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Click to view street address. Rockwood, TN - 37854 (865)376-5627. Financial Help Provided: Services: Food Stamp; Families First; Child Care Certificate;. Customer Service Number at 1-888-997-1117. PINs may be changed at any time after DSNAP benefits are available on your account by using one of the three options. SNAP offers nutrition assistance to buy healthy food. The allotment is based on the number of people in the household and the amount of money the.
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Overview

NEW!  November 16, 2021 - Connecticut’s SNAP-eligible households to receive additional emergency food benefits November 17

The Connecticut Department of Social Services today announced that it will deliver $32.3 million in Emergency Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits to over 213,100 Connecticut households on Wednesday, November 17, 2021. Monthly allocations of emergency SNAP benefits are going to all enrolled households, based on continuance of a declared public health emergency related to COVID-19 in Connecticut.

Authorized by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act of 2020, this federal allocation will provide a minimum of $95 in extra food aid to all enrolled families and individuals, raising the state’s total emergency SNAP funding to over $505.7 million since the COVID-19 pandemic began.

Specifically:

  • All 213,100 SNAP-eligible households statewide will receive the emergency benefits on their Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) cards on November 17, 2021.
  • Households already eligible for the maximum monthly SNAP benefit will receive an extra $95.
  • The remaining households that don’t usually qualify for the maximum monthly SNAP benefit because of income or other factors will receive extra benefits of at least $95 but averaging an estimated $154 (depending on their specific benefit situation).
  • With this additional $32.3 million allocation by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service, emergency benefits are totaling over $505.7 million in additional SNAP assistance statewide over 19 months, with commensurate spending at supermarkets, groceries, farmers markets, and other food retailers.
  • The $95 increase results from President Biden’s January 22, 2021, executive order, which required the USDA to consider new guidance allowing states to increase SNAP emergency benefit allocations for all households, including those previously ineligible to receive it. This increase is expected to be ongoing, contingent on the continuation of the state and federal public health emergencies.
  • All households also received their normal SNAP benefits, based on the new Thrifty Food Plan amounts, on one of the first three days of the month as they normally do, according to last name.
  • If a household is granted regular SNAP benefits on or after Monday November 15, the additional SNAP benefits will be added to the EBT card on a Friday, depending on the date of granting.

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NEW! October 22, 2021 -  ‘Pandemic EBT’ Child Care program bringing extra food benefits to over 34,800 young children in Connecticut on October 24

The Connecticut Department of Social Services (DSS), in consultation with the Department of Education and Office of Early Childhood, today announced that $13 million in special food assistance benefits will be distributed Sunday, October 24, 2021, to the families of over 34,800 children under age 6 and who are enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

This is the last major distribution in the current round of $119.1 million in food benefits going to nearly 282,900 schoolchildren, and 34,800 SNAP recipients in child care under age 6, through the federal Summer ‘Pandemic EBT’ (or P-EBT).

Specific information about the October 24 distribution of Pandemic EBT Child Care benefits:

  • DSS will deposit benefits onto existing SNAP Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) cards on October 24, 2021, to nearly 27,400 households (34,800 eligible children) who were under age 6 and receiving SNAP benefits from DSS as of June 30, 2021, unless the child already received Pandemic EBT Children in School benefits by being eligible for the free or reduced-price meals program at their school.
  • DSS will also deposit benefits onto existing SNAP Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) cards of SNAP-eligible households who welcomed a newborn in either July or August 2021.
  • The planned one-time additional benefit is $375 per child.
  • DSS has already deposited benefits totaling $106 million dollars to 282,900 schoolchildren eligible to receive free and reduced-priced meals at their school as of the end of the 2020–2021 school year on September 26, 2021, and October 10, 2021.  In total, the P-EBT program has provided Connecticut children with an additional $452.6 in SNAP benefits since the beginning of the pandemic. 
  • Families do not need to apply for P-EBT benefits, as DSS uses SNAP eligibility information to determine if children are eligible for P-EBT Child Care benefits.

Benefits can be used at any location that accepts SNAP/EBT cards. This includes famers markets and direct market farms. In fact, enrollees can double the value of P-EBT or other SNAP benefits at farmers markets that are participating in CT Fresh Match. Additional information on that program can be found online at www.endhungerct.org/services/farmers-markets.

P-EBT participants will also have online access to eligible food purchases through delivery or curbside pickup at participating retailers Amazon, Aldi and Price Chopper/Market 32 via Instacart, BJ’s Wholesale Clubs, Food Bazaar, ShopRite, Stop and Shop and Walmart. Additional information on that is available at www.ct.gov/snap.

Food budgets can be stretched further with WIC. Households with kids under age 5, new parents, and pregnant or breastfeeding women may be eligible to receive healthy foods, free nutrition education, breastfeeding support, and referrals to helpful resources. To apply or learn more, visit portal.ct.gov/DPH/WIC/WIC.

DSS received information from the Office of Early Childhood and the Department of Education to implement the P-EBT Child Care plan, which was approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service.  The P-EBT Child Care SNAP funding was authorized by the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act, with additional amendments made in the Continuing Appropriations Act and Other Extensions Act of 2021, as well as the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021.

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UPDATED August 26, 2021 - Expansion of online purchasing of food with SNAP benefits; Stop & Shop joins BJ’s Wholesale Club, Price Chopper, Aldi, Amazon, Walmart and ShopRite. 

The Department of Social Services (DSS) is pleased to announce the expansion of its Online Purchasing Pilot to include Stop & Shop stores across Connecticut.  Stop & Shop now accepts EBT payments for SNAP-eligible items when placing online orders for Stop & Shop Pickup and Delivery for in-club pickup and curbside pickup (www.stopandshop.com/new-customer).

Customers who prefer to use the Instacart marketplace may now also use their SNAP benefits to purchase grocery items from Stop & Shop at https://www.instacart.com/stop-shop.

The new user-friendly experience offers online grocery shoppers the option to add their EBT card to their account on www.StopandShop.com  and shop using their SNAP funds.  While browsing online aisles, SNAP customers can sort products to show eligible items, and a "SNAP Eligible" label will appear within the product details.  At checkout, customers can select the "Apply SNAP Benefits" option and select the amount to charge to their EBT card, allowing personalized budgeting throughout the month.

Please click here to read the Stop & Shop news release, with full information about placing online orders for SNAP-eligible items.

We are also proud to have other major food retailers – BJ’s Wholesale Club,Aldi,Amazon, Walmart and ShopRite-- offering online purchasing of food with SNAP benefits in Connecticut.

**Please note:  Only Price Chopper, Aldi and Stop & Shop stores participate in Instacart.  Amazon, Walmart, ShopRite and BJ’s Wholesale Club have their own online delivery methods; please see links below. 

Online contact points are www.amazon.com/snap-ebt;  www.walmart.com/grocery; https://shoprite.com/Store-Locator; SNAP/EBT - Price Chopper - Market 32; www.BJs.com and BJs.com/help/ebt/; and www.stopandshop.com/new-customer.

Please note:  only SNAP benefits on EBT cards can be used for online purchases.  At this time, cash assistance benefits on EBT cards cannot be used for any part of online shopping, including shipping, delivery or service fees. Customers will need a secondary form of payment for non-food items, such as taxes, tips and fees, per federal SNAP guidelines.

While federal rules do not allow any SNAP benefits to be used for shipping, delivery or service fees, some food retailers may choose to waive fees, if applicable.  To help subsidize costs for EBT SNAP beneficiaries, through June 16, 2021, Instacart (representing ALDI & Price Chopper) will waive delivery and/or pickup fees on up to the first three EBT SNAP orders for each customer with a valid EBT card associated with their Instacart account.  After this period, online shopping customers using SNAP benefits must use another means of payment for any fees and/or any non-SNAP-eligible items they wish to purchase.

