trouble breastfeeding and may have frequent nipple pain. If either is the case, talk to your doctor or a lactation consultant about ways to make nursing easier and reduce any pain.

    Can I still breastfeed if I have a breast infection?

    Yes. Contrary to what many people think, you can continue to nurse your baby while treating your breast infection. In fact, continuing to breastfeed can help clear up the infection.

    p

    How can I ease my breast or nipple pain?

    When dealing with sore breasts or nipples, here are some pointers for avoiding pain in the future as well as making yourself more comfortable while your breasts heal:

    • Make sure your baby latches onto your breasts correctly every time.
    • Ask your doctor or lactation consultant to recommend a cream to put on your nipples in between feedings to help sore nipples heal.
    • At the end of a feeding, massage some breast milk on your nipples, and then allow them to air dry.
    • Consider wearing breast shields in between feedings (not to be confused with nipple shields, which are used during breastfeeding) to protect sore nipples. Breast shields are dome-shaped covers that prevent nipples from rubbing against clothing and help them heal faster.
    • Ask your health care provider if a nipple shield is a good idea to use while nursing. These shields are placed over the areola and nipple during a feeding to protect sore or cracked nipples. Nipple shields may interfere with a mother's milk supply, so it's important to only use them under the supervision of a doctor or lactation consultant.
    • Some women find it helpful to nurse more often but for shorter periods of time, rather than nurse for extended periods.
    • Try to nurse first on the side that's less sore.
    • Gently break suction when removing your baby from your breast. (Slip your finger in the side of your baby's mouth, between the gums, and then turn your finger a quarter turn to break the suction.)
    • Vary breastfeeding positions to help drain all areas of your breast.
    • Use wet or dry heat on your breasts (a warm water bottle, heating pad, washcloth, or warm shower) right before feeding. (However, if you have a yeast infection in your breast, you'll need to keep your nipples dry because the yeast thrives on moisture.)
    • Put ice packs or cool compresses on engorged breasts after feedings.
    • Gently massage the sore area before nursing.
    • Get plenty of rest and fluids.
    • Some mothers with cracked or sore nipples find that pumping for 2 to 3 days allows their nipples to heal.

    If you find that you're consistently unable to nurse your baby without pain, be sure to call your doctor or a lactation consultant.

    p

    Is it normal for my breasts to become engorged?

    No. If the breasts are emptied frequently, engorgement (when the breasts become overfilled with milk) won't happen. Engorgement can lead to mastitis and should be avoided.

    But the longer you wait to breastfeed or pump — both initially and throughout your time nursing — the more uncomfortable and engorged your breasts may become.

    If you can't feed your baby right away, use warm compresses and try to pump or manually express your milk. One way you can express your milk is by holding onto your breast with your fingers underneath your breast and your thumb on top. Gently but firmly press your thumb and fingers back against the chest wall, then roll your thumb and fingers toward your areola over and over to help push the milk down the milk ducts.

    Also, nursing often (approximately every 2 to 3 hours) and trying to empty your breasts can help with the initial discomfort and prevent engorgement.

    Источник: https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/breastfeed-discomfort.html

    Breastfeeding pain relief: Home remedies and ways to deal with discomfort

  • We earn a commission for products purchased through some links in this article.

  • Breastfeeding pain is extremely common among new mothers. While it’s usually nothing to worry about, don’t ignore the symptoms – especially if they persist for more than a couple of days.

    What you shouldn’t do is suffer in silence. Whether you’re unsure about whether you’re breastfeeding properly, what foods to eat or avoid during breastfeeding, or you’re surprised by the unexpected aspects of breastfeeding, the early motherhood experience can only be bettered by good, tried-and-tested advice.

    ‘There is an abundance of support available to mums during their breastfeeding journey,’ says Harriet Hickey, a midwife at The Pregnancy Clinic, which has clinics in Kent and Surrey. ‘It’s really important to remember that breastfeeding is a new skill for both you and your baby. Over time you will learn what works out best for you.’ These breastfeeding accessories can make the process more comfortable.

    Here, our experts highlight the most common reasons for breastfeeding pain, and what the best breastfeeding pain relief home remedies are.

    What causes breastfeeding pain?

    There are numerous reasons for breastfeeding pain – most of which are benign and easily treated.

    ‘It’s very common for women to experience breastfeeding pain, especially first-time mothers,’ says Eleni Mavrides, a consultant in obstetrics and gynaecology. ‘It’s normal for your body to take a few days when first starting to breastfeed to adjust and in that time, you may feel discomfort or pain,’ she explains.

    ‘This is usually because your breasts over-produce milk at the beginning,’ she continues. ‘You can help prevent this through massaging your breasts regularly, letting your baby finish their feeds, and making sure your baby is attaching to the breast properly during feeding. Using over-the-counter medication, such as paracetamol, will manage the pain if you’re in need of pain relief.’

    Woman with her sleeping baby

    Treat breastfeeding pain quickly so it doesn’t affect you bonding with your baby. (Credit: Getty)

    Breastfeeding pain in the breast and home remedies to help

    Breast engorgement

    While breast engorgement is typical for new mums as they adjust to the arrival of milk, it can be very uncomfortable.Breast engorgement happens when your breasts become overly full. This can be quite painful, with symptoms such as tight or hard breasts, pain in your armpit and sometimes difficulty in attaching baby to the breast,’ explains Harriet.

    ‘If breast engorgement happens in the first few days of your baby’s life this may be due to your baby simply establishing their feeds. If this is the case support with positioning and attachment can make all the difference,’ she says. ‘The symptoms of breast engorgement should settle once you gain further confidence in positioning and attachment.’

    If your baby is yet to latch properly, try expressing some breast milk by hand. Avoid the use of nipple shields, though. ‘They can restrict the amount of milk the baby is able to get, which can lead to the breasts becoming more engorged and sore,’ warns Daniel Brash, a pharmacist and co-director of Healthcare 4 All.

    Then there’s the old wives’ tale of placing chilled cabbage leaves in your bra after feeding or expressing. While it seems a little eccentric the cooling effect on your breast really can help to reduce the pain and swelling. You can also wrap a towel around a small bag of frozen vegetables and place it on the swollen area to relieve swelling and numb the pain.

    Wearing a well-fitting bra designed for breastfeeding, so it doesn’t restrict your breasts, could also benefit you.

    Your midwife, health visitor or a breastfeeding specialist should also be able to help you deal with engorged breasts, or any other breastfeeding pain or concerns.

    A woman with breastfeeding pain because of mastits

    Mastitis can be very painful and will usually need medical treatment. (Credit: Getty)

    Mastitis

    Mastitis can happen as a consequence of a blocked milk duct,’ says Harriet. ‘The breast becomes inflamed and often very painful,’ she says. This inflammation may quickly become an infection if not treated, which means that bacteria can grow in the milk.

    Here, Harriet explains the main symptoms of mastitis:

    • A noticeable red area on the breast
    • Tender and hot-to-the-touch breast
    • Flu like symptoms/generally feeling unwell
    • High temperature

    Often mastitis is a reaction to poor positioning, which – once rectified – can ease the problem. ‘However, if symptoms of mastitis are not relieved after you’ve checked your baby’s positioning and attachment, much like when relieving symptoms of breast engorgement, then it’s important to get checked out by your GP,’ advises Harriet.

    Eleni agrees: ‘If your breasts feel inflamed, red, hot, tender or lumpy, and you feel unwell with flu-like symptoms, such as fever, chills and tiredness, make sure you ask for help straight away.’ If left untreated mastitis can become a breast abscess.

    If you’re not feeling better within 12-24 hours, or if you feel worse, see a doctor. You may need antibiotics, which will be fine to take while you are breastfeeding. To control the pain, over-the-counter medicines such as ‘paracetamol or ibuprofen may also help,’ she says.

    It’s important to keep feeding your baby from the affected breast. Although this may be painful and miserable for you, it can make the mastitis worse if you stop feeding from your affected breast.

    Breast abscess

    When mastitis is untreated it can cause a breast abscess,’ warns Harriet. An abscess is a very painful, swollen, pus-filled lump inside the breast. You can also develop a breast abscess after a prolonged period of breast engorgement.

    A breast abscess needs immediate treatment by a medical professional. The abscess may be drained, or you may be prescribed antibiotics. Although it seems counter-intuitive, it’s important to keep breastfeeding. This keeps the breast well-drained. If it’s too painful to breastfeed you can pump or express by hand instead. “If the affected breast is too painful or the incision is close to your nipple you may need to express your milk for a day or two. Keeping your milk flowing will help your breast heal,” recommends the La Leche League Great Britain website, which provides mother-to-mother support for breastfeeding mums.

    A baby latching on to its mother's breast

    Not latching on correctly is one of the main causes of breastfeeding pain. (Credit: Getty)

    Breastfeeding pain in the nipples and home remedies to help

    Problems with latching

    If your baby is poorly attached to your breast during a feed, your nipple may become pinched between your baby’s tongue and the roof of their mouth (the hard palate). This will make your nipples sore. Before long your nipples can crack and bleed, which makes breastfeeding uncomfortable and even painful. When your baby is effectively attached, your nipple rests comfortably against the soft palate at the back of their mouth. This makes a huge difference in comfort.

    ‘It’s really quite common to have issues with latching. As a result there’s a lot of help available,’ says Harriet. ‘Some important points to remember – especially when you are struggling with the latch – are:

    • Being comfortable and making sure you are in a position you can sustain for some time i.e. utilising a comfy chair and cushions to support your arms and shoulders. Nursing cushions are really useful.
    • Holding your baby close and ensuring you’re not leaning over to feed your baby.
    • Ensuring your baby’s head and body are in a straight line, their chin to your breast with their head free to tilt backwards.
    • Aiming to place your baby’s nose level to your nipple to encourage a wide-open mouth when attaching.’

    As well as Harriet’s advice, Eleni suggests that ‘mothers change the position of their baby frequently when breastfeeding. One position to try involves putting your baby tummy-down on your body with their head near your breast. This is also a great position to try and get your baby to self-latch as they bob their head and move towards the breast with minimal help from mum, usually resulting in a pain-free latch,’ she says.

    Don’t keep trying on your own if it still hurts – find a lactation consultant or speak to your doctor, health visitor or midwife.

    Tongue tie

    If your baby is suffering from tongue tie, it can make latching onto your breast correctly impossible, which is distressing for both mum and baby. Tongue tie means your baby can’t lift its tongue or stick it out so is unable to cup the breast to extract milk. This can mean a lot of pain for mum as the tongue can rub against the end of nipple, causing it to crack.

    ‘Tongue tie occurs when the skin between your baby’s tongue and mouth are shorter than expected,’ says Harriet. ‘This can sometimes affect breastfeeding and should always be considered when there’s difficulty with attachment and latch,’ she advises.

    Because tongue tie can be difficult to diagnose, it helps to get expert support. ‘Ask your midwife or health visitor to check for tongue tie. Tongue tie is often picked up soon after birth but can be difficult to detect,’ advises Daniel.

    ‘Your midwife, health visitor or GP will be able to guide you, with referral to an expert,’ says Harriet. A health professional will snip the thin flap of skin on the baby’s tongue so it’s able to move more freely. This quick and almost painless procedure will make breastfeeding more effective and less painful.

    Woman with breast pain touching her breast

    Blocked milk ducts, thrush and pain in the armpit are all possible while breastfeeding. (Credit: Getty)

    Blocked ducts

    Ducts are another potential breast issue. ‘The breasts are made of milk-producing glands. Tubes known as milk ducts transport the milk from these glands to your nipple. This is so you’re able to feed your baby,’ explains Harriet. ‘It’s not uncommon for these ducts to become blocked. They don’t always drain properly during a feed, particularly in those early days of establishing feeds,’ she says. These ducts can also become blocked if you’re making breast milk faster than you can express it.

    If you have blocked ducts you’re likely to feel ‘a small lump just under the breast, which can sometimes feel quite tender,’ says Harriet. Check under your breasts regularly – if you suspect a blocked duct Harriet recommends the following:

    • ‘Feed your baby from the area where you can feel a blocked duct. Massage the lump gently towards the nipple at the same time.
    • A warm bath, shower or flannel on the breast may relieve any discomfort.’

    The La Leche League GB website also recommends “avoiding saturated fats and taking one or two 1200mg capsules of lecithin three or four times a day to reduce the risk of blocked ducts.”

    Thrush

    Most of us know thrush as a vaginal condition. However, it’s possible to get this yeast infection on our skin – especially warm, moist areas such as the armpits, groin, between the fingers and the breasts.

