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Each lawyer on this page has been ranked in the most recent Chambers guides, Aldo José Ocampo Castañares Práxedes Joaquín Castillo Báez. Dominican Bar Association - Colegio de Abogados de la República Dominicana: José Alfredo Montas Calderon & Lineed Altagracia Bruno Almonte, Directors. Casey Anthony's Former Lawyer Jose Baez Threatens to Sue Over Claims He Had Sexual Relationship with Her. "I unequivocally and categorically.

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Jose baez abogado

Brian Laundrie Family Will Not Be Repped by Casey Anthony Lawyer, Jose Baez

The family of Brian Laundrie -- the main person of interest in the death of Gabby Petito -- has not retained the lawyer known for representing other notorious defendants like Casey Anthony and Aaron Hernandez . despite swirling rumors.

Attorney Jose Baez tells TMZ . he has not spoken to the Laundrie family or Brian himself. He says, "Therefore, I do not represent him or anyone else related to the case" and tells us his current caseload makes it very unlikely he'd be available for this case "given its current complexities."

Earlier Thursday, Laundrie's parents made a 2-hour trip to Orlando and people online noticed they were close to Baez's office . which sparked speculation they were looking to hire him. But, we're told that's not the case, and the Laundries' lawyer says they were simply there for business.

As you know . Baez was responsible for getting Casey Anthony acquitted in the death of her 2-year-old daughter, Caylee.

Baez was also the lawyer for NFL star Aaron Hernandez's in both his 2012 double murder case and his 2013 murder appeal . until Hernandez killed himself in prison.

As we've reported . Laundrie is still missing roughly a week after his parents first told authorities he took his backpack and went on a hike. Before that, he was named a person of interest in the disappearance of Gabby, his fiancee, after returning home from a cross-country trip on Sept. 1 without her.

Weeks before that, the couple were involved in a domestic dispute in Utah, in which a 911 caller said he saw Brian slapped and hit Gabby.

Her body was found Sunday in a Wyoming state park near a site where the van the couple was traveling in was spotted by a witness in mid-August. The coroner ruled Gabby's death a homicide, and as of now . all signs point to Brian -- the last person ally auto contact customer service see her alive.

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Источник: https://www.tmz.com/2021/09/23/brian-laundrie-gabby-petito-family-not-represented-casey-anthony-lawyer-jose-baez/

Jose Baez (lawyer)

American lawyer

Not to be confused with José Báez (baseball) or José Luis Báez.

José Ángel Báez (born September 17, 1970) is an American attorney and author. He is known for representing high-profile defendants such as Casey Anthony, Aaron Hernandez, Mark Nordlicht, Katelyn Roman, and Harvey Weinstein.

Early life and education[edit]

Báez was born to Puerto Rican parents in Manhattan, N.Y.,[1] and raised in the Bronx, New York, and South Florida with his three sisters by jose baez abogado single mother.[2][3] He attended Homestead High School in Florida, but dropped out in the ninth grade. He married and became a father at age 17.[3] After earning his General Equivalency Diploma (GED), he joined the U.S. Navy in 1986. According to his resume, he spent three years assigned in connection with NATO at Norfolk, Virginia, trained as an intelligence analyst, and held a Top Secret security clearance.[4]

After leaving the Navy in 1989, Báez attended Miami-Dade Community College, then transferred to Florida State University where he earned a BA. He earned his Juris Doctor degree from St. Thomas University School of Law in 1997.[5]

Career[edit]

After graduating from law school in 1997, Báez was denied admission to the Florida Bar due to financial irresponsibility.[6][7] Unable to practice as an attorney, he worked instead as an intern at the Miami Dade Public Defender's office and owned several companies. In 2005, the Florida Board of Bar Examiners admitted Baez after he had demonstrated that he had rehabilitated himself.[7]

Criminal cases[edit]

After being granted his license, he focused primarily on criminal defense cases, including the case of Elvira García, an undocumented Mexican immigrant accused of kidnapping a child that she had adopted as her own. García's charges were dropped, as it turned out to be more of a civil custody matter.[8][9] He also tried the first-degree murder case of Nilton Díaz, heavily covered by the media in Orlando and Puerto Rico because the victim was the 2-year-old granddaughter of World Boxing Champion Wilfredo Vazquez.[10] Diaz was acquitted of first and second degree murder but convicted of manslaughter and child abuse.

Casey Anthony case[edit]

Báez came to significant national attention when he took on the case of Casey Anthony. Time Magazine dubbed it "the Social Media Trial of the Century".[11] Anthony was acquitted of the murder of her daughter, Caylee, after a trial that lasted six weeks. In a press conference on the day of the verdict, Baez said, "While we're happy for Casey, there are no winners in this case. Caylee has passed on far, far too soon, and what my driving force has been for the last three years has been always to make sure that there has been justice for Caylee and Casey because Casey did not murder Caylee. It's that simple." He added, "And today our system of justice has not dishonored her memory by a false conviction."[12] Baez was featured on every major news network and show across the country. Baez authored a book jose baez abogado Peter Golenbock about the Anthony Case, Presumed Guilty, which was published on July 3, 2012 and became a New York Times Best Seller. Fox News Channel commentator Geraldo Rivera referred to Baez as "Juanie Cochran."[13]

Missing in Aruba[edit]

After representing Anthony, Báez was brought on to assist attorney Chris Lejuez in representing millionaire businessman Gary Giordano in Aruba. Giordano was detained in KIA Prison for 116 days in connection with the disappearance of Robyn Gardner.[14] Aruba's High Court released Gary Giordano on November 28, 2011. No charges were ever filed against Gary Giordano. Baez and Lejuez successfully defended an appeal filed by Aruba's Chief Prosecutor, Taco Stein.[15]

Baez defended Giordano on the American reality prime time court showYou the Jury, which was canceled after two episodes. Baez also defended Gerod Roth in the show.