Customary shipping/delivery fees are:

  • Instacart pickup fees are $1.99 and delivery starts at $3.99.
  • ShopRite has a $10 service fee and a separate delivery fee.
  • Walmart fees vary between $7.95 and $9.95 (or a flat fee of $98/year).
  • Amazon waives delivery fees for orders over $35 with free 2-day shipping for Prime members. For non-Prime members, orders of $25 or more of receive free shipping in 5-8 business days.
  • Stop & Shop Pickup orders are subject to a $2.95 fee.  Stop & Shop Delivery orders are subject to a delivery fee of $9.95 for orders less than $100 and $6.95 for orders greater than $100.  Customers new to Pickup and Delivery can use promo code “SSONLINE50” for $50 off and free* delivery and pickup for 60 days.  *$50 off is obtained by getting $25 off your first two orders of $100 or more each (before taxes and after all other coupons and savings are applied). Stop & Shop will waive your Delivery and Pickup fee on first order and then on all subsequent orders of $100 or more if placed within 60 days of first order. Valid for first-time residential customers. Order calculation excludes alcoholic beverages, gift cards, postage stamps and any other purchases prohibited by law. Offer not transferable. Limit 1 per household. Fuel charges may apply. Enter code at first order checkout. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 12/31/21.

SNAP benefits are funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), which also regulates which foods are eligible for purchase with the benefits.   FNS is the authorizing agency for food retailers participating in the program.  For information about enrolling in SNAP EBT and online food sales through SNAP, food retailers can visit www.fns.usda.gov/snap/retailer-requirements-provide-online-purchasing.

To read the federal approval announcement, click here. For more information about the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program in Connecticut, visit www.ct.gov/snap

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Elderly Simplified Application Project (ESAP)

Overview

The Department of Social Services is pleased to announce a Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) demonstration project for older adults and those with disabilities.  Once enrolled in SNAP, eligible households qualifying for the Elderly Simplified Application Project (ESAP) will experience additional flexibilities to support continued enrollment.

Flexibilitiesin ESAP include:

  • An expanded three-year SNAP certification period of eligibility;
  • No periodic report formwill be due halfway through the certification cycle, as is usually the case for SNAP enrollees;
  • Revised reporting requirements (explained in greater detail below); and
  • The opportunity for some relaxed renewal flexibilities, when households meet additional requirements.

ESAP Eligibility Criteria:

  • All adult (18 years or older) household members must be determined elderly (60years or older) or with a disability, per SNAP regulations and
  • No household members can be employed (i.e., receive countable earned income).

Revised Reporting Requirements:

Please note that ESAP-eligible SNAP households need to report information to DSS before their renewal is due if they experience a household change that would disqualify them from ESAP(for example, if the household no longer includes an older adult or adult with disability, or if they start working). All SNAP households must report if they receive lotto/gambling winnings equal to or in excess of $3,500.   

SNAP Definition of a Disability:

An individual who meets one or more of the following:

  • Receives disability or blindness benefits from any of these programs: Social Security, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Medicaid, or SSI-related Medicaid.

  • Receives a federally or state administered SSI supplement based on disability or blindness, or section 212(a) of PL 93-66.
    Receives a disability retirement benefit from a government agency for a disability considered permanent by SSA.
  • Is a veteran the VA considers totally disabled or permanently housebound or in need of regular aid and attendance.
  • Is a veteran’s surviving spouse who the VA considers:
    • in need of regular aid and attendance,
    • permanently housebound, or
    • approved for benefits because of the veteran’s death and has a disability considered permanent by SSA.
    • Is a veteran’s surviving child who the VA considers:
      • incapable of self-support, or
      • approved for benefits because of the veteran’s death and has a disability considered permanent by SSA
  • receives interim assistance benefits pending the receipt of Supplemental Security Income, receives disability related medical assistance under title XIX of the Social Security Act, or receives disability-based State general assistance (SAGA) benefits provided that the eligibility to receive any of these benefits is based upon disability or blindness criteria established by the State agency which are at least as stringent as those used under title XVI of the Social Security Act.

ESAP is designed to increase the efficiency of SNAP and reduce food insecurity among a population whose household circumstances generally stay the same and can have additional barriers associated with age or disability, such as transportation or mobility. The Connecticut Department of Social Services was approved for this demonstration project by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service, the agency that administers and funds SNAP nationwide.   We look forward to serving you!  [updated 10-30-20]

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Pandemic EBT (P-EBT) - The Department of Social Services (DSS), in collaboration with the Connecticut State Department of Education (CSDE), received approval to operate this program in response to the COVID-19 related school closures for the 2019 – 2020 school year. P-EBT provides food supports to help families with children who were receiving free and reduced-price school meals pay for food. For more information please follow this link.

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Food Resources for Kids During COVID-19 Emergency:  Special information from the Office of Early Childhood  (En Espanol)

Suspension of ‘ABAWD’ work requirements.  ABAWD work requirements and three-month SNAP time limit for enrollees in all towns in Connecticut has been suspended for the duration of the public health emergency, per Congressional action (ABAWD=Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependent Children enrolled in the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program).

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Extension of SNAP eligibility.  If your SNAP renewal form or periodic review form (PRF) was due in March 2020—benefits are automatically continued through September 2020.  If your SNAP renewal form or PRF is due in April 2020—benefits will be automatically continued through October 2020.  If your SNAP renewal form or PRF is due in May 2020—benefits will be automatically continued through November 2020.  If your SNAP renewal for or PRF is due in June 2020—benefits will automatically be continued through  December 2020.

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For Expedited SNAP cases:  DSS will still issues SNAP benefits for one or two months, depending on whether the application was received before or after the 15th of the month, while the interview and verifications are pending.  Just as above, If the household then responds with the needed information before completing the interview, and all the criteria above are met, the DSS worker will process the case without the interview.  Please note:  Expedited SNAP cases are those where the household has gross income less than $150 and liquid assets less than $100 in the month of application, whose combined income and assets are less than their combined rent/mortgage and utility expenses, or who are migrant or seasonal farmworkers who are destitute and have liquid assets less than $100 while residing in Connecticut.

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The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as Food Stamps, helps eligible individuals and families afford the cost of food at supermarkets, grocery stores and farmers’ markets.

SNAP Time Limits for Able-Bodied Adults without Dependents (ABAWDs): What you should know

 

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SNAP recipients in Connecticut must report when their household’s total monthly gross income goes above 130% of the federal poverty level (FPL). Please follow this link to learn more about income reporting requirements.

Mensaje Importante sobre SNAP

Beneficiarios de SNAP en Connecticut tienen que reportar cuando el total del ingreso bruto mensual de su hogar exceda el 130% del nivel federal de pobreza (FPL) Oprime aquí para obtener más información.

 

Click this link to view the CT SNAP Policy Handbook.

USDA Non-Discrimination Statement 

USDA Aviso de No Discriminación 

For full information about getting delicious, healthy foods at Connecticut farmers’ markets and farms, please follow this link.

 

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FREE ADMISSION TO MYSTIC AQUARIUM FOR SNAP EBT CARD HOLDERS

 

For your safety, ALL Aquarium visits now require a timed ticket and must be reserved online. Click Here to Learn More

 

Источник: https://portal.ct.gov/dss/SNAP/Supplemental-Nutrition-Assistance-Program---SNAP

Abuse & Neglect Statewide Reporting Hotline
For 24/7 reporting of suspected abuse and/or neglect of a child or vulnerable adult. 