    ‘Some women develop thrush in their breasts when feeding. Symptoms include painful breastfeeding in both breasts, and pain which does not pass immediately following feeding,’ explains Harriet. The NHS website also says to look out for “a red, itchy or painful rash that scales over with white or yellow discharge. The rash may not be so obvious on darker skin.”

    Even mild thrush needs checking. ‘It’s important to treat thrush, as it can be passed from mum to baby and vice versa.’ You can learn more about breastfeeding and thrush here but it’s also recommended that you speak to your GP if you think you have it. Thrush is treated with over-the-counter creams or prescribed anti-fungal medication for mums, and drops for babies.

    Breastfeeding pain in the armpit and home remedies to help

    Some mums will feel pain under the arms. ‘The breast tissue is present not only in breasts but also extends into the armpit,’ says Harriet.

    ‘It’s not unusual to have swelling and engorgement of a small area in the armpit while breastfeeding,’ she adds. ‘Engorgement is common as breastfeeding is being established. It usually goes away once feeding is established.’

    Blonde woman breastfeeding her baby

    Breastfeeding pain is normal but don’t ignore it. (Credit: Getty)

    Is breastfeeding pain normal?

    It’s easy, as a sleep-deprived new mum, to think the worst but breastfeeding pain is common. ‘There are a number of reasons why breastfeeding causes discomfort,’ says Harriet. ‘While quickly resolved, it’s important to understand why you’re in discomfort and to not ignore any pain.’

    Top tips for soothing painful breasts when nursing

    ‘Breastfeeding pain is not uncommon,’ says Harriet reassuringly. ‘And discomfort can be prevented and treated.’ This will allow for successful feeding until you’re ready to stop breastfeeding.

    The main thing is to speak up. ‘Seek advice from your midwife or a breastfeeding specialist – also called a lactation consultant. They can discuss simple measures to prevent breastfeeding pain. For example, ensuring there’s proper latching when baby is feeding as the inability to do so leads to breast milk not draining properly, which causes sore nipples, lumps and engorged breasts,’ adds Harriet. If you grapple with dry nipples or breasts ‘use breastfeeding-friendly ointments to keep them moist,’ advises Harriet. We like Mama Mio’s Keep Calm Nipple Balm.

    ‘At times, a cold compress helps with soreness and pain from swollen breasts,’ advises Harriet. ‘It’s okay to use simple painkillers such as paracetamol to relieve pain.’

    However, ‘if those measures don’t relieve symptoms seek advice from your doctor or midwife to rule out infection,’ she says.

    Источник: https://www.goodto.com/family/babies/breastfeeding-pain-388738

    Natural Thrush Treatment for Mom and Baby

    When you’re breastfeeding, thrush can happen at anytime. Let’s talk about a great natural thrush treatment for mom and baby.

    I remember it like it was just yesterday. We had finally gotten the hang of breastfeeding. He was off the nipple shield, his latch was set, the pain had stopped. I felt like a champ. I wanted to hold signs wherever I went pointing it out: look at this, look what I’m doing with my body.

    Then came the thrush. Ugh!

    Natural Thrush Treatment For Mom And Baby

    It just started out as general itching for me. I thought nothing of it, nothing at all. Then the thrush turned to searing pain, the kind of itching pain you feel when you’ve scratched a bug bite for too long—except much, much worse. 

    Misconceptions About Treating Thrush

    Through the mom’s group I was a part of I knew that thrush existed, but I assumed only dirty people got it, people who don’t wash bras and only shower once a month. Boy was I wrong.

    In my first-time mom panic, I called the my OB. She asked me to check the baby’s mouth, and sure enough it was dotted with white patches—and not just the milky ones from a good feed—genuine stay-put patches.  The nurse offered to call me in a prescription of nystatin, to which I gladly agreed, knowing that if I felt like this, my baby probably felt much worse.

    For my thrush pain, she told me to pick up some jock cream. Say what? That should have been the first sign that I should have gone down a different path, but I went with it, trusting the nurse over my gut.

    Following the nurses instructions, I painted Anthony’s mouth before and after every feeding, dousing my nipples with jock cream after he nursed and scrubbing them raw to get it off so that I wouldn’t poison my first born. After two days there was no change, so I started to do some research.

    Natural Thrush Treatment that Works Fast

    Thrush is essentially a yeast infection in the mucus membranes, which can affect multiple parts of the body. For us it manifested in white patches in his mouth, a shiny red rash, and itchy, painful nipples. Looking on the back of my nystatin bottle, I recognized one of the key ingredients as sugar.  Yeast thrives off sugar. No wonder we hadn’t kicked the thrush yet.

    Natural Thrush Treatment For Mom And Baby FB

    I continued to read and research, looking for a good natural thrush treatment. I’d heard about genetian violet, but there were a few mixed reviews and links to cancer that left me unnerved. Plus, I didn’t want everything in my life to be purple.

    I found a few articles on success with grapefruit seed extract, and, paired with anecdotal success from a few women in my mom’s group I decided to try it as a natural thrush treatment. It was, after all, just an extract straight from grapefruit. If it failed, there was no harm done.

    Oh. My. Goodness. Just ten drops of GSE in an ounce of water. That’s all it took. I soaked Q-tips in the solution and painted his mouth before feedings, and my nipples after. Within two hours the pain had subsided. Within one day, the thrush was completely gone. I kept up the routine for a day or two after the thrush had cleared, just in case, but it was gone, and it hasn’t been back since.

    Ultimately, breastfeeding is hard. There are a lot of challenges you can face. Thrush shouldn’t be something that makes or breaks that relationship, that destroys the joy of bonding, the pride in knowing that you are sustaining a life with your body, the love you will undoubtedly share with your child. Trust your gut, do your research, and you will undoubtedly find natural thrush treatment solutions for you and your family that will be the best for all parties involved.

    More Breastfeeding Articles:


    Breastfeeding & Beyond author: Megan EcclesWhen Megan Eccles isn’t blogging at Megan Eccles, she can be found on a ranch in the foothills of Southern California, trying to keep up with the many ups and downs of life.  Between striving towards self sufficiency, learning how to be a mother, and writing, and writing, and writing, she can be found on the left most corner of her couch with a cup of tea and a good book.

    Filed Under: Breastfeeding, Natural Remedies, Practical Health27 Comments

    Источник: https://www.intoxicatedonlife.com/natural-thrush-treatment/

     

    treatment for nipple blisters and thrush

     

    How to Treat Milk Blisters and Thrush Naturally

    Do you have a milk bleb that won’t go away?

    If you are reading this post then you are in a desperate attempt to treat a painful milk blister on your nipple.

    Oh…..the joys of motherhood, aren’t they grand?

    You think you have this whole breastfeeding thing down and then boom….this milk blister appears!

    Breastfeeding is wonderful but can cause some serious pain in the boob! I’ve had experience with clogged milk ducts, milk blisters, and thrush and I’m not sure which one is worse!

    Milk blisters can be incredibly painful and if left untreated for too long can cause even more problems like mastitis!

    Mastitis is no picnic, so you want to treat your nipple blister or bleb as soon as possible!

    Keep reading to find out how you can make that milk blister burning pain go away, treat milk blebsand thrush at home naturally, and enjoy breastfeeding your baby again!

    What Is a Milk Blister?

    You’ve probably heard of the term milk blister before or maybe even a bleb, but maybe you aren’t too sure that’s what you have?

    To make sure this is what you have, let me break it down for you a bit.

    There are a few different types of milk blisters than you can have while breastfeeding your baby. Some are white, yellow, and some can be red or brown.

    Here are the differences in milk blisters and common causes for these types of milk blisters or blebs.

    1. A milk blister that is caused by a clogged milk duct

    This is caused by a clogged nipple pore and usually appears to be white or yellow in color.

    Milk lays under the skin where the blocked pore is and forms a blister-like bubble over the area. This is very painful and normally the pain is only in that spot, nowhere else on the breast.

    Once you treat the milk blister with the tips below, you’ll need to unclog your milk duct to prevent further milk blisters or problems. Come back after you’ve treated the blister and read this post here to help you naturally unclog a blocked milk duct fast! 👇🏻

    Clogged milk duct remedies

     

    2. A milk blister caused by thrush

    Milk blisters like this can also be white and patchy. This type of blister is caused by thrush. This is much deeper, under the skin, and usually, more of the breast is in pain, rather than just one spot.

    3. A milk blister caused by friction

    This type of blister is called a blood blister and is red or brown in color. Many people refer to this blister as a bleb.

    This is usually caused by too much friction on the nipple. Too much friction can happen when baby nurses very rough, has a poor latch, or the mother is using the wrong size nipple shield or pump.

     

    Remember, I am not a doctor, only a mother that has experienced all of these breastfeeding issues first hand. For more information, always consult with your doctor or a lactation consultant. To read my full disclosure policy, click here. 

     

    Treatment for white milk blisters and red blebs

    After nursing my three daughters for almost two years with each one, I have been that lucky mom to encounter many of these breastfeeding issues.

    I had an incredibly painful milk bleb or blood blister with my second daughter when she was only a week old!

    She was a very rough eater and the friction from her nursing caused a milk bleb! I was recovering from a c-section and had pain everywhere while taking care of my toddler and then this happened!

    Here is what I did to treat my blood blister and also continue to nurse my baby at the same time!

    Saline soak treatment

    This sounds incredibly strange but it works!

    Get a small cup, I actually used a shot glass because it was the perfect fit for my nipple!

    This treatment helped clear up my milk blister in a day! I’m not even kidding!

    One full day of repeating this saline soak and I felt so much better!

    This salt solution below didn’t burn or irritate my nipple and healed it faster than I thought was possible!

    • Take 8 ounces of warm water and mix 1/2 teaspoon of table salt or Epsom salt into the water
    • Mix around and pour the solution into a shot glass, if you have one on hand, for easy dipping/treatment.
    • Dip your nipple into this solution for 2-3 minutes after each breastfeeding session or whenever possible.
    • Once you are done, pat your nipple dry and let it air out for a few minutes.
    • Continue to do this several times a day until you see and feel some relief!

    Apply heat

    Grab yourself a hot washcloth and apply it to your nipple, without burning yourself, of course! Do this immediately after the saline soak and then nurse your baby or pump.

    Continue these steps until the blister opens up and is able to release some milk.

    If you are able to nurse rather than use a pump, it is a much better way to fix the blister.

    Breastfeed your baby with a nipple shield

    If you want to continue to nurse your baby on that side of your breast, you can use a nipple shield to help you through this phase!

    A nipple shield was what helped me continue to breastfeed my baby while I had a milk blister and it was a miracle!

    Caution:

    You will not want to use a nipple shield if that was what caused the blister in the first place!

    Using the wrong size nipple shield or pump can cause blood (friction) milk blisters! If this is what caused your blister, buy a bigger size for your nipple or a better pump attachment and continue with the salt treatments and try again when you have a more comfortable fit.

    If you are in so much pain you can’t nurse at all, pump your milk on that breast, and nurse your baby on the other side.

    Nipple shields can be a blessing to some mothers and to others cause more breastfeeding issues than they started with!

    For more information about nipple shields, read this post on the pros and cons of using a nipple shield to see if it’s right for you! Also, consult your lactation consultant if you have one for any questions and concerns!

    In some cases, a nipple shield can be wonderful and help a breastfeeding mom tremendously! 👇

    Nipple shields for sore nipples

     

    Here are some of my favorite nipple shields to use below:

     

    Essential oils for nipple blister or thrush

    After applying heat, your nipples may feel a bit dry. Take a cotton ball and apply some coconut oil to your nipple. The coconut oil will help treat the nipple blister and soothe the dry area.

    Coconut oil is an effective anti-fungal and will also help treat the nipple blister if was caused by thrush. Coconut oil is also great for cracked or sore nipples while breastfeeding.

    So many wonderful uses for coconut oil, always good to have on hand!

     

    Milk Blister or Thrush?

    Are you still confused if it is a milk blister or thrush causing your breast pain?

    A milk blister can be caused by thrush but you can also have thrush without a milk blister.

    How can you tell the difference?

    As mentioned above, a milk blister will have a white covering of skin over the part of the nipple. If you notice that you have more than one blister at once, Kellymom.com says to suspect thrush as the cause.

    The milk blister must be treated first even if it was caused by thrush. Once the milk blister is treated with a saline solution and a few days later you notice you are STILL in pain but your nipples are bright pink instead, this means the thrush is still present!