Rebecca Sedwick[edit]

In October 2013, Báez was hired to defend the 12‑year-old suspect arrested in connection with the death of 12‑year-old Rebecca Ann Sedwick, whose mother had claimed was bullied to the point where she committed suicide by jumping to her death from a silo in a cement factory.[16] The case made national news when Polk County, Florida, Sheriff Grady Judd made the first arrest in the country for usps office open today, and gave interviews on all major media shows including the Today Show and Good Morning America.[17] Baez criticized Sheriff Judd for releasing the juveniles' names and photographs, setting off a battle between the sheriff and defense attorney.[18] Sheriff Judd told the media that Báez, "a flashy lawyer from out of town, should go work out a plea deal." In the end, all charges against his client were dropped. After winning the case, Báez told Sheriff Judd that "He should get a lawyer and a darn good one because he's gonna need it," indicating that his client may sue the Sheriff.[19] No known further legal action occurred.

Aaron Hernandez[edit]

Báez was working with former NFL player Aaron Hernandez to appeal his conviction for the murder of Odin Lloyd up until Hernández's apparent suicide on April 19, 2017.[20] Báez has stated publicly that he does not believe that Hernández committed suicide and is "determined to find the jose baez abogado surrounding his untimely death" as "Aarón was looking forward to an opportunity for a second chance to prove his innocence."[21]

Báez defended Aarón Hernández on charges related to a 2012 Boston jose baez abogado homicide of Daniel de Abreu and Safiro Furtado in a drive-by shooting in Boston's South End on July 16, 2012. On April 14, 2017, a jury cleared Hernández of committing the murders.[22] Hernández was already serving a life term without parole for the Odin Lloyd killing. Five days after the not guilty verdict, Hernández committed suicide by hanging himself in his prison cell.

Lawsuit against NFL and New England Patriots[edit]

On September 21, 2017, Baez announced Aaron Hernandez was diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy by Dr. Ann McKee of Boston University, and that he had filed a federal lawsuit, on behalf of Hernandez' daughter, against the National Football League and the New England Patriots, seeking unspecified damages for loss of parental support. The suit alleges the league and team were aware of the dangers of repeated head injuries and refused to disclose these to Hernandez.[23]

Acquittal of Mark Nordlicht, hedge fund executive[edit]

In the summer of 2019, José Báez represented Mark Nordlicht, the CIO of the billion-dollar hedge fund, Platinum Partners. Nordlicht was charged with securities fraud, investment adviser fraud, and multiple counts of conspiracy. The government alleged that Nordlicht, along with others, engaged in one of the largest "ponzi-esque" schemes in history. Báez tried the case over a two-month period in an Eastern District of New York courtroom, winning acquittals for Mark Nordlicht.[24]

Representation of Harvey Weinstein[edit]

In early 2019, Jose Baez was sought out by Harvey Weinstein, former co-founder of Miramax, to represent him in the New York criminal case where Mr. Weinstein is accused of rape and other sexual offenses. Baez served on Weinstein's defense team until late 2019, later criticizing decisions made by other members of the defense. Weinstein was eventually convicted of several charges.[25][26]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ab"Barbara Walters interview with Jose Baez July 5, 2011". Youtube. ABC News. Retrieved 17 July 2015.
  2. ^Carolyn Salazar (July 5, 2011). "José Báez, Casey Anthony's Lawyer: From Troubled Son to Star Defense Attorney". Fox News Latino. Retrieved May 10, 2015.
  3. ^ ab"Video Interview 5 July 2011 with Barbara Walters"., ABC Nightline News. By Nikki Battiste and Kimberly Brown, July 6, 2011. During the 2nd jose baez abogado at video index 03:09, Baez says he was born in Manhattan. Other sources reported his place of birth as Puerto Rico, such as:
  4. ^""Exclusive Casey Anthony Lawyer Jose Baez Interview""., Terra, June 22, 2020 .
  5. ^Carolyn Salazar (July 5, 2011). "José Báez, Casey Anthony's Lawyer: From Troubled Son to Star Defense Attorney". Fox News Latino. Retrieved May 10, 2015.
  6. ^Hopper, Jessica (8 June 2011). "Casey Anthony's Lawyer Jose Baez Has Trials of His Own".
  7. ^ abCurtis, Henry P. "Casey Anthony's lawyer, Jose Baez, rejected by Florida Board on first try". Orlando Sentinel. Archived from the original on 5 December 2013. Retrieved 30 July 2017.
  8. ^"Roommate Charged With Kidnapping 6-Week-Old Boy". www.wftv.com. 2006-09-27. Retrieved 2013-06-18.
  9. ^"Who Is Jose Baez? | Casey Anthony – WESH Home". Wesh.com. 2008-08-04. Retrieved 2013-06-18.
  10. ^Hudak, Stephen. "Nilton Diaz denies killing girl, 2, in Lake County murder trial". Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved 17 February 2013.
  11. ^"Casey Anthony Murder Case: Social-Media Trial of Century – TIME". content.time.com. 2011-06-16. Retrieved 2014-03-22.
  12. ^Hightower, Kyle (July 2, 2011). "Jurors see scant evidence in Casey Anthony trial". NBC News/Associated Press.
  13. ^"Geraldo Rivera: Juanie Cochran | Fox News Latino". Latino.foxnews.com. 2011-06-02. Retrieved 2013-06-18.
  14. ^"Video Gary Giordano Hires Casey Anthony's Lawyer - ABC News".
  15. ^"Freed US man wins Aruba appeal – US news – Crime & courts | NBC News". nbcnews.com. Retrieved 2014-03-22.
  16. ^"Casey Anthony attorney to represent Florida girl in online bullying case | Fox News". foxnews.com. 2013-10-23. Retrieved 2014-03-22.
  17. ^"Sheriff: We won't tolerate cyberbullying – Video on TODAY.com". today.com. Retrieved 2014-03-22.
  18. ^"Jose Baez insists 12-year-old accused bully is innocent; triggers epic battle with Sheriff Judd | Watch the video – Yahoo News". news.yahoo.com. Retrieved 2014-03-22.
  19. ^"Charges dropped against girls in Florida cyber-bullying suicide case – NBC News". usnews.nbcnews.com. Retrieved 2014-03-22.
  20. ^Mike DeForest (2016-06-07). "Jose Baez to represent Aaron Hernandez". Clickorlando.com. Retrieved 2017-04-25.
  21. ^"Aaron Hernandez's Attorney 'Determined To Find The Truth' In Death « CBS Boston". Boston.cbslocal.com. 2017-04-19. Retrieved 2017-04-25.
  22. ^"Jury acquits Aaron Hernandez of murder charges". The Boston Globe. 2017-04-14. Retrieved 2017-04-25.
  23. ^Belson, Ken (2017-09-21). "Aaron Hernandez Found to Have Severe C.T.E."The New York Times.
  24. ^"New Life In Platinum Partners Case, Acquittal And New Trial".
  25. ^"Harvey Weinstein gets approval to use Casey Anthony's lawyer Jose Baez - ABC News".
  26. ^"Jose Baez Criticizes Harvey Weinstein's Defense". Law & Crime. 2020-02-25. Retrieved 2021-04-28.

