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pics of doc holliday

Mary Katherine Horony Cummings popularly known as Big Nose Kate, was a Hungarian-born Since Kate met Doc Holliday in the early 1870s, she may have confused the. Val Kilmer: Doc Holliday. Showing all 70 items. Jump to: Photos (25); Quotes (45). By Doc Holliday. KICK AM 1530. 2 hours ago. Cover picture for the article After the holiday weekend, the marches will happen December 4 through February.
pics of doc holliday

Pics of doc holliday -

“Doc” Holliday sounds like one of those stupid made-up radio names. In my case, it isn’t.  No, my real name isn’t Bernie Liebowitz. Yes, the “Doc” part is a nickname. But, I really am a Holliday. I am a descendant of the famous gunfighter, John Henry Holliday.

I will spare you the genealogy lesson. But, here are some basic facts of my gunfighter connection. I was contacted by Karen Holliday Tanner back in the 1990’s. She said she was writing a book on Doc and was seeking info on my part of the Holliday family. There was a very prominent dude named John Holliday in the St. Louis area back in the 1800’s. My family in Missouri is descended from him. John Henry “Doc” Holliday’s family in Georgia is connected to him. What does this mean? It means my family watches the movie “Tombstone” at least twice per month.

Feel free to peruse my pics from our family trip to the actual Doc Holliday grave in Glenwood Springs this past summer.  I will try to do my best to never say "I'm your huckleberry". Remember, I said "try".

Источник: https://983thesnake.com/yes-my-name-really-is-doc-holliday-photos/

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Источник: https://variety.com/

John Ringo, the famous gun-fighting gentleman, is found dead in Turkey Creek Canyon, Arizona.

Romanticized in both life and death, John Ringo was supposedly a Shakespeare-quoting gentleman whose wit was as quick as his gun. Some believed he was college educated, and his sense of honor and courage was sometimes compared to that of a British lord. In truth, Ringo was not a formally educated man, and he came from a struggling working-class Indiana family that gave him few advantages. Yet, he does appear to have been better read than most of his associates, and he clearly cultivated an image as a refined gentleman.

By the time he was 12, Ringo was already a crack shot with either a pistol or rifle. He left home when he was 19, eventually ending up in Texas, where in 1875 he became involved in a local feud known as the “Hoodoo War.” He killed at least two men, but seems to have either escaped prosecution, or when arrested, escaped his jail cell. By 1878, he was described as “one of the most desperate men in the frontier counties” of Texas, and he decided it was time to leave the state.

In 1879, Ringo resurfaced in southeastern Arizona, where he joined the motley ranks of outlaws and gunslingers hanging around the booming mining town of Tombstone. Nicknamed “Dutch,” Ringo had a reputation for being a reserved loner who was dangerous with a gun. He haunted the saloons of Tombstone and was probably an alcoholic. Not long after he arrived, Ringo shot a man dead for refusing to join him in a drink. Somehow, he again managed to avoid imprisonment by temporarily leaving town. He was not involved in the infamous gunfight at the O.K. Corral in 1881, but he did later challenge Doc Holliday (one of the survivors of the O.K. Corral fight) to a shootout. Holliday declined and citizens disarmed both men.

The manner of Ringo’s demise remains something of a mystery. He seems to have become despondent in 1882, perhaps because his family had treated him coldly when he had earlier visited them in San Jose. Witnesses reported that he began drinking even more heavily than usual. On this day in 1882, he was found dead in Turkey Creek Canyon outside of Tombstone. It looked as if Ringo had shot himself in the head and the official ruling was that he had committed suicide. Some believed, however, that he had been murdered either by his drinking friend Frank “Buckskin” Leslie or a young gambler named “Johnny-Behind-the-Deuce.” To complicate matters further, Wyatt Earp later claimed that he had killed Ringo. The truth remains obscure to this day.

Источник: https://www.history.com

When you go to sleep in the American West, you never know what you might wake up to. A Colorado family learned this as they awoke to hundreds of elk that had taken over their yard.

This was quite a sight to see as a driver cruised through a small neighborhood in Estes Park, Colorado. If you're familiar with Estes Park, you know there are more elk there than people. That's especially true this time of year.

It's not unusual in Estes Park to have elk in your yard, but it's not common to have THIS MANY elk in your yard.

It's worth noting that there are several mature elk bulls in this group including this big guy situated right by the family's front window.

Impressive.

You go to sleep at night with an empty yard and wake up with an elk herd crowded up against your front door. One of the many things we love about our part of America.

LOOK: Stunning animal photos from around the world

From grazing Tibetan antelope to migrating monarch butterflies, these 50 photos of wildlife around the world capture the staggering grace of the animal kingdom. The forthcoming gallery runs sequentially from air to land to water, and focuses on birds, land mammals, aquatic life, and insects as they work in pairs or groups, or sometimes all on their own.

LOOK: 30 fascinating facts about sleep in the animal kingdom

Источник: https://kingfm.com/colorado-family-learns-100s-of-elk-have-taken-over-their-yard/

An Old West mystery still piques curiosity. The story behind the firearm given to Doc Holliday by his girlfriend as a love token continues to drive visitors see it for themselves and ponder what happened on the day the famed gunslinger died in Glenwood Springs.

Glenwood Springs, Colo. (Sept. 20, 2018)

— On Nov. 8, 1887, John Henry “Doc” Holliday died of tuberculosis in a rented room at the Hotel Glenwood in Glenwood Springs, Colorado. The fact is, despite his fame and notoriety, the gambler, gunfighter, dentist and friend of Wyatt Earp left this earth destitute. However, legend tells us that Doc did have one possession dear to him at the time of his passing that turned out to be quite valuable: an 1866 Remington derringer pistol with an inscription reading To Doc from Kate.