    Having thrush alone looks different. Thrush is very painful and your nipples are a bright pink color. You can also look inside your baby’s mouth to see if they have any thrush patches as an indicator of what’s causing your nipple pain.

    Once you treat the nipple blister and have a recurrence of thrush, here is an excellent way to treat thrush and make it go away forever!

    Grapefruit seed extract!

    Yes, this is magic! My firstborn had a few cases of thrush and our doctor prescribed an antibiotic for her but it didn’t seem to help that much.

    Once I discovered using GSE, it was a game-changer for me! The best part is, it was all-natural and it worked!

    GSE is safe to use for breastfeeding mothers and babies. This was amazing because I didn’t need to worry about what was going on in my nipples or in my baby’s mouth!

    Not to mention, there are so many things that grapefruit seed extract can treat, so you’ll get your money’s worth!

    Treatment for Thrush

    • Be sure to use drinking or purified water that isn’t tap.
    • Pour one ounce of purified water into a cup
    • Add 10-15 drops of GSE into the water and mix
    • Dip a cotton ball or q-tip into the mixture and swab on your infected nipple. Also, dip a cotton swab and rub it inside your baby’s mouth wherever there are thrush patches that you can get to.
    • Continue to do this every hour until you notice a difference

    For more information on using grapefruit seed extract, click here. 

    **UPDATED 2020

    If GFSE DOES NOT WORK….TRY THIS instead!!!

    GSE was always my go-to and it worked fast and was all-natural, easy, and great to use!

    However, I just had my fourth baby and again we both encountered thrush! He first had a horrible diaper rash and nothing worked on it that our doctor prescribed! I finally combined Burt’s Bees diaper cream and monistat 7 and it did the trick!

    But…I still had it on my nipples and I couldn’t use the diaper cream mixture on myself because he wouldn’t be able to nurse anymore.

    This was by far the worst case of nipple thrush I’ve ever had! So, I reached for my GSE and it helped the situation but it did not completely cure it as quickly as it did with my daughter! I had to try something else and I came across Gentian Violet.

    This is the best resource I found on using gentian violet. I ordered it from Amazon and literally applied it that first night and it helped so much! I had to use it for the next three days and my thrush was completely gone! The pain from this nipple thrush was so much worse than what I had with my daughter and that’s because my son refused to let me nurse him with a nipple shield. I truly believe that the GSE will work fine as long as you let your nipple take a break and either pump or use a nipple shield. My son wasn’t letting that happen!

    However, when I used the gentian violet, the pain decreased so much and I was still able to nurse him from that breast. It was safe to use for both of us and gave me the pain relief I needed to continue nursing him!

    I will warn you, there are some cons to using gentian violet which is why it was my LAST resort!

    • It is VERY MESSY, apply with a cotton swab and put on nipples very carefully
    • It stains and does not come out of clothing or pretty much anything!
    • It will turn your baby’s mouth purple so you’ll either have a lot of explaining to do…or just tell people he ate a purple marker and leave it at that! lol
    • You should not use it on you or your baby for more than 4 days, you should see immediate relief once using it as well!

    Click the photo below for more information:


    Other treatments for thrush:

    If mom and baby are both battling thrush, mom should take a good probiotic which will also help her kick the thrush to the curb. She can also have her baby take a probiotic too. Here are some favorites below:

    Watch your diet

    If thrush is causing your milk blisters and overall nipple pain, then take a look at your diet. Cutting down on any sugars that are unnecessary in your diet will also help the thrush go away.

    Other essential oils for thrush

    I have read that Thieves and tea tree oil can also help treat thrush but you will have to dilute it first with a carrier oil like coconut oil before applying it.

    I love my essential oils but I will be honest with you, if you try the grapefruit seed extract first for a few days, I doubt you’ll ever need to use your essential oils.

    That’s how confident I am in the GSE! It works and it’s completely safe, so give that a try first before you test out your oils!

    Many mothers ask about oregano oil because it is a known anti-fungal essential oil. However, it is pretty strong oil and after reading this article, I’d stay away from it until there’s more research done just to be safe for both breastfeeding mama and baby.

    Conclusion

    I hope these tips were able to help other moms relieve their pain and treat milk blisters and thrush naturally! Breastfeeding is an amazing gift to give your children, however, sometimes dealing with problems such as plugged milk ducts, thrush, and milk blebs that won’t go away can cause headaches and pain for us mamas at a time we don’t need them!

    Hopefully, these treatments helped some of you continue to breastfeed your babies pain-free and enjoy this precious time you have with them again!

    You may also be interested in:

    Breast pump essentials

    Pumping tips

     

     

     

     

    Nipple Thrush remedy

    Milk blister remedies
    Treating milk blisters

    How to Treat Milk Blisters and Thrush Naturally

    Treating a nipple blister

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    Источник: https://www.italianpolishmomma.com/treating-milk-blisters-and-thrush-naturally/

    Nipple Thrush

    Thrush is a common, harmless yeast infection found in many different parts of the body, affecting both men and women. This blog post will discuss breastfeeding thrush, its causes, symptoms, and treatments.

    What Is Thrush?

    Thrush is an overgrowth of the yeast organism candida albicans. This organism is always present in our bodies but has a tendency to overgrow when we are ill, tired, pregnant or using antibiotics.

    It thrives in warm, moist environments such as the vagina, nappy area, mouth, and nipple (in lactating women). Overgrowth may also happen when our microbiome is out of balance.

    What Causes Nipple Thrush?

    Nipple thrush is likely to occur when the infection is affecting other parts of the body, usually the vagina. There may be a higher chance of breastfeeding thrush if you have the tendency to vaginal yeast infections.

    The infection can also be caused if any other family remember has the infection such as a nappy rash or athlete’s foot. Antibiotics are another cause of thrush as they kill good bacteria, giving room to bad bacteria to flourish. If a mother has experienced recent nipple trauma, that can also lead to thrush.

    Nipple Thrush Symptoms

    Thrush in breastfeeding mothers can be painful, and problems can start after a period of breastfeeding without issues sometimes affecting both breasts. It’s therefore important to look out for the following symptoms when identifying whether you have thrush on your nipples:

    • Itching, burning or shooting pain on the nipple or deep within the breast, often towards the end of a feed, and for quite some time after. It’s important that other causes of breast pain should always be ruled out before a thrush diagnosis is made.
    • Nipple trauma that won’t heal.
    • A white ‘plaque’ or residue may be present in the crease around the nipple.
    • Pain does not reduce with improved latch.
    • There is NO related pyrexia.
    • There are NO red areas on the breast.

    If you think you might be suffering from cracked and sore nipples try our HPA Lanolin Nipple Cream.

    What Does Thrush on a Nipple Look Like?

    When you have nipple thrush, your nipple appearance may change to being shiny in appearance, sometimes chapped, blistered with white patches but may also look completely normal. You may also experience itchy, flaky and red nipples or areola.

    Breastfed Baby Thrush Symptoms

    Babies can also display symptoms of thrush (though they may not) these can consist of:

    • White patches in baby’s mouth
    • White coating on the tongue that does not go away when cleaned
    • A pearl-like sheen to lips
    • Nappy rash
    • Fussiness and windiness when breastfeeding

    All of these signs and symptoms can help confirm diagnosis but are not necessarily present in their entirety which can make differential diagnosis difficult. However, a swab can confirm diagnosis (using a charcoal swab).  

    Nipple Thrush Treatment

    You can carry on breastfeeding while you and your baby are being treated for this fungal infection. However, it’s essential to get full treatment to kill the bacteria. The first route consists of a thrush cream that can be applied to the skin of the nipple, the baby’s mouth, and bottom.

    Miconazole cream 2% can be prescribed to apply to nipples in minimal quantities, after every feed. If nipples appear very sore topically, miconazole 2% in combination with hydrocortisone 1% may be most effective (such as Dactacort cream).

    The second route, is systematic/oral treatment for deep breast pain that does not improve with topical treatment. As a drug unlicensed for breastfeeding women, physicians take responsibility for prescribing this. The amounts of fluconazole getting through to baby from the breastmilk would be less than that prescribed for a baby.

    However, fluconazole has a half-life of 88 hours in babies under 6 weeks therefore the risk of accumulating doses needs to be considered when planning this treatment. Treatment generally comes as a loading dose of 150-400mg and maintenance doses of 100-200mg for at least 10 days.

    Fluconazole does not kill off yeast as such but stops overgrowth, which is why shortened treatment courses may well be ineffective and could arguably cause sensitisation.

    It is also recommended to keep your nipples as dry as possible by regularly changing your breast pads to avoid any moist environment.

    Baby Thrush Treatment

    Miconazole oral gel for thrush seems to be the most effective treatment for babies. Gel does not penetrate the skin and is not suitable for nipples. Nystatin suspension is also sometimes prescribed for baby’s oral use.

    Additionally, make sure to:

    • Clean teats and dummies after use by boiling them for five minutes.
    • Wash your hands thoroughly after applying the cream on babies and nappy changes.
    • Wash anything that comes in contact with the fungal area, such as clothes, bedding etc.

    Preventing Recurring Nipple Thrush

    A recurring thrush while breastfeeding can be prevented by:

    • Ongoing support with attachment and positioning.
    • Considering a good quality probiotic to support a healthy microbiome.
    • Having good hygiene as candida albicans can thrive in shared towels, laundry, clothes, breast pump parts, hands, toys etc.
    • Changing breast pads/bras frequently and washing them as hot as possible to kill off yeast. Disposable breast pads may be preferable to washable ones during an outbreak of thrush.
    • Making dietary adjustments such as reducing sugar, processed foods, carbohydrates, dairy and increasing iron intake may be helpful.
    • If thrush seems recurring, consider testing for diabetes.

    Sometimes, nipple thrush pain is quite similar to other health issues – some of the most popular issues that get mistaken as a yeast infection are:

    • Vasospasm/Raynaud’s Phenomenon
    • Micro-fissures due to suboptimal attachment.
    • Tongue tie in baby.
    • Nipple eczema.
    • Bacterial infection (staphylococcus aureus possibly).
    • Other skin conditions like psoriasis or dermatitis.

    Bibliography.

    1. Amir L, Hoover K. (2002) “Candidiasis and Breastfeeding.” LLLI Schaumberg
    2. Chetwynd EM, Ives TJ, Payne PM et al. (2002) “Fluconazole for postpartum candidal mastitis and infant thrush.” J Hum Lact;18:168-71.
    3. Hale T. (2012) “Medications and Mothers Milk” (15th Ed), Hale Publications
    4. Hoppe JE, et al (1997) “Treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis in immunocompetent infants: a randomised multicentre study of miconazole gel vs nystatin suspension.” Paed Infec Dis. 1997; 16:288-93
    5. Mohrbacher, N., Stock J. (2008) “La Leche League International: The Breastfeeding Answer Book” 3rd revised edition, LLLI.
    6. Weiner S. (2006)” Diagnosis and Management of Candida of the Nipple and Breast.” J.Midwif. Women Health; 51:125-128
    7. (2002) “Breastfeeding and Maternal Medication” WHO.
    8. http://www.who.ch/child-adolescent-health
    Источник: https://lansinoh.co.uk/blogs/breastfeeding/thrush

    Thrush While Breastfeeding

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    by Amy O’Connor

    Medically Reviewedby Jesil Pazhayampallil, M.D., F.A.A.P.

    Medical Review Policy

    All What to Expect content that addresses health or safety is medically reviewed by a team of vetted health professionals. Our Medical Review Board includes OB/GYNs, pediatricians, infectious disease specialists, doulas, lactation counselors, endocrinologists, fertility specialists and more. 

    We believe you should always know the source of the information you're reading. Learn more about our editorial and medical review policies.

     on July 23, 2021

    When breastfeeding becomes painful, or your baby suddenly goes on strike and won't feed, thrush could be the culprit. Here's how to manage feeding your baby when you're both dealing with thrush.

    Back to Top

    If your baby has white patches in his mouth, or breastfeeding is suddenly more painful for him, you and/or your baby could have a yeast infection — but not the vaginal kind you may have gotten in the past. This harmless-but-annoying fungus known as oral thrush sports cottage cheese-like spots in and around your baby's mouth, and can make breastfeeding difficult for all parties involved.

    Don't panic! Here's what you need to know about thrush and breastfeeding, including treatment and prevention tips so you can both get through this temporary rough patch.

    What is thrush?

