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Solar panels for trailer homes


solar panels for trailer homes

Except instead of the solar panels powering your home, they charge your RV batteries. You can also get additional batteries that the solar. Mobile homes in the form of RVs or trailers are all the rage right now. This sudden shift towards minimalistic living has also pushed people. Like site-built homes, new manufactured homes (formerly known as mobile homes) can orienting the home to maximize solar exposure, landscaping for energy.

Solar panels for trailer homes -


Many people make the mistake of jumping into buying solar panels for their RV before doing their homework.They buy a panel or two online and install it without really considering their total power usage, then become frustrated because the system is not performing up to their expectations. Doing this is like purchasing an air conditioning or heating system for your home without assessing the square footage, number of rooms, number of levels, and the typical temperature fluctuations where you live. A solar powered system is not one size fits all.

Are panels worth it? It all depends on how many electrical appliances you want to run, how often you want to be off-grid and whether you want to invest in a solar panel system or continue to pay full-price for full hook-ups at an RV park or campground ($30 - $80 per night). A simple system like ours will get you started for as little as $900.

It’s All About the Watts

The very first step of deciding on the type & size of each component within your system is to calculate your total watt hours – the magic number that powers your life. Taking the time to determine your total watt hours eliminates the guess work out of customizing a solar powered system and allows you to make educated decisions so that you don’t under, or over, purchase equipment – this can save you time, frustration and money. It will require about 1-2 hours of homework, but the time you put in will be worth it.

In our vintage trailer, Hamlet, we choose to live large by living very small, and keep our energy needs quite low. Rather than relying on the typical energy hogging appliances in many RV’s (though some are getting better/smarter), we use alternative methods to store and cook food so that we don’t need a traditional refrigerator, oven, microwave, toaster, or coffee maker. We can make delicious meals without any electricity! Tonight, homemade Chile Rellenos with black beans and Spanish rice. Last night, Pesto Pasta Primavera with garlic bread! Oh, and homemade brownies with ice cream (grabbed from the store) for dessert of course. The challenge of cooking without electricity is so much fun when you get your head around it.

Ok…think back to some of the basic physics that you were probably introduced to in high school. Get a pen, paper, and a calculator and let’s get started! 

Step 1

Find the sticker (or imprint) on the back of each appliance you plan to run and note the number of watts. If for some reason watts is not listed, look for amps and volts and multiply these numbers together. (watts = amps x volts)


Step 2

Determine the number of hours you typically use each appliance each day. Be realistic but be honest. How many hours of TV do you watch per day? Do you want to run a satellite dish, or stream a movie on your wifi? These numbers are an important part of the equation.

Step 3

For each appliance, multiply the watts times the number of hours per day it will be in use. For example, for a 300-watt coffee maker that you plan to run for 15 minutes each day, multiply 300 x .25 = 75 watt hours. For a 500-watt refrigerator, multiply 500 x 24 hours.

Step 4

Add up all these numbers and you will determine your magic number of daily total watt hours!  You can plug this number into a solar calculator to get an idea of the watt hours you'll need in your battery bank, how many / what wattage of panels you'll need, and the appropriate number of amps for a charge controller.

Step 5

If you’ve just realized that your energy needs are huge, take a moment to rethink what you can do differently and reevaluate what you need vs what you want. What electrical items can you live without or use less? Are there some that you can eliminate while boondocking? Here’s a few questions to ask yourself:

  • Are you willing to use a kettle and French press to make coffee? It makes better tasting coffee, and the only waste are the coffee grounds, which make great compost.
  • Are you willing to spend 5 minutes to heat up your leftovers in a pan on the propane stove instead of 3 minutes in the microwave? Your food will taste better.
  • How about watching 2 hours of TV rather than 5? Or read a book instead? Your brain and eyes will thank you.
  • Ladies, are you willing to air dry your hair (even a couple times per week) so you don’t need a hair dryer? Or, dry your hair in the campground bathroom when it’s absolutely necessary?
  • How about making toast on a griddle over a propane stove rather than relying on an electric toaster? So much tastier…just like at your favorite local diner!
  • What about choosing a down comforter or possibly an electric blanket for those cold nights instead of heating your entire RV with a furnace fan? You could save hundreds of watts per hour!
  • When boondocking, could you store your fresh food in a cooler rather than running a full residential fridge? There are many new 12-volt coolers which require far less energy to keep your food safe.

Remember: There are many easy ways to reduce your energy needs without reducing your creature comforts. Making these changes will simplify what you need in your RV, eliminate clutter, and reduce the overall cost of your solar powered system significantly. Less to maintain + less money = less stress!

A Bit More Physics to Stretch Your Brain

Now that you’ve determined your watt hours, let’s plunge a bit deeper into the physics of electricity as you will come across this terminology when you are deciding on which size/type of components to purchase. Don’t get too hung up on these concepts, but it’s good to understand a bit of it before talking to a sales person or technician.

Watts, Volts, and Amps: Think about these concepts in terms of water running through a shower head.

Amps is like the flow of water in terms of liters per minute coming through the shower head.

Volts is the pressure at which these liters of water are being pushed through the shower head.

Watts is the product of amps x volts, or how satisfying and effective that shower head is at getting you clean! Remember: Anything that heats or cools generally requires a lot of watts. Learn more about the relationship between amps and volts and watts here.

Ready to solar power your life? Get your total watt hours and list of appliances ready and give Renogy a call at 1.800.330.8676 to get a quote on your system. It’s good to call a few different solar panel manufacturers to compare prices, warranties, customer service, etc. Then, determine if you are going to D.I.Y. or hire a professional installer. Or, do some yourself and hire a professional for the trickier parts. Most electricians are familiar with solar installations, just ask around for recommendations in your area. If you live in the southeast, we highly recommend the folks at IONCON of Boone, NC!

If we’ve inspired you to go solar with Renogy, please use our affiliate link and promo code “canlife.” You will get a 10% discount and we will get credit for the sale. It’s win-win! And, as always,contact us directly with any questions. We love to hear from our readers!

Shari Galiardi & David Hutchison have turned their higher education backgrounds, desire for life-long learning, and thirst for adventure travel into writing, photography, video production, and public speaking tours from coast to coast. Known to their friends as simply Shari & Hutch, you can learn more about their full-time, solar powered adventures on their website at freedominacan.com. Or, follow them onFacebook, Instagram, andYouTube as “Freedom in a Can.”

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Источник: https://www.renogy.com/blog/the-complete-guide-to-getting-started-with-solar-in-mobile-homes-are-panels-worth-it/

Yes, Solar Panels for Mobile Homes Are Possible

solar-panels-for-mobile-homes

A comprehensive answer to ‘Are Solar Panels for Mobile Homes Possible?’

Interested in installing solar on the roof of your manufactured home? Let’s be honest: in most instances, it’s not possible to install solar panels for mobile homes. It’s mostly due to the roof structure of mobile homes – they simply aren’t designed to hold the weight of an entire solar installation.

However, that doesn’t mean you’re completely out of luck. Some mobile homes can safely have solar installed; it all depends on your local building codes as well as the structure of your home. And if it ends up that you really can’t have solar on your roof, maybe you’ve got another area of your property where you can install solar panels.

Before looking into all this, let’s figure out if installing solar panels for your mobile home is even a good decision.

#1 Will solar panels lower my electricity bill?electricity-bill

In a word: yes. In most states, it’s cheaper to purchase and install solar panels on your roof than continuing to purchase electricity from your utility for the next 25 years (which is the estimated life of solar installations).

Solar panels for mobile homes cost as much as any other roof-top installation, as there is no real special equipment, and you can see some real savings.

Let’s run through a quick example just to see typical costs and savings:

Say you live in a manufactured home in Nevada. You use about 913 kWh each month and spend $0.13/kWh for electricity from the utility (both of which are average for the state).

To cover 100% of your annual energy usage, you’d need a 6.5kW installation (equal to about 25 solar panels).

Let’s make it a little more interesting: You measure your roof, but uh oh! It looks like you can only fit 12 solar panels on your roof. This means you can only cover 50% of your total electricity use with solar! Does installing solar panels to cover 50% of your usage make sense? Let’s find out!

12 solar panels (3.12kW) would produce about 5,299 kWh each year in Nevada. At the national average installation cost of $2.93/watt, a 3.2kW installation would cost $6,400 after the 30% federal tax credit. Assuming they last the standard 25 years, your solar installation would produce about 120,504 kWh by the end of its life.

If you purchased that much electricity from your utility over the next 25 years, you’d spend $24,062. So, by covering even just 50% of your total electricity use, you save over $17.5k! That seems like a good deal to us!

#2 Can I install solar panels on my mobile home?solar-panels-for-mobile-homes

In all honesty, probably not. As we saw above, the issue is not about electricity use or production. You can save quite a bit of money by offsetting your electricity costs for your manufactured home by going solar.

It’s also not about roof space. Sure, you might have a smaller roof than the average house, but with the average manufactured home being over 1,000 square feet, you should have no problem fitting a row or two of solar panels up there. You can even save money by covering just 50% of your total usage!

The issue is the structural components of most manufactured homes, specifically the roof and the foundation. Most of these homes simply aren’t designed to hold solar panels. Let’s get a little more detailed:

The roof needs to be strong enough

Solar panels and all their equipment are heavy. The solar panels themselves weigh around 35 pounds each. Then there’s the aluminum rails that the solar panels sit on, the flashing and attachment points that are bolted to your roof, and the electrical conduit that protects the wires running to your breaker box, not to mention the weight of the installers while they wander around your roof installing the panels!