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jose_Baez_(lawyer)
Luis N. Saldaña - Román
Shareholder

Born in Seville, Spain, December 17, 1967; admitted to bar, 1992, Puerto Rico; 1993, U.S. District Court, District of Puerto Rico and U.S. Court of Appeals, First Circuit. Mr. Saldaña is the Honorary Consul for the Kingdom of Denmark, San Juan, Puerto Rico since March 2011. Since May 2019 he is also the Honorary Consul for the Kingdom of Sweden (Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands). Her Majesty Margrethe II of Denmark bestowed upon him the Order of the Dannebrog on May 2019. Co-Author ABA's Book on Obtaining Evidence Abroad, Discovery Across the Globe (Puerto Rico Chapter). [see info]
  
Ian P. Carvajal
Shareholder

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 26, 1968; admitted to bar, 1994, Puerto Rico, 1995, State of Louisiana, U.S. District Court, Eastern, Middle, Western Districts of Louisiana; U.S. Court of Appeals, Fifth Circuit; 1997, U.S. District Court, District of Puerto Rico; 1998, U.S. Court of Appeals, First Circuit. [see info]
  
Lizette Vélez-Rivé
Shareholder

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, February 5, 1968; admitted to bar, 1994, Puerto Rico; 1995, U.S. District Court, District of Puerto Rico and U.S. Court santander bank customer service reviews Appeals, First Circuit. [see info]
  
Frances R. Colón-Rivera
Partner

Born in Fajardo, Puerto Rico, June 7, 1970; admitted to bar, 1996, Puerto Rico, U.S. Court of Appeals, First Circuit and U.S. District Court, District of Puerto Rico. Ms. Colón has been a speaker on National Business Institute, Fundamentals on Employment Discrimination Law Seminars and on the Council on Education in Management Puerto Rico Employment Law Update Seminars. [see info]
  
Manuel Sosa-Báez
Partner

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, February 6, 1974; admitted to bar, 2002, Puerto Rico; U.S. Court of Appeals, First Circuit; and, U.S. District Court, District of Puerto Rico. Admited to bar, 2013, United States Court for International Trade. Lecturer on Federal Jurisdiction, 2013- present; Adjunct Professor of Maritime Law, University of Puerto Rico, School of Law, 2005-10; Visiting Professor of Maritime Law, Interamerican University of Puerto Rico, School of Law, Summer 2005; Speaker on Maritime Law and Legislation at Ship Operations Cooperative Program’s Meeting, June 22-24, 2004;Author of Puerto Rico Clings to the Uniformity of General Maritime Law, 2 Jose baez abogado Mar. Bull. 257 (3d Quarter 2004). [see info]
  
Bayoán Muñiz-Calderón
Partner

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, September 24, 1979; admitted to bar, 2005, Puerto Rico; U.S. District Court of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Court of Appeals [see info]
  
Vanessa Blanco-Méndez
Partner

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, January 16, 1984; admitted to bar, 2010, Puerto Rico; U.S. District Court, District of Puerto Rico, 2012; U.S. Court of Appeals, First Circuit, 2015. [see info]
  
Fernando Sabater-Clavell
Partner

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, February 21, 1981; admitted to bar, 2007, Puerto Rico; U.S. District Court for the District of Puerto Rico, U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. [see info]
  
Lourdes M. Santos-Gutiérrez
Partner

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, June 25, 1979; admitted to bar, 2005, Puerto Rico, U.S. District Court for the District of Puerto Rico; U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. [see info]
  
Carolene Fontanet-Smith
Junior Partner

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, August 18, 1989; admitted to bar, 2015, Puerto Rico; U.S. District Court for the District of Puerto Rico, 2015. [see info]
  
Alicia P. Pérez-Caballero
Junior Partner

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, September 18, 1987; admitted to Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and U.S. District Court for the District of Puerto Rico. [see info]
  
José A. Sánchez-Girona
Associate

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, August 1, 1967; admitted to Commonwealth of Puerto Rico; U.S. District Court for the District of Puerto Rico; First Circuit Court. [see info]
  