-and-

Out of Home Abuse and Neglect Reporting (OHAN)

For reports of suspected child abuse and/or neglect that occurs in foster care placements or at child care facilities.

1-888-CARE4US
1-888-227-3487


Financial Fraud (Vendor/Retailer/DSS Employee) Press 2 for assistance(800) 694-8518Adoption & Birth Parent Services(800) 922-2504Children’s Helpline (For reporting by children in foster care.)(800) 645-9789Child Abuse Hotline (National)(800) 422-4453Child Support Services(800) 768-5858DAODAS(803) 896-5555SC Emergency Management Division(803) 737-8500Careline (Prenatal Care Information) (855-4-SCDHEC)(855) 472-3432Individual & Provider Rights / HIPAA(800) 311-7220Medicaid(888) 549-0820Palmetto AIDS Life Support Service (PALSS)(803) 779-7257National Parent Hotline(855) 427-2736National Domestic Violence Hotline
Local Domestic Violence Shelters and Organizations1-800-799-SAFE (7233)Social Security Administration(800) 772-1213Women, Infants & Children (855-4-SCDHEC)(855) 472-3432
Источник: https://dss.sc.gov/contact/

How can I apply for food stamps?

To apply for food stamp benefits, or for information about the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), contact your local SNAP office. You can find local offices and each State's application on the USDA national map. Local offices are also listed in the State or local government pages of the telephone book. The office should be listed under "Food Stamps," "Social Services," "Human Services," "Public Assistance," or a similar title. You can also call your State's SNAP hotline numbers. Most are toll-free numbers.

Each State has its own application form. If your State’s form is not on the web yet, you'll need to contact your local SNAP office to request one. Please don't call USDA or HHS headquarters as only your State accepts applications and determines eligibility.

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is administered by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), Food and Nutrition Service program.

Posted in: Programs for Families and Children

Источник: https://www.hhs.gov/answers/programs-for-families-and-children/how-can-i-apply-for-food-stamps/index.html

CLASP

*Updated April 2021

Access to SNAP Promotes Food Security, Improves Wellbeing, and Reduces Poverty

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is our nation’s most important anti-hunger program, providing food assistance to people with low incomes, including postsecondary students, workers, children, people with disabilities, seniors, and many more. SNAP helps approximately 38 million people in nearly 20 million households put food on the table each month. In 2018, SNAP lifted 3.2 million people out of poverty, including 1.5 million children. The SNAP program has been shown to support work, stimulate economic growth, improve academic outcomes for children, and improve health outcomes for recipients.

Today’s College Students Require Greater Support

The needs of college students have changed drastically over time, requiring more comprehensive supportive services that improve their ability to persist in and complete their education. For the first time since 1975, recent high school graduates from households with low incomes are enrolling in college at rates higher than their middle-income peers.  Most undergraduate students (71 percent) have at least one characteristic—such as single parenting or working part time—that makes it hard to attend college.  As a result, they’re less likely to finish school than “traditional” undergraduate students who often attend full time, don’t work during the school year, and/or receive financial support from their parents. 

Estimates of food insecurity among college students range widely, from 9 percent to over 50 percent, depending on the methodology and population studied.   However, the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) found that 7.3 million students—39 percent of all undergraduate students—were in households with incomes under 130 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL), and 29 percent of all undergraduates were in such households with low incomes and had another risk factor for food insecurity.  During the COVID-19 public health emergency, food insecurity rates have doubled overall and tripled in households with children throughout the nation. Now more than ever, it is critical that students have access to food assistance benefits. 

Food insecurity on college campuses disproportionately affects people of color. According to the Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice, 47 percent of Black students and 42 percent of Latinx students, compared to only 30 percent of their white counterparts, experience food insecurity at four-year institutions. At two-year colleges, the numbers increase, with 54 percent of Black students, 55 percent of Native American students and 47 percent of Latinx students experiencing food insecurity compared to only 37 percent of white students.   Due to racial, historical, and economic inequities, students of color experience much higher levels of insecurity than their white counterparts in meeting their basic needs. 

Few Students Receive SNAP in Spite of Need

Food insecurity is associated with a range of negative health consequences  that interfere with students’ ability to attend and complete college.  SNAP offers a modest assurance that people are able to meet their most basic human need for food. Studies have shown that lack of access to food and proper nutrition exacerbates stress, anxiety, and depression;  causes sleep disturbances and fatigue; and impairs cognitive functioning.  Access to SNAP relieves stress, improves vitality, and allows students to focus their energy on improving their educational and employment outcomes. 

The GAO study found that approximately 1.5 million college students nationwide receive SNAP, but this is only a small share of those who could benefit from it. So few college students benefit from SNAP because of both eligibility restrictions discussed below and the fact that less than 4 out of 10 students who appear to be eligible for SNAP are receiving it.

This brief explains the special eligibility rules for college students, describes what states and schools can do to expand access to SNAP, and answers other common questions about SNAP and students.

Are College Students Eligible for SNAP?

College Students are Eligible for SNAP if They Meet Additional Requirements

Postsecondary students enrolled at least half-time must meet all of the standard SNAP eligibility rules, as well as one of several additional qualifications. Students must meet standard SNAP eligibility requirements such as income and asset limits, household qualifications, and immigration status. (See discussion starting on page 8.)

If students are enrolled at least half-time they may qualify for SNAP if they meet any one of the following 10 criteria:

  • responsible for a dependent child under 6, 
  • responsible for a dependent child between ages 6 to 12 for whom they have trouble securing child care, 
  • works at least 20 hours a week or 80 hours per month in paid employment, 
  • receives Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) cash assistance or services, 
  • is age 17 or younger or age 50 or older, 
  • is a single parent enrolled full-time and responsible for a dependent child age who is 12 or under, 
  • participates in a state or federally funded work-study program, 
  • participates in an on-the-job training program, 
  • is in school through a state or federally approved employment and training program, or 
  • is unable or has a reduced capacity to work due to health reasons.

In addition, lawmakers added two additional student eligibility criteria for SNAP to support students during the COVID-19 public health crisis. If students meet either of the below criteria, they are temporarily eligible for SNAP (assuming they meet the other SNAP eligibility rules):

1.    Are eligible for federal or state-funded work-study programs during the regular school year or,
2.    Have an expected family contribution (EFC) of $0 during the current academic year or receive the full Pell Grant. 
These temporary student eligibility changes for SNAP will remain in effect until 30 days after the federally declared COVID-19 public health emergency ends. Students will remain eligible until their next redetermination after that date. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has told states that the emergency is likely to remain in place for the entirety of 2021, and it will provide at least 60 days’ notice prior to termination.

Are All College Students Subject to the Special Rules for Students?

No, student restrictions do not apply to:

  • individuals attending college less than half-time, as defined by the school.
  • individuals who are in a program that does not require a high school diploma and is not a “regular” program of a college or university, even if most other students have a high school diploma. For example, a student enrolled in a vocational program or remedial education program that does not require a diploma is not considered a college student, even if the course is operated by a college and is located on campus..

Are College Students Subject to the SNAP Time Limits for Childless Workers (also called Able Bodied Adults without Dependents, or ABAWDs)?