Even if we only account for the solar panels, the 12-panel system above would add an additional 420 pounds to your roof! Now add 3 installers at 170 pounds each, 2 feet of snow in the winter, and insane wind pushing down (or pulling up, which is also an issue!) on the entire roof during a snowstorm and you can see why any homeowner contemplating solar needs a strong roof structure to ensure their own safety and the safety of the installers.

A lot goes into making sure a roof is safe for solar. Solar companies must follow local building codes, ensuring that any home’s roof joists are strong enough to handle all the weight. They look at the dimensions of the roof joists, the spacing between joists, and even the type of wood used for the joists (since some types of wood are weaker than others). They also look for damage to joists, rotten wood, mold, or any other signs that your joists are compromised.

The issue with most manufactured homes is that they typically have smaller roof joists than conventional homes. This means they can’t safely hold the weight of the installation. If you’ve got the right joist set-up, you could be well on your way to safely installing solar on your roof, but few mobile homes actually do.

A permanent foundation is required

We’ve all probably seen a conventional house being built. Builders dig deep into the ground to lay a concrete foundation that gives the house its strong structure. Manufactured homes are different, though. They aren’t necessarily permanently embedded into the ground. Instead, they are placed on top of the ground.

In everyday life, this isn’t really an issue. With solar panels, though, building codes note that the structure they’re installed on needs to be permanently attached to the ground. This might not seem like a huge issue, but depending on your local building department, it could stop your installation in its tracks.

City or county building codes are based on the International Building Code, but by no means do they follow every rule exactly. Before you wave solar off as impossible, be sure to talk to a few installers to see what your local building department truly requires.

Remember, solar companies want to install solar on your roof! If they say they can’t install on your roof, it’s for your own safety!

#3 Are there other places to install solar on my property?freestanding-solar

Can’t install on your roof, but still interested in solar? You might have other options!

Ask yourself if there are there any other buildings you can install solar on. Maybe an enclosed patio, garage, or outbuilding? The requirements to put solar on these buildings is the same as for homes – they need to be permitted, structurally sound, and large enough for solar panels – but these buildings certainly open up your available roof space!

You could also consider a ground mounted solar installation. Instead of solar panels on your roof, a structure is permanently attached to the ground and the solar panels are installed on it. If you’ve got the space and your city or county allows it, this could certainly be an option.

Ground mounts are more expensive than rooftop solar, so keep that in mind. Again, reach out to a few installers to see what they offer and what your local regulations are.

#4 Consider energy efficiency upgradesinsulation

If you can’t install solar (and even if you can), consider installing a few energy efficiency upgrades to your home. In fact, the most cost-effective thing you can do to lower your energy costs is to install energy efficient upgrades. It’s even cheaper than solar!

Older mobile homes are infamously inefficient. Windows are thin and unsealed, allowing conditioned air to leak out. Walls can be uninsulated. The Environmental and Energy Study Institute found that people living in manufactured homes built before the late 1970s use 1.5x more energy than any other home type.

In 1976, new federal standards for manufactured homes (known as the HUD Code) means they are now much more energy efficient, but new mobile homes can still be plagued by inefficiencies. A study by the US Department of Energy identified the 5 best upgrades to increase your mobile home’s efficiency:

  • Seal air leaks as well as furnace ducts
  • Perform a furnace tune-up to ensure it’s working properly
  • Adding insulation to the belly of the home
  • Installing storm windows inside the home
  • Blowing insulation into the attic space

Also consider replacing old lightbulbs with LEDs, replacing that 30-year old refrigerator and dishwasher for Energy Star models and caulking around all your windows and doors so conditioned air can’t escape. Most of these little projects can be done in a weekend and they’ll go a long way to reducing your energy use (and costs)!

More: 5 Major Ways to Save Money on Home Energy Beyond Solar Panels 

#5 The Future looks bright for solar on mobile homes

Heavy mounting equipment isn’t the only option to install solar on your roof. New products are constantly being introduced and we’re seeing more and more options that could easily lend themselves to mobile homes in the future.

Here are the 2 most promising options:

Tesla solar roof tiles

If you haven’t heard of these yet, Tesla’s solar roof tiles might just be a game changer for the entire solar industry when they come out in 2017. These solar tiles are made of textured and colored glass with a solar cell embedded. They look just like any other roof shingle and they actually replace your shingles on your roof – the solar panels don’t go on your roof, they are your roof! This cuts cost and weight, which is great news for manufactured homes!

Details on the product are still scarce, but hopefully they’ll be a great solar option for mobile homes in the future.

Stick-on solar

Like solar tiles, stick-on solar panels also weigh less than traditional solar installations. These solar panels have an adhesive backing that simply sticks on to your shingles. Installation is ultra-fast compared to traditional hardware.

The best part? They are ultra-lightweight as well! The panels don’t have the aluminum frames that most solar panels have and there’s no attachment hardware like rails, L-feet, or anything else. Lumeta, one of the more prominent manufacturers of stick-on solar for homes, is planning to release their products in late 2017. These panels weigh just 17.5 pounds, compared to 35 to 40 pounds for most traditional solar panels.

Once available, both these stick-on panels and Tesla’s solar shingles could open up solar to manufactured home owners that otherwise couldn’t get solar on their roofs. It’s certainly an exciting time for solar!

The bottom line on solar panels for mobile homessolar-garage

You can certainly install solar on mobile homes, but homes that meet the requirements are fairly rare. Our best advice is to talk to a few local installers to see what the local building requirements are and have them inspect your roof joists and foundation to see if your home is up for the challenge.

If you can’t install solar on your roof, consider other places to install solar on your property: garages, patios, or even open areas with space for a ground-mounted installation.

And don’t forget the efficiency measures! Whether you install solar or not, upgrading your home’s insulation and sealing air leaks goes a long way to ensuring you are using as little energy as possible!

Image Credit under CC License via Flickr – 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 & Pixabay – 4

Источник: https://understandsolar.com/solar-panels-for-mobile-homes/

WHY GO SOLAR?

Go-anywhere freedom.
Freedom to explore remote, off-grid locations. Complete mobile power solutions allow you to trade campgrounds and plug-ins for untouched landscapes and remote vistas.

Cost Savings.
While generators and solar systems both require an upfront investment, the running costs for solar are minimal compared to operating a heavy, noisy generator.

Less noise.
Running a generator can interrupt a peaceful setting and may also be restricted or regulated in some locations. Solar saves yourself (and your neighbors) the headache of relying on generators.

Fewer emissions.
By powering your RV’s electrical system with a renewable energy source, you’re able to harness the power of the sun instead of relying on fossil fuels.

ABOUT GO POWER!

Go Power! is a trusted, recognized leader in mobile power technology. From our beginnings as a small Canadian distributor of solar energy products, we have grown to become one of North America’s leading suppliers of recreational and business mobile solar solutions.

About Us

Meet the Team

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Источник: https://gpelectric.com/

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Call them tiny, manufactured or mobile homes, there is no question they are in demand right now. But how many solar panels will you need to power a mobile home? Is it even practical to use solar power here?

A mobile home requires 15 x 300W solar panels. This solar array can produce 4500 watts a day on average, which is sufficient for a 500 to 780 sq. ft. house that uses basic appliances.

How Much Solar Power Does a Mobile Home Need?

While most energy efficient mobile homes are in the 500 to 800 sq. ft. range, power consumption varies widely. This is how we came up with the 4500 watts a day consumption, and what conditions apply.

A mobile house typically uses up to 4100 watts to 4500 watts a day, with 80% of that coming from cooling and heating. This is the breakdown of the power consumption per day.

  • Computer 300W
  • Mobile device 30W
  • Lights 30W
  • Refrigerator 800W
  • Cooling/heating 3000W

Total: 4160 watts

These calculations assume you use propane gas to cook. If you use a solar powered microwave the power requirements will be greater. Note also that this house does not use any coffee maker, blender, gaming console etc. If you include those, adjust the numbers accordingly..

But let us assume your house needs 4000W-4500W per day, Now we need to figure out how many solar panels it will take in the next section.

If you already know how many solar panels you need, we recommend 300 watts per panel. Anything smaller and it will take up too much space. We suggest starting off with the ACOPOWER 300W Solar Panel Kit and add more as needed. With a versatile kit you can add as many panels as required without difficulty.

More Mobile Home Solar Power Calculations

A solar array consisting of 15 x 300W solar panels will be sufficient. It might seem like overkill because in theory one 300W panel can produce 1500 watts a day (300 x 5 = 1500). So 3 x 300W looks enough, right? Well it depends.

if you only need 4000 watts for a short time, 3 to 4 300W panels will do. But a house requires 4000 watts and more for longer periods. 4 x 300W solar panels might produce 1000 watts an hour on a good day, but if you have an AC or heater running all day along with other appliances, the hourly watt usage will exceed 1000 watts.

A refrigerator that uses 1000 watts a day likely has a 3000 surge watt requirement. Add in a microwave, dishwasher, toaster and you will see why 15 solar panels at 300 watts each is ideal. The more appliances you run, the greater the demand from your PV system.

There are many factors that affect solar panel production, but the most important are:

  • Solar panel ratings are based on peak output. In real life, a 300W solar panel is unlikely to produce 300 watts continuously. It will likely be 250W or 200W.
  • Solar panel production drops significantly during the winter. And if there is a sudden downpour production can cease altogether.
  • Geography affects the output of a PV module. If you live in one of the colder states, that 300W solar panel may produce only half its rated output.
  • Solar panel production is based on peak performance during the summer. Expect the numbers to drop during the cold season, so it pays to have more solar panels available during times like these.