    Thrush is a fungus that's present on just about everyone's body, but often flares up in babies under 6 months old, because their developing immune systems aren't yet able to fight off many infections.

    Thrush is caused by an overgrowth of the yeast fungus called Candida albicans, which your newborn may have picked up while traveling through the birth canal. Thrush can also appear in babies who are born prematurely (before 37 weeks), in those with a very low birth weight and in infants who have been treated with antibiotics.

    Thrush is common and easy to treat, but may make breastfeeding difficult for you and your baby. It thrives in warm, damp conditions, which is why it sometimes also appears as diaper rash.

    Signs of thrush while breastfeeding

    Breastfeeding is skin to skin, so nursing a baby with thrush could mean the infection gets passed along to you — and, in turn, it can travel right back to your baby. Here are the signs of thrush in both breastfeeding mothers and their babies. 

    Thrush symptoms in breastfeeding people

    If you have a case of candida on your nipples, breasts or areolas, you may experience:

    Continue Reading Below

    • Sensitive or itchy skin
    • Red or cracked nipples
    • Flaky skin around the areola
    • Sharp pain in your breasts or nipples between feedings

    It's also possible to develop thrush under your breasts, as candida loves a dark, moist place to grow — and this is an ideal spot. If you have an infection under your breast, you may note some of the same signs as above, including an itchy or burning sensation as well as red or flaky skin.

    Thrush symptoms in babies

    If your baby has thrush, you may notice the following:

    • The main symptom of oral thrush is white spots on your baby's mouth, tongue and sometimes the corners of the mouth. These spots will look a bit like cottage cheese, and won't come off easily if you wipe his mouth with your finger or a soft cloth.
    • Fussiness is another common sign, so if your infant starts to suck and then turns away or cries, it could be thrush.

    Be careful not to confuse thrush with an oral coating of your breast milk, which can also show up as white spots. How to tell the difference: Milk curds wipe away, but thrush does not.

    Treatments for thrush while breastfeeding

    Treatments for thrush in breastfeeding people

    Thrush can be passed back and forth, so your practitioner may recommend that both you and your baby get treated. If you have thrush on your nipples, areolas or breasts, your doctor will likely recommend that you apply a prescription antifungal cream. The infection should clear up after about a week, but let your doctor know if it doesn't.

    Treatments for thrush in babies

    Oral thrush in babies can be treated with an antifungal medication (such as Nystatin), which can be applied topically to the inside of the mouth and tongue. Oral fluconazole (Diflucan) given by dropper may also be prescribed in tough cases. (If thrush is on your breasts or your baby's bottom, you may use a different kind of medication.)

    Common questions about thrush and breastfeeding

    • Can your baby still breastfeed if he gets thrush? Your baby can breastfeed during an outbreak of thrush, but if he has sore patches in his mouth, he may avoid latching on or be reluctant to feed at all (if your baby is on a "nursing strike," check to see if thrush could be the cause). Others aren't bothered by thrush, and happily nurse away. The challenge comes if your baby's thrush passes to your breasts and makes them sore, too. If breastfeeding is your baby's primary source of nourishment, and he's turning his head or crying when it comes time to nurse, call your practitioner to see how you can speed up healing.
    • Can your baby give you thrush if you're breastfeeding?Yes, oral thrush from your baby can be transmitted to your breasts from your baby's mouth or skin during feeds, but you can also potentially get it in sneakier ways, like changing diapers, touching his pacifier to your skin or wiping his drool. If you are susceptible to getting vaginal yeast infections or have one already, you may be more likely to get thrush from your baby while breastfeeding.
    • Can breastfeeding cause thrush in your baby? Candida can live on your breasts, in your nipples or in your breast milk, making it easy for it to pass to your baby through feedings. Candida can also spread to anything that touches your baby's mouth, including your hands, milk, burp cloths or your clothing, and can potentially end up causing thrush in your baby. The presence of candida can result in an overgrowth — oral thrush. Those with relatively weak immune systems — such as newborns, premature babies, very low birth weight babies and children with cancer — are more susceptible to developing it. Taking antibiotics can also result in a loss of "good" bacteria that help fight off fungal infections.  On the other hand, if your breastfeeding baby has oral thrush, it's possible you got the infection from him.
    • What if thrush makes breastfeeding too painful? If breastfeeding is too painful while you or your baby has thrush, check in with your pediatrician to get treatment, fast. You may find it more comfortable to pump rather than breastfeed. It might also help to talk to a breastfeeding or lactation consultant to help you find ways to continue that aren’t too uncomfortable.
    • Can you give your baby pumped breast milk if you have thrush? Mothers are encouraged to keep up their nursing routine during the treatment of thrush — and some prefer to continue pumping and serving stored or frozen milk, too. There’s some research that indicates using frozen pumped milk while having thrush doesn’t pose a risk to healthy babies, especially if the milk is scalded before serving it. However, since freezing your milk won’t kill yeast, discuss the best approach with your pediatrician, especially if you’re an exclusive pumper. They may recommend scalding the pumped milk and allowing it to cool before offering it to your baby as a conservative approach.

    How to prevent thrush while breastfeeding

    It's not always possible to prevent your baby from getting thrush. But you can try to avoid it by keeping things as clean, dry and unconducive to fungus growth as possible using these tactics:

    • Wash your hands thoroughly after changing your baby's diaper, as thrush can be spread through the digestive system and thrives in the warm folds of his bottom. You can also make sure to change your baby’s diaper frequently and keep his bottom and thigh folds as clean and dry as possible.
    • Thoroughly clean your bottles (including bottle nipples), your pumping equipment, pacifiers and toys (especially the ones that might go in baby's mouth) between uses. 
    • Practice nipple and breast hygiene, such as by wearing cotton bras and tanks, which are less likely to trap moisture, and allowing your nipples to dry completely between feedings. Change nipple pads and shields often.
    • Have a separate towel for each family member. Wash all linens in hot water, and dry well.

    From the What to Expect editorial team and Heidi Murkoff, author of What to Expect When You're Expecting. What to Expect follows strict reporting guidelines and uses only credible sources, such as peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions and highly respected health organizations. Learn how we keep our content accurate and up-to-date by reading our medical review and editorial policy.

    • What to Expect the First Year, 3rd edition, Heidi Murkoff.
    • WhatToExpect.com, What is Thrush in Babies?, November 2020.
    • WhatToExpect.com, How to Change a Baby’s Diaper, March 2021.
    • WhatToExpect.com, How to Treat Sore Nipples and Breastfeeding Pain, August 2020.
    • WhatToExpect.com, Most Common Breastfeeding Problems and Solutions, August 2020.
    • WhatToExpect.com, Nursing Strikes: Why Baby May Be Refusing to Breastfeed, August 2020.
    • WhatToExpect.com, Exclusive Pumping Guide, July 2020.
    • American Academy of Pediatrics, Thrush and Other Candida Infections, October 2020.
    • American Academy of Pediatrics, Thrush, 2020.
    • National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus, Thrush in Newborns, October 2017.
    • Mayo Clinic, Oral Thrush, March 2018.
    • La Leche League International, Storing Human Milk, 2021. 
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Candidiasis, October 2020.
    • Merck Manual, Candidiasis, 2021.
    • National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, Effect of Probiotics on Oral Candidiasis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis, October 2019.
    • National Institutes of Health, Candida Infection of the Skin, December 2020.
    • National Organization for Rare Disorders, Candidiasis, 2021.
    • Stanford Children’s Health, Thrush (Oral Candida Infection) in Children, 2021.
    • Leigh Anne O’Connor, IBCLC, LCCE, lactation consultant.

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    Blog

    Sore nipples are very common, especially if you’re ovulating or breastfeeding. However, just as with most reproductive health issues, many women feel bashful about discussing them openly.

    What you need to know, however, is that there is nothing to be embarrassed about. Nipples are highly sensitive areas, and as such, are easily irritated.

    5 Home Remedies for Sore Nipples

    1. Aloe Vera

    Fresh Aloe vera delivers soothing relief and natural healing for sore nipples. Rub some clear gel from the inside of an aloe leaf onto the affected area and allow it to air dry. The cooling relief starts almost immediately.

    2. Coconut Oil

    Coconut oil is great for soothing your skin. Apply a small amount to nipples in a gentle massage. It can bring relief to sore, cracked or itchy nipples. It’s also a moisturizing agent, so it’s particularly welcoming if you’re breastfeeding.

    3. Basil Leaves

    Grind up some leaves into a paste, and apply to the nipples, then allow to air dry. Before breastfeeding your little one, remember to wash off the paste.

    4. Witch Hazel

    Applying witch hazel to your nipples will help reduce inflammation, and eliminate itching.

    5. Cold and Warm therapy

    Applying ice (wrapped in a towel) for a few minutes will help reduce any swelling in the area, while applying a heat pack promotes healing. Just make sure not to apply heat directly to the skin.

    Natural Nipple Soreness Treatment for Nursing Moms

    For the nursing mother, just applying a few drops of your own breast milk to the nipple before breastfeeding will provide healing. Breast milk is known to contain antibacterial properties. After breastfeeding, apply more milk to your affected nipple and allow it to air dry.

    7 Sore Nipple Symptoms

    Every woman is different, so it’s possible that you may not experience every symptom, but you might experience some of the following symptoms:

    • Mild soreness
    • Breast pain
    • Tenderness
    • Swelling
    • Nipples or breasts feel heavy
    • Itchiness
    • Discharge from nipples

    These issues do not need to send anyone into panic mode, but if you are curious about more information or are starting to worry, please contact a medical professional.

    10 Causes of Sore Nipples

    There are many reasons for experiencing sore nipples. Some of the most common reasons include the following:

    1. Ovulation. When you’re ovulating, the levels of estrogen and progesterone in your body fluctuate: Estrogen causes breasts to enlarge, while progesterone causes milk ducts to engorge. This causes the nipples to become very tender and sore. It usually occurs about a week to ten days before your period.

    2. Menstruation. Just as when you’re ovulating, estrogen levels change, causing reactions while you’re on your period: bloating, mood swings, breast pain, and nipple soreness. Sometimes the breast tissue around the nipple will look lumpy.

    3. Pregnancy. Sore nipples during pregnancy are due to a rise in estrogen. This hormone promotes breast growth for the production of milk. In addition, while your body prepares to deliver your baby, you receive additional blood flow to your breasts. The combination of both factors often results in sore nipples.

    4. Breastfeeding. Newborns need constant feeding, and the constant latching onto your breasts eventually stretches tissue in the areola. As a result, you may experience tenderness, chafing, pain, and soreness in your nipples.

    5. Mastitis. Mastitis is an inflammation of breast tissue. It can be caused by bacteria entering your system through cracked skin. It’s often experienced by women who are lactating. Another common cause is a blocked milk duct, which occurs when a breast isn’t completely emptied during a feeding.

    6. Eczema. Certain chemicals found in soaps or laundry detergent can cause irritation to the skin. If irritation occurs in the areolas, the nipples can become itchy and sore.

    7. Menopause. The same way an increase in estrogen and progesterone cause nipple soreness during ovulation and menstruation, a decrease in these hormones also results in breast pain and tenderness. This is especially so during menopause, when the fluctuation is so drastic. In addition to soreness, you may feel a burning or throbbing sensation around the nipples.

    8. Paget’s Disease of the nipple. This condition occurs when cancer cells collect in the tissue surrounding the nipples. In addition to soreness, the nipple becomes itchy, red, scaly, and irritated. It’s usually diagnosed in women in their 50s or 60s.

    9. Yeast infection of the nipples. Yeast infections are skin infections. While it is commonly known to occur in the vagina, it can also happen on nipples. This is common when a woman is breastfeeding, since the baby can pass thrush through their mouth into the nipples. This type of yeast thrives on breast milk.

    10. Running long distances. Sometimes, nipple soreness doesn’t have anything to do with your reproductive health. If you’re a new runner, it’s essential to wear a good sports bra that fits well and is specifically designed for high-impact activity. A regular bra can allow your breasts to bounce around while you run, causing friction with the material you’re wearing. You can also apply Body Glide around your sports bra line to avoid chafing and irritation.

    Call OB-GYN Women’s Centre of Lakewood Ranch Today

    Our highly skilled and compassionate doctors offer support with kindness. Sore nipples are a common occurrence. If you would like more information about tender breasts or have general gynecological inquiries, please contact OB-GYN Women’s Centre of Lakewood Ranch today. Let us advise you further.