No, student restrictions do not apply to:

When students are enrolled at least half-time and qualify for SNAP based on the student rules, they are not subject to the ABAWD time limit.  However, childless students without a documented disability who are enrolled in school less than half-time or are in an adult education or English as Second Language (ESL) program may be subject to the ABAWD rule; if so, they must work at least 20 hours per week or they will be limited to 3 months of SNAP receipt in a 36-month period. Attending school will only count toward the required 20 hours if it is part of a SNAP Employment and Training program or another federal, state, or local work program.

How Does Age or Disability Status Affect Student Eligibility For SNAP?

  • Individuals who are 50 or over or under 18 years old are exempt from the student exclusion (and are also not subject to ABAWD rules).
  • Individuals who are unable to work or have a reduced capacity to work because of a disability (or temporary illness) are exempt from the student exclusion. This exemption does not require total and permanent disability at the level of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) eligibility but may require a medical note or other documentation. The specific rules for what qualifies are set at the state level. Many states recognized that students placed in colleges under the state’s Vocational Rehabilitation Act program are also SNAP eligible because they have an incapacity but are able to become employable with additional training and education.

Are Parenting or Caregiving Students Exempt from the Student Rule?

In many cases, yes. The following parents or caregivers are exempt from the student rule:

  • Parents caring for and living with a child under 6. (This exemption is not limited to single parents.)
  • Single parent with a child under 12 enrolled full-time (as defined by the school).
  • Parents responsible for a child between 6 and 12 years old and who cannot obtain adequate child care.
  • Parents (including pregnant women) who receive TANF cash assistance. 
  • Parent exemptions are not limited to birth parents—grandparents and other caregivers may qualify as well. 
  • If a student lacks access to adequate child care to attend classes AND work 20 hours per week, the student is exempt from the student exclusion. This exemption can apply even if the student isn’t actually employed; if child care is not available during the hours needed for classes; and if the only child care available is substandard, or not appropriate for the child.

How Does Employment Affect SNAP Eligibility?

  • Students are exempt from the student exclusion if they are employed for pay at least 20 hours per week.
  • States have the option to average hours of employment over a month and should do so to reduce the harm caused by variable hours of work.
  • Schools may need to provide documentation of hours of work to students employed on campus (e.g., as course assistants) even if they are not paid on an hourly basis.
  • Students are exempt if they are participating in a federal or state work-study program – even if they work fewer than 20 hours per week. (Note: During the COVID-19 public health emergency, students are eligible for SNAP if they are eligible for federal or state work-study. Even if the students have not been placed in a work study placement, they are still eligible for SNAP under these temporary changes.)

If Students Receives TANF Are They Exempt from Student Rules?

  • Students receiving monthly cash assistance payments from TANF are exempt from the student exclusion rules.
  • This rule may also apply to students who receive other TANF-funded benefits, such as child care, diversion payments, etc.
  • The exclusion may also apply to students who attended school while receiving such benefits in the past..

What Education and Training Programs Count for Exemptions from the Student Restrictions?

Students who are enrolled in college as part of SNAP Employment and Training (E&T), Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) programs, and Trade Adjustment Assistance programs are specifically exempted from the student restrictions.

In addition, the federal statute exempts students who are enrolled in “another program for the purpose of employment and training operated by a State or local government.” SNAP agencies have the power to decide what programs to count for this purpose. Many programs in community colleges could reasonably count as a state or local program for the purpose of employment and training. Some states look at whether a program meets vocational components and goals similar to those identified under the Carl A. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act grants as an indicator, so SNAP offices are not required to individually assess programs. Career pathways programs, high-need credentials, and programs approved as training under Unemployment Insurance could also count.

Why are SNAP Student Rules so Complex?

The SNAP rules are based on an outdated image of who is a college student—the image of a traditional student right out of high school who comes from a middle-class family that can fully support all of the needs of their children in college. The lawmakers who created the SNAP rules were concerned that students who are being supported by their parents not receive SNAP benefits. However, according to a study done by the U.S. Government Accountability Office, 71 percent of students are “non-traditional” students who are financially independent from parents.

What Can States Do to Expand College Student Access to SNAP?

States have flexibility in identifying the programs offered at institutions of higher education that can be considered for the purpose of qualifying students for SNAP. These higher education programs, often at community colleges, must be operated by a state or local government, target households with low incomes, and help increase participants’ employability. 

States also have flexibility in how they administer their SNAP E&T programs for current SNAP recipients not in school. Therefore, to expand access to SNAP, states should form partnerships with community colleges and other community partners that broadly serve students and households with low incomes to deliver SNAP E&T program services to these SNAP recipients. For example, as part of a state’s SNAP E&T program, a SNAP recipient could train to become a Certified Nursing Assistant at a community college. This SNAP recipient would be able to get employment and training services as well as support services such as transportation, child care, and textbooks because state SNAP E&T programs are required to provide necessary support services for recipients.

The Basics about SNAP Benefits

How Much are SNAP Benefits Worth?

The SNAP benefits are based on the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Thrifty Food Plan (TFP), currently set at $204 per month for an individual, with larger families receiving more funds.  However, the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 raised maximum SNAP allotments to 115 percent of the June 2020 value of the TFP from Jan. 1, 2021, through June 30, 2021. The American Rescue Plan Act of 2021, signed by President Joseph R. Biden on March 11, 2021, extends increases to the SNAP maximum allotments from July 1, 2021, through Sept. 30, 2021. Therefore, the maximum allotment of benefits for an individual based on temporary COVID increases is now $234 per month, with family benefits similarly increased.   

Benefits are generally reduced for households with earned or unearned income. However, during the COVID-19 pandemic, most states are providing all households with the maximum benefit. Expenses such as housing costs and child care are also taken into account in the benefit calculation. All federal financial aid is not countable for SNAP (see below).

How Are SNAP Benefits Paid? Where Can They Be Used?

SNAP benefits are paid through Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) cards that can only be used to buy food.  Most states make one distribution per month, although some split the benefit into multiple distributions. Recipients can use SNAP to buy their groceries at authorized retailers including grocery stores, discount stores, bodegas, and farmers markets that accept EBT. Generally, SNAP benefits cannot be used to buy hot meals or prepared foods, such as fast food or takeout pizza, unless a state has a Restaurant Meal Program allowing recipients who are elderly, disabled, or homeless to purchase prepared food at approved locations.

Can SNAP Be Used on Campus?

Campus stores may be eligible if approved to take SNAP benefits; however, stores must meet certain requirements, including selling a mixture of foods. SNAP cannot be used to pay for college cafeteria meals because SNAP generally can’t be used to purchase prepared meals unless a state has a Restaurant Meal Plan and the specific student qualifies for it based on homelessness or disability. If students live in a dorm and receive more than half of their meals from a meal plan, they are not eligible for SNAP. Due to the pandemic, the EBT online purchasing pilot program expanded across almost all states—allowing SNAP recipients to buy food online from certain grocery stores including Amazon and Walmart.

What Are the Income and Asset Requirements for SNAP?

Eligibility for SNAP is determined by a household’s income and resources. Because the SNAP benefit is based on the funds available to the family to buy food, state agencies subtract deductions such as work expenses, child care, excess housing costs, and medical expenses from a household’s gross income to determine its net income. The net income is used to determine the SNAP benefit amount. 

Under standard rules, gross monthly income—that is, income before any of the program's deductions are applied—must be under a gross income test. A handful of states use the 130 percent federal poverty level (FPL) gross income test, but 45 states use higher gross income tests between 150 percent and 200 percent FPL.  For example, the poverty line in federal fiscal year 2019 for a family of three is $1,778 per month; therefore, to be eligible for SNAP the income for a household of three must be less than $2,311, which is 130 percent of the poverty line, in states using that threshold. Broad based categorical eligibility (BBCE) allows states to raise the gross income limit, if they so choose, to allow for high living expenses such as housing or child care. Most states have taken up the option under BBCE to use higher gross income tests, typically between 150 and 200 percent FPL.  After applying deductions, an applicant’s net income must be at or below the poverty line unless the household has a member over age 60 or the applicant is getting major disability benefits such as SSDI or SSI. 