If your power requirements are 4100 watts, you should add a couple hundred more. It is always a good idea to have some reserve power. Bottom line: you should have more solar power available than what you need. A good sized battery bank or a solar generator is also recommended.

Does a Solar Powered Mobile Home Need Batteries?

The panels are only one part of your solar system. To fully power your mobile house, you need a charge controller, batteries and an inverter. We suggest a 1200ah battery bank or more. You can buy three 400ah Shunbin LiFePO4 batteries or any size as long as the total is 1200ah.

A mobile that consumes 4100 to 4500W needs:

  • 15 x 300W solar panels
  • 1200ah lead acid battery bank (12 x 370ah batteries)
  • 60A MPPT charge controller
  • 5000W inverter
  • Backup generator (optional)

You should also have a surge protector, circuit breakers, system control panel and the required cables, wires and connectors. if you purchased a solar panel kit or will have a professional installer do it for you, they will provide all the tools and hardware.

if you are going to do the installation, review each component and calculate how much solar power you need. A note about the generator: your backup generator should ideally have the same capacity as the solar array, in this case 4500W. It is not strictly necessary, but in case of emergency can be a real life saver.

You can never tell with the weather or if an unforeseen disaster strikes. If you end being unable to use your solar power system for prolonged periods, having a generator on standby can give you peace of mind.

You can go with 12V or 24V batteries. depending on the electrical system. You can opt for AGM or lithium, but for tiny houses, lead acid batteries are sufficient.

Lithium batteries have benefits and so do AGM, but lead acid batteries are cheaper. Their life cycles are more numerous than AGM too. Though they require more maintenance than lithium, it is not an issue if you are willing to take care of them.

But the biggest selling point is the price. Living in mobile homes is all about managing cost. And using lad acid batteries is one of the best ways to do that.

Can You Install Solar Panels on a Mobile Home?

It is possible to install solar panels on a mobile home, but it is impractical because the roofs on most of these houses cannot support the weight of several solar panels.

Roof space is not a problem. A 1000 or 1500 sq. ft. house needs 30 to 35 solar panels to power everything. If you scale it down to the size of a mobile house, around 500 to 800 sq. ft. you only need 15 PV modules as we mentioned. The roof is smaller, but you need fewer panels.

The problem is the weight. A 300W solar panel weighs 35 to 40 lbs. 15 of these means 600 pounds on the roof. Plus you have to install the brackets, mounts and rails because solar panels need space.

To install those solar panels, two to three people have to get on the roof. Assume each one weighs 160 lbs., that is another 480 lbs. 480 plus 600 is 1080 pounds, that is more than a ton!

Even though the installers are only there temporarily, the roof will have to support the weight of snow during winter and deal with strong winds too. So unless the roof is super strong, it is not a good idea.

Is Your Mobile House Roof Strong Enough? The only way to find out is to contact a solar installer. They will inspect the roof and determine if the supporting structure can handle the weight of the solar panel. Before any installation takes place, they will check the joists, the roofing material to ensure it is durable enough.

Solar panel installations also have to follow the building codes and if your local codes say mobile houses cannot be placed on the roof, then you have to look for alternatives. And the good news there are other options.

Are There Alternative Places to Install Solar Panels on a Mobile Home?

If you cannot put solar panels on the roof, that does not mean you have to give up on solar power. Here are some ideas.

The first option is to install the panels on another structure close by, like a pergola, a patio or even a shed. Once set up, you can connect these panels to your main house.

If your property has a sizeable land area, consider a ground mounted solar installation. In a grounded configuration, a structure is set up where the solar panels can be installed. If your local building code allows this, it is the best alternative to rooftop solar panels.

Keep in mind that ground mount solar panels cost more than rooftop panels to install. Their output is also lower because they are further from the sun. However, it is the most practical option if you want solar power for your mobile home.

Conclusion

In the past, mobile homes were notorious for being energy wasters, often consuming more than the average size American house. Nowadays these properties use energy saving materials, which make them a practical alternative for many.

Источник: https://www.portablesolarexpert.com/how-many-solar-panels-do-i-need-for-a-mobile-home/

What is a manufactured home?

Manufactured homes have come a long way from their former reputation as mobile homes. Made with better quality products while remaining affordable, they’re attractive housing options that are increasing in popularity.

Standards for manufactured homes have improved in recent years and are now almost indistinguishable from foundation-built properties depending on the manufacturer and location.

In this article, we’ll look into specifics about what is technically a manufactured home, the history of manufactured homes over the years, and details about what to consider when thinking about solar and other energy concerns for a manufactured home.

What is a Manufactured Home?

Manufactured homes are created and assembled in a factory and delivered to the site where they will reside as one complete unit. You may have seen a manufactured home on the back of a flatbed semi truck with a wide load sign warning drivers to leave space for safety.

Manufactured homes should be differentiated from modular homes, which are constructed as several pieces of the whole in a factory. These different parts or pieces are then delivered to the site and assembled there.

A manufactured home will always be moveable because it is built on a permanent chassis and could be transported anywhere at any time. Often, a manufactured home will stay in one place during its lifetime despite this. A modular home, however, can be built on a crawlspace or a basement.

Even though manufactured homes technically have wheels and a hitch for transporting at any time, they’re often taken to the home’s site on large flatbed trucks now. This is because they used to be much smaller and more mobile, but this has changed as they have increased in size over the years.

Although they often have wheels underneath their siding, they will likely never move from location once they are in place, due partly to their increased size. However, since a manufactured home is not permanently connected to the foundation, if you own a manufactured home in a neighborhood and would like to move it out to a rural area one day, you have that option.

History of Manufactured Homes

Manufactured homes were first introduced for post-WWII soldiers and families, and then for people looking for work in the post-depression era. The job market was sparse and stable careers were hard to come by. These people needed affordable housing options that also allowed them the possibility of moving, even to another state if necessary to seek out job opportunities.1

Originally, manufactured homes were known as trailers since they could trail behind a car in a move. If you’re having a hard time picturing this, it’s because they generally used to be only 8-feet wide. They also used to be more cheaply made.

New standards for manufactured homes were introduced under the National Mobile Home Construction and Safety Act2 which Congress implemented in 1976. The Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Code regulations were enacted. This increased the safety of materials, assembly standards, durability, and affordability for manufactured homes.

These federal safety and construction standards supersede any state or local laws and apply to any manufactured homes built after June 15, 1976. HUD regulates the standards by inspecting manufactured home factories or by visiting constructed homes on retailer lots to ensure they meet the regulatory guidelines.

If a home manufacturer does not meet these standards, they must correct any issues and inform the homeowners.

Источник: https://www.vivintsolar.com/blog/what-is-a-manufactured-home

Energy Transition

Solar power, once thought to be only for the wealthy, is now helping rural poor reduce their energy bills. Americans who live in mobile homes are particularly vulnerable to energy poverty. But a new program could get them clean energy and provide long-term savings, says Bentham Paulos.

two run-down mobile homes with a view of the horizon

Mobile homes are notoriously energy-inefficient, meaning high power bills for low-income people (Public Domain)


While many think of poverty as an urban problem, the truth is that some of the poorest communities in America are in rural areas.

The quintessential example of rural poverty is the trailer home park.  Manufactured homes, formerly called trailers or mobile homes, are often built in neighborhoods owned by a single landlord, though can also be built on individual lots.

And incomes are low.  According to the Census Bureau, the median household income of occupants of a manufactured home was only $28,400 last year, compared to $48,000 for all housing types.  Almost a quarter of mobile home households have incomes under the federal poverty level.

New Mexico is a hotbed of manufactured housing, which makes up 17% of the housing stock in the state.  That is the second highest number per capita, after Solar panels for trailer homes Carolina, according to Ken Hughes of the state energy office.  “They’re just everywhere.”

There are 357 manufactured home communities in the state, according to the New Mexico Manufactured Housing Association, but even more manufactured homes are not in trailer parks, but are on land owned by the solar panels for trailer homes are especially common in the Española Valley, a rural area that is 89% Hispanic, just north of Santa Fe.  Mobile homes are about 30% of homes there, and 22% of all households live under the federal poverty line.

While the quality of manufactured homes has improved in recent years, older homes are notoriously energy-inefficient.  Poorly insulated, with low-quality windows, they can saddle their low-income owners with high energy bills.

“For low-income families, electricity is usually the third biggest item after lodging and food,” says Hughes.

But Hughes and his colleague Mark Gaiser are working on new approaches to cut energy bills using solar power.

Because the roofs of manufactured homes are not always able to support the racks and panels of a solar system, Hughes and Gaiser are looking instead at ground-mounted solar systems.  To cut installation costs and save space in a crowded trailer park, they have developed an ingenious “solar on a stick” design, with four 300-kilowatt panels mounted on a single pole.

The whole thing will sit on a four-foot-long industrial screw to reduce installation costs, drilled into the ground using fence-making equipment.  Gaiser would like to use trackers so the panels could follow the progress of the sun, increasing their energy output.  But trackers on the market now are too expensive, so he is trying to adapt car actuators to be a low-cost, time-based tracker.

Gaiser thinks he can get the installed cost of the system down to about $2 per watt, or $2400 for a 1.2 kW system.  Residential rooftop systems in New Mexico are currently more than twice that price.