    Comments

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    Источник: https://obgynwc.com/home-remedies-for-sore-nipples/
    home remedies for nipple yeast infection

    : Home remedies for nipple yeast infection

    Home remedies for nipple yeast infection
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    Natural Thrush Treatment for First commonwealth bank ardmore boulevard and Baby

    When you’re breastfeeding, thrush can happen at anytime. Let’s talk about a great natural thrush treatment for mom and baby.

    I remember it like it was just yesterday. We had finally gotten the hang of breastfeeding. He was off the nipple shield, his latch was set, the pain had stopped. the skeleton key in hindi download felt like a champ. I wanted to hold signs wherever I went pointing it out: look at this, look what I’m doing with my body.

    Then came the thrush. Ugh!

    Natural Thrush Treatment For Mom And Baby

    It just started out as general itching for me. I thought nothing of it, nothing at all. Then the thrush turned to searing pain, the kind of itching pain you feel when you’ve scratched a bug bite for too long—except much, much worse. 

    Misconceptions About Treating Thrush

    Through the mom’s group I was a part of I knew that thrush existed, but I assumed only dirty people got it, people who don’t wash bras and only shower once a month. Boy was I wrong.

    In my first-time mom panic, I called the my OB. She asked me to check the baby’s mouth, and sure enough it was dotted with white patches—and not just the milky ones from a good feed—genuine stay-put patches.  The nurse offered to call me in a prescription of nystatin, to which I gladly agreed, knowing that if I felt like this, my baby probably felt much worse.

    For my thrush pain, she told me to pick up some jock cream. Say what? That should have been the first sign that I should have gone down a different path, but I went with it, trusting the nurse over my gut.

    Following the nurses instructions, I painted Anthony’s mouth before and after every feeding, dousing my nipples with jock cream after he nursed and scrubbing them raw to get it off so that I wouldn’t poison my first born. After two days there was no change, so I started to do some research.

    Natural Thrush Treatment that Works Fast

    Thrush is essentially a yeast infection in the mucus membranes, which can affect multiple parts of the body. For us it manifested in white patches in his mouth, a shiny red rash, and itchy, painful nipples. Looking on the back of my nystatin bottle, I recognized one of the key ingredients as sugar.  Yeast thrives off sugar. No wonder we hadn’t kicked the thrush yet.

    Natural Thrush Treatment Home remedies for nipple yeast infection Mom And Baby FB

    I continued to read and research, looking for a good natural thrush treatment. I’d heard about genetian violet, but there were a few mixed reviews and links to cancer that left me unnerved. Plus, I didn’t want everything in my life to be purple.

    I found a few articles on success with grapefruit seed extract, and, paired with anecdotal success from a few women in my mom’s group I decided to try it as a natural thrush treatment. It was, after all, just an extract straight from grapefruit. If it failed, there td bank 4 ave brooklyn no harm done.

    Oh. My. Goodness. Just ten drops of GSE in an ounce of water. That’s all it took. I soaked Q-tips in the solution and painted his mouth before feedings, and my nipples after. Within two hours the pain had subsided. Within one day, the thrush was completely gone. I kept up the routine for a day or two after the thrush had cleared, just in case, but it was gone, and it hasn’t been back since.

    Ultimately, breastfeeding is hard. There are a lot of challenges you can face. Thrush shouldn’t be something that makes or breaks that relationship, that destroys the joy of bonding, the pride in knowing that you are sustaining a life with your body, the love you will undoubtedly share with your child. Trust your gut, do your research, and you will undoubtedly find natural thrush treatment solutions for you and your family that will be the best for all parties involved.

    More Breastfeeding Articles:


    Breastfeeding & Beyond author: Megan EcclesWhen Megan Eccles isn’t blogging at Megan Eccles, she can be found on a ranch in the foothills of Southern California, trying to keep up with the many ups and downs of life.  Between striving towards self sufficiency, learning how to be a mother, and writing, and writing, and writing, she can be found on the left most corner of her couch with a cup of tea and a good book.

    Filed Under: Breastfeeding, Natural Remedies, Practical Health27 Comments

    Источник: https://www.intoxicatedonlife.com/natural-thrush-treatment/

    Breastfeeding and thrush

    Breast and nipple pain in breastfeeding women is sometimes caused by a thrush (candida) infection in the breast. Breastfed babies can also develop thrush in their mouths.

    Thrush infections sometimes happen when your nipples become cracked or damaged. This means the candida fungus that causes thrush can get into your nipple or breast. 

    Thrush infections can also happen after you or your baby has had a course of antibiotics. Antibiotics may reduce the number of helpful bacteria in the body and allow the candida fungus that causes thrush to flourish.

    Signs of thrush in breastfeeding women

    You may have a thrush infection in your breasts if:

    It's not likely to be thrush if:

    • you have always experienced pain while breastfeeding
    • the pain only affects home remedies for nipple yeast infection nipple or breast
    • you have a fever
    • there is a warm, red patch on 1 of your breasts

    Symptoms of oral thrush in breastfed babies 

    Signs to look for include:

    • creamy white how to activate walmart prepaid debit card or patches on the tongue, gums, roof of the mouth or insides of the cheeks – if you gently wipe these patches with a clean cloth, they won't come off
    • your baby being unsettled when feeding
    • a white film on the lips
    • in some babies, nappy rash that won't clear up

    If you suspect you or your baby has a thrush infection, see your health visitor or GP. They can arrange for swabs first bank of india after independence be taken from your nipples and your baby's mouth to see if thrush is present. It's important other causes of breast pain are ruled out before you start treatment for thrush. 

    If no thrush is present, the pain home remedies for nipple yeast infection be caused by something else, such as poor positioning and attachment. It's important for your midwife, health visitor or a breastfeeding specialist to watch you do a full breastfeed and give advice if needed.

    Read more about other possible causes of breast pain.

    If either you or your baby does have thrush, you'll need to be treated at the same time as the infection can easily spread between you. It can also spread to other members of the family. 

    Washing your hands carefully after nappy changes and using separate towels will help prevent the infection spreading. You'll also need to wash and sterilise any dummies, teats or toys your baby puts in their mouth.

    You'll need to wash any breastfeeding bras at a high temperature and change your breast pads frequently while you're both being treated.

    If you express any breast milk while you have thrush, you'll need to give the milk to your baby while you're still having treatment. Freezing it and using it may mean the thrush comes back at a later date.

    Treating thrush when you're breastfeeding

    You can carry on breastfeeding while you and your baby are treated for thrush. 

    Oral thrush in babies is usually treated with an anti-fungal gel or liquid. This is safe for your baby to have. It's important to wash your hands carefully after treating your baby. 

    See more about treating oral thrush in babies.

    Thrush in breastfeeding women is usually treated with a cream that you sparingly spread on and around your nipples after feeds. You'll need to wash your hands thoroughly after treating yourself. Some women may need to take anti-fungal tablets to clear the infection. 

    Once you and your baby start treatment, your symptoms should improve within 2 to 3 days. It will take a little longer for the infection to clear completely. 

    If you don't see any improvement within 7 days, speak to your health visitor or GP.

    Источник: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/baby/breastfeeding-and-bottle-feeding/breastfeeding-problems/thrush/

    Rashes under the breasts are quite common. Blame it on the summers or seasonal allergies, these rashes are often unavoidable. Breast rashes can also be an embarrassing affair at public gatherings due to the constant itching. How do you deal with this ordeal? Are there any natural remedies available to get rid of them? Read on to know more.

    Causes And Symptoms Of Rashes Under The Breast

    If you notice irritation or redness of the skin under your breasts, you have most probably developed a breast rash. Several factors can cause rashes under your breasts. While one of the most common causes is a heat rash, other triggers can be classified into four categories. They are:

    The skin folds under your breasts as well as other body parts may for the ideal breeding ground for bacterial, fungal, and yeast infections. Candidiasis, which is caused by a type of yeast called Candida, and ringworm, which is a fungal infection caused by a group of fungi called dermatophytes, can both result in rashes under the breasts.

    Itchy blisters, cracks, and red, round chinese pokemon cards worth money of skin that look like a ring are some of the common signs associated with such infections.

    Subscribe

    If you have developed red or skin-colored bumps under your breasts that itch a lot, it could be hives. Hives are formed as a result of an allergic response of your body to certain foods, medications, pollen, plants, and insect bites. Hives will usually blanch us bank arena concert tickets turn white when pressed.

    Autoimmune conditions like eczema, inverse psoriasis, hyperhidrosis, and Hailey-Hailey disease can also cause rashes to form on different parts of your body, including the folds under your breasts.

    Eczema is characterized by small, fluid-filled blisters that eventually ooze and crust over. The symptoms of inverse psoriasis include smoothened, red patches of skin in the affected area.

    Hyperhidrosis causes frequent sweating that leads to the formation of rashes. Hailey-Hailey disease triggers blistering rashes in the affected body parts.

    Another cause of rashes under your breasts could be inflammatory breast cancer, which is a rare but rapidly spreading type of cancer. Its symptoms may include:

    • Pink or red discoloration of the skin
    • Pitted skin that may resemble an orange peel
    • A pimple-like rash
    • An inverted nipple that points inward rather than outward

    The causes of rashes under the breast may vary in their gravity. While such rashes are hardly a cause of concern most of the times, they may also be a result of life-threatening diseases like cancer.

    If your symptoms are similar to that of any serious medical conditions, it is best to avail medical intervention immediately to rule out any complications. However, if the rashes are due to microbial infections or allergies, here are some amazing home remedies that will help.

    11 Natural Remedies To Get Rid Of Rashes Under The Breast

    1. Baking Soda

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    The alkalinity of baking soda increases the pH of your skin and helps relieve itchiness associated with rashes under your breasts. It can also help in the removal of scales from the skin if any (1).

    You Will Need
    • 1 teaspoon of baking soda
    • A few drops of water
    What You Have To Do
    1. Add a few drops of water to a teaspoon of baking soda.
    2. Mix well and apply the mixture to the affected areas.
    3. Leave it on for 20-30 minutes.
    4. Rinse it off with water.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You may do this once daily.

    2. Coconut Oil

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    The anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of coconut oil can help in getting rid of rashes under the breasts (2). The antimicrobial potential of coconut oil against Candida can be used to treat yeast infections that could be causing the rashes (3).

    You Will Need
    • 1-2 teaspoons of virgin coconut oil
    What You Have To Do
    1. Rub virgin coconut oil in your palms and apply it over the affected area.
    2. Leave it on until it dries.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You may do this 1-2 times daily.

    3. Tea Tree Essential Oil

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    Tea tree oil exhibits antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties (4). These properties can help in getting rid of rashes under the breast by eliminating the infection-causing microbes and reducing swelling and itching.

    You Will Need
    • 2-3 drops of tea tree oil
    • 2-3 teaspoons of any carrier oil (coconut or olive oil)
    What You Have To Do
    1. Add two to three drops of tea tree oil to two to three teaspoons of any carrier oil.
    2. Mix well and apply to the affected area.
    3. Leave it on overnight.
    4. Rinse it off the next morning.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You can do this once daily.

    4. Apple Cider Vinegar

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    Apple cider vinegar exhibits antimicrobial properties that work effectively against multiple microbes, including Candida. Hence, this remedy may be useful if the rashes under your breasts are the result of a yeast infection (5).

    You Will Need
    • 1-2 tablespoons of organic apple cider vinegar
    • ½ cup of water
    • Cotton balls
    What You Have To Do
    1. Add one to two tablespoons of raw apple cider vinegar to half a cup of water.
    2. Mix well and soak a cotton ball in it.
    3. Apply the mixture to the affected area and allow it to dry.
    4. Rinse it off with water.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You can do this multiple times daily.

    5. Cold Compress

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    A cold compress numbs the affected area, thereby helping in reducing the itchiness that often occurs in the case of rashes under the breast (6).

    You Will Need
    What You Have To Do
    1. Apply a cold compress to the affected area.
    2. Leave it on for 5-10 minutes and remove it.
    3. Repeat twice.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You may do this multiple times daily.

    6. Garlic

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    Garlic offers multiple benefits for your skin. It has both anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties, which can help in treating skin infections that cause rashes under the breasts (7), (8).

    You Will Need
    • 1-2 garlic cloves
    • 1 tablespoon of olive oil
    What You Have To Do
    1. Mince the garlic cloves.
    2. Add a tablespoon of olive oil to the minced garlic and heat it slightly.
    3. Strain the garlic cloves out.
    4. Apply the oil to the affected area.
    5. Leave it on overnight.
    6. Rinse it off the next morning.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You may do this once daily.