It’s this artifact from the past that keeps visitors coming to the Doc Holliday Museum—a stand-alone museum dedicated to Doc’s life and the times in which he lived. The museum, run by the Glenwood Springs Historical Society, is located on the lower level of the Bullocks Western Store at Eighth St. and Grand Ave. Coincidentally, it also happens to be the location of the Hotel Glenwood—where Doc died. In 1945, the Hotel Glenwood burned to the ground.

Doc’s derringer is the centerpiece exhibit of the museum. Even though the weapon is enshrined in a well-lit plexiglass case, museum-goers can still get an up-close look at the ornate inscription. It’s well known that Holliday had a relationship with Mary Katherine Horony-Cummings, better known as “Big Nose Kate,” a prostitute of Hungarian decent. According to the lore, Kate gave the gun to Holliday as a gift, probably around 1881 in Tombstone, Arizona.

“People are fascinated by Doc Holliday largely because of his association with Wyatt Earp and his role in the shoot-out at the OK Corral,” Executive Director of the Glenwood Springs Historical Society and the Frontier Museum Bill Kight said. “But he also had a life beyond that infamous event that defined him. It seems he had a girlfriend for whom he cared. This gun which she purportedly gave him is a token of that affection, or at least we like to think it is.”

Kight hedges a bit because shortly after the museum purchased the gun for $84,000, its provenance came under scrutiny. Some stories indicate that after Doc’s death, the derringer was taken by William G. Wells, the bartender at the Hotel Glenwood, as partial payment to cover the gambler’s funeral expenses. It remained in the Wells family until 1968 when Utah gun dealer E. Dixon Larson purchased it. It wasn’t until after the museum sealed the deal on the purchase that it learned Larson was of questionable character—a man known for his passionate pursuit for acquiring celebrity Wild West firearms. Some speculate that “Dix,” now deceased, was not above forging documents and embellishing historical stories. After Larson, the gun was bought in the 1980s by a Tennessee lawyer, then by Jason Brierly of Vancouver, Canada, who sold it to the Glenwood Springs Historical Society.

Whatever the truth may be, it’s a mystery that only adds to the mystique of Doc Holliday—and drives visitors to schedule a stop at the eponymous museum. In addition to seeing the small, pearl-handled pistol up close, Doc Holliday groupies can also make a pilgrimage to his memorial marker in Linwood Cemetery which overlooks Glenwood Springs. Near the end of his life, in ill health and unable to earn a living dealing faro at the local gambling halls, Holliday was bed-ridden. As he lay dying he is reported to have asked for a shot of whiskey. The story is that Doc fully expected to die in gunfight, but upon finding himself at death’s door in a bed instead, he appreciated the irony of his situation and uttered his last words: “This is funny.”

Though Doc’s memorial marker is a place for visitors to pay their respects, Holliday was actually buried in the cemetery’s Potter’s Field and no one knows the exact whereabouts of his final resting place. It is yet another unsolved mystery Doc Holliday left behind and one that, like the derringer, keeps Glenwood Springs visitors enthralled with this bit of Old West history in Glenwood Springs, Colorado.

Find out more about Doc Holliday, the Glenwood Springs Historical Museum and more at visitglenwood.com.


About Glenwood Springs

For more information and to plan a visit please see visitglenwood.com. Glenwood Springs is located between Aspen and Vail, Colorado, 160 miles (257 kilometers) west of Denver or 90 miles (145 kilometers) east of Grand Junction on Interstate 70 off Exit 116. An online Media Room is available at visitglenwood.com/media. B-roll video footage is available upon request.

Media Contacts:

Lisa Langer, Director of Tourism Promotion

Glenwood Springs Chamber Resort Association

970-230-9035

Lisa’s email

or

Patsy Popejoy, Communications Director

Resort Trends, Inc. – tourism communications

317-509-7384

Patsy’s email

Источник: https://visitglenwood.com/blog/2018/09/a-glenwood-springs-unsolved-mystery-derringer-continues-to-attract-doc-holliday-history-buffs/

The afternoon of October 26, 1881, gunfire erupted in the frontier town of Tombstone. The fighting was over in less than a minute, and when the gun smoke cleared, three men lay dead. This short skirmish might have been a footnote in American history, but it grew and became a legend, perhaps the most famous in the Old West.

A feud had been building between two rival factions in Tombstone. One was led by Kansas lawman Wyatt Earp, his brothers Virgil and Morgan, and their friend John “Doc” Holliday. The other was a loose band of outlaws called the “cowboys”: Among their members were brothers Ike and Billy Clanton and brothers Tom and Frank McLaury. The rising tensions between the two groups revealed that the line between law enforcement and vendetta was very thin in the Arizona Territory.

Tombstone was founded a few years earlier by Ed Schieffelin, a former scout with the United States Army. Schieffelin headed to the Arizona Territory in the 1870s to strike it rich in mining. He found a promising spot in what is today southeastern Arizona, about 30 miles north of the Mexican border. (See life as a cowboy nearly 100 years ago.)

Schieffelin was warned by soldiers that, having chosen a spot in Apache territory, he was more likely to find his own tombstone than precious metals. When Schieffelin hit on a seam of silver there in 1877, he had the last laugh and called the claim Tombstone. The name was carried over as the name of the settlement founded near the site, fueled by a silver rush that attracted fortune hunters to the new town.