That price will also put them in the ballpark with the large ground-mounted systems that the local electric coop, Kit Carson, is installing.  The coop is planning to get 100% of its summer peak demand from solar within five years, putting in thirty 1 MW systems.

“That approach will help with bills over time,” says Hughes, “but no individuals will see direct benefits.”

Gaiser plans to get a prototype up by end of the month, and work with local colleges to get 10 more installed by May of next year.  In the end, the state office will release an “open source” strategy and design, using primarily off-the-shelf parts.

The plan is to find a company to make the mounting systems locally, and install them for rural customers of all kinds.  But they are especially interested in getting how to protest property taxes online in tarrant county benefits to low-income households.

“We are looking for non-profits that would want to take up the challenge,” Gaiser says.

One non-profit that is bringing solar to low-income rural households is the Rural Renewable Energy Alliance (RREAL), based in Minnesota.

RREAL has been working to reduce energy bills for residents of manufactured homes in the Upper Midwest, delivering weatherization and home energy assistance programs.

Federal taxpayers pay $3.4 billion per year in energy assistance programs.  And while the Trump administration proposed zeroing-out the program, Congress is likely to continue funding.

RREAL advocates for using solar to provide long-term savings and self-reliance to low-income households.

“We are hemorrhaging public resources without providing a long-term solution or addressing the root causes of energy poverty,” says Jason Edens, Director of RREAL.

In the Upper Midwest, winter heating loads are substantial, says Edens.  “And because there is little opportunity to improve the envelope of a manufactured home, there is significant value in adding solar heat.”

RREAL has specialized in solar air heaters, essentially wall-mounted black boxes that heat up on cold sunny days and warm up a home.  But the low cost of solar photovoltaics has made PV a more competitive option.

RREAL recently completed a project with Leech Lake band of the Ojibwe Nation, installing five 40 kW solar systems on tribal properties.  The savings from the solar will be directed to low-income energy assistance for tribal families.  It is the first 100% low-income community solar installation in Minnesota, as well as the first in the country on tribal lands.

“Solar assistance is literally moving families from impoverished to empowered,” says Edens.

Bentham Paulos is an energy consultant and writer based in California. His views are his own, and don’t necessarily represent those of any of his clients. For more information see PaulosAnalysis.com.

by Ben Paulos

Bentham Paulos is an energy consultant and writer based in California. His views are his own, and don’t necessarily represent those of any of his clients.

Источник: https://energytransition.org/2017/10/solar-comes-to-the-trailer-park/

Move Over Tiny Homes, These Us bank new account Solar Homes Are Hot for 2018

Prefab Solar Homes That Will Blow Your Mind

For many people, living sustainably isn’t just a trend – it’s an ethos. For those striving to live more sustainably, traditional homeownership hasn’t been the ideal choice. In many cases, traditional construction, featuring large floor plans and large heating and cooling footprints, has been avoided in favor of an evolving set of alternative options.

The default housing choice for the sustainability-minded over the last decade has been the tiny home, but that may all be about to change. A wave of modular, prefabricated homes (many complete with solar power generating systems and systems designs to lower their energy and water usage) are currently gaining popularity worldwide. Here’s a look at four companies producing prefab, sustainable homes that you’ll definitely want to keep an eye on.

prefab solar home

Deltec Homes

Deltec Homes of Asheville, North Carolina has been in business since 1968. Since the mid-eighties, they have been constructing modular prefab homes that are known for both their hurricane resistance and energy efficiency. They are a certified B corporation and offer sustainability-minded homeowners a great prefab option in their Renew Collection line of homes.

These houses are created using pre-designed floor plans that are created to use two-thirds less energy than a conventionally constructed home while powering the remaining third of its energy needs through solar power. They even make a passive-solar farmhouse that also has solar panels on it.

Cubicco, M.A.Di., and other European Modular Home Builders

An international manufacturer of modular dwelling units with a base in Miami, Florida, Cubicco makes beautiful modular dwellings, working with developers and builders to put together communities of sustainable homes. They have a model home open for tour that you should check out if you live nearby or are visiting South Florida.

Like the Italian designer of the M.A.DI. concept and other European modular home companies, they are focused on providing affordable, sustainable, prefab modular homes that can be manufactured, transported by truck, and assembled quickly on site and with minimal impact to the ecology of the building site. Further, these homes are powered by solar panels.

prefab solar home

Hive Modular

Hive Modular of Minneapolis, Minnesota focuses on projects of over 1,000 square feet in size, but don’t worry, they also make smaller houses for tiny home enthusiasts. They manufacture and ship volumetric modular homes, with all the wiring, fixtures, and plumbing pre-installed at the factory to save on construction costs. All of their homes have passive solar features worked into the design and are solar panel installation-ready when delivered.

Hive Modular builds homes in a variety of sizes. Some models are narrow in design and are meant to help with urban in-fill efforts by slipping into lots between existing homes. Some models are more spacious and designed for suburban lots or rural installation. Lake lure north carolina vacation home rentals also make custom modular homes, working with the homeowner to design and deliver the perfect house, and they even design and build modular multi-family housing.

prefab solar home

Method Homes

Serving the Western United States and Canada (including Hawaii and Alaska), Method Homes builds and delivers absolutely beautiful zero net energy (ZNE) homes and commercial structures.

Through the employment of high R-value insulation and tight construction, the employment of a heat exchanger, high-quality windows and doors, passive solar design, a high-efficiency heating and cooling system, solar electricity, and high-efficiency fixtures and appliances, Method Homes strives to make your home produce more energy than it actually uses.

Picking Out and Customizing Your Prefab Dwelling Unit

This article just scratches the surface of the rapidly developing U.S. prefab solar home industry. A quick Google search can turn up a wide variety of options if an eco-friendly, solar-powered, prefab home seems like a good fit for solar panels for trailer homes. And yes, if you want to, it can still be tiny.

Carson Buck

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Carson is a real estate agent based out of Phoenix, Arizona. Carson loves data and market research, and how readily available it is in today's world. He is passionate about interpreting these insights hotels near university at buffalo help his clients find and buy their perfect home. Carson got into the real estate industry because he loves the feeling of handing over the keys to a new home to happy clients. In his free time, he works on his backyard bonsai garden and spends time with his wife, Julia.

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Источник: https://www.homes.com/blog/2018/07/move-over-tiny-homes-these-pre-fab-solar-homes-are-hot-for-2018/

ECO-WORTHY 1600W 2400W 3600W Watt Solar Panel Kit For RV Trailer Home Shed Farm


ECO-WORTHY 1600W 2400W 3600W Watt Solar Panel Kit For RV Trailer Home Shed Farm
ECO-WORTHY 1600W 2400W 3600W Watt Solar Panel Kit For RV Trailer Home Shed Farm
ECO-WORTHY 1600W 2400W 3600W Watt Solar Panel Kit For RV Trailer Home Shed Farm
ECO-WORTHY 1600W 2400W 3600W Watt Solar Panel Kit For RV Trailer Home Shed Farm
ECO-WORTHY 1600W 2400W 3600W Watt Solar Panel Kit For RV Trailer Home Shed Farm
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ECO-WORTHY 1600W 2400W 3600W Watt Solar Panel Kit For RV Trailer Home Shed Farm
ECO-WORTHY 1600W 2400W 3600W Watt Solar Panel Kit For RV Trailer Home Shed Farm
ECO-WORTHY 1600W 2400W 3600W Watt Solar Panel Kit For RV Trailer Home Shed Farm
ECO-WORTHY 1600W 2400W 3600W Watt Solar Panel Kit For RV Trailer Home Shed Farm

ECO-WORTHY 1600W 2400W 3600W Watt Solar Panel Kit For RV Trailer Home Shed FarmECO-WORTHY 1600W 2400W 3600W Watt Solar Panel Kit For RV Trailer Home Shed Farm

1600W 2400W 3600W Watt Solar Panel Kit For RV Trailer Home Shed Farm. High-efficiency 100W monocrystalline solar panel, another 3500W solar charger inverter, built-in 80A MPPT battery charge controller and 3500W 48V-110V inverter, with UPS function, can be connected to household AC power, freely switch between four battery charging modes To save more electricity. Using the system designed by the photovoltaic junction box, the wiring and connection of the power generation system are simpler and safer. The built-in disconnect switch and independent fuse protect your solar power system.

100AH deep cycle battery gel battery, maintenance-free, no leakage. 30% longer service life and depth of discharge than ordinary lead-acid batteries.

Full digital voltage and current double closed loop control, advanced SPWM technology, output of pure sine wave. Two output modes: mains bypass and inverter output; uninterrupted power supply.

Available in 4 charging modes: Only Solar, Grid power Priority, Solar Power Priority and Mains & Solar hybrid charging. Advanced MPPT technology with an efficiency of 99.9%. Designed with a LCD screen and 3 LED indicators for dynamic display of system data and operating status. ON/OFF rocker switch for AC output control.

Power saving mode available to reduce no-load loss. Intelligent variable speed fan to efficiently dissipate heat and extend system life. Lithium battery activation design, allowing access of lead-acid battery and lithium battery. 360 ° all-round protection with a number of protection functions.

Complete protections, including short circuit protection, over voltage and under voltage protection, overload. Solar charge only, no grid power charging. Only start the grid power charge when the solar power charge fails. Grid power battery first, solar power started only when the grid power is invalid. Hybrid charging of solar power and grid power, priority photovoltaic MPPT charging, when the photovoltaic energy is insufficient.