    7. Aloe Vera

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    The anti-inflammatory activity of aloe vera extracts can be used in soothing the itchiness and inflammation associated with rashes under the breast (9).

    You Will Need
    • Freshly extracted aloe vera gel
    What You Have To Do
    1. Extract the gel from an aloe leaf.
    2. Whisk the gel using a fork and apply it to the affected area.
    3. Leave it on for 20-30 minutes and then rinse it off with water.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You may do this 1-2 times daily.

    8. Neem

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    Neem exhibits many therapeutic benefits, including its ability to reduce inflammation and fight infections (10). These properties can also help reduce breast rashes and prevent their recurrence.

    You Will Need
    • A handful of neem leaves
    • Water (as required)
    What You Have To Do
    1. Wash the neem leaves thoroughly.
    2. Grind the leaves with a little water to form a thick paste.
    3. Apply the neem paste to the affected skin and leave it on for 20-30 minutes.
    4. Rinse it off with water.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You may do this once daily.

    9. Oatmeal

    Shutterstock

    Oatmeal has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may be used in the treatment of rashes under the breasts (11).

    You Will Need
    • 1 cup of ground oats
    • Water
    What You Have To Do
    1. Fill your bath with water.
    2. Add a cup of ground oats to it and mix well.
    3. Soak in the oatmeal bath for 20-30 minutes.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You may do this once daily.

    10. Witch Hazel

    Shutterstock

    The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of home remedies for nipple yeast infection hazel can help in the treatment of rashes under the breasts and alleviate itching and inflammation (12).

    You Will Need
    What You Have To Do
    1. Take some witch hazel on a cotton ball and apply it to the affected area.
    2. Allow it to dry on its own.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You may do this 1-2 times daily.

    11. Turmeric

    Shutterstock

    The major component of turmeric is curcumin. This compound has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which can help in treating the rashes under the breasts (13).

    You Will Need
    • 1-2 teaspoons of turmeric powder
    • Water (as required)
    What You Have To Do
    1. Mix one to two teaspoons of turmeric powder with a few drops of water.
    2. Mix well to form a thick paste.
    3. Apply the paste to the affected area and leave it on for 15-20 minutes.
    4. Rinse it off with water.
    How Often You Should Do This

    You may do this once daily or every alternate day.

    While you allow these remedies to work on those stubborn rashes under your breasts, here are some beneficial tips that can prevent the rashes from recurring.

    How To Prevent Rashes Under The Breast

    • Clean the affected area with antibacterial soap and water daily.
    • Use only fragrance-free moisturizers.
    • Avoid scratching the affected area.
    • Wear soft clothing that does not irritate your skin.
    • Change out of sweaty clothing right away.
    • Limit wearing your bra as much as possible until the rash begins clearing.
    • Wear bra liners to absorb excess sweat.
    • Apply Calamine lotion on the affected area.

    Try a combination of these tips and remedies to get rid of rashes under the breasts for good. In case your symptoms do not show any improvement despite treatment, make an appointment with a dermatologist as soon as possible to find out the root cause of the rashes.

    Was this post helpful? Tell us in the comments below.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    Does a yeast infection under the breast smell?

    Yes, if left untreated, yeast infections under the breasts can give off a foul odor.

    Can I use deodorant under my breasts?

    Yes, you can use a deodorant or antiperspirant under your breasts. However, this is not recommended usps office open today you are breastfeeding.

    How long should a breast rash last?

    A breast rash should ideally disappear in a few days or weeks. However, if it doesn’t, it is best to see a doctor immediately.

    How do I stop sweating between my breasts?

    You can stop excessive sweating between your breasts by using any deodorizing talc and wearing soft and breathable clothing. Sweat or moisture-wicking bras are also available to tackle this problem.

    Will going braless affect your breast health?

    There is no scientific proof that suggests that going braless will affect your breast health in any way. It may, however, cause your breasts to sag in the long run.

    Can a breast rash be a sign of breast cancer?

    Yes, a breast rash can also be a sign of inflammatory breast cancer. Its symptoms may include:

    • Pink or red discoloration of the skin
    • Pitted skin that may resemble an orange peel
    • A pimple-like rash
    • An inverted nipple that points inward rather than outward

    What doctor to visit for rashes under the breasts?

    You can visit a dermatologist for rashes under the breasts. Depending on your symptoms, your dermatologist may either prescribe the required treatment or refer you to another specialist.

    When to visit a doctor for rashes under the breasts?

    You can visit a doctor for rashes under the breasts if your symptoms turn severe or do not go away despite availing treatment and taking the necessary precautions.

    Sources

    Articles on StyleCraze are backed by verified information from peer-reviewed and academic research papers, reputed organizations, research institutions, and medical associations to ensure accuracy and relevance. Check out our editorial policy for further details.

    • Scaly skin and bath pH: Rediscovering baking soda, Journal Of The American Academy Of Dermatology.
      https://www.jaad.org/article/S0190-9622(09)00493-9/fulltext
    • Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic activities of virgin coconut oil. Pharmaceutical Biology, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/20645831/
    • In vitro evaluation of the antifungal activity of monolaurin against Candida albicans biofilms. PeerJ, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/27366648/
    • Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree) Oil: a Review of Antimicrobial and Other Medicinal Properties, Clinical Microbiology Reviews, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1360273/
    • Antimicrobial activity of apple cider vinegar against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans; downregulating cytokine and microbial protein expression, Scientific Reports, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5788933/
    • Effects of menthol and cold on histamine-induced itch and skin reactions in man. Neuroscience Letters, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/7624016/
    • [Ajoene the main active compound of garlic (Allium sativum): a new antifungal agent]. Ibero-American Journal of Mycology, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/16854181/
    • Anti-Wrinkle and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Active Garlic Components and the Inhibition of MMPs via NF-κB Signaling, PLoS ONE, US Amazon prime and audible Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3774756/
    • Anti-inflammatory activity of extracts from Aloe vera gel. Journal Of Ethnopharmacology, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/9121170/
    • Therapeutics Role of Azadirachta indica (Neem) and Their Active Constituents in Diseases Prevention and Treatment, Evidence-based Complementary And Alternative Medicine, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4791507/
    • Anti-inflammatory activities of colloidal oatmeal (Avena sativa) contribute to the effectiveness of oats in the treatment of itch associated with dry, irritated skin. Journal of Drugs in Dermatology, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/25607907/
    • Antioxidant and potential anti-inflammatory activity of extracts and formulations of white tea rose, and witch hazel on primary human dermal fibroblast cells, Journal Of Inflammation, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3214789/
    • Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of curcumin. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, US National Library Of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/17569207/

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    Источник: https://www.stylecraze.com/articles/effective-home-remedies-to-treat-rashes-under-breasts/

    Nipple Thrush

    Thrush is a common, harmless yeast infection found in many different parts of the body, affecting both men and women. This blog post will discuss breastfeeding thrush, its causes, symptoms, and treatments.

    What Is Thrush?

    Thrush is an overgrowth of the yeast organism candida albicans. This organism is always present in our bodies but has a tendency to overgrow when we are ill, tired, pregnant or using antibiotics.

    It thrives in warm, moist environments such as the vagina, nappy area, mouth, and nipple (in lactating women). Overgrowth may also happen when our microbiome is out of balance.

    What Causes Nipple Thrush?

    Nipple thrush is likely to occur when the infection is affecting other parts of the body, usually the vagina. There may be a higher chance of breastfeeding thrush if you have the tendency to vaginal yeast infections.

    The infection can also be caused if any other family remember has the infection such as a nappy rash or athlete’s foot. Antibiotics are another cause of thrush as they kill good bacteria, giving room to bad bacteria to flourish. If a mother has experienced recent nipple trauma, that can also lead to thrush.

    Nipple Thrush Symptoms

    Thrush in breastfeeding mothers can be painful, and problems can start after a period of breastfeeding without issues sometimes affecting both breasts. It’s therefore important to look out for the following symptoms when identifying whether you have thrush on your nipples:

    • Itching, burning or shooting pain on the nipple or deep within the breast, often towards the end of a feed, and for quite some time after. It’s important that other causes of breast pain should always be ruled out before a thrush diagnosis is made.
    • Nipple trauma that won’t heal.
    • A white ‘plaque’ or residue may be present in the crease around the nipple.
    • Pain does not reduce with improved latch.
    • There is NO related pyrexia.
    • There are NO red areas on the breast.

    If you think you might be suffering from cracked and sore nipples try our HPA Lanolin Www alsat m tv seriale Cream.

    What Does Thrush on a Nipple Look Like?

    When you have nipple thrush, your nipple appearance may change to being shiny in appearance, sometimes chapped, blistered with white patches but may also look completely normal. You may also experience itchy, flaky and red nipples or areola.

    Breastfed Baby Thrush Symptoms

    Babies can also display symptoms of thrush (though they may not) these can consist of:

    • White patches in baby’s mouth
    • White coating on the tongue that does not go away when cleaned
    • A pearl-like sheen to lips
    • Nappy rash
    • Fussiness and windiness when breastfeeding

    All of these signs and symptoms can help confirm diagnosis but are not necessarily present in their entirety which can make differential diagnosis difficult. However, a swab can confirm diagnosis (using a charcoal swab).  

    Nipple Thrush Treatment

    You can carry on breastfeeding while you and your baby are being treated for this fungal infection. However, it’s essential to get full treatment to kill the bacteria. The first route consists of a thrush cream that can be applied to the skin of the nipple, the baby’s mouth, and bottom.

    Miconazole cream 2% can be prescribed to apply to nipples in minimal quantities, after every feed. If nipples appear very sore topically, miconazole 2% in combination with hydrocortisone 1% may be most effective (such as Dactacort cream).

    The second route, is systematic/oral treatment for deep breast pain that does not improve with topical treatment. As a drug unlicensed for breastfeeding women, physicians take responsibility for prescribing this. The amounts of fluconazole getting through to baby from the breastmilk would be less than that prescribed for a baby.

    However, fluconazole has a half-life of 88 hours in babies under 6 weeks therefore the risk of accumulating doses needs to be considered when planning this treatment. Treatment generally comes as a loading dose of 150-400mg and maintenance doses of 100-200mg for at least 10 days.

    Fluconazole does not kill off yeast as such but stops overgrowth, which is why shortened treatment courses may well be ineffective and could arguably cause sensitisation.

    It is also recommended to keep your nipples as dry as possible by regularly changing your breast pads to avoid any moist environment.

    Baby Thrush Treatment

    Miconazole oral gel for thrush seems to be the most effective treatment for babies. Gel does not penetrate the skin and is not suitable for nipples. Nystatin suspension is also sometimes prescribed for baby’s oral use.

    Additionally, make sure to:

    • Clean teats and dummies after use by boiling them for five minutes.
    • Wash your hands thoroughly after applying the cream on babies and nappy changes.
    • Wash anything that comes in contact with the fungal area, such as clothes, bedding etc.

    Preventing Recurring Nipple Thrush

    A recurring thrush while breastfeeding can be prevented by:

    • Ongoing support with attachment and positioning.
    • Considering a good quality probiotic to support a healthy microbiome.
    • Having good hygiene as candida albicans can thrive in shared towels, laundry, clothes, home remedies for nipple yeast infection pump parts, hands, toys etc.
    • Changing breast pads/bras frequently and washing them as hot as possible to kill off yeast. Disposable breast pads may be preferable to washable ones boone county ky school closings an outbreak of thrush.
    • Making dietary adjustments such as reducing sugar, processed foods, carbohydrates, dairy and increasing iron intake may be helpful.
    • If thrush seems recurring, consider testing for diabetes.

    Sometimes, nipple thrush pain is quite similar to other health issues – some of the most popular issues that get mistaken as a yeast infection are:

    • Vasospasm/Raynaud’s Phenomenon
    • Micro-fissures due to suboptimal attachment.
    • Tongue tie in baby.
    • Nipple eczema.
    • Bacterial infection (staphylococcus aureus possibly).
    • Other skin conditions like psoriasis or dermatitis.

    Bibliography.