Wyatt Earp

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Brothers against brothers

By 1881 Tombstone had a population of more than 7,000 and was the seat of the newly formed Cochise County. The area was thriving but had a notorious reputation for being rough and lawless. The Earps were drawn to Tombstone by the promise of fortune from the silver rush. Wyatt Earp had served as a police officer in Wichita and Dodge City, Kansas, before he moved to Tombstone in late 1879. With him came his brother, Virgil, a miner and soldier who would become Tombstone’s town marshal in 1880. (This is how Jesse James became an infamous outlaw.)

Morgan, a younger brother of Wyatt and Virgil, joined his siblings in Tombstone that same year. Shortly after came a man who had befriended Wyatt Earp in Dodge City: Doc Holliday, a former dentist from Georgia turned gambler and gunfighter. All the brothers had other income that was unrelated to law enforcement, with stakes in mines and saloons and occasional work as bartenders and private security.

The Earp-Holliday faction had rivals in Tombstone: the cowboys. The Clanton and the McLaury brothers had a reputation as outlaws and were known to make their living thanks to cattle rustling. Beef shortages in the growing towns had given them a way of making easy money. They would rustle cattle on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border.

Keen to meet demand, the butchers in Tombstone were not particularly fussy about the meat’s origins, particularly if it was from the other side of the frontier. The first source of tension between the cowboys and the Earps was over some stolen mules that the Earps tracked down to the McLaury ranch. The McLaurys, meanwhile, accused the Earps of acting for their own benefit instead of acting as law officers. (Will cowboy poetry survive the modern era?)

Location, location, location

A vintage picture of a horse drawn carriage in Tombstone Arizona

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Tombstone's Fremont Street in 1882

UIG/ALBUM

The shoot-out between the Earps and the cowboys did not technically take place at the Old Kindersley horse corral. The actual location was a vacant lot at the end of Fremont Street, Tombstone’s main thoroughfare, which was located behind the O.K. Corral.

Politics and pistols

Wyatt Earp developed a professional rivalry with a fellow politician, Johnny Behan. Ten months before the shoot-out, Behan and Earp had both run for sheriff in Cochise County. Partway into the race, Behan had convinced Earp to pull out, promising him the job of under sheriff in return. After securing the office of county sheriff, Behan reneged on the deal and appointed another man to the position, leading to the two men’s mutual enmity.

Guns in tombstone

In October 1881 an ordinance was passed in Tombstone prohibiting the carrying of weapons in town. This riled the cowboys, who were used to carrying their weapons wherever they pleased. As town marshal, Virgil Earp was responsible for enforcing the law and wanted to disarm the offenders.

A heated argument took place between Doc Holliday and Ike Clanton at the Alhambra saloon on the night of October 25, 1881. The fight was broken up, but Clanton continued to drink into the morning. Making threats against Holliday and the Earps, Clanton was armed with several guns, accounts say.

a vintage movie poster featuring a cowboy and couple

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Virgil Earp disarmed Clanton, took him before a judge, who imposed a fine before letting him go. Ike, infuriated, sought out a group of five cowboys, including his brother Billy and the McLaurys, and went with them to Fremont Street. They spread the word that they were armed and intended to remain so. Sheriff Behan met the cowboys and tried to talk them into surrendering their weapons but failed. Sources differ: Some say the cowboys either denied having guns on them or refused to surrender them. (This 81-year-old cowboy still has lessons to share.)

Behan then met with Virgil Earp, who had deputized his brothers and Doc Holliday. The sheriff tried to convince the Earps to back off, but they pressed on, finding the Clantons and the McLaurys in a lot near the Old Kindersley Corral.

Shots erupted, but no one knows who fired first. The fight was over as quickly as it began. Billy Clanton and Tom and Frank McLaury were dead. Ike Clanton and two other cowboys had escaped the same fate. On the Earps’ side, all survived, but only Wyatt remained unharmed.

Under Tombstone law, policemen were in the right if they shot armed opponents threatening to kill. After the shooting, Ike Clanton accused the marshal’s group of firing at five unarmed men, leading Sheriff Behan to arrest the Earp brothers and Holliday, accusing them of murder. During a preliminary hearing that lasted a month, it was proven that two of the cowboys had been armed. The judge threw out the trial, but lingering doubts about the Earps’ true intentions that day would remain.

A black and white picture of three men in caskets

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The shooting brought terrible consequences for both the Earps and the cowboys. On December 28, 1881, Virgil Earp was ambushed and shot in the back on his way home. His injuries left him alive, but seriously injured. In March of the following year, Morgan Earp was killed. The assailants were never positively identified, but many believe the two Earps were gunned down as revenge for the events at the O.K. Corral.

Shortly after these events, Wyatt Earp became a deputy U.S. marshal. He deputized several men, including Doc Holliday, and set out on a vendetta against the men he believed responsible for the death of his brother. Four cowboys, including one of Sheriff Behan’s aides, were killed. Behan acquired an arrest warrant and pursued Earp and his men, without success. Wyatt Earp left Arizona Territory in April 1882, later settling in California with his partner, Josephine Marcus, Behan’s former girlfriend. (Saddle up with Hawaii's cowboys.)

four tombstones on a rocky graveyard

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Men and myths

The story of the O.K. Corral soon became part the frontier myth. Wyatt Earp’s colorful life as a lawman, gambler, miner, pimp, and saloon owner made him a natural target for colorful anecdotes, but he was reluctant to discuss openly what happened during those fateful seconds in Tombstone.