Xaymara Colón-González
Junior Partner

Born in Aibonito, Puerto Rico, September 16, 1986; admitted to bar, 2013, Puerto Rico; U.S. District Court, District of Puerto Rico (2013). [see info]
  
Luis J. Clas-Wiscovitch
Associate

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, September 19, 1989; admitted to bar 2016, Puerto Rico; U.S. District Court for the District of Puerto Rico. Admitted to the Florida Bar, 2018. [see info]
  
Angel Rotger-Sabat
Partner

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, October 25, 1967; admitted to bar, 1993, Puerto Rico, and U.S. Court of Appeals, First Circuit, 1994, U.S. District Court, District of Puerto Rico, and 2016, District of Columbia, and 2019, Colorado; former Attorney General (2000), and Deputy Attorney General (1997-1999) of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. [see info]
  
Johanna Smith-Miró
Associate

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico August 14, 1984 Admitted to Bar 2013, Puerto Rico; USDC 2017 [see info]
  
Manuel E. Mazo-Nido
Associate

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, March 3, 1991; admitted to the Puerto Rico Bar, 2017; U.S District Court for the District of Puerto Rico, awaiting induction ceremony, 2019. [see info]
  
Gretchen L. Alvarado-González
Associate

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, September 3, 1988; admitted to bar, 2014, Puerto Rico; U.S. District Court, District of Puerto Rico, 2014. [see info]
  
Jose R. Feliciano-Boada
Associate

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, August 3, 1992, admitted to the Puerto Rico Bar 2017; District of Columbia Bar 2019 and a registered USPTO Patent Attorney. [see info]
  
Fernando J. Collazo Valle
Special Counsel

Born in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, July 15, 1977. Bar admissions: Puerto Rico (2003), U.S. District Court for the District of Puerto Rico (2003), U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit (2003), U.S. Supreme Court (2006). [see info]
  
Gladys M. Míguez-Corujo
Junior Partner

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, March 2, 1983; jose baez abogado to bar, 2011, Puerto Rico; U.S. District Court for the District of Puerto Rico, 2011. [see info]
  

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Источник: http://www.scvrlaw.com/attorney_list.php

Casey Anthony’s Lawyer Jose Baez Hires an Agent

Jose Baez, the attorney who successfully defended Casey Anthony, has signed with Paradigm.

The agency will represent the lawyer in broadcasting and publishing opportunities, and motion picture and television rights. Paradigm’s Jim Griffin will be the lead agent. 

The South Florida attorney quickly rose to national prominence during the Anthony trial. On Tuesday a jury found Baez’s client not guilt of murdering her daughter Caylee in 2008.

Anthony is slated to be released from prison July 13. She was sentenced today to four years in prison for her conviction on four counts of providing false information to law enforcement, but will be released because of credit for good behavior and time served.

Rumors circulated Thursday that both Anthony and her 42-year-old attorney had recently signed with WME, but THR has confirmed those reports are false.

Email: [email protected]
Twitter: @DanielNMiller

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Источник: https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/business/business-news/casey-anthonys-lawyer-jose-baez-208926/

Casey Anthony Trial – Lessons in Courtroom Civility & Ethics

by Stephan Mihalovits

The Casey Anthony trial has drawn public interest on an international scale. A horrible tragedy resulted in a young life lost. The defendant mother is widely perceived as guilty. But despite global public interest and the seriousness of Caylee Anthony’s death, the trial and verdict in Florida provide more proof that attorneys oftentimes act unprofessionally to opposing counsel and against ethical guidelines, even when stakes are highest.

As trial commenced, Florida Chief Judge Belvin Perry Jr. astutely ordered both sides to refrain from disparaging remarks throughout the contentious proceedings. But despite the order and public scrutiny, the lawyers abandoned their professional duty.

During the defense’s closing statements, attorney Jose Baez delivered his final remarks to the jury before they decided his client’s fate. As Baez spoke, prosecutor Jeff Ashton was seen smiling and laughing. Mr. Baez lashed back at “this laughing guy over here,” Mr. Ashton objected, and Judge Perry eventually reprimanded both sides.

It was just one more delay in the Casey Anthony trial happening just days after Judge Perry sentenced one spectator to jail time, fines and court costs for “flipping a bird” at an attorney.

Encouraging & Enforcing Legal Ethics & Civility

The California State Bar set ethical standards in writing in 2007 with California Attorney Guidelines of Civility and Professionalism. Though guidelines are not laws and are non-binding, attorneys who act in violation of the guidelines may find themselves subject to liability:

Leko v. Cornerstone Bldg. Inspection Service (2001): Attorneys who fail to confer with opposing counsel to resolve discovery issues may be fined, as was one of the attorneys in this case.

When opposing counsel failed to calendar a deposition and usaa credit card customer service hours tried twice to reschedule, the fined attorney responded with an insulting letter and then moved to compel depositions. The court fined this attorney for disregarding an obligation to informally resolve the matter; though it cited the insulting letter as relevant to the Court’s decision.

In the Matter of an Anonymous Member of the South Carolina Bar (2011): The U.S. Supreme Court got involved here, though only with a letter of caution. The Hearing Panel decided an attorney could be disciplined for activities that “pollute the administration of justice” or “bring the legal profession into disrepute.”

Perhaps the lines in this e-mail from the respondent, sent to opposing counsel in a family law matter, triggered the decision:

“I have a client who is a drug dealer on. . Street down town [sic]. He informed me that your daughter, [redacted] was detained for buying cocaine and heroine [sic]. She is, or was, a teenager, right? This happened jose baez abogado night in a known high crime/drug area, where alos [sic] many shootings take place. Lucky for her and the discover online banking bonus other teens, they weren’t charged. Does this make you and [redacted] bad parents? This incident is far worse than the allegations your client is making. I just thought it was ironic….”