    1. Amir L, Hoover K. (2002) “Candidiasis and Breastfeeding.” LLLI Schaumberg
    2. Chetwynd EM, Ives TJ, Payne PM et al. (2002) “Fluconazole for postpartum candidal mastitis and infant thrush.” J Hum Lact;18:168-71.
    3. Hale T. (2012) “Medications and Mothers Milk” (15th Ed), Hale Publications
    4. Hoppe JE, et al (1997) “Treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis in immunocompetent infants: a randomised multicentre study of miconazole gel vs nystatin suspension.” Paed Infec Dis. 1997; 16:288-93
    5. Mohrbacher, N., Stock J. (2008) “La Leche League International: The Breastfeeding Answer Book” 3rd revised edition, LLLI.
    6. Weiner S. (2006)” Diagnosis and Management of Candida of the Nipple and Breast.” J.Midwif. Women Health; 51:125-128
    7. (2002) “Breastfeeding and Maternal Medication” WHO.
    8. http://www.who.ch/child-adolescent-health
    Источник: https://lansinoh.co.uk/blogs/breastfeeding/thrush

    About oral thrush

    Oral thrush is a fungal infection of the throat, tongue or the lining of the mouth. In bad cases, it can spread down the food pipe.

    Oral thrush is mostly caused by a fungal yeast called Candida albicans. We all have this yeast in our bodies, and our immune systems keep it in balance with the other bacteria and funguses that live in our bodies. If the balance is upset, the yeast can multiply and produce an infection.

    Things that can upset the balance include:

    Some babies pick up oral thrush when they pass through their mothers’ vaginas during birth. This is because the vagina often has small amounts of candida naturally.

    Babies might also develop oral thrush if they suck on objects already infected with thrush, like nipples, teats or dummies.

    Oral thrush is very common in the first two years of life. It doesn’t easily spread between children.

    Symptoms of oral thrush

    If your child has oral thrush, you might notice that they have white spots and patches that look like cottage cheese on their tongue, inner cheeks, lips, gums or roof of their mouth. These patches don’t rub off with gentle pressure. If the patches are removed, they leave inflamed areas that can bleed.

    A child with oral thrush might also have cracking and inflammation at the corners of their mouth. They might not be able to taste things as well as usual.

    Oral thrush generally doesn’t irritate babies and young children. But it might cause irritation if the areas get very inflamed. In this case, your child might not want to feed or eat. They might also drool. And if the infection spreads to your child’s food pipe, it can be painful and make it hard for them to swallow.

    If a baby is breastfeeding, they can pass on thrush, which can cause a nipple infection. This kind of infection causes inflamed, sensitive and cracked nipples. Your breast might hurt during feeding, and you might have a stabbing pain deep in your breast.

    Does your child need to see a doctor about oral thrush?

    Yes. You should take your child to the GP if your child:

    • has white patches on the inside of their mouth
    • suffers from thrush infections that keep coming back, even though you’re using treatment recommended by a health professional
    • has difficulty or pain swallowing.

    Oral thrush treatment

    If your child has oral thrush and is otherwise well, your GP might not need to treat the oral thrush. It will go away on its own.

    But if your baby is having difficulty feeding or is irritable, your GP will probably prescribe antifungal drops or oral gel, which you use after each feed or meal for 10 days.

    Sometimes oral thrush goes along with thrush in the nappy area, which will need treatment at the same time.

    You can still breastfeed if your child has oral thrush. Your doctor might advise you to put some antifungal cream on your nipples as well, but you should wipe this off before feeding.

    Prevention of oral thrush

    There are several things you can do to prevent oral thrush:

    • If you’re bottle-feeding your baby, sterilise teats and bottles after each use.
    • If you’re breastfeeding, clean your nipples gently between feeds.
    • Sterilise dummies and teething rings regularly.
    • If your baby gets nappy rash, make sure you treat it properly.
    • Use antibiotics only when necessary and prescribed by a doctor for your child.
    • If your child has asthma, make sure they wash their mouth with water after asthma preventer medications.
    • If your child has diabetes, try to keep their blood sugar level within its target range.
    • Wash clothing at 60°C to kill fungus.
    Источник: https://raisingchildren.net.au/guides/a-z-health-reference/oral-thrush

    Thrush While Breastfeeding

    author-image

    by Amy O’Connor

    Medically Reviewedby Jesil Pazhayampallil, M.D., F.A.A.P.

    Medical Review Policy

    All What to Expect content that addresses health or safety is medically reviewed by a team of vetted health professionals. Our Medical Review Board includes OB/GYNs, pediatricians, infectious disease specialists, doulas, lactation counselors, endocrinologists, fertility specialists and more. 

    We believe you should always know the source of the information you're reading. Learn more about our editorial and medical review policies.

     on July 23, 2021

    When breastfeeding becomes painful, or your baby suddenly goes on strike and won't feed, thrush could be the culprit. Here's how to manage feeding your baby when you're both dealing with thrush.

    Back to Top

    If your baby has white patches in his mouth, or breastfeeding is suddenly more painful for him, you and/or your baby could have a yeast infection — but not the vaginal kind you may have gotten in the past. This harmless-but-annoying fungus known as oral thrush sports cottage cheese-like spots in and around your baby's mouth, and can make breastfeeding difficult for all parties involved.

    Don't panic! Here's what you need to know about thrush and breastfeeding, including treatment and prevention tips so you can both get through this temporary rough patch.

    What is thrush?

    Thrush is a fungus that's present on just about everyone's body, but often flares up in babies under 6 months old, because their developing immune systems aren't yet able to fight off many infections.

    Thrush is caused by an overgrowth of the yeast fungus called Candida albicans, which your newborn may have picked up while traveling through the birth canal. Thrush can also appear in babies who are born prematurely (before 37 weeks), in those with a very low birth weight and in infants who have been treated with antibiotics.

    Thrush is common and easy to treat, but may make breastfeeding difficult for you and your baby. It thrives in warm, damp conditions, which is why it sometimes also appears as diaper rash.

    Signs of thrush while breastfeeding

    Breastfeeding is skin to skin, so nursing a baby with thrush could mean the infection gets passed along to you — and, in turn, it can travel right back to your baby. Here are the signs of thrush in both breastfeeding mothers and their babies. 

    Thrush symptoms in breastfeeding people

    If you have a case of candida on your nipples, breasts or areolas, you may experience:

    Continue Reading Below

    • Sensitive or itchy skin
    • Red or cracked nipples
    • Flaky skin around the areola
    • Sharp pain in your breasts or nipples between feedings

    It's also possible to develop thrush under your breasts, as candida loves a dark, moist place to grow — and this is an ideal spot. If you have an infection under your breast, you may note some of the same signs as above, including an itchy or burning sensation as well as red or flaky skin.

    Thrush symptoms in babies

    If your baby has thrush, you may notice the following:

    • The main symptom of oral thrush is white spots on your baby's mouth, tongue and sometimes the corners of the mouth. These spots will look a bit like cottage cheese, and won't come off easily if you wipe his mouth with your finger or a soft cloth.
    • Fussiness is another common sign, so if your infant starts to suck and then turns away or cries, it could be thrush.

    Be careful not to confuse thrush with an oral coating of your breast milk, which can also show up as white spots. How to tell the difference: Milk curds wipe away, but thrush does not.

    Treatments for thrush while breastfeeding

    Treatments for thrush in breastfeeding people

    Thrush can be passed back and forth, so your practitioner may recommend that both you and your baby get treated. If you have thrush on your nipples, areolas or breasts, your doctor will likely recommend that you apply a prescription antifungal cream. The infection should clear up after about a week, but let your doctor know if it doesn't.

    Treatments for thrush in babies

    Oral thrush in babies can be treated with an antifungal medication (such as Nystatin), which can be applied topically to the inside of the mouth and tongue. Oral fluconazole (Diflucan) given by dropper may also be prescribed in tough cases. (If thrush is on your breasts or your baby's bottom, you may use a different kind of medication.)

    Common questions about home remedies for nipple yeast infection and breastfeeding

    • Can your baby still breastfeed if he gets thrush? Your baby can breastfeed during an outbreak of thrush, but fifth third bank mortgage application he has sore patches in his mouth, he may avoid latching on or be reluctant to feed at all (if your baby is on a "nursing strike," check to see if thrush could be the cause). Others aren't bothered by thrush, and happily nurse away. The challenge comes if your baby's thrush passes to your breasts and makes them sore, too. If breastfeeding is your baby's primary source of nourishment, and he's turning his head or crying when it comes time to nurse, call your practitioner to see how you can speed up healing.
    • Can your baby give you thrush if you're breastfeeding?Yes, oral thrush from your baby can be transmitted to your breasts from your baby's mouth or skin during feeds, but you can also potentially get it in sneakier ways, like changing diapers, touching his pacifier to your skin or wiping his drool. If you are susceptible to getting vaginal yeast infections or have one already, you may be more likely to get thrush from your baby while breastfeeding.
    • Can breastfeeding cause thrush in your baby? Candida can live on your breasts, in your nipples or in your breast milk, making it easy for it to pass to your baby through feedings. Candida can also spread to anything that touches your baby's mouth, including your hands, milk, burp cloths or your clothing, and can potentially end up causing thrush in your baby. The presence of candida can result in an overgrowth — oral thrush. Those with relatively weak immune systems — such as newborns, premature babies, very low birth weight babies and children with cancer — are more susceptible to developing it. Taking antibiotics can also result in a loss of "good" bacteria that help fight off fungal infections.  On the other hand, if your breastfeeding baby has oral thrush, it's possible you got the infection from him.
    • What if thrush makes breastfeeding too painful? If breastfeeding is too painful while you or your baby has thrush, check in with your pediatrician to get treatment, fast. You may find it more comfortable to pump rather than breastfeed. It might also help to talk to a breastfeeding or lactation consultant to help you find ways to continue that aren’t too uncomfortable.
    • Can you give your baby pumped breast milk if you have thrush? Mothers are encouraged to keep up their nursing routine during the treatment of thrush — and some prefer to continue pumping and serving stored or frozen milk, too. There’s some research that indicates using frozen pumped milk while having thrush doesn’t pose a risk to healthy babies, especially if the milk is scalded before serving it. However, since freezing your milk won’t kill yeast, discuss the best approach with your pediatrician, especially if you’re an exclusive pumper. They may recommend scalding the pumped milk discover online banking bonus allowing it to cool before offering it to your baby as a conservative approach.

    How to prevent thrush while breastfeeding

    It's not always possible to prevent your baby from getting thrush. But you can try to avoid it by keeping things as clean, dry and unconducive to fungus growth as possible using these tactics:

    • Wash your hands thoroughly after changing your baby's diaper, as thrush can be spread through the digestive system and thrives in the warm folds of his bottom. You can also make sure to change your baby’s diaper frequently and keep his bottom and thigh folds as clean and dry as possible.
    • Thoroughly clean your bottles (including bottle nipples), your pumping equipment, pacifiers and toys (especially the service credit union branches near me that might go in baby's mouth) between uses. 
    • Practice nipple and breast hygiene, such as by wearing cotton bras and tanks, which are less likely to trap moisture, and allowing your nipples to dry completely between feedings. Change nipple pads and shields often.
    • Have a separate towel for each family member. Wash all linens in hot water, and dry well.

    From the What to Expect editorial team and Heidi Murkoff, author of What to Expect When You're Expecting. What to Expect follows strict reporting guidelines and uses only credible sources, such as peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions and highly respected health organizations. Learn how we keep our content accurate and up-to-date by reading our medical review and editorial policy.

    • What to Expect the First Year, 3rd edition, Heidi Murkoff.
    • WhatToExpect.com, What is Thrush in Babies?, November 2020.
    • WhatToExpect.com, How to Change a Baby’s Diaper, March 2021.
    • WhatToExpect.com, How to Treat Sore Nipples and Breastfeeding Pain, August 2020.
    • WhatToExpect.com, Most Common Breastfeeding Problems and Solutions, August 2020.
    • WhatToExpect.com, Nursing Strikes: Why Baby May Be Refusing to Breastfeed, August 2020.
    • WhatToExpect.com, Exclusive Pumping Guide, July 2020.
    • American Academy of Pediatrics, Thrush and Other Candida Infections, October 2020.
    • American Academy of Pediatrics, Thrush, 2020.
    • National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus, Thrush in Newborns, October 2017.
    • Mayo Clinic, Oral Thrush, March 2018.
    • La Leche League International, Storing Human Milk, 2021. 
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Candidiasis, October 2020.
    • Merck Manual, Candidiasis, 2021.
    • National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine, Effect of Probiotics on Oral Candidiasis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis, October 2019.
    • National Institutes of Health, Candida Infection of the Skin, December 2020.
    • National Organization for Rare Disorders, Candidiasis, 2021.
    • Stanford Children’s Health, Thrush (Oral Candida Infection) in Children, 2021.
    • Leigh Anne O’Connor, IBCLC, LCCE, lactation consultant.