In 1931, two years after Earp’s death, Stuart N. Lake, a former press aide to President Theodore Roosevelt, published Wyatt Earp, Frontier Marshal, a biography that included a dramatic telling of the shoot-out at the O.K. Corral and other events in Earp’s life. The book was extremely successful and elevated Earp to almost mythic status by simplifying the story. Lake made Wyatt the hero and the cowboys the villains. The truth, however—like the line dividing law and vengeance in those wilder times—is much blurrier.

Источник: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/history-magazine/article/what-happened-gunfight-ok-corral

I've shared a lot of video of both UFO's and also meteorites this year. This isn't either of those. It is a very bright streak seen in our skies, but there's no doubt as to what it is.

First, I need to fess up. I got this totally wrong the first time I saw it. I was positive it was a meteor streaking through our skies. I said this in front of my wife and she quickly grabbed me by the ear and informed me I was wrong.

Watch this and see if you can identify without me telling you. This was one of the streaks above the Midwest as seen over Indiana a few weeks ago.

If you guessed space debris, give yourself a cookie. It's space debris and after doing some research, I now understand why we're seeing so many streaks like this. According to Interesting Engineering, there are over 128 million objects orbiting earth that are larger than a millimeter.

There's so much space junk around our planet, Fast Company estimates that Earth could have it's own ring like Saturn someday. A ring of space trash...just like my yard, but in space.

Some of the larger streaks in the night sky are remains of rockets. Others are old satellites or payloads from space missions that no longer serve a purpose.

What's the difference between space trash and meteors? One word: speed. As National Geographic points out, meteors travels 44 miles per second. Space trash seems to just slowly drift as it burns up in the atmosphere. A meteor will flash quickly as it gets closer to Earth.

Next time you see one of those streaks, you can know you're not seeing an alien invasion. It's just junk we left in space burning up over our heads. How glamorous.

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Источник: https://101theeagle.com/bright-streak-in-our-night-sky-was-not-a-ufo-or-meteor/

“Doc” Holliday sounds like one of those stupid made-up radio names. In my case, it isn’t.  No, my real name isn’t Bernie Liebowitz. Yes, the “Doc” part is a nickname. But, I really am a Holliday. I am a descendant of the famous gunfighter, John Henry Holliday.

I will spare you the genealogy lesson. But, here are some basic facts of my gunfighter connection. I was contacted by Karen Holliday Tanner back in the 1990’s. She said she was writing a book on Doc and was seeking info on my part of the Holliday family. There was a very prominent dude named John Holliday in the St. Louis area back in the 1800’s. My family in Missouri is descended from him. John Henry “Doc” Holliday’s family in Georgia is connected to him. What does this mean? It means my family watches the movie “Tombstone” at least twice per month.

Feel free to peruse my pics from our family trip to the actual Doc Holliday grave in Glenwood Springs this past summer.  I will try to do my best to never say "I'm your huckleberry". Remember, I said "try".

Источник: https://983thesnake.com/yes-my-name-really-is-doc-holliday-photos/

An Old West mystery still piques curiosity. The story behind the firearm given to Doc Holliday by his girlfriend as a love token continues to drive visitors see it for themselves and ponder what happened on the day the famed gunslinger died in Glenwood Springs.

Glenwood Springs, Colo. (Sept. 20, 2018)

— On Nov. 8, 1887, John Henry “Doc” Holliday died of tuberculosis in a rented room at the Hotel Glenwood in Glenwood Springs, Colorado. The fact is, despite his fame and notoriety, the gambler, gunfighter, dentist and friend of Wyatt Earp left this earth destitute. However, legend tells us that Doc did have one possession dear to him at the time of his passing that turned out to be quite valuable: an 1866 Remington derringer pistol with an inscription reading To Doc from Kate.

It’s this artifact from the past that keeps visitors coming to the Doc Holliday Museum—a stand-alone museum dedicated to Doc’s life and the times in which he lived. The museum, run by the Glenwood Springs Historical Society, is located on the lower level of the Bullocks Western Store at Eighth St. and Grand Ave. Coincidentally, it also happens to be the location of the Hotel Glenwood—where Doc died. In 1945, the Hotel Glenwood burned to the ground.

Doc’s derringer is the centerpiece exhibit of the museum. Even though the weapon is enshrined in a well-lit plexiglass case, museum-goers can still get an up-close look at the ornate inscription. It’s well known that Holliday had a relationship with Mary Katherine Horony-Cummings, better known as “Big Nose Kate,” a prostitute of Hungarian decent. According to the lore, Kate gave the gun to Holliday as a gift, probably around 1881 in Tombstone, Arizona.

“People are fascinated by Doc Holliday largely because of his association with Wyatt Earp and his role in the shoot-out at the OK Corral,” Executive Director of the Glenwood Springs Historical Society and the Frontier Museum Bill Kight said. “But he also had a life beyond that infamous event that defined him. It seems he had a girlfriend for whom he cared. This gun which she purportedly gave him is a token of that affection, or at least we like to think it is.”

Kight hedges a bit pics of doc holliday shortly after the museum purchased the gun for $84,000, its provenance came under scrutiny. Some stories indicate that after Doc’s death, the derringer was taken by William G. Wells, the bartender at the Hotel Glenwood, as partial payment to cover the gambler’s funeral expenses. It remained in the Wells family until 1968 when Utah gun dealer E. Dixon Larson pics of doc holliday it. It wasn’t until after the museum sealed the deal on the purchase that it learned Larson was of questionable character—a man known for his passionate pursuit for acquiring celebrity Wild West firearms. Some speculate that “Dix,” now deceased, was not above forging documents and embellishing historical stories. After Larson, the gun was bought in the 1980s by a Tennessee lawyer, then by Jason Brierly of Vancouver, Canada, who sold it to the Glenwood Springs Historical Society.