Respondent tried to explain, pointing to “daily obnoxious, condescending, and harassing e-mails, faxes and hand-delivered letters” from opposing counsel.

The Lessons From Uncivil Discourse

So what have we learned from the Casey Anthony trial, Leko, and Anonymous? Whether handling matters in public or in private, attorneys who fail to act professionally risk facing real consequences.

Disclaimer:
This Blog/Web Site is made available by the lawyer or law firm publisher for educational purposes only, to provide general information and a general understanding of the law, not to provide specific legal advice. By using this blog site you understand there is no attorney client relationship between you and the Blog/Web Site publisher. The Blog/Web Site should not be used as a substitute for obtaining legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state.
Источник: https://www.lewitthackman.com/casey-anthony-trial-lessons-in-courtroom-civility-ethics/

Jose baez abogado -

STATE OF NEW JERSEY v. JOSE R. BAEZ

NOT FOR PUBLICATION WITHOUT THE APPROVAL OF THE APPELLATE DIVISION This opinion shall not "constitute precedent or be binding upon any court ." Although it is posted on the internet, this opinion is binding only on the parties in the case and its use in other cases is limited. R. 1:36-3. SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY APPELLATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. A-1525-19 STATE OF NEW JERSEY, Plaintiff-Respondent, v. JOSE R. BAEZ a/k/a JOSE R. BAEZ-DE LA CRUZ, Defendant-Appellant. Argued December 2, 2020 – Decided February 19, 2021 Before Judges Alvarez and Geiger. On appeal from the Superior Court of New Jersey, Law Division, Bergen County, Indictment No. 17-10-1383. Kevin G. Roe argued the cause for appellant. Craig A. Becker, Assistant Prosecutor, argued the cause for respondent (Mark Musella, Bergen County Prosecutor, attorney; Craig A. Becker, of counsel and on the brief). PER CURIAM Defendant Jose R. Baez appeals the June 10, 2019 Law Division denial of his motion to suppress evidence, as well as the November 1, 2019 sentence. We affirm. At the suppression hearing, Bergen County Prosecutor's Office Narcotics Task Force Detective Timothy Cullen testified that on February 22, 2017, a Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) agent1 passed on a tip from a confidential informant (CI). The CI notified the DEA agent, based on the CI's "personal knowledge," that defendant was moving laundered money in exchange for drugs. The CI said defendant was known to travel in a vehicle containing hidden compartments. Cullen further testified he was advised the CI had been "responsible for the seizure of 100 kilograms of narcotics, over a million dollars in currency and about two dozen criminal arrests." As a result, on that date, officers monitored defendant's quick round trip from New Jersey to New York through license plate readers located at the George Washington Bridge. Cullen had previously surveilled defendant's home address and knew defendant drove a black 2008 Saturn Vue. The officers monitored defendant's travel on Route 1 southbound, while Cullen stationed himself on a side street. When defendant's vehicle came into 1 The agent was a Fort Lee officer on loan to the DEA. A-1525-19 2 Cullen's view, defendant was traveling in the far-left lane. Cullen pulled out and followed defendant in the left lane for approximately a quarter mile. Defendant crossed over the right lane and turned right onto an exit ramp. Once off the highway, Cullen pulled him over, intending to cite defendant for a violation of failure to keep right, N.J.S.A. 39:4-88(a). Because the car had tinted windows, Cullen knocked on a rear window so defendant would roll it down. The officer wanted to confirm that defendant was the only occupant. Cullen recognized defendant immediately as the person he had seen getting in and out of the Saturn Vue in front of the Palisades Park address he had surveilled a month or two earlier. As Cullen spoke to defendant through the open car window, he noticed a strong smell of air freshener, and saw a single key with an after-market alarm fob in the ignition. The judge watched the video recording of the stop, and it corroborated Cullen's account. Cullen explained car air freshener was frequently used by persons involved in illegal drug trafficking because it was rumored to mask the scent of contraband, thus throwing off any police dogs used to search a vehicle. The after-market fob was commonplace in cars used in the transport of illegal drugs. During the stop, defendant told Cullen that the car belonged to his sister. He first claimed that he never drove it, then said he drove it "sometimes." Cullen A-1525-19 3 said it is not unusual that when a vehicle is "trapped out," in other words, fitted with hidden compartments for the transport of contraband, that it is registered to a third party. Defendant told Cullen that he lived in Manhattan and was on his way to an Auto Zone store in New Jersey to buy brake parts. Cullen knew this statement was false, having seen defendant at his home address. When asked if he had ever been in trouble, defendant denied it—a statement Cullen also knew was false, as defendant had a 2007 conviction for money laundering. At that juncture, Cullen asked defendant to sign a consent to search. Defendant agreed. $63,500 was found in a secret compartment, along with $1000 and two cell phones in a man's satchel on the front seat. Approximately $1600 was taken from defendant's person. Based on the discovery of the bundled cash in defendant's vehicle, together with the other circumstances spelled out in an affidavit, Cullen obtained a search warrant for defendant's home. The execution of the warrant led to the discovery of $316,000 in bundled currency inside hidden compartments, along with four kilograms of cocaine. Defendant moved to suppress the results of the search of the vehicle and his residence. The judge's denial of defendant's motion to suppress was A-1525-19 4 anchored in his conclusion that Cullen was a credible witness and the motor vehicle stop constitutionally reasonable. He found the distance Cullen witnessed defendant driving in the left lane of an otherwise empty roadway sufficient to establish a reasonable and articulable suspicion that he was violating the motor vehicle laws. Based on the initial seizures of cash, and the vehicle's hidden compartment, he also found the search warrant application passed constitutional muster. After the motion was denied, defendant entered a plea of guilty to count one of a multi-count indictment—first-degree possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute, N.J.S.A. 2C:35-5(a)(1) and N.J.S.A. 2C:35-5(b)(1).2 The judge imposed the recommended sentence of twelve years imprisonment with four years of parole ineligibility based on his weighing of the aggravating and mitigating factors, including consideration of defendant's personal and health status. Now on appeal, defendant argues the following: I. DEFENDANT'S VEHICLE WAS STOPPED IN THE ABSENCE OF A REASONABLE OR ARTICULABLE SUSPICION TO BELIEVE A CRIME WAS COMMITTED AND WAS A PRETEXT TO SEARCH DEFENDANT'S VEHICLE. 