The most cost-saving electricity, suitable for places with abundant solar energy resources. Used in areas where the power grid is relatively stable and electricity prices are relatively expensive. It is suitable for areas with unstable power grid and can provide sufficient backup power supply at any time.

Mode1Solar power priority mode Solar panel and battery supply power to the load, diversified charging modes and output modes are optional. When the photovoltaic priority mode is selected, green solar energy can be maximized to achieve energy saving and emission reduction. When the photovoltaic is invalid, switch to the mains power supply.

This mode maximizes the use of solar energy, while maintaining battery power, and is suitable for areas with relatively stable power grids. Mode2:Grid power priority mode Switch to inverter power supply only when grid pwoer is invalid, equivalent to backup UPS, used in unstable grid area Mode3:Inverter priority mode Switch to grid power supply only when the battery is under voltage, this mode uses DC power to the greatest extent and is used in areas where the power grid is stable. 48V (Minimum starting voltage 44V). Lead acid or lithium battery. Alarm and turn off charging after 1 minute.

Maximum PV open circuit voltage. PV charging current range (can be set). Forced air cooling, variable speed of fan.

The item "ECO-WORTHY 1600W 2400W 3600W Watt Solar Panel Kit For RV Trailer Home Shed Farm" is in sale since Thursday, June 4, 2020. This item is in the category "Home & Garden\Home Improvement\Electrical Supplies\Alternative Energy Supplies\Solar Power Supplies\Solar Panels & Kits".

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  1. Brand: ECO-WORTHY
  2. Features: Corrosion Resistant
  3. Voltage: 41-50 V
  4. Application: Commercial
  5. System Configuration: Hybrid
  6. Solar Technology: Monocrystalline
  7. Current Type: AC/DC
  8. Power: Greater Than 2000 W
  9. Type: Solar Panel KIt
  10. Charging Mode: MPPT (Maximum Power Point Tracking)
  11. Pliability: Rigid
  12. Recommended Environment: Outdoor
  13. Connector Type: MC4
  14. Inverter Technology: Battery-Based
  15. Power Source: Solar
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ECO-WORTHY 1600W 2400W 3600W Watt Solar Panel Kit For RV Trailer Home Shed FarmECO-WORTHY 1600W 2400W 3600W Watt Solar Panel Kit For RV Trailer Home Shed Farm
Источник: https://wattsmonocrystallinesolar.com/en/eco-worthy-1600w-2400w-3600w-watt-solar-panel-kit-for-rv-trailer-home-shed-farm.html

Yes, Solar Panels for Mobile Homes Are Possible

solar-panels-for-mobile-homes

A comprehensive answer to ‘Are Solar Panels for Mobile Homes Possible?’

Interested in installing solar on the roof of your manufactured home? Let’s be honest: in most instances, it’s not possible to install solar panels for mobile homes. It’s mostly due to the roof structure of mobile homes – they simply aren’t designed to hold the weight of an entire solar installation.

However, that doesn’t mean you’re completely out of luck. Some mobile homes can safely have solar installed; it all depends on your local building codes as well as the structure of your home. And if it ends up that you really solar panels for trailer homes have solar on your roof, maybe you’ve got another area of your property where you can install solar panels.

Before looking into all this, let’s figure out if installing solar panels for your mobile home is even a good decision.

#1 Will solar panels lower my electricity bill?electricity-bill

In a word: yes. In most states, it’s cheaper to purchase and install solar panels on your roof than continuing to purchase electricity from your utility for the next 25 years (which is the estimated life of solar installations).

Solar panels for mobile homes cost as much as any other roof-top installation, as there is no real special equipment, and you can see some real savings.

Let’s run through a quick example just to see typical costs and savings:

Say you live in a manufactured home in Nevada. You use about 913 kWh each month and spend $0.13/kWh for electricity from the utility (both of which are average for the state).

To cover 100% of your annual energy usage, you’d need a 6.5kW installation (equal to about 25 solar panels).

Let’s make it a little more interesting: You measure your roof, but uh oh! It looks like you can only fit 12 solar panels on your roof. This means you can only cover 50% of your total electricity use with solar! Does installing solar panels for trailer homes panels to cover 50% of your usage make sense? Let’s find out!

12 solar panels (3.12kW) would produce about 5,299 kWh each year in Nevada. At the national average installation cost of $2.93/watt, a 3.2kW installation would cost $6,400 after the 30% federal tax credit. Assuming they last the standard 25 years, your solar installation would produce about 120,504 kWh by the end of its life.

If you purchased that much electricity from your utility over the next 25 years, you’d spend $24,062. So, by covering even just 50% of your total electricity use, you save over $17.5k! That seems like a good deal to us!

#2 Can I install solar panels on my mobile home?solar-panels-for-mobile-homes

In all honesty, probably not. As we saw above, the issue is not about electricity use or production. You can save quite a bit of money by offsetting your electricity costs for your manufactured home by going solar.

It’s also not about roof space. Sure, you might have a smaller roof than the average house, but solar panels for trailer homes the average manufactured home being over 1,000 square feet, you should have no problem fitting a row or two of solar panels how to calculate balloon mortgage payment there. You can even save money by covering just 50% of your total usage!

The issue is the structural components of most manufactured homes, specifically the roof and the foundation. Most of these homes simply aren’t designed to hold solar panels. Let’s get a little more detailed:

The roof needs to be strong enough

Solar panels and all their equipment are heavy. The solar panels themselves weigh around 35 pounds each. Then there’s the aluminum rails that the solar panels sit on, the flashing and attachment points that are bolted to your roof, and the electrical conduit that protects the wires running to your breaker box, not to mention the weight of the installers while they wander around your roof installing the panels!

Even if we only account for the solar panels, the 12-panel system above would add an additional 420 pounds to your roof! Now add 3 installers at 170 pounds each, 2 feet of snow in the winter, and insane wind pushing down (or pulling up, which is also an issue!) on the entire roof during a snowstorm and you can see why bank of america merchant services login homeowner contemplating solar needs a strong roof structure to ensure their own safety and the safety of the installers.

A lot goes into making sure a roof is safe for solar. Solar companies must follow local building codes, ensuring that any home’s roof joists are strong enough to handle all the weight. They look at the dimensions of the roof joists, the spacing between joists, and even the type of wood used for the joists (since some types of wood are weaker than others). They also look for damage to joists, rotten wood, mold, or any other signs that your joists are compromised.

The issue with most manufactured homes is that they typically have smaller roof joists than conventional homes. This means they can’t safely hold the weight of the installation. If you’ve got the right joist set-up, you could be well on your way to safely installing solar on your roof, but few mobile homes actually do.

A permanent foundation is required

We’ve all probably seen a conventional house being built. Builders dig deep into the ground to lay a concrete foundation that gives the house its strong structure. Manufactured homes are different, though. They aren’t necessarily permanently embedded into the ground. Instead, they are placed on top of the ground.

In everyday life, this isn’t really an issue. With solar panels, though, building codes note that the structure they’re installed on needs to be permanently attached to the ground. This might not seem like a huge issue, but depending on your local building department, it could stop your installation in its tracks.

City or county building codes are based on the International Building Code, but by no means do they follow every rule exactly. Before you wave solar off as impossible, be sure to talk to a few installers to see what your local building department truly requires.

Remember, solar companies want to install solar on your roof! If they say they can’t install on your roof, it’s for your own safety!

#3 Are there other places to install solar on my property?freestanding-solar

Can’t install on your roof, but still interested in solar? You might have other options!

Ask yourself if there are there any other buildings you can install solar on. Maybe an enclosed patio, garage, or outbuilding? The requirements to put solar on these buildings is the same as for homes – they need to be permitted, structurally sound, and large enough for solar panels – but these buildings certainly open up your available roof space!

You could also consider a ground mounted solar installation. Instead of solar panels on your roof, a structure is permanently attached to the ground and the solar panels are installed on it. If you’ve got the space and your city or county allows it, this could certainly be an option.

Ground mounts are more expensive than rooftop solar, so keep that in mind. Again, reach out to a few installers to see what they offer and what your local regulations are.

#4 Consider energy efficiency upgradesinsulation

If you can’t install solar (and even if you can), consider installing a few energy efficiency upgrades to your home. In fact, the most cost-effective thing you can do to lower your energy costs is to install energy efficient upgrades. It’s even cheaper than solar!

Older mobile homes are infamously inefficient. Windows are thin and unsealed, allowing conditioned air to leak out. Walls can be uninsulated. The Environmental and Energy Study Institute found that people living in manufactured homes built before the late 1970s use 1.5x more energy than any other home type.

In 1976, new federal standards for manufactured homes (known as the HUD Code) means they are now much more energy efficient, but new mobile homes can still be plagued by inefficiencies. A study by the US Department of Energy identified the 5 best upgrades to increase your mobile home’s efficiency:

  • Seal air leaks as well as furnace ducts
  • Perform a furnace tune-up to ensure it’s working properly
  • Adding insulation to the belly of the home
  • Installing storm windows inside the home
  • Blowing insulation into the attic space

Also consider replacing old lightbulbs with LEDs, replacing that 30-year old refrigerator and dishwasher for Energy Star models and caulking around all your windows and doors so conditioned air can’t escape. Most of these little projects can be done in a weekend and they’ll go a long way to reducing your energy use (and costs)!

More: 5 Major Ways to Save Money on Home Energy Beyond Solar Panels 

#5 The Future looks bright for solar on mobile homes

Heavy mounting equipment isn’t the only option to install solar on your roof. New products are constantly being introduced and we’re seeing more and more options that could easily lend themselves to mobile homes in the future.