Whatever the truth may be, it’s a mystery that only adds to the mystique of Doc Holliday—and drives visitors to schedule a stop at the eponymous museum. In addition to seeing the small, pearl-handled pistol up close, Doc Holliday groupies can also make a pilgrimage to his memorial marker in Linwood Cemetery which overlooks Glenwood Springs. Near the end of his life, in ill health and unable to earn a living dealing faro at the local gambling halls, Holliday was bed-ridden. As he lay dying he is reported to have asked for a shot of whiskey. The story is that Doc fully expected to die in gunfight, but upon finding pics of doc holliday at death’s door in a bed instead, he appreciated the irony of his situation and uttered his last words: “This is funny.”

Though Doc’s memorial marker is a place for visitors to pay their respects, Holliday was actually buried in the cemetery’s Potter’s Field and no one knows the exact whereabouts of his final resting place. It is yet another unsolved mystery Doc Holliday left behind and first national bank severna park that, like the derringer, keeps Glenwood Springs visitors enthralled with this bit of Old West history in Glenwood Springs, Colorado.

Find out more about Doc Holliday, the Glenwood Springs Historical Museum and more at visitglenwood.com.


About Glenwood Springs

For more information and to plan a visit please see visitglenwood.com. Glenwood Springs is located between Aspen and Vail, Colorado, 160 miles (257 kilometers) west of Denver or 90 miles (145 kilometers) east of Grand Junction on Interstate 70 off Exit 116. An online Media Room is available at visitglenwood.com/media. B-roll video footage is available upon request.

Media Contacts:

Lisa Langer, Director of Tourism Promotion

Glenwood Springs Chamber Resort Association

970-230-9035

Lisa’s email

or

Patsy Popejoy, Communications Director

Resort Trends, Inc. – tourism communications

317-509-7384

Patsy’s email

Источник: https://visitglenwood.com/blog/2018/09/a-glenwood-springs-unsolved-mystery-derringer-continues-to-attract-doc-holliday-history-buffs/

When you go to sleep in the American West, you never know what you might wake up to. A Colorado family learned this as they awoke to hundreds of elk that had taken over their yard.

This was quite a sight to see as a driver cruised through a small neighborhood in Estes Park, Colorado. If you're familiar with Estes Park, you know there are more elk there than people. That's especially true this time of year.

It's not unusual in Estes Park to have elk in your yard, but it's not common to have THIS MANY elk in your yard.

It's worth noting that there are several mature elk bulls in this group including this big guy situated right by the family's front window.

Impressive.

You go to sleep at night with an empty yard and wake up with an elk herd crowded up against your front door. One of the many things we love about our part of America.

LOOK: Stunning animal photos from around the pics of doc holliday grazing Tibetan antelope to migrating monarch butterflies, these 50 photos of wildlife around the world capture the staggering grace of the animal kingdom. The forthcoming gallery runs sequentially from air to land to water, and pics of doc holliday on birds, land mammals, aquatic life, and insects as they work in pairs or groups, or sometimes all on their own.

LOOK: 30 fascinating facts about sleep in the animal kingdom

Источник: https://kingfm.com/colorado-family-learns-100s-of-elk-have-taken-over-their-yard/

Tombstone: Doc Holliday's 15 Best One-Liners

Tombstone has become one of the most popular Westerns of the modern era. It's the story of legendary lawman Wyatt Earp(Kurt Russell) and focuses on his time in Tombstone, Arizona, battling cowboys alongside his brothers and best friend, the former dentist turned poker playing gunfighter Doc Holliday.

RELATED: 10 Best Val Kilmer Movies, Ranked By IMDB

It is Val Kilmer's scene-stealing portrayal of Doc Holliday that most fans point to when discussing their love for the film. The amazing dialogue, delivered with ease by Kilmer, elevates the character to icon status. Here are Doc Holliday's 15 best lines from the movie.

Updated on December 12th, 2020 by Mark Birrell: Val Kilmer's performance as the legendary Doc Holliday is so iconic that almost every line that he says feels like an all-time great and so many of them stick with fans long after the credits roll. We couldn't keep this list to just 10 quotes so we've added an extra 5 for your reading pleasure.

15 "You know, Ed, if I thought you weren't my friend, I just don't think I could bear it."

Doc Holliday is depicted in the movie as an bank of eastman magnolia state bank card player and this gets him into his fair share of fights. When he's introduced at the beginning, one such argument happens right off the bat.

Holliday is playing against a man named Ed Bailey, who takes exception to Holliday's victory and begins getting aggressive only for Holliday to crank up his sarcasm and push right back.

14 "I stand corrected, Wyatt. You're an oak."

When Wyatt Earp first meets his main love interest, the actress Josephine Marcus, face to face after a performance, she enters the saloon by dancing with various men across the floor towards Earp.

Holliday had deliberately set Earp up by getting him to insist that he was a faithfully married man who would forsake all other women before she walked in and, when Earp proves to be a man of his word and declines to dance with Josephine, Holliday is forced to admit defeat. Even though he's ultimately dead right, and probably knows it too.

13 "Evidently, Mr. Ringo's an educated man. Now I really hate him."