2 The dismissed charges included third-degree possession of cocaine, N.J.S.A. 2C:35-10(a)(1), and second-degree money laundering, N.J.S.A. 2C:21-25. A-1525-19 5 II. THE POLICE LACKED A REASONABLE BASIS TO REQUEST CONSENT TO SEARCH DEFENDANT'S VEHICLE. III. THE ISSUANCE OF THE SEARCH WARRANT FOR DEFENDANT'S RESIDENCE WAS BASED UPON INFORMATION LEARNED DURING THE COURSE OF THE ILLEGAL STOP AND SEARCH OF DEFENDANT'S VEHICLE REQUIRING SUPPRESSION OF SAME. IV. THE CUSTODIAL TERM IMPOSED ON DEFENDANT WAS EXCESSIVE. I. We "uphold the factual findings underlying the trial court's decision, so long as those findings are 'supported by sufficient credible evidence in the record.'" State v. Evans, 235 N.J. 125, 133 (2018) (quoting State v. Elders, 192 N.J. 224, 243 (2007)). We further defer to credibility findings because of the trial judge's exclusive opportunity to view a witness's demeanor. State v. Locurto, 157 N.J. 463, 474 (1999). "When the reviewing court is satisfied that the findings and result meet this criterion, its task is complete and it should not disturb the result, even though it has the feeling it might have reached a different conclusion were it the trial tribunal." Id. at 471. However, the appellate court "need not defer 'to a trial . . . court's interpretation of the law' because '[l]egal A-1525-19 6 issues are reviewed de novo.'" State v. Watts, 223 N.J. 503, 516 (2015) (second alteration in original) (quoting State v. Vargas, 213 N.J. 301, 327 (2013)). It is well-established that a reasonable and articulable suspicion to conduct a motor vehicle stop is a "lower standard than probable cause[.]" State v. Alessi, 240 N.J. 501, 518 (2020). We assess the totality of the circumstances in determining whether the officer had such a reasonable and articulable suspicion, as opposed to a mere hunch, or subjective good faith. Ibid. Cullen testified unequivocally that when defendant's vehicle came into view, defendant was traveling in the left lane, where he continued for at least a quarter of a mile before crossing the right lane to exit to the right. Cullen also testified that there were no other vehicles on the roadway. Although defendant may be correct that the stop might never have occurred but for Cullen's suspicion that defendant was involved in nefarious activity, the driving he witnessed for that quarter of a mile sufficed to make his decision to stop the car and investigate the motor vehicle infraction lawful. The State is not required "to prove that the suspected motor-vehicle violation occurred" and that it could have obtained a conviction in order for the stop to be lawful. Locurto, 157 N.J. at 470. Thus, defendant's failure to keep to the right demonstrated reasonable and articulable suspicion for the stop. Indeed, A-1525-19 7 "the State need prove only that the police lawfully stopped the car, not that it could convict the driver of the motor-vehicle offense." State v. Williamson, 138 N.J. 302, 304 (1994). Defendant suggests that traveling in the left lane was reasonable given the presence of numerous businesses including gas stations on the right-hand side of the roadway, and the presence of potential other drivers creating a driving hazard. This speculation is not supported by evidence in the record. Therefore, nothing refutes Cullen's statement, which the judge found credible, that at the time defendant was traveling in the left lane, he did so on an empty highway. Cullen's testimony established reasonable and articulable suspicion for the motor vehicle stop. II. Defendant also contends that the officer had no reasonable basis to request the consent to search. This argument lacks merit. At the time of the stop, as Cullen explained, he had more than enough information to make the request. He had been provided information by the DEA suggesting that defendant's quick trip to New York had a criminal purpose. The motor vehicle was registered to a third party, and Cullen saw a single key with an after-market alarm fob in the ignition, often found in cars used to transport contraband. The odor of air A-1525-19 8 freshener, defendant's untruth about his criminal history and how often he used the vehicle, and his unconvincing story regarding a trip to an auto parts store, add up to a substantial basis for a request for consent to search. Defendant relies on State v. Carty, 170 N.J. 632 (2002), to support his position. But, in Carty, the officer who conducted the traffic stop had no expressed reasons for requesting the consent to search, nor did he have any objective basis for assuming that the defendant in that case was involved in criminal activity. In this case, however, Cullen had ample information. III. Defendant further contends that the evidence seized from his home should be suppressed as the affidavit in support of the search warrant relied upon facts gathered during the initial stop of his vehicle and evidence seized after his consent to the vehicle's search. Since the officer's conduct was lawful, this argument has no merit and need not be addressed. R. 2:11-3(e)(2). IV. Defendant underwent successful treatment for throat cancer sometime before the sentence. During the sentence hearing, the judge referred to the condition, the fact defendant appeared to be in remission, and that medical treatment is available within the prison system. He further found defendant had A-1525-19 9 a minor child for whom he was financially responsible. On the other hand, the quantity of cash and drugs found in defendant's apartment was substantial, indicating in the judge's words "a significant profit motive." Accordingly, the judge found aggravating factors three, the risk of reoffense, six, the extent of defendant's prior criminal history (in this case, a prior money laundering), and nine, the need to deter him and others from violating the law. See N.J.S.A. 2C:44-1(a)(3), (6), and (9). The court found in mitigation the hardship defendant's child will suffer as a result of defendant's incarceration. See N.J.S.A. 2C:44-1(b)(11). The judge adequately analyzed the aggravating and mitigating factors, and properly weighed them in imposing the sentence. Our "review of sentencing decisions is relatively narrow and is governed by an abuse of discretion standard." State v. Blackmon, 202 N.J. 283, 297 (2010). We find no such abuse of discretion occurred here. The sentence does not shock our conscience. Ibid. Affirmed. A-1525-19 10
Источник: https://law.justia.com/cases/new-jersey/appellate-division-unpublished/2021/a1525-19.html