Here are the 2 most promising options:

Tesla solar roof tiles

If you haven’t heard of these yet, Tesla’s solar roof tiles might just be a game changer for the entire solar industry when they come out in 2017. These solar tiles are made of textured and colored glass with a solar cell embedded. They look just like any other roof shingle and they actually replace your shingles on your roof – the solar panels don’t go on your roof, they are your roof! This cuts cost and weight, which is great news for manufactured homes!

Details on the product are still scarce, but hopefully they’ll be a great solar option for mobile homes in the future.

Stick-on solar

Like solar tiles, stick-on solar panels also weigh less than traditional solar installations. These solar panels have an adhesive backing that simply sticks on to your shingles. Installation is ultra-fast compared to traditional hardware.

The best part? They are ultra-lightweight as well! The panels don’t have the aluminum frames that most solar panels have and there’s no attachment hardware like rails, L-feet, or anything else. Lumeta, one of the more prominent manufacturers of stick-on solar for homes, is planning to release their products in late 2017. These panels weigh just 17.5 pounds, compared to 35 to 40 pounds for most traditional solar panels.

Once available, both these stick-on panels and Tesla’s solar shingles could open up solar to manufactured home owners that otherwise couldn’t get solar on their roofs. It’s certainly an exciting time for solar!

The bottom line on solar panels for mobile homessolar-garage

You can certainly install solar on mobile homes, but homes that meet the requirements are fairly rare. Our best advice is to talk to a few local installers to see what the local building requirements are and have them inspect your roof joists and foundation to see if your home is up for the challenge.

If you can’t install solar on your roof, consider other places to install solar on your property: garages, patios, or even open areas with space for a ground-mounted installation.

And don’t forget the efficiency measures! Whether you install solar or not, upgrading your home’s insulation and sealing air leaks goes a long way to ensuring solar panels for trailer homes are using as little energy as possible!

Image Credit under CC License via Flickr – 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 & Pixabay – 4

Источник: https://understandsolar.com/solar-panels-for-mobile-homes/


Many people make the mistake of jumping into buying solar panels for their RV before doing their homework.They buy a panel or two online and install it without really considering their total power usage, then become frustrated because the system is not performing up to their expectations. Doing this is like purchasing an air conditioning or heating system for your home without assessing the square footage, number of rooms, number of levels, and the typical temperature fluctuations where you live. A solar powered system is not one size fits all.

Are panels worth it? It all depends on how many electrical appliances you want to run, how often you want to be off-grid and whether you want to invest in a solar panel system or continue to pay full-price for full hook-ups at an RV park or campground ($30 - $80 per night). A simple system like ours will get you started for as little as $900.

It’s All About the Watts

The very first step of deciding on the type & size of each component within your system is to calculate your total watt hours – the magic number that powers your life. Taking the time to determine your total watt hours eliminates the guess work out of customizing a solar powered system and allows you to make educated decisions so that you don’t under, or over, purchase equipment – this can save you time, frustration and money. It will require about 1-2 hours of homework, but the time you put in will be worth it.

In our vintage trailer, Hamlet, we choose is coconut water from concentrate good for you live large by living very small, and keep our energy needs quite low. Rather than relying on the typical energy hogging appliances in many RV’s (though some are getting better/smarter), we use alternative methods to store and cook food so that we don’t need a traditional refrigerator, oven, microwave, toaster, or coffee maker. We can make delicious meals without any electricity! Tonight, homemade Chile Rellenos with black beans and Spanish rice. Last night, Pesto Pasta Primavera with garlic bread! Oh, and homemade brownies with ice cream (grabbed from the store) for dessert of course. The challenge of cooking without electricity is so much fun when you get your head around it.

Ok…think back to some of the basic physics that you were probably introduced to in high school. Get a pen, paper, and a calculator and let’s get started! 

Step 1

Find the sticker (or imprint) on the back of each appliance you plan to run and note the number of watts. If for some reason watts is not listed, look for amps and volts and multiply these numbers together. (watts = amps x volts)


Step 2

Determine the number of hours you typically use each appliance each day. Be realistic but be honest. How many hours of TV do you watch per day? Do you want to run a satellite dish, or stream a movie on your wifi? These numbers are an important part of the equation.

Step 3

For each appliance, multiply the watts times the number of hours per day it will be in use. For example, for a 300-watt coffee maker that you city bank lubbock texas phone number to run for 15 minutes each day, multiply 300 x .25 = 75 watt hours. For a 500-watt refrigerator, multiply 500 x 24 hours.

Step 4

Add up all these numbers and you will determine your magic number of daily total watt hours!  You can plug this number into a solar calculator to get an idea of the watt hours you'll need in your battery bank, how many / what wattage of panels you'll need, and the appropriate number of amps for a charge controller.

Step 5

If you’ve just realized that your energy needs are huge, take a moment to rethink what you can do differently and reevaluate what you need vs what you want. What electrical items can you live without or use less? Are there some that you can eliminate while boondocking? Here’s a few questions to ask yourself:

  • Are you willing to use a kettle and French press to make coffee? It makes better tasting coffee, and the only waste are the coffee grounds, which make great compost.
  • Are you willing to spend 5 minutes to heat up your leftovers in a pan on the propane stove instead of 3 minutes in the microwave? Your food will taste better.
  • How about watching 2 hours of TV rather than 5? Or read a book instead? Your brain and eyes will thank you.
  • Ladies, are you willing to air dry your hair (even a couple times per week) so you don’t need a hair dryer? Or, dry your hair in the campground bathroom when it’s absolutely necessary?
  • How about making toast on a griddle over a propane stove rather than relying on an electric toaster? So much tastier…just like at your favorite local diner!
  • What about choosing a down comforter or possibly an electric blanket for those cold nights instead of heating your entire RV with a furnace fan? You could save hundreds of watts per hour!
  • When boondocking, could you store your fresh food in a cooler rather than running a full residential fridge? There are many new 12-volt coolers which require far less energy to keep your food safe.

Remember: There are many arvest com online banking login ways to reduce your energy needs without reducing your creature comforts. Making these changes will simplify what you need in your RV, eliminate clutter, and reduce the overall cost of your solar powered system significantly. Less to maintain + less money = less stress!

A Bit More Physics to Stretch Your Brain

Now that you’ve determined your watt hours, let’s plunge a bit deeper into the physics of electricity as you will come across this terminology when you are deciding on which size/type of components to purchase. Don’t get too hung up on these concepts, but it’s good to understand a bit of it before talking to a sales person or technician.

Watts, Volts, and Amps: Think about these concepts in terms of water running through a shower head.

Amps is like the flow of water in terms of liters per minute coming through the shower head.

Volts is the pressure at which these liters of water are being pushed through the shower head.

Watts is the product of amps x volts, or how satisfying and effective that shower head is at getting you clean! Remember: Anything that heats or cools generally requires a lot of watts. Learn more about the relationship between amps and volts and watts here.

Ready to solar power your life? Get your total watt hours and list of appliances ready and give Renogy a call at 1.800.330.8676 to get a quote on your system. It’s good to call a few different solar panel manufacturers to compare prices, warranties, customer service, etc. Then, determine if you are going to D.I.Y. or hire a professional installer. Or, do some yourself and hire a professional for the trickier parts. Most electricians are familiar with solar installations, just ask around for recommendations in your area. If you live in the southeast, we highly recommend the this is my prayer for you reba mcentire lyrics at IONCON of Boone, NC!

If we’ve inspired you to go solar with Renogy, please use our affiliate link and promo code “canlife.” You will get a 10% discount and we will get credit for the sale. It’s win-win! And, as always,contact us directly with any questions. We love to hear from our readers!

Shari Galiardi & David Hutchison have turned their higher education backgrounds, desire for life-long learning, and thirst for adventure travel into writing, photography, solar panels for trailer homes production, and solar panels for trailer homes speaking tours from coast to coast. Known to their friends as simply Shari & Hutch, you can learn more about their full-time, solar powered adventures on their website at freedominacan.com. Or, follow them onFacebook, Instagram, andYouTube as “Freedom in a Can.”

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Источник: https://www.renogy.com/blog/the-complete-guide-to-getting-started-with-solar-in-mobile-homes-are-panels-worth-it/

WHY GO SOLAR?

Go-anywhere freedom.
Freedom to explore remote, off-grid locations. Complete mobile power solutions allow you to trade campgrounds and plug-ins for untouched landscapes and remote vistas.

Cost Savings.
While generators and solar systems both require an upfront investment, the running costs for solar are minimal compared to operating a heavy, noisy generator.

Less noise.
Running a generator can interrupt a peaceful setting and may also be restricted or regulated in some locations. Solar saves yourself (and your neighbors) the headache of relying on generators.

Fewer emissions.
By powering your RV’s electrical system with a renewable energy source, you’re able to harness the power of the sun instead of relying on fossil fuels.

ABOUT GO POWER!

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Источник: https://gpelectric.com/
solar panels for trailer homes

Solar panels for trailer homes -

Sunworks to add 1-MW solar project to California mobile home park

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Sunworks will install a 1-MW solar system for Meridian Terrace Mobile Home Park, a San Bernardino, California-based mobile home community of 268 homes. The Sunworks solar installation is scheduled for completion in the second half of 2018 and is expected to produce a majority of the property’s electricity needs within its first year of operation.

Sunworks’ CEO Chuck Cargile said, “The cost-effective solar power generated by our systems will help control electricity costs and provide clean energy to more than 200 mobile homes. In addition, ‘Park N’ Shade’ structures will enhance the common areas within the community providing its residents with a number of tangible conveniences and benefits.”