Households receiving SNAP without an elderly or disabled member can’t have assets of more than $2,250, and households with an elderly or disabled member can’t have more than $3,500 in assets.  However, most states have taken up BBCE, which allows states to eliminate or increase the asset limit to allow people to build savings--an important tool to exiting poverty.

What Other Expenses Are Taken into Account?

A standard deduction accounts for unavoidable costs that may affect a SNAP recipient’s ability to afford food. Furthermore, if a household has earned income, the rules allow for a deduction equal to 20 percent of earnings. In addition, applicants are allowed to take a dependent care deduction for out-of-pocket child care or other dependent care expenses that are necessary for a member to work or participate in education or training. Household members who are legally obligated to pay child support are allowed to take a child support deduction. Households with an elderly or disabled member with medical expenses over $35 a month that are not paid by insurance or someone else, receive a deduction for medical expenses. Lastly, rules provide for an excess shelter deduction that considers the household’s housing costs, including utilities, when they exceed more than half of a household’s income.

Whose Income and Assets are Counted?

According to federal SNAP policy, a household is considered to be a group of people who live together and buy groceries together for more than half of their meals, regardless of relation. However the relation is considered, when certain family members live in the household together—even if they purchase meals separately—they must be included in the same SNAP household. For example, 19-year-olds living at home full time must be included in the same SNAP household as their parents because children must be included in their parents’ SNAP household until they reach 22 years of age. This is true even for students who are living with their parents due to campus closures as a result of the COVID-19 public health crisis. Spouses must be included in one another’s SNAP household.

If college students live with a roommate and they purchase and prepare food together for at least half of their meals, they are counted as a SNAP household and must apply together. All forms of income, including earned or unearned, for each household member over the age of 17 must be presented when applying for SNAP benefits. Special rules apply when one or more members of a household are ineligible for reasons that can include their immigration status or status as a student without meeting one of the student exemptions. While students can live in a household with other individuals receiving SNAP benefits, students are not counted in the total household number and their income and resources are not counted.

Do Students Need to Report Their Parents’ Income?

Income and assets of parents who do not live with the student are not counted. However, if parents or others provide students with ongoing financial support, that support may need to be reported as income unless it is clearly a loan. If students live at home with their parents but are at least 22 years old and buy and prepare their food independently, they can apply separately and do not need to report their parents’ income. For students who live at home with their parents and are under the age of 22, they would need to report their parents’ income and apply under the same SNAP household. 

In What State Should Students Apply for SNAP if They Live in One State but Attend School in Another?

SNAP benefits follow students where they live. Students should apply for SNAP benefits in the state where they currently reside. For example, if a student attends school in Virginia, but lives in Maryland, that student should apply for SNAP benefits in Maryland (assuming they meet all SNAP eligibility criteria). There is not a minimum amount of time that someone needs to live in a state to apply for SNAP. To verify their state residency, the student applicant will be required to provide documentation, for example a utility bill, a license from the state of residence, a rental agreement, etc.

What are the Special Rules for Non-Citizens and Mixed-Status Immigrant Families?

Undocumented non-citizens and non-citizens with temporary status, including those who entered with student visas, are not eligible for SNAP benefits. Students granted Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) are also not eligible for SNAP benefits. Non-citizen children under 18 who are “qualified immigrants” are eligible without a waiting period. However, non-citizen adults who are “qualified immigrants,” such as Lawful Permanent Residents (LPRs), typically are subject to a five-year waiting period unless they are under age 18, have a disability, or meet other exemptions (for example, if they were previously refugees, granted asylum, etc.). Rules for non-citizens are complicated, and this section only captures a brief synopsis of the rules.

For mixed-status households, if some members of a household are eligible for SNAP and others are not because of their immigration status, the eligible members can still receive SNAP benefits. Ineligible individuals can apply for benefits on behalf of eligible family members. While ineligible household members do not need to provide a Social Security number, they do have to report on their income and assets. States have options on how to treat the income and resources of a non-applicant household member in determining eligibility and benefits.

Interaction of Financial Aid and SNAP

Does Financial Aid Count as Income?

Federal financial aid is not treated as income for the purpose of determining eligibility for public benefit programs, including SNAP. This includes grants, scholarships, fellowships, work-study, and educational loans on which payment is deferred (including but not limited to Pell Grants and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG)).  SNAP regulations authorize states to count non-federal financial aid that is used for normal living expenses (e.g., room and board). States may, however, disregard all educational assistance for SNAP if they do so for TANF or Medicaid and choose to align their SNAP policies with the other program.  Students may also ask financial aid offices to prioritize or earmark their state and private financial aid for tuition and fees first, and thus avoid having any financial aid count toward SNAP. 

SNAP does not count private loans (from individuals as well as commercial institutions) as income.

Does Receiving SNAP Affect Financial Aid?

SNAP benefits are not treated as income when calculating an expected family contribution (EFC) for financial aid. Any payment or reimbursements related to a student’s participation in an education component under SNAP E&T is also not counted as income.

When students complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and report that they or their families have received SNAP or other benefits in the past 24 months, they are eligible for a simplified needs analysis that does not require them to answer questions about family assets. If students receive SNAP and have family income under $26,000, they qualify for an automatic zero EFC and can receive more financial aid.

Conclusion

People with low incomes trying to pursue economic security by earning a college degree often forgo working more hours to attend school, reducing their income. Furthermore, many students earn low to moderate incomes, work part time, and are financially independent from their parents—but still experience food insecurity. And the COVID-19 public health emergency has only made these economic struggles even more difficult for many. Research shows that having low income is the highest risk factor for food insecurity among undergraduate students, yet almost 60 percent do not participate in SNAP.  Today, postsecondary students face many non-academic challenges, therefore, access to SNAP is critical because food insecurity is one of the greatest threats to student health, wellbeing, and academic success—especially for community college students. Moving forward, we must increase access to SNAP for postsecondary students by simplifying the eligibility rules and intentionally informing students who are already eligible but not currently receiving SNAP benefits. 

Citations:

>>View full citations here

Источник: https://www.clasp.org/publications/report/brief/frequently-asked-questions-about-snap-and-students

3SquaresVT

USDA Nondiscrimination Statement

This institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, disability, age, sex and in some cases religion or political beliefs. The U.S. Department of Agriculture also prohibits discrimination based on race, color, national origin, sex, religious creed, disability, age, political beliefs or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027), found online at: https://www.usda.gov/oascr/filing-program-discrimination-complaint-usda-customer, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992.  Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

  •  Mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 0250-9410
  • Fax: (202) 690-7442
  • Email: [email protected]

For any other information dealing with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) issues, persons should either contact the USDA SNAP Hotline Number at (800) 221-5689, which is also in Spanish or call the State Information/Hotline Numbers (click the link for a listing of hotline numbers by State); found online at: https://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/state-directory.

To file a complaint of discrimination regarding a program receiving Federal financial assistance through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), write: HHS Director, Office for Civil Rights, Room 515-F, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20201 or call (202) 619-0403 (voice) or (800) 537-7697 (TTY).