Holliday's main rivalry in the movie is between him and the ruthless gunslinger Johnny Ringo, whose reputation appears to match Holliday's own as does his intellect and skill with a pistol.

On first meeting, the two immediately get into a little war of words, spilling over from English into Latin. This prompts Holliday to explain in a typically hilarious and sardonic manner.

12 "I know, why don't we have a spelling contest."

Val Kilmer's Holliday is a character who just can't help himself when he sees an opportunity to amuse himself and verbally take his opponent down a few rungs.

About halfway through the movie, once the central conflicts have begun to show themselves, Holliday once again gets into an altercation due to being too successful at cards. After beating Ike Clanton 12 hands in a row, things start to get heated. Holliday, seeing the opportunity to really push his opponent, suggests that poker isn't Ike's game and proposes this alternative as a joke, finally causing Clanton to snap.

11 "My Hypocrisy Goes Only So Far."

Doc Holliday was deputized before joining Wyatt Earp on his vendetta ride to hunt down the cowboys responsible for murdering Wyatt's brother Morgan. Before dueling with Johnny Ringo, Holliday was sure to show his opponent the badge letting him know he had the legal right to shoot him dead.

RELATED: Top 10 Western Movies Of The 2010s, Ranked

After killing Johnny Ringo Doc took off his badge and placed it on the corpse. He spoke the above quote to let Wyatt know although he is happy to stand beside his friend on his quest for vengeance it doesn't hide the fact that inside he will always be a killer and he's at peace with that.

10 "There's No Normal Life There's Just Life. Now Get On With It."

In his final conversation with Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday drops the above quote on his best friend after the hardened lawman confesses all he wants now is a little normalcy.

Doc drops the hard truth on his only friend from his deathbed emphasizing that no matter what we do we all end up in the same place in the end so you better find happiness while you can. Wyatt seems to take Doc's words to heart and seeks out Josie - the woman he loves, but up until talking with Doc was too afraid to commit to.

9 "I'm Your Huckleberry."

Perhaps the quote most associated with Doc Holliday, he spoke the line twice in Tombstone -- the first time was in response to Johnny Ringo's open challenge to Wyatt Earp and his crew. However, Ringo's fellow cowboys broke up the fight before anything could happen.

Johnny Ringo wouldn't be so lucky the second time when he greets who he thinks is Wyatt Earp only to realize it is actually Doc Holliday who has come to fight instead. Holliday cooly announced his arrival with his most famous line and dispatched Johnny Ringo minutes later.

8 "Johnny I Apologize, I Forgot You Were There."

Wyatt Earp was walking the dusty streets of Tombstone discussing business with his brothers, unaware he pics of doc holliday being stalked by a gun-toting Johnny Tyler (Billy Bob Thornton) whom he had slapped around moments earlier. Before Tyler could pounce he was interrupted by Doc Holliday who had been watching the scene play out.

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The mere presence of Holliday was enough to scare the daylights out of Johnny Tyler. As Holliday and the Earp brothers stood catching up in the street Doc finally let the cowardly Johnny Tyler off the hook by dismissing him with the above line.

7 "I've Not Yet Begun To Defile Myself."

Besides gun fighting and poker, Doc Holliday had another destructive hobby - drinking. As he got older and the effects of tuberculosis began to worsen Holliday relied even more on alcohol to soothe his pain.

While playing poker and winning hand after hand against Ike Clanton, Doc began to insult the slow-witted cowboy. Ike responded with violence before Wyatt Earp intervened and apologized on Holliday's behalf, blaming his actions on being drunk. But no one knows his own limits like Doc Holliday, who assured everyone with the above quote that he was just getting started.

6 "Why Johnny Ringo, You Look Like Somebody Just Walked Over Your Grave."

The sadistic cowboy known as Johnny Ringo (Michael Biehn) had challenged Wyatt Earp to a duel to the death but it was Doc Holliday who showed up instead. As confident as Ringo was it was hard to ignore the fact that Holliday webster first spencer hours a well-known killer with legendary speed.

Johnny Ringo couldn't help but show his inner fear at the sight of the former dentist and his doubts about his ability to beat him bubbled to the surface. Holliday had obviously seen that look before in many of his past opponents and the above comment simply pointed out what was clearly written over Ringo's face.

5 "I'm afraid the strain was more than he could bear."

After shooting and killing Johnny Ringo in their climactic duel, which was supposed to take place between Ringo and Wyatt Earp before Doc showed up to save Earp (as he confirmed to Earp before the duel that Wyatt could not beat Ringo), Earp arrives to find Mack real estate group kneeling over Ringo's body.

Before Earp's arrival, he pics of doc holliday rather sarcastically that Ringo was just too "high-strung" and adds this explanation when Earp walks over. This, like the manner in which Ringo dies, is in reference to the theory that the real Johnny Ringo may have actually committed suicide.

4 "In Vino Veritas."

Upon meeting Johnny Ringo Doc Holliday immediately insults him. In an attempt to broker peace, Wyatt Earp apologizes on Doc's behalf attributing his behavior to being drunk to which Doc replies in Latin, "In Vino Veritas," or "In wine there is truth."

Doc Holliday is simply pointing out that just because he is drunk does not mean he's not speaking the truth. Ringo too is an educated man and the two gunslingers have a tense conversation completely in Latin. You don't need to understand what they are saying to know these two are on a collision course to war.

3 "I Have Two Guns, One For Each Of You."

Earlier in the evening, Doc had been playing piano after a night of drinking and poker. He is interrupted when Wyatt finds himself surrounded by a group of cowboys wanting to pics of doc holliday their leader who is accused of murder.