Jose Baez - Relaciones, patrimonio neto, medidas, citas, familia, niños y biografía.

Valor neto $ 5 millones
Fecha de nacimiento 17 de octubre de 1968 (52 años)
Género Masculino
Profesión Abogado
Última actualización 2021
trabajos Abogado

Información general

Jose Baez Net Worth: Jose Baez es un abogado estadounidense que tiene un valor neto de $ 5 millones de dólares. José ganó la prominencia nacional cuando representó con éxito Casey Anthony durante su juicio de asesinato.

Nació el 17 de septiembre de 1970 en Nueva York, Nueva York. Jose Baez creció viajando entre Bronx y Florida. Salió de la escuela antes de graduarse, después de que él y su novia quedaban embarazada. Posteriormente completó su GED, y luego se unió a la Marina de los Estados Unidos a mediados de los 80. Continuó a trabajar como analista de inteligencia, y luego se graduó de la Universidad Estatal de Florida. Luego obtuvo su título de ley de la Escuela de Derecho de la Universidad de St. Thomas en 1997.

Debido a los problemas de bancarrota previos, se le negó la admisión al bar de Florida hasta el 2005. Desde entonces, se ha centrado principalmente en casos de defensa penal, y se ha desempeñado como asesor legal en múltiples casos de alto perfil, incluida la representación de Elvira García, Nilton Díaz, Casey Anthony , y Gary Giordano. Jose Baez es considerado uno de los mejores abogados criminales del país.

Casey Anthony
Источник: https://www.modelworth.com/es-eur/person/jose-baez

Casey Anthony Trial – Lessons in Courtroom Civility & Ethics

by Stephan Mihalovits

The Casey Anthony trial has drawn public interest on an international scale. A horrible tragedy resulted in a young life lost. The defendant mother is widely perceived as guilty. But despite global public interest and the seriousness of Caylee Anthony’s death, the trial and verdict in Florida provide more proof that attorneys oftentimes act unprofessionally to opposing counsel and against ethical guidelines, even when stakes are highest.

As trial commenced, Florida Chief Judge Belvin Perry Jr. astutely ordered both sides to refrain from disparaging remarks throughout the contentious proceedings. But despite the order and public scrutiny, the lawyers abandoned their professional duty.

During the defense’s closing statements, attorney Jose Baez delivered his final remarks to the jury before they decided his client’s fate. As Baez spoke, prosecutor Jeff Ashton was seen smiling and laughing. Mr. Baez lashed back at “this laughing guy over here,” Mr. Ashton objected, and Judge Perry eventually reprimanded both sides.

It was just one more delay in the Casey Anthony trial happening just days after Judge Perry sentenced one spectator to jail time, fines and court costs for “flipping a bird” at an attorney.

Encouraging & Enforcing Legal Ethics & Civility

The California State Bar set ethical standards in writing in 2007 with California Attorney Guidelines of Civility and Professionalism. Though guidelines are not laws and are non-binding, attorneys who act in violation of the guidelines may find themselves subject to liability:

Leko v. Cornerstone Bldg. Inspection Service (2001): Attorneys who fail to confer with opposing counsel to resolve discovery issues may be fined, as was one of the attorneys in this case.

When opposing counsel failed to calendar a deposition and then tried twice to reschedule, the fined attorney responded with an insulting letter and then moved to compel depositions. The court fined this attorney for disregarding an obligation to informally resolve the matter; though it cited the insulting letter as relevant to the Court’s decision.

In the Matter of an Anonymous Member of the South Carolina Bar (2011): The U.S. Supreme Court got involved here, though only with a letter of caution. The Hearing Panel decided an attorney could be disciplined for activities that “pollute the administration of justice” or “bring the legal profession into disrepute.”

Perhaps the lines in this e-mail from the respondent, sent to opposing counsel in a family law matter, triggered the decision:

“I have a client who is a drug dealer on . . . Street down town [sic]. He informed me that your daughter, [redacted] was detained for buying cocaine and heroine [sic]. She is, or was, a teenager, right? This happened at night in a known high crime/drug area, where alos [sic] many shootings take place. Lucky for her and the two other teens, they weren’t charged. Does this make you and [redacted] bad parents? This incident is far worse than the allegations your client is making. I just thought it was ironic….”

Respondent tried to explain, pointing to “daily obnoxious, condescending, and harassing e-mails, faxes and hand-delivered letters” from opposing counsel.

The Lessons From Uncivil Discourse

So what have we learned from the Casey Anthony trial, Leko, and Anonymous? Whether handling matters in public or in private, attorneys who fail to act professionally risk facing real consequences.