Sunworks was awarded this project in partnership with Alacrity Energy and Westland Real Estate Group. Alacrity Energy represents Westland RE Group to acquire solar systems for their vast real estate holdings of 11,000 commercial and residential units.

“We are thrilled to have the opportunity to manage the Meridian Terrace solar installation,” said Yitzy Geisinsky, president of Alacrity Energy, who is overseeing the project on behalf of Westland. “We were delighted to choose Sunworks based on their thorough attention to detail and impressive accomplishments,” he added.

News item from Sunworks

Источник: https://www.solarpowerworldonline.com/2018/05/sunworks-adds-1-mw-solar-to-california-mobile-home-park/

Move Over Tiny Homes, These Pre-Fab Solar Homes Are Hot for 2018

Prefab Solar Homes That Will Blow Your Mind

For many people, living sustainably isn’t just a trend – it’s an ethos. For those striving to live more sustainably, traditional homeownership hasn’t been the ideal choice. In many cases, traditional construction, featuring large floor plans and large heating and cooling footprints, has been avoided in favor of an evolving set of alternative options.

The default housing choice for the sustainability-minded over the last decade has been the tiny home, but that may all be about to change. A wave of modular, prefabricated homes (many complete with solar power generating systems and systems designs to lower their energy and water usage) are currently gaining popularity worldwide. Here’s a look at four companies producing prefab, sustainable homes that you’ll definitely want to keep an eye on.

prefab solar home

Deltec Homes

Deltec Homes of Asheville, North Carolina has been in business since 1968. Since the mid-eighties, they have been constructing modular prefab homes that are known for both their hurricane resistance and energy efficiency. They are a certified B corporation and offer sustainability-minded homeowners a great prefab option in their Renew Collection line of homes.

These houses are created using pre-designed floor plans that are created to use two-thirds less energy than a conventionally constructed home while powering the remaining third of its energy needs through solar power. They even make a passive-solar farmhouse that also has solar panels on it.

Cubicco, M.A.Di., and other European Modular Home Builders

An international manufacturer of modular dwelling units with a base in Miami, Florida, Cubicco makes beautiful modular dwellings, working with developers and builders to put together communities of sustainable homes. They have a model home open for tour that you should check out if you live nearby or are visiting South Florida.

Like the Italian designer of the M.A.DI. concept and other European modular home companies, they are focused on providing affordable, sustainable, prefab modular homes that can be manufactured, transported by truck, and assembled quickly on site and with minimal impact to the ecology of the building site. Further, these homes are powered by solar panels.

prefab solar home

Hive Modular

Hive Modular of Minneapolis, Minnesota focuses on projects of over 1,000 square feet in size, but don’t worry, they also make smaller houses for tiny home enthusiasts. They manufacture and ship volumetric modular homes, with all the wiring, fixtures, and plumbing pre-installed at the factory to save on construction costs. All of their homes have passive solar features worked into the design and are solar panel installation-ready when delivered.

Hive Modular builds homes in a variety of sizes. Some models are narrow in design and are meant to help with urban in-fill efforts by slipping into lots between existing homes. Some models are more spacious and designed for suburban lots or rural installation. They also make custom modular homes, working with the homeowner to design and deliver the perfect house, and they even design and build modular multi-family housing.

prefab solar home

Method Homes

Serving the Western United States and Canada (including Hawaii and Alaska), Method Homes builds and delivers absolutely beautiful zero net energy (ZNE) homes and commercial structures.

Through the employment of high R-value insulation and tight construction, the employment of a heat exchanger, high-quality windows and doors, passive solar design, a high-efficiency heating and cooling system, solar electricity, and high-efficiency fixtures and appliances, Method Homes strives to make your home produce more energy than it actually uses.

Picking Out and Customizing Your Prefab Dwelling Unit

This article just scratches the surface of the rapidly developing U.S. prefab solar home industry. A quick Google search can turn up a wide variety of options if an eco-friendly, solar-powered, prefab home seems like a good fit for you. And yes, if you want to, it can still be tiny.

Carson Buck

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Carson is a real estate agent based out of Phoenix, Arizona. Carson loves data and market research, and how readily available it is in today's world. He is passionate about interpreting these insights to help his clients find and buy their perfect home. Carson got into the real estate industry because he loves the feeling of handing over the keys to a new home to happy clients. In his free time, he works on his backyard bonsai garden and spends time with his wife, Julia.

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Источник: https://www.homes.com/blog/2018/07/move-over-tiny-homes-these-pre-fab-solar-homes-are-hot-for-2018/

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Call them tiny, manufactured or mobile homes, there is no question they are in demand right now. But how many solar panels will you need to power a mobile home? Is it even practical to use solar power here?

A mobile home requires 15 x 300W solar panels. This solar array can produce 4500 watts a day on average, which is sufficient for a 500 to 780 sq. ft. house that uses basic appliances.

How Much Solar Power Does a Mobile Home Need?

While most energy efficient mobile homes are in the 500 to 800 sq. ft. range, power consumption varies widely. This is how we came up with the 4500 watts a day consumption, and what conditions apply.

A mobile house typically uses up to 4100 watts to 4500 watts a day, with 80% of that coming from cooling and heating. This is the breakdown of the power consumption per day.

  • Computer 300W
  • Mobile device 30W
  • Lights 30W
  • Refrigerator 800W
  • Cooling/heating 3000W

Total: 4160 watts

These calculations assume you use propane gas to cook. If you use a solar powered microwave the power requirements will be greater. Note also that this house does not use any coffee maker, blender, gaming console etc. If you include those, adjust the numbers accordingly..

But let us assume your house needs 4000W-4500W per day, Now we need to figure out how many solar panels it will take in the next section.

If you already know how many solar panels you need, we recommend 300 watts per panel. Anything smaller and it will take up too much space. We suggest starting off with the ACOPOWER 300W Solar Panel Kit and add more as needed. With a versatile kit you can add as many panels as required without difficulty.

More Mobile Home Solar Power Calculations

A solar array consisting of 15 x 300W solar panels will be sufficient. It might seem like overkill because in theory one 300W panel can produce 1500 watts a day (300 x 5 = 1500). So 3 x 300W looks enough, right? Well it depends.

if you only need 4000 watts for a short time, 3 to 4 300W panels will do. But a house requires 4000 watts and more for longer periods. 4 x 300W solar panels might produce 1000 watts an hour on a good day, but if you have an AC or heater running all day along with other appliances, the hourly watt usage will exceed 1000 watts.

A refrigerator that uses 1000 watts a day likely has a 3000 surge watt requirement. Add in a microwave, dishwasher, toaster and you will see why 15 solar panels at 300 watts each is ideal. The more appliances you run, the greater the demand from your PV system.

There are many factors that affect solar panel production, but the most important are:

  • Solar panel ratings are based on peak output. In real life, a 300W solar panel is unlikely to produce 300 watts continuously. It will likely be 250W or 200W.
  • Solar panel production drops significantly during the winter. And if there is a sudden downpour production can cease altogether.
  • Geography affects the output of a PV module. If you live in one of the colder states, that 300W solar panel may produce only half its rated output.
  • Solar panel production is based on peak performance during the summer. Expect the numbers to drop during the cold season, so it pays to have more solar panels available during times like these.

If your power requirements are 4100 watts, you should add a couple hundred more. It is always a good idea to have some reserve power. Bottom line: you should have more solar power available than what you need. A good sized battery bank or a solar generator is also recommended.

Does a Solar Powered Mobile Home Need Batteries?

The panels are only one part of your solar system. To fully power your mobile house, you need a charge controller, batteries and an inverter. We suggest a 1200ah battery bank or more. You can buy three 400ah Shunbin LiFePO4 batteries or any size as long as the total is 1200ah.

A mobile that consumes 4100 to 4500W needs:

  • 15 x 300W solar panels
  • 1200ah lead acid battery bank (12 x 370ah batteries)
  • 60A MPPT charge controller
  • 5000W inverter
  • Backup generator (optional)

You should also have a surge protector, circuit breakers, system control panel and the required cables, wires and connectors. if you purchased a solar panel kit or will have a professional installer do it for you, they will provide all the tools and hardware.

if you are going to do the installation, review each component and calculate how much solar power you need. A note about the generator: your backup generator should ideally have the same capacity as the solar array, in this case 4500W. It is not strictly necessary, but in case of emergency can be a real life saver.

You can never tell with the weather or if an unforeseen disaster strikes. If you end being unable to use your solar power system for prolonged periods, having a generator on standby can give you peace of mind.

You can go with 12V or 24V batteries. depending on the electrical system. You can opt for AGM or lithium, but for tiny houses, lead acid batteries are sufficient.

Lithium batteries have benefits and so do AGM, but lead acid batteries are cheaper. Their life cycles are more numerous than AGM too. Though they require more maintenance than lithium, it is not an issue if you are willing to take care of them.

But the biggest selling point is the price. Living in mobile homes is all about managing cost. And using lad acid batteries is one of the best ways to do that.

Can You Install Solar Panels on a Mobile Home?

It is possible to install solar panels on a mobile home, but it is impractical because the roofs on most of these houses cannot support the weight of several solar panels.

Roof space is not a problem. A 1000 or 1500 sq. ft. house needs 30 to 35 solar panels to power everything. If you scale it down to the size of a mobile house, around 500 to 800 sq. ft. you only need 15 PV modules as we mentioned. The roof is smaller, but you need fewer panels.