Doc wanders into the street to help his friend when one of the cowboys refers to him as "the drunk piano player," and tells him he's so drunk he's probably seeing double. Never at a loss for words the deadly shootist pulls out both pistols and remarks, "I have two guns, one for obstructed view seats at bank of america stadium of you."

2 "You're A Daisy If You Do."

During the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral Doc found himself in the sights of cowboy Frank McLaury who barked, "I've got you now, you son of a bi**h." Always cool under pressure, Holliday simply replied, "You're a daisy if you do," and watched as McLaury was shot by Morgan Earp.

According to witnesses of the gunfight, Doc Holliday actually uttered the now-iconic line when he found himself in the crosshairs of Frank McLaury which only adds to the legendary outlaw's legacy.

1 "I'm Dying How Are You?"

Even at his lowest point, Doc Holliday was capable of delivering the goods. The above line was Doc's response to his best and only friend Wyatt Earp. The lawman had come for one of his regular visits with Holliday who was nearing the end of his battle with tuberculosis.

Doc was laid up in bed at a Colorado sanitorium. Wyatt casually asked Doc how he was doing. Holliday just as casually replied, "I'm dying, how are you?" Doc Holliday kept his amazing sense of sarcasm with him until the very end.

NEXT: 10 Best Quotes From Our Favorite Horror Movies

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About The Author
Walt Gogolya (19 Articles Published)

Walt has maintained an online presence as a blogger since 2005 - long before social media took over the Internet. You can visit his personal site walterwrite.com He considers himself a "master" of Simpsons trivia and spent time hosting weekly quiz competitions before realizing it's more fun to compete than host. Walt's guilty pleasures include pink Starburst, chase bank careers san antonio hair bands and Little House on the Prairie (The TV show not the books).

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Источник: https://screenrant.com/tombstone-doc-hollidays-10-best-one-liners/

I've shared a lot of video of both UFO's and also meteorites this year. This isn't either of those. It is pics of doc holliday very bright streak seen in our skies, but there's no doubt as to what it is.

First, I need to fess up. I got this totally wrong the first time I saw it. I was positive it was a meteor streaking through our skies. I said this in front of my wife and she quickly grabbed me by the ear and informed me I was wrong.

Watch this and see if you can identify without me telling you. This was one of the streaks above the Midwest as seen over Indiana a few weeks ago.

If you guessed space debris, give yourself a cookie. It's space debris and after doing some research, I now understand why we're seeing so many streaks like this. According to Interesting Engineering, there are over 128 million objects orbiting earth that are larger than a millimeter.

There's so much space junk around our planet, Fast Company estimates that Earth could have it's own ring like Saturn someday. A ring of space trash.just like my yard, but in space.

Some of the larger streaks in the night sky are remains of rockets. Others are old satellites or payloads from space missions that no longer serve a purpose.

What's the difference between space trash and meteors? One word: speed. As National Geographic points out, meteors travels 44 miles per second. Pics of doc holliday trash seems to just slowly drift as it burns up bank of eastman magnolia state bank the atmosphere. A meteor will flash quickly as it gets closer to Earth.

Next time you see one of those streaks, you can know you're not seeing an alien invasion. It's just junk we left in space burning up over our heads. How glamorous.

8 Pics of Hannibal and Quincy Taken by Astronauts in Space

$45 Million Dollar Chicago Mansion Most Expensive in Illinois

Источник: https://101theeagle.com/bright-streak-in-our-night-sky-was-not-a-ufo-or-meteor/

The afternoon of October 26, 1881, gunfire erupted in the frontier town of Tombstone. The fighting was over in less than a minute, and when the gun smoke cleared, three men lay dead. This short skirmish might have been a footnote in American history, but it grew and became a legend, perhaps the most famous in the Old West.

A feud had been building between two rival factions in Tombstone. One was led by Kansas lawman Wyatt Earp, his brothers Virgil and Morgan, and their friend John “Doc” Holliday. The other was a loose band of outlaws called the “cowboys”: Among their members were brothers Ike and Billy Clanton and brothers Tom and Frank McLaury. The rising tensions between the two groups revealed that the line between law enforcement and vendetta was very thin in the Arizona Territory.

Tombstone was founded a few years earlier by Ed Schieffelin, a former scout with the United States Army. Schieffelin headed to the Arizona Territory in the 1870s to strike it rich in mining. He found a promising spot in what jose ramirez maurice hooker today southeastern Arizona, about 30 miles north of the Mexican border. (See life as a cowboy nearly 100 years ago.)

Schieffelin was warned by soldiers that, having chosen a spot in Apache territory, he was more likely to find his own tombstone than precious metals. When Schieffelin hit on a seam of silver there in 1877, he had the last laugh and called the claim Tombstone. The name was carried over as the name of the settlement founded near the site, fueled by a silver rush that attracted fortune hunters to the new town.

Wyatt Earp

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Brothers against brothers

By 1881 Tombstone had a population of more than 7,000 and was the seat of the newly formed Cochise County. The area was thriving but had a notorious reputation for being rough and lawless. The Earps were drawn to Tombstone by the promise of fortune from the silver rush. Wyatt Earp had served as a police officer in Wichita and Dodge City, Kansas, before he moved to Tombstone in late 1879. With him came his brother, Virgil, a miner and soldier who would become Tombstone’s town marshal in 1880. (This is how Jesse James became an infamous outlaw.)