Disclaimer:
This Blog/Web Site is made available by the lawyer or law firm publisher for educational purposes only, to provide general information and a general understanding of the law, not to provide specific legal advice. By using this blog site you understand there is no attorney client relationship between you and the Blog/Web Site publisher. The Blog/Web Site should not be used as a substitute for obtaining legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state.
Источник: https://www.lewitthackman.com/casey-anthony-trial-lessons-in-courtroom-civility-ethics/

Jose Baez is a gifted lawyer; he’s won acquittals for two of the country’s highest-profile defendants: Casey Anthony and Aaron Hernandez. Baez is active on Instagram, and he’s been posting a lot about the Hernandez case. In fact, he called the Netflix series on Hernandez a “lame ass documentary.”

The Florida attorney is featured in the new Netflix documentary on Hernandez, Killer Inside: The Mind of Aaron Hernandez. The documentary shows him winning an acquittal for Hernandez in the double murder of two men in Boston. However, Hernandez remained in prison because he was previously convicted of another homicide – the shooting death of Odin Lloyd – a case in which he was represented by another lawyer.

The former New England Patriots’ star killed himself in prison in 2017 while the Lloyd conviction was still up on appeal. The Netflix show basically accuses Hernandez of going on a violent crime spree, but he was only convicted of the Lloyd murder. You can see a roundup of murders and shootings linked to Hernandez here. In at least one of the shootings mentioned in the Netflix show, there is strong evidence that Hernandez didn’t do it.

However, what happened to Jose Baez? Where is he today?

Here’s what you need to know:


Baez Believes He Could Have Gotten Hernandez an Acquittal in the Odin Lloyd Case Because of Questions About Who Pulled the Trigger

Baez shared an excerpt from an article from Yahoo Sports in which the author answered this question, “Could Jose Baez have gotten Aaron off in the appeal of the Odin Lloyd murder?” The author responded that the evidence in the Lloyd case was “overwhelming.”

Baez wrote on Instagram, “I get asked this all the time and since this reporter threw it out there I must respectfully disagree. I think there was an outstanding chance he could have won the Odín Lloyd Trial. 4 guys go into a pit and 3 come out and you assume it was the NFL star with everything to lose and not the other two with criminal records? There was zero evidence as to who pulled the trigger. Thanks for the backhanded compliment Dan but I disagree. #aaronhernandez #baezlawfirm #aaronhernandezuncovered #unneccessaryroughness.”

Baez is referring to the two Hernandez friends who were with the NFL star that day when they picked up Lloyd shortly before his shooting death.

Today, Baez is still practicing law in Florida. You can find his law firm website here. “The Baez Law Firm offers clients top legal representation in criminal defense, civil rights, and civil litigation in south and central Florida, from Miami to Orlando to Tampa and all points in between,” it reads.

He briefly represented disgraced Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein but withdrew from that case.

His website explains that, in addition to his legal work, he “is on the faculty at Harvard Law School where he teaches trial techniques to second- and third-year law students in what is considered one of Harvard Law School’s most popular courses. Mr. Baez is fluent in Spanish and Portuguese and is extremely active in various charitable endeavors in the Hispanic community. When not in the office fighting for justice, he enjoys traveling and spending time with his family.”


Baez Doesn’t Think the Netflix Documentary Was Accurate

After the Netflix series streamed, Baez took to Instagram with harsh words.

“I don’t give a damn about what some lame ass documentary has to say about Aaron,” he wrote. “I knew him, they did not and while he was far from perfect, they are not even close to the truth. People have no idea how documentaries are made, the truth is usually found on the cutting room floor. These producers lied directly to my face, so I don’t expect their money making scheme to be much better. #ripchico #baezlawfirm #aaronhernandez.”

He didn’t explain further, though. But he shared a collage of photos showing Hernandez with Baez and Hernandez’s daughter and fiancee, Shayanna Jenkins.

Baez wrote a book on the Hernandez case.

He won the acquittal for Hernandez in the double murder case in part by causing doubts about the real triggerman, and questioning the testimony of a convicted drug dealer and former Hernandez friend Alexander Bradley, who claimed he was present when Hernandez shot two men because one of them had spilled a drink on him. Unlike the Lloyd case, there was no forensic evidence linking Hernandez to the double homicide, although authorities said they unearthed the car driven during the murders in the garage of his cousin.

The Lloyd case was built on the testimony of co-actors but also cell phone and surveillance video that established the timeline showing that Lloyd had just been picked up by Hernandez and was killed a short distance from the NFL player’s house.

Last April 2019, Baez also posted about Aaron on Instagram, writing this:

“The day I slipped in court and called him Aaron Rodriguez went like this:
AH: Bro you called me Aaron Rodriguez!
JB: Get the f*ck out of here, no I didn’t.
AH: Yeah you did! (Laughing)
JB: Well if I can convince them all, that they got the wrong guy, maybe we can walk you out of here right now! (AH, JB: ??) #ripchico #aaronhernandez. Today to honor 81 I will post another humorous moment in court. He had the best sense of humor and the most beautiful smile. ?”


Baez Is Friends With Geraldo Rivera & Is an In Demand Speaker

In recent posts, Baez indicated he was boating with TV personality Geraldo Rivera, writing, “Went boating today with my lifelong friend and TV legend, Geraldo Rivera. He always gives me the best advice on life, as he always did things his way. #geraldorivera #goat #josebaez #livinglegend.”

He gives talks at universities around the country.

He sometimes posts photos of himself on his page. One caption in December 2019 read, “I hope to arrive to my death late, In love and a little drunk….Atticus ??”

READ NEXT: How Many People Did Aaron Hernandez Kill?


Источник: https://heavy.com/sports/2020/01/jose-baez-now-today/

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Источник: https://www.bostonpersonalinjurylawyer.com/
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