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    Источник: https://www.whattoexpect.com/first-year/breastfeeding/thrush-and-breastfeeding/

    Breastfeeding pain relief: Home remedies and ways to deal with discomfort

  • We earn a commission for products purchased through some links in this article.

  • Breastfeeding pain is extremely common among new mothers. While it’s usually nothing to worry about, don’t ignore the symptoms – especially if they persist for more than a couple of days.

    What you shouldn’t do is suffer in silence. Whether you’re unsure about whether you’re breastfeeding properly, what foods to eat or avoid during breastfeeding, or you’re surprised by the unexpected home remedies for nipple yeast infection of breastfeeding, the early motherhood experience can only be bettered by good, tried-and-tested advice.

    ‘There is an abundance of support available to mums during their breastfeeding journey,’ says Harriet Hickey, a midwife at The Pregnancy Clinic, which has clinics in Kent and Surrey. ‘It’s really important to service credit union branches near me that breastfeeding is a new skill for both you and your baby. Over time you will learn what works out best for you.’ These breastfeeding accessories can make the process more comfortable.

    Here, our experts highlight the most common reasons for breastfeeding pain, and what the best breastfeeding pain relief home remedies are.

    What causes breastfeeding pain?

    There are numerous home remedies for nipple yeast infection for breastfeeding pain – most of which are benign and easily treated.

    ‘It’s very common for women to experience breastfeeding pain, especially first-time mothers,’ says Eleni Mavrides, a consultant in obstetrics and gynaecology. ‘It’s normal for your body to take a few days when first starting to breastfeed to adjust and in that time, you may feel discomfort or pain,’ she explains.

    ‘This is usually because your breasts over-produce milk at the beginning,’ she continues. ‘You can help prevent this through massaging your breasts regularly, letting your baby finish their feeds, and making sure your baby is attaching to the breast properly during feeding. Using over-the-counter medication, such as paracetamol, will manage the pain if you’re in need of pain relief.’

    Woman with her sleeping baby

    Treat breastfeeding pain quickly so it doesn’t affect you bonding with your baby. (Credit: Getty)

    Breastfeeding pain in the breast and home remedies to help

    Breast engorgement

    While breast engorgement is typical for new mums as they adjust to the arrival of milk, it can be very uncomfortable.Breast engorgement happens when your breasts become overly full. This can be quite painful, with symptoms such as tight or hard breasts, pain in your armpit and sometimes difficulty in attaching baby to the breast,’ explains Harriet.

    ‘If breast engorgement happens in the first few days of your baby’s life this may be due to your baby simply establishing their feeds. If this is the case support with positioning and attachment can make all the difference,’ she says. ‘The symptoms of breast engorgement should settle once you gain further confidence in positioning and attachment.’

    If your baby is yet to latch properly, try expressing some breast milk by hand. Avoid the use of nipple shields, though. ‘They can restrict the amount of milk the baby is able to get, which can lead to the breasts becoming more engorged and sore,’ warns Daniel Brash, a pharmacist and co-director of Healthcare 4 All.

    Then there’s the old wives’ tale of placing chilled cabbage leaves in your bra after feeding or expressing. While it seems a little eccentric the cooling effect on your breast really can help to reduce the pain and swelling. You can also wrap a towel around a small bag of frozen vegetables and place it on the swollen area to relieve swelling and numb the pain.

    Wearing a well-fitting bra designed for breastfeeding, so it doesn’t restrict your breasts, could also benefit you.

    Your midwife, health visitor or a breastfeeding specialist should also be able to help you deal with engorged breasts, or home remedies for nipple yeast infection other breastfeeding pain or concerns.

    A woman with breastfeeding pain because of mastits

    Mastitis can be very painful and will usually need medical treatment. (Credit: Getty)

    Mastitis

    Mastitis can happen as a consequence of a blocked milk duct,’ says Harriet. ‘The breast becomes inflamed and often very painful,’ she says. This inflammation may quickly become an infection if not treated, which means that bacteria can grow in the milk.

    Here, Harriet explains the main symptoms of mastitis:

    • A noticeable red area on the breast
    • Tender and hot-to-the-touch breast
    • Flu like symptoms/generally feeling unwell
    • High temperature

    Often mastitis is a reaction to poor positioning, which – once rectified – can ease the problem. ‘However, if symptoms of mastitis are not relieved after you’ve checked your baby’s positioning and attachment, much like when relieving symptoms of breast engorgement, then it’s important to get checked out by your GP,’ advises Harriet.

    Eleni agrees: ‘If your breasts feel inflamed, red, hot, tender or lumpy, and you feel unwell with flu-like symptoms, such as fever, chills and tiredness, make sure you ask for help straight away.’ If left untreated mastitis can become a breast abscess.

    If you’re not feeling better within 12-24 hours, or if you feel worse, see a doctor. You may need antibiotics, which will be fine to take while you are breastfeeding. To control the pain, over-the-counter medicines such as ‘paracetamol or ibuprofen may also help,’ she says.

    It’s important to keep feeding your baby from the affected breast. Although this may be painful and miserable for you, it can make the mastitis worse if you stop feeding from your affected breast.

    Breast abscess

    When mastitis is untreated it can cause a breast abscess,’ warns Harriet. An abscess is a very painful, swollen, pus-filled lump inside the breast. You can also develop a breast abscess after a prolonged period of breast engorgement.

    A breast abscess needs immediate treatment by a medical professional. The abscess may be drained, or you may be prescribed antibiotics. Although it seems counter-intuitive, it’s important to keep breastfeeding. This keeps the breast well-drained. If it’s too painful to breastfeed you can pump or express by hand instead. “If the affected breast is too painful or the incision is close to your nipple you may need to express your milk for a day or two. Keeping your milk flowing will help your breast heal,” recommends the La Leche League Great Britain website, which provides mother-to-mother support for breastfeeding mums.

    A baby latching on to its mother's breast

    Not latching on correctly is one of the main causes of breastfeeding pain. (Credit: Getty)

    Breastfeeding pain in the nipples and home remedies to help

    Problems with latching

    If your baby is poorly attached to your breast during a feed, your nipple may become pinched between your baby’s tongue and the roof of their mouth (the hard palate). This will make your nipples sore. Before long your nipples can crack and bleed, which makes breastfeeding uncomfortable and even painful. When your baby is effectively attached, your nipple rests comfortably against the first national bank severna park palate at the back of their mouth. This makes a huge difference in comfort.

    ‘It’s really quite common to have issues with latching. As a result there’s a lot of help available,’ says Harriet. ‘Some important points to remember – especially when you are struggling with the latch – are:

    • Being comfortable and making sure you are in a position you can sustain for some time i.e. utilising a comfy chair and cushions to support your arms and shoulders. Nursing cushions are really useful.
    • Holding your baby close and ensuring you’re not leaning over to feed your baby.
    • Ensuring your baby’s head and body are in a straight line, their chin to your breast with their head free to tilt backwards.
    • Aiming to place your baby’s nose level to your nipple to encourage a wide-open mouth when attaching.’

    As well as Harriet’s advice, Eleni suggests that ‘mothers change the position of their baby frequently when breastfeeding. One position to try involves putting your baby tummy-down on your body with their head near your breast. This is also a great position to try and get your baby to self-latch as they bob their head and move towards the breast with minimal help from mum, usually resulting in a pain-free latch,’ she says.

    Don’t keep trying on your own if it still hurts – find a lactation consultant or speak to your doctor, health visitor or midwife.

    Tongue tie

    If your baby is suffering from tongue tie, it can make latching onto your breast correctly impossible, which is distressing for both mum and baby. Tongue tie means your baby can’t lift its tongue or stick it out so is unable to cup the breast to extract milk. This can mean a lot of pain for mum as the tongue can rub against the end of nipple, causing it to crack.

    ‘Tongue tie occurs when the skin between your baby’s tongue and mouth are shorter than expected,’ says Harriet. ‘This can sometimes affect breastfeeding and should always be considered when there’s difficulty with attachment and latch,’ she advises.

    Because tongue tie can be difficult to diagnose, it helps to get expert support. ‘Ask your midwife or health visitor to check for tongue tie. Tongue tie is often picked up soon after birth but can be difficult to detect,’ advises Daniel.

    ‘Your midwife, health visitor or GP will be able to guide you, with referral to an expert,’ says Harriet. A health professional will snip the thin flap of skin on the baby’s tongue so it’s able to move more freely. This quick and almost painless procedure will make breastfeeding more effective and less painful.

    Woman with breast pain touching her breast

    Blocked milk ducts, thrush and pain in the armpit are all possible while breastfeeding. (Credit: Getty)

    Blocked ducts

    Ducts are another potential breast issue. ‘The breasts are made of milk-producing glands. Tubes known as milk ducts transport the milk from these glands to your nipple. This is so you’re able to feed your baby,’ explains Harriet. ‘It’s not uncommon for these ducts to become blocked. They don’t always drain properly during a feed, particularly in those early days of establishing feeds,’ she home remedies for nipple yeast infection. These ducts can also become blocked if you’re making breast milk faster than you can express it.

    If you have hotels near university at buffalo ducts you’re likely to feel ‘a small lump just under the breast, which can sometimes feel quite tender,’ says Harriet. Check under your breasts regularly – if you suspect a blocked duct Harriet recommends the following:

    • ‘Feed your baby from the area where you can feel a blocked duct. Massage the lump gently towards the nipple at the same time.
    • A warm bath, shower or flannel on the breast may relieve any discomfort.’

    The La Leche League GB website also recommends “avoiding saturated fats and taking one or two 1200mg capsules of lecithin three or four times a day to reduce the risk of blocked ducts.”

    Thrush

    Most of us know thrush as a vaginal condition. However, discover bank mobile check deposit limit possible to get this yeast infection on our skin – especially warm, moist areas such as the armpits, groin, between the fingers and the breasts.

    ‘Some women develop thrush in their breasts when feeding. Symptoms include painful breastfeeding in both breasts, and pain which does not pass immediately following feeding,’ explains Harriet. The NHS website also says to look out for “a red, itchy or painful rash that scales over with white or yellow discharge. The rash may not be so obvious on darker skin.”

    Even mild thrush needs checking. ‘It’s important to treat thrush, as it can be passed from mum to baby and vice versa.’ You can learn more about breastfeeding and thrush here but it’s also recommended that you speak to your GP if you think you have it. Thrush is treated with over-the-counter creams or prescribed anti-fungal medication for mums, and drops for babies.

    Breastfeeding pain in the armpit and home remedies to help

    Some mums will feel pain under the arms. ‘The breast tissue is present not only in breasts but also extends into the armpit,’ says Harriet.

    ‘It’s not unusual to have swelling and engorgement of a small area in the armpit while breastfeeding,’ she adds. ‘Engorgement is common as breastfeeding is being established. It usually goes away once feeding is established.’

    Blonde woman breastfeeding her baby

    Breastfeeding pain is normal but don’t ignore it. (Credit: Getty)

    Is breastfeeding pain normal?

    It’s easy, as a sleep-deprived new mum, to think the worst but breastfeeding pain is common. ‘There are a number of reasons why breastfeeding causes discomfort,’ says Harriet. ‘While quickly resolved, it’s important to understand why you’re in discomfort and to not ignore any pain.’

    Top tips for soothing painful breasts when nursing

    ‘Breastfeeding pain is not uncommon,’ says Harriet reassuringly. ‘And discomfort can be prevented and treated.’ This will allow for successful feeding until you’re ready to stop breastfeeding.

    The main thing is to speak up. ‘Seek advice from your midwife or a breastfeeding specialist – also called a lactation consultant. They can discuss simple measures to prevent breastfeeding pain. For example, ensuring there’s proper latching when baby is feeding as the inability to do so leads to breast milk not draining properly, which causes sore nipples, lumps and engorged breasts,’ adds Harriet. If you grapple with dry nipples or breasts ‘use breastfeeding-friendly ointments to keep them moist,’ advises Harriet. We like Mama Mio’s Keep Calm Nipple Balm.

    ‘At times, a cold compress helps with soreness and pain from swollen breasts,’ advises Harriet. ‘It’s okay to use simple painkillers such as paracetamol to relieve pain.’

    However, ‘if those measures don’t relieve symptoms seek advice from your doctor or midwife to rule out infection,’ she says.

    Источник: https://www.goodto.com/family/babies/breastfeeding-pain-388738

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