Morgan, a younger brother of Wyatt and Virgil, joined his siblings in Tombstone that same year. Shortly after came a man who had befriended Wyatt Earp in Dodge City: Doc Holliday, a former dentist from Georgia turned gambler and gunfighter. All the pics of doc holliday had other income that was unrelated to law enforcement, with stakes in mines and saloons and occasional work as bartenders and private security.

The Earp-Holliday faction had rivals in Tombstone: the cowboys. The Clanton and the McLaury brothers had a reputation as outlaws and were known to make their living thanks to cattle rustling. Beef shortages in the growing towns had pics of doc holliday them a way of making easy money. They would rustle cattle on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border.

Keen to meet demand, the butchers in Tombstone were not particularly fussy about the meat’s origins, particularly if it was from the other side of the frontier. The first source of tension between the cowboys and the Earps was over some stolen mules that the Earps tracked down to the McLaury ranch. The McLaurys, meanwhile, accused the Earps of acting for their own benefit instead of acting as law officers. (Will cowboy poetry survive the modern era?)

Location, location, location

A vintage picture of a horse drawn carriage in Tombstone Arizona

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Tombstone's Fremont Street in 1882

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The shoot-out between the Earps and the cowboys did not technically take place at the Old Kindersley horse corral. The actual location was a vacant lot at the end of Fremont Street, Tombstone’s main thoroughfare, which was located behind the O.K. Corral.

Politics and pistols

Wyatt Earp developed a professional rivalry with a fellow politician, Johnny Behan. Ten months before the shoot-out, Behan and Earp had both run for sheriff in Cochise County. Partway into the race, Behan had convinced Earp to pull out, promising him the job of under sheriff in return. After securing the office of county sheriff, Behan reneged on the deal and appointed another man to the position, leading to the two men’s mutual enmity.

Guns in tombstone

In October 1881 an ordinance was passed in Tombstone prohibiting the carrying of weapons in town. This riled the cowboys, who were used to carrying their weapons wherever they pleased. As town marshal, Virgil Earp was responsible for enforcing the law and wanted to disarm the offenders.

A heated argument took place between Doc Holliday and Ike Clanton at the Alhambra saloon on the night of October 25, 1881. The fight was broken up, but Clanton continued to drink into the morning. Making threats against Holliday and the Earps, Clanton was armed with several guns, accounts say.

a vintage movie poster featuring a cowboy and couple

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Virgil Earp disarmed Clanton, took him before a judge, who imposed a fine before letting him go. Ike, infuriated, sought out a group of five cowboys, including his brother Billy and the McLaurys, and went with them to Fremont Street. They spread the word that they were armed and intended to remain so. Sheriff Behan met the cowboys and tried to talk them into surrendering their weapons but failed. Sources differ: Some say the cowboys either denied having guns on them or refused to surrender them. (This 81-year-old cowboy still has lessons to share.)

Behan then met with Virgil Earp, who had deputized his brothers and Doc Holliday. The sheriff tried to convince the Earps to back off, but they pressed on, finding the Clantons and the McLaurys in a lot near the Old Kindersley Corral.

Shots erupted, but no one knows who fired first. The fight was over as quickly as it began. Billy Clanton and Tom and Frank McLaury were dead. Ike Clanton and two other cowboys had escaped the same fate. On the Earps’ side, all survived, but only Wyatt remained unharmed.

Under Tombstone law, policemen were in the right if they shot armed opponents threatening to kill. After the shooting, Ike Clanton accused the marshal’s group of firing at five unarmed men, leading Sheriff Behan to arrest the Earp brothers and Holliday, accusing them of murder. During a preliminary hearing that lasted a month, it was proven that two of the cowboys had been armed. The judge threw out the trial, but lingering doubts about the Earps’ true intentions that day would remain.

A black and white picture of three men in caskets

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The shooting brought terrible consequences for both the Earps and the cowboys. On December 28, 1881, Virgil Earp was ambushed and shot in the back on his way home. His injuries left him alive, but seriously injured. In March of the following year, Morgan Earp was killed. The assailants were never positively identified, but many believe the two Earps were gunned down as revenge for the events at the O.K. Corral.

Shortly after these events, Wyatt Earp became a deputy U.S. marshal. He deputized several men, including Doc Holliday, and set out on a vendetta against the men he believed responsible for the service credit union branches near me of his brother. Four cowboys, including one of Sheriff Behan’s aides, were killed. Behan acquired an arrest warrant and pursued Earp and his men, without success. Wyatt Earp left Arizona Territory in April 1882, later settling in California with his partner, Josephine Marcus, Behan’s former girlfriend. (Saddle up with Hawaii's cowboys.)

four tombstones on a rocky graveyard

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Men and myths

The story of the O.K. Corral soon became part the frontier myth. Wyatt Earp’s colorful life as a lawman, gambler, miner, pimp, and saloon owner made him a natural target for colorful anecdotes, but he was reluctant to discuss openly what happened during those fateful seconds in Tombstone.

In 1931, two years after Earp’s death, Stuart N. Lake, a former press aide to President Theodore Roosevelt, published Wyatt Earp, Frontier Marshal, a biography that included a dramatic telling of the shoot-out at the O.K. Corral and other events in Earp’s life. The book was extremely successful and elevated Earp to almost mythic status by simplifying the story. Lake made Wyatt the hero and the cowboys the villains. The truth, however—like the line dividing law and vengeance in those wilder times—is much blurrier.

Источник: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/history-magazine/article/what-happened-gunfight-ok-corral

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The Real-Life Story of Doc Holliday - The Outlaw and Legend of TOMBSTONE

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