The problem is the weight. A 300W solar panel weighs 35 to 40 lbs. 15 of these means 600 pounds on the roof. Plus you have to install the brackets, mounts and rails because solar panels need space.

To install those solar panels, two to three people have to get on the roof. Assume each one weighs 160 lbs., that is another 480 lbs. 480 plus 600 is 1080 pounds, that is more than a ton!

Even though the installers are only there temporarily, the roof will have to support the weight of snow during winter and deal with strong winds too. So unless the roof is super strong, it is not a good idea.

Is Your Mobile House Roof Strong Enough? The only way to find out is to contact a solar installer. They will inspect the roof and determine if the supporting structure can handle the weight of the solar panel. Before any installation takes place, they will check the joists, the roofing material to ensure it is durable enough.

Solar panel installations also have to follow the building codes and if your local codes say mobile houses cannot be placed on the roof, then you have to look for alternatives. And the good news there are other options.

Are There Alternative Places to Install Solar Panels on a Mobile Home?

If you cannot put solar panels on the roof, that does not mean you have to give up on solar power. Here are some ideas.

The first option is to install the panels on another structure close by, like a pergola, a patio or even a shed. Once set up, you can connect these panels to your main house.

If your property has a sizeable land area, consider a ground mounted solar installation. In a grounded configuration, a structure is set up where the solar panels can be installed. If your local building code allows this, it is the best alternative to rooftop solar panels.

Keep in mind that ground mount solar panels cost more than rooftop panels to install. Their output is also lower because they are further from the sun. However, it is the most practical option if you want solar power for your mobile home.

Conclusion

In the past, mobile homes were notorious for being energy wasters, often consuming more than the average size American house. Nowadays these properties use energy saving materials, which make them a practical alternative for many.

Источник: https://www.portablesolarexpert.com/how-many-solar-panels-do-i-need-for-a-mobile-home/

Energy Transition

Solar power, once thought to be only for the wealthy, is now helping rural poor reduce their energy bills. Americans who live in mobile homes are particularly vulnerable to energy poverty. But a new program could get them clean energy and provide long-term savings, says Bentham Paulos.

two run-down mobile homes with a view of the horizon

Mobile homes are notoriously energy-inefficient, meaning high power bills for low-income people (Public Domain)


While many think of poverty as an urban problem, the truth is that some of the poorest communities in America are in rural areas.

The quintessential example of rural poverty is the trailer home park.  Manufactured homes, formerly called trailers or mobile homes, are often built in neighborhoods owned by a single landlord, though can also be built on individual lots.

And incomes are low.  According to the Census Bureau, the median household income of occupants of a manufactured home was only $28,400 last year, compared to $48,000 for all housing types.  Almost a quarter of mobile home households have incomes under the federal poverty level.

New Mexico is a hotbed of manufactured housing, which makes up 17% of the housing stock in the state.  That is the second highest number per capita, after South Carolina, according to Ken Hughes of the state energy office.  “They’re just everywhere.”

There are 357 manufactured home communities in the state, according to the New Mexico Manufactured Housing Association, but even more manufactured homes are not in trailer parks, but are on land owned by the homeowner.

They are especially common in the Española Valley, a rural area that is 89% Hispanic, just north of Santa Fe.  Mobile homes are about 30% of homes there, and 22% of all households live under the federal poverty line.

While the quality of manufactured homes has improved in recent years, older homes are notoriously energy-inefficient.  Poorly insulated, with low-quality windows, they can saddle their low-income owners with high energy bills.

“For low-income families, electricity is usually the third biggest item after lodging and food,” says Hughes.

But Hughes and his colleague Mark Gaiser are working on new approaches to cut energy bills using solar power.

Because the roofs of manufactured homes are not always able to support the racks and panels of a solar system, Hughes and Gaiser are looking instead at ground-mounted solar systems.  To cut installation costs and save space in a crowded trailer park, they have developed an ingenious “solar on a stick” design, with four 300-kilowatt panels mounted on a single pole.

The whole thing will sit on a four-foot-long industrial screw to reduce installation costs, drilled into the ground using fence-making equipment.  Gaiser would like to use trackers so the panels could follow the progress of the sun, increasing their energy output.  But trackers on the market now are too expensive, so he is trying to adapt car actuators to be a low-cost, time-based tracker.

Gaiser thinks he can get the installed cost of the system down to about $2 per watt, or $2400 for a 1.2 kW system.  Residential rooftop systems in New Mexico are currently more than twice that price.

That price will also put them in the ballpark with the large ground-mounted systems that the local electric coop, Kit Carson, is installing.  The coop is planning to get 100% of its summer peak demand from solar within five years, putting in thirty 1 MW systems.

“That approach will help with bills over time,” says Hughes, “but no individuals will see direct benefits.”

Gaiser plans to get a prototype up by end of the month, and work with local colleges to get 10 more installed by May of next year.  In the end, the state office will release an “open source” strategy and design, using primarily off-the-shelf parts.

The plan is to find a company to make the mounting systems locally, and install them for rural customers of all kinds.  But they are especially interested in getting the benefits to low-income households.

“We are looking for non-profits that would want to take up the challenge,” Gaiser says.

One non-profit that is bringing solar to low-income rural households is the Rural Renewable Energy Alliance (RREAL), based in Minnesota.

RREAL has been working to reduce energy bills for residents of manufactured homes in the Upper Midwest, delivering weatherization and home energy assistance programs.

Federal taxpayers pay $3.4 billion per year in energy assistance programs.  And while the Trump administration proposed zeroing-out the program, Congress is likely to continue funding.

RREAL advocates for using solar to provide long-term savings and self-reliance to low-income households.

“We are hemorrhaging public resources without providing a long-term solution or addressing the root causes of energy poverty,” says Jason Edens, Director of RREAL.

In the Upper Midwest, winter heating loads are substantial, says Edens.  “And because there is little opportunity to improve the envelope of a manufactured home, there is significant value in adding solar heat.”

RREAL has specialized in solar air heaters, essentially wall-mounted black boxes that heat up on cold sunny days and warm up a home.  But the low cost of solar photovoltaics has made PV a more competitive option.

RREAL recently completed a project with Leech Lake band of the Ojibwe Nation, installing five 40 kW solar systems on tribal properties.  The savings from the solar will be directed to low-income energy assistance for tribal families.  It is the first 100% low-income community solar installation in Minnesota, as well as the first in the country on tribal lands.

“Solar assistance is literally moving families from impoverished to empowered,” says Edens.

Bentham Paulos is an energy consultant and writer based in California. His views are his own, and don’t necessarily represent those of any of his clients. For more information see PaulosAnalysis.com.

by Ben Paulos

Bentham Paulos is an energy consultant and writer based in California. His views are his own, and don’t necessarily represent those of any of his clients.

Источник: https://energytransition.org/2017/10/solar-comes-to-the-trailer-park/

What is a manufactured home?

Manufactured homes have come a long way from their former reputation as mobile homes. Made with better quality products while remaining affordable, they’re attractive housing options that are increasing in popularity.

Standards for manufactured homes have improved in recent years and are now almost indistinguishable from foundation-built properties depending on the manufacturer and location.

In this article, we’ll look into specifics about what is technically a manufactured home, the history of manufactured homes over the years, and details about what to consider when thinking about solar and other energy concerns for a manufactured home.

What is a Manufactured Home?

Manufactured homes are created and assembled in a factory and delivered to the site where they will reside as one complete unit. You may have seen a manufactured home on the back of a flatbed semi truck with a wide load sign warning drivers to leave space for safety.

Manufactured homes should be differentiated from modular homes, which are constructed as several pieces of the whole in a factory. These different parts or pieces are then delivered to the site and assembled there.

A manufactured home will always be moveable because it is built on a permanent chassis and could be transported anywhere at any time. Often, a manufactured home will stay in one place during its lifetime despite this. A modular home, however, can be built on a crawlspace or a basement.

Even though manufactured homes technically have wheels and a hitch for transporting at any time, they’re often taken to the home’s site on large flatbed trucks now. This is because they used to be much smaller and more mobile, but this has changed as they have increased in size over the years.

Although they often have wheels underneath their siding, they will likely never move from location once they are in place, due partly to their increased size. However, since a manufactured home is not permanently connected to the foundation, if you own a manufactured home in a neighborhood and would like to move it out to a rural area one day, you have that option.

History of Manufactured Homes

Manufactured homes were first introduced for post-WWII soldiers and families, and then for people looking for work in the post-depression era. The job market was sparse and stable careers were hard to come by. These people needed affordable housing options that also allowed them the possibility of moving, even to another state if necessary to seek out job opportunities.1

Originally, manufactured homes were known as trailers since they could trail behind a car in a move. If you’re having a hard time picturing this, it’s because they generally used to be only 8-feet wide. They also used to be more cheaply made.

New standards for manufactured homes were introduced under the National Mobile Home Construction and Safety Act2 which Congress implemented in 1976. The Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Code regulations were enacted. This increased the safety of materials, assembly standards, durability, and affordability for manufactured homes.

These federal safety and construction standards supersede any state or local laws and apply to any manufactured homes built after June 15, 1976. HUD regulates the standards by inspecting manufactured home factories or by visiting constructed homes on retailer lots to ensure they meet the regulatory guidelines.

If a home manufacturer does not meet these standards, they must correct any issues and inform the homeowners.

Источник: https://www.vivintsolar.com/blog/what-is-a-manufactured-home

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