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

Источник: https://dcf.vermont.gov/benefits/3SquaresVT

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)

SNAP logo

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides monthly benefits that help eligible low-income households buy the food they need for good health. For most households, SNAP funds account for only a portion of their food budgets; they must also use their own funds to buy enough food to last throughout the month. Eligible households can receive food assistance through regular SNAP or through the Louisiana Combined Application Project (LaCAP).

For more information on SNAP and other services available through the Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS), call 1-888-LAHELP-U (1-888-524-3578).

SNAP participants may also meet the income eligibility guidelines for nutrition services through the Women, Infants & Children Program (WIC) offered by the Louisiana Department of Health. 

Learn more about WIC and find out if you qualify.


qualifications

Qualifying for Regular SNAP

To get benefits through regular SNAP, households must meet certain tests, including resource and income tests.

Resources: Individuals who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or households including anyone who receives Family Independence Temporary Assistance Program (FITAP), Kinship Care Subsidy Program (KCSP), or Strategies to Empower People (STEP) Program benefits are exempt from the resource limit. Households not exempt from the resource limit may have up to $2500 in resources, such as a bank account, cash, certificate of deposit (CDs), stocks, and bonds. Non-exempt households that include at least one household member who is age 60 or older or includes a disabled member may have up to $3750 in resources.

Households are not exempt from the resource limit if:

  • Any member is disqualified for Intentional Program Violation, or
  • The household is disqualified for failing to comply with work registration requirements.

The following individuals are not exempt from the resource limit:

  • An ineligible alien,
  • An ineligible student,
  • An individual who is disqualified for failure to comply with work registration requirements,
  • An individual who is disqualified for failure to provide or apply for a social security number, and
  • An individual who is on strike.

Income: Households must meet income tests (unless any member is receiving FITAP, KCSP, STEP benefits, or all members are receiving SSI).

Most households must meet both the gross and net income tests, but a household with a person who is 60 years old or older or a person who is receiving certain types of disability payments only has to meet the net income test.

Gross income means a household's total, non-excluded income, before any deductions have been made. Net income means gross income minus allowable deductions. Households, except those noted, that have income over the amounts listed below cannot get SNAP benefits.

Allotment Amounts: The amount of SNAP a household receives depends on the number of people in the SNAP household and the amount of their net income. The table below shows the maximum SNAP allotments by household size.

Other Eligibility Requirements

  • Identity - Individuals must show proof they are the person they claim to be. Applicants must provide proof of their identity.
  • Residence - the client must be living in Louisiana.
  • Citizenship - household members can include either US citizens and/or certain aliens with verifiable USCIS documentation.
  • Enumeration - households must provide or apply for Social Security numbers for each member before certification.
  • Work Registration - all able-bodied adults, with specific exceptions, must register for work and accept suitable employment

Visit the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program online and view the federal requirements for food assistance in several languages.

Qualifying for LACAP

LaCAP is a food assistance program for Louisiana residents who are at least 60 years of age and receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI). It is a simplified version of SNAP. If you are eligible for LaCAP, you will receive a Louisiana Purchase Card and SNAP benefits will be automatically deposited into your account every month. There are three standard allotment amounts in LaCAP. Depending on shelter costs, LaCAP participants will receive $30, $82, or $170. LaCAP cases are certified for 36 months.

You city bank lubbock texas phone number be eligible for LaCAP if you are receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and you:

  • Are age 60 or older,
  • Are not institutionalized or otherwise ineligible for SNAP benefits due to immigration status, or an Intentional Program Violation.
  • Live alone or buy and prepare your food separately or agree to buy and prepare your food separately from the other people who live with you, and
  • Are not living with your spouse or own child who capital one closing branches under 22 years of age.

Applying for LaCAP

Two ways:

  • Fill out the application (LaCAP Enrollment form1A).
  • Or fax the completed form to:
  • Call 1-888-LAHELP-U (1-888-524-3578) for assistance. (View the LAHELPU keypad shortcuts)
  • After DCFS receives your application,you will be assigned a worker who will determine your eligibility.  DCFS will send you a letter within 30 days of the date we receive your enrollment form to let you know if you are eligible or not. If you are eligible, the letter will also tell you the amount of your benefits and when they will begin.

    Other Options

    Seniors receiving SSI who need food assistance do not have to use LaCAP.

    Food assistance is available through LaCAP or through regular SNAP. If you receive benefits through LaCAP and you want to change to regular SNAP, you can do so at any time.

    You may qualify for more benefits through regular SNAP if you:

    • Pay more than $35 per month in out-of-pocket medical expenses, or
    • Pay more than $569 per month for shelter costs.

    LaCAP Program Information and Rights and Responsibilities 


    apply

    Applying service credit union branches near me SNAP Benefits

    Step One:

    • Fill out an Application online.
    • You can also apply for the Family Independence Temporary Assistance Program (FITAP) or Kinship Care Subsidy Program (KCSP) with this application.
    • You may also apply by phone by calling 1-888-LAHELP-U (888-524-3578).
    • You can also download an application and fill it out by hand.

    Step Two:

    Step Three (for downloaded applications filled out by hand only):

    • Mail the completed form to the Document Processing Center:
      • DCFS Economic Stability
        P.O. Box 260031
        Baton Rouge, LA 70826
    • Drop off at the nearest local office
    • Or fax the completed form to:

    Step Four:

    • After receiving your application, call us Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. to complete an interview over the phone. You no longer need to wait on a scheduled phone interview, saving you time.
    • If a face-to-face interview is requested, you may schedule an appointment with any DCFS parish office.

    Questions?

    *Households composed entirely of people who are applying for or receiving SSI may apply for SNAP benefits through regular SNAP at the Social Security Administration office unless they already have a SNAP application pending.

    Regular SNAP Benefits Amounts

    Benefits depend on both the number of persons in the household and the net monthly income amount remaining after all allowable deductions have been subtracted. 

    Income deductions are subtracted from both earned and unearned income.

    deductions

    Deductions
    Earned Income20% of gross earnings
    Standard
    Household SizeDeduction Amount
    1 - 3$177
    4$184
    5$215
    6 or more$246
    MedicalAllowable medical expenses incurred by elderly or disabled household members in excess of $35 per household
    Dependent CarePayments for the care of a child or other incapacitated adult which are necessary for a household member to work, look for work or attend school or training
    Child SupportAllowable for payments of legally obligated child support
    Shelter
    • Allowable shelter costs (rent or mortgage, property taxes, insurance on the structure and utility expenses) in excess of 50% of household income remaining after all other deductions
    • For households with an elderly or disabled member, there is no limit on the shelter deduction; for all other households, the shelter deduction cannot exceed $597.

    How are My Benefits Issued?

    Check the Balance on your Louisiana Purchase Card (EBT Account)

    Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) is a method of delivering governmental benefits to recipients electronically.  Louisiana uses magnetic stripe card technology.  The card, which is referred to as the Louisiana Purchase Card enables recipients to access benefits at Point-of-Sale (POS) machines.

    SNAP benefits are posted to recipients' accounts during the first fourteen days of the month. Recipient benefits are accessible by 5:00 a.m. the morning after they are posted. Benefits are posted on the same date every month regardless of the day of the week. Holidays and weekends do not affect the date of benefit availability. In emergency situations, benefits are available immediately.

    Benefits are secure and accessible only to persons authorized by the recipient. The Personal Identification Number (PIN) is selected by the recipient and must be correctly entered in order to successfully complete all electronic transactions.  As purchases are made at grocery store checkout lanes, recipient accounts are debited and the recipient is given a receipt that provides the remaining account balance.

    Eligible Food Items

    Households CAN use SNAP benefits to buy:

    • Foods for the household to eat, such as:
      • breads and cereals;
      • fruits and vegetables;
      • meats, fish and poultry; and
      • dairy products.
    • Seeds and plants that produce food for how to activate walmart prepaid debit card household to eat.

    Households CANNOT use SNAP benefits to buy:

    • Beer, wine, liquor, cigarettes or tobacco;
    • Any nonfood items, such as:
      • pet foods;
      • soaps, paper products; and
      • household supplies.
    • Vitamins and medicines;
    • Food that will be eaten in the store;
    • Hot foods.

    In general, food products that contain alcohol or tobacco, items that are not intended for human consumption (e.g. paper products, pet foods, etc.), vitamins and supplements, and foods sold hot at the point-of-sale, are not eligible for purchase with SNAP benefits.

    Disaster Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program

    The USDA provides nutrition assistance to those most affected by a disaster or emergency. When the State of Louisiana notifies the USDA of the types and quantities of food that relief organizations need for emergency feeding operations, supplies are provided to disaster relief organizations such as the Red Cross and the Salvation Army for mass feeding or household distribution. The USDA also authorizes States to provide D-SNAP benefits if certain conditions are met.

    rights

    Your Rights Regarding SNAP

    You have the right to:

    • Receive an application when you ask for it.
    • Turn in your application the same day you receive it.
    • Receive your SNAP benefits (or be notified that you are not eligible for the program) within 30 days after you turn in your application.
    • Receive SNAP benefits within 7 days if you are eligible and have little or no money.
    • Have a fair hearing if you disagree with any action taken on your case.
    In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, religious creed, disability, age, political beliefs, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

    Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

    To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form (AD-3027) or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

    1. Mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture
          Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
              1400 Independence Avenue, SW
              Washington, D.C. 20250-9410
    2. Fax: (202) 690-7442; or
    3. Email: [email protected] 

    This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

    A program complaint may be filed with the Department of Children and Victoria secret pink perfume scents Services (DCFS) by emailing [email protected] or by calling 225-342-2342.

    You may file a civil rights complaint with the Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) by completing the Civil Rights Complaint Form. Turn the form in at a local office; mail it to DCFS Civil Rights Section, P.O. Box 1887, Baton Rouge, LA 70821; email [email protected], or; call (225) 342-0309. You may file a civil rights complaint with DCFS and USDA or only DCFS.

    View the full non-discrimination statement here. 

    SNAP Historical Information

    This program was established by Congress in 1964 by PL 88-55 which was superseded by the Food Stamp Act of 1977 and subsequent amendments to the Act.  It is administered at the federal level by the U.S. Department of Agriculture - Food and Nutrition Service and at the state level by the Department of Children & Family Services.

    Besides certification and issuance activities, the Food Security Act of 1985 mandated that employment and training services be provided for SNAP recipients who are mandatory work registrants.  The employment and training activities, known as the Louisiana Job Employment Training (LaJET) Program, are accomplished through the cooperative efforts of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the DCFS parish offices, (in parishes where available) local governing authorities in the State and the Louisiana Workforce Commission.

    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996, which was signed into law on August 22, 1996, implemented many changes in SNAP, including a limit on the number of months certain persons can receive SNAP food stamp office number near me without working.

    Related Links

     

    211

    Dial 211 for Food Assistance
    211 Logo

    211 is an easy to remember telephone number that connects callers to information about critical health and human services available in their community.

    It's single access point for details about food pantries and other food assistance sources near you.

    Learn more about the 211 Louisiana Statewide Network

    CUSTOMER SERVICE
    REPORT CHILD ABUSE/NEGLECT
    Helpful Links
    Statewide Initiatives
    Источник: http://www.dcfs.la.gov/page/93

    CLASP

    *Updated April 2021

    Access to SNAP Promotes Food Security, Improves Wellbeing, and Reduces Poverty

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is our nation’s most important anti-hunger program, providing food assistance to people with low incomes, including postsecondary students, workers, children, people with disabilities, seniors, and many more. SNAP helps approximately 38 million people in nearly 20 million households put food on the table each month. In 2018, SNAP lifted 3.2 million people out of poverty, including 1.5 million children. The SNAP program has been shown to support work, stimulate economic growth, improve academic outcomes for children, and improve health outcomes for recipients.

    Today’s College Students Require Greater Support

    The needs of college students have changed drastically over time, requiring more comprehensive supportive services that improve their ability to persist in and complete their education. For the first time since 1975, recent high school graduates from households with low incomes are enrolling in college at rates higher than their middle-income peers.  Most undergraduate students (71 percent) have at least one characteristic—such as single parenting or working part time—that makes it hard to attend college.  As a result, they’re less likely to finish school than “traditional” undergraduate students who often attend full time, don’t work during the school year, and/or receive financial support from their parents. 

    Estimates of food insecurity among college students range widely, from 9 percent to over 50 percent, depending on the methodology and population studied.   However, the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) found that 7.3 million students—39 percent of all undergraduate students—were in households with incomes under 130 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL), and 29 percent of all undergraduates were in such households with low incomes and had another risk factor for food insecurity.  During the COVID-19 public health emergency, food insecurity rates have doubled overall and tripled in households with children throughout the nation. Now more than ever, it is critical that students have access to food assistance benefits. 

    Food insecurity on college campuses disproportionately affects people of color. According to the Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice, 47 percent of Black students and 42 percent of Latinx students, compared to only 30 percent of their white counterparts, experience food insecurity at bank of commerce atm account number institutions. At two-year colleges, the numbers increase, with 54 percent of Black students, 55 percent of Native American students and 47 percent of Latinx students experiencing food insecurity compared to only 37 percent of white students.   Due to racial, historical, and economic inequities, students of color experience much higher levels of insecurity than their white counterparts in meeting their basic needs. 

    Few Students Receive SNAP in Spite of Need

    Food insecurity is associated with a range of negative health consequences  that interfere with students’ ability to attend and complete college.  SNAP offers a modest assurance that people are able to meet their most basic human need for food. Studies have shown that lack of access to food and proper nutrition exacerbates stress, anxiety, and depression;  causes sleep disturbances and fatigue; and impairs cognitive functioning.  Access to SNAP relieves stress, improves vitality, and allows students to focus their energy on improving their educational and employment outcomes. 

    The GAO study found that approximately 1.5 million college students nationwide receive SNAP, but this is only a small share of those who could benefit from it. So few college students benefit from SNAP because of both eligibility restrictions discussed below and the fact that less than 4 out of 10 students who appear to be eligible for SNAP are receiving it.

    This brief explains the special eligibility rules for college students, describes what states and schools can do to expand access to SNAP, and answers other common questions about SNAP and students.

    Are College Students Eligible for SNAP?

    College Students are Eligible for SNAP if They Meet Additional Requirements

    Postsecondary students enrolled at least half-time must meet all of the standard SNAP eligibility rules, as well as one of several additional qualifications. Students must meet standard SNAP eligibility requirements such as income and asset limits, household qualifications, and immigration status. (See discussion starting on page 8.)

    If students are enrolled at least half-time they may qualify for SNAP if they meet any one of the following 10 criteria:

    • responsible for a dependent child under 6, 
    • responsible for a dependent child between ages 6 to 12 for whom they have trouble securing child care, 
    • works at least 20 hours a week or 80 hours per month in paid employment, 
    • receives Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) cash assistance or services, 
    • is age 17 or younger or age 50 or older, 
    • is a single parent enrolled full-time and responsible for a dependent child age who is 12 or under, 
    • participates in a state or federally funded work-study program, 
    • participates in an on-the-job training program, 
    • is in school through a state or federally approved employment and training program, or 
    • is unable or has a reduced capacity to work due to health reasons.

    In addition, lawmakers added two additional student eligibility criteria for SNAP to support students during the COVID-19 public health crisis. If students meet either of the below criteria, they are temporarily eligible for SNAP (assuming they meet the other SNAP eligibility rules):

    1.    Are eligible for federal or state-funded work-study programs during the regular school year or,
    2.    Have an expected family contribution (EFC) of $0 during the current academic year or receive the full Pell Grant. 
    These temporary student eligibility changes for SNAP will remain in effect until 30 days after the federally declared COVID-19 public health emergency ends. Students will remain eligible until their next redetermination after that date. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has told states that the emergency is likely to remain in place for the entirety of 2021, and it will provide at least 60 days’ notice prior to termination.

    Are All College Students Subject to the Special Rules for Students?

    No, student restrictions do not apply to:

    • individuals attending college less than half-time, as defined by the school.
    • individuals who are in a program that does not require a high school diploma and is not a “regular” program of a college or university, even if most other students have a high school diploma. For example, a student enrolled in a vocational program or remedial education program that does not require a diploma is not considered a college student, even if the course is operated by a college and is located on campus.

    Are College Students Subject to the SNAP Time Limits for Childless Workers (also called Able Bodied Adults without Dependents, or ABAWDs)?

    No, student restrictions do not apply to:

    When students are enrolled at least half-time and qualify for SNAP based on the student rules, they are not subject to the ABAWD time limit.  However, childless students without a documented disability who are enrolled in school less than half-time or are in an adult education or English as Second Language (ESL) program may be subject to the ABAWD rule; if so, they must work at least 20 hours per week or they will be limited to 3 months of SNAP receipt in a 36-month period. Attending school will only count toward the required 20 hours if it is part of a SNAP Employment and Training program or another federal, state, or local work program.

    How Does Age or Disability Status Affect Student Eligibility For SNAP?

    • Individuals who are 50 or over or under 18 years old are exempt from the student exclusion (and are also not subject to ABAWD rules).
    • Individuals who are unable to work or have a reduced capacity to work because of a disability (or temporary illness) are exempt from the student exclusion. This exemption does not require total and permanent disability at the level of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) eligibility but may require a medical note or other documentation. The specific rules for what qualifies are set at the state level. Many states recognized that students placed in colleges under the state’s Vocational Rehabilitation Act program are also SNAP eligible because they have an incapacity but are able to become employable with additional training and education.

    Are Parenting or Caregiving Students Exempt from the Student Rule?

    In many cases, yes. The following parents or caregivers are exempt from the student rule:

    • Parents caring for and living with a child under 6. (This exemption is not limited to single parents.)
    • Single parent with a child under 12 enrolled full-time (as defined by the school).
    • Parents responsible for a child between 6 and 12 years old and who cannot obtain adequate child care.
    • Parents (including pregnant women) who receive TANF cash assistance. 
    • Parent exemptions are not limited to birth parents—grandparents and other caregivers may qualify as well. 
    • If a student lacks access to adequate child care to attend classes AND work 20 hours per week, the student is exempt from the student exclusion. This exemption can apply even if the student isn’t actually employed; if child care is not available during the hours needed for classes; and if the only child care available is substandard, or not appropriate for the child.

    How Does Employment Affect SNAP Eligibility?

    • Students are exempt from the student exclusion if they are employed for pay at least 20 hours per week.
    • States have the option to average hours of employment over a month and should do so to reduce the harm caused by variable hours of work.
    • Schools may need to provide documentation of hours of work to students employed on campus (e.g., as course assistants) even if they are not paid on an hourly basis.
    • Students are exempt if they are participating in a federal or state work-study program – even if they work fewer than 20 hours per week. (Note: During the COVID-19 public health emergency, students are eligible for SNAP if they are eligible for federal or state work-study. Even if the students have not been placed in a work study placement, they are still eligible for SNAP under these temporary changes.)

    If Students Receives TANF Are They Exempt from Student Rules?

    • Students receiving monthly cash assistance payments from TANF are exempt from the student exclusion rules.
    • This rule may also apply to students who receive other TANF-funded benefits, such as child care, diversion payments, etc.
    • The exclusion may also apply to students who attended school while receiving such benefits in the past.

    What Education and Training Programs Count for Exemptions from the Student Restrictions?

    Students who are enrolled in college as part of SNAP Employment and Training (E&T), Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) programs, and Trade Adjustment Assistance programs are specifically exempted from the student restrictions.

    In addition, the federal statute exempts students who are enrolled in “another program for the purpose of employment and training operated by a State or local government.” SNAP agencies have the power to decide what programs to count for this purpose. Many programs in community colleges could reasonably count as a state or local program for the purpose of employment and training. Some states look at whether a program meets vocational components and goals similar to those identified under the Carl A. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act grants as an indicator, so SNAP offices are not required to individually assess programs. Career pathways programs, high-need credentials, and programs approved as training under Unemployment Insurance could also count.

    Why are SNAP Student Rules so Complex?

    The SNAP rules are based on an outdated image of who is a college student—the image of a traditional student right out of high school who comes from a middle-class family that can fully support all of the needs of their children in college. The lawmakers who created the SNAP rules were concerned that students who are being supported by their parents not receive SNAP benefits. However, according to a study done by the U.S. Government Accountability Office, 71 percent of students are “non-traditional” students who are financially independent from parents.

    What Can States Do to Expand College Student Access to SNAP?

    States have flexibility in identifying the programs offered at institutions of higher education that can be considered for the purpose of qualifying students for SNAP. These higher education programs, often at community colleges, must be operated by a state or local government, target households with low incomes, and help increase participants’ employability. 

    States also have flexibility in how they administer their SNAP E&T programs for current SNAP recipients not in school. Therefore, to expand access to SNAP, states should form partnerships with community colleges and other community partners that broadly serve students and households with low incomes to deliver SNAP E&T program services to these SNAP recipients. For example, as part of a state’s SNAP E&T program, a SNAP recipient could train to become a Certified Nursing Assistant at a community college. This SNAP recipient would be able to get employment and training services as well as support services such as transportation, child care, and textbooks because state SNAP E&T programs are required to provide necessary support services for recipients.

    The Basics about SNAP Benefits

    How Much are SNAP Benefits Worth?

    The SNAP benefits are based on the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Thrifty Food Plan (TFP), currently set at $204 per month for an individual, with larger families receiving more funds.  However, the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 raised maximum SNAP allotments to 115 percent of the June 2020 value of the TFP from Jan. 1, 2021, through June 30, 2021. The American Rescue Plan Act of 2021, signed by President Joseph R. Biden on March 11, 2021, extends increases to the SNAP maximum allotments from July 1, 2021, through Sept. 30, 2021. Therefore, the maximum allotment of benefits for an individual based on temporary COVID increases is now $234 per month, with family benefits similarly increased.   

    Benefits are generally reduced for households with earned or unearned income. However, during the COVID-19 pandemic, most states are providing all households with the maximum benefit. Expenses such as housing costs and child care are also taken into account in the benefit calculation. All federal financial aid is not countable for SNAP (see below).

    How Are SNAP Benefits Paid? Where Can They Be Used?

    SNAP benefits are paid through Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) cards that can only be used to buy food.  Most states make one distribution per month, although some split the benefit into multiple distributions. Recipients can use SNAP to buy their groceries at authorized retailers including grocery stores, discount stores, bodegas, and farmers markets that accept EBT. Generally, SNAP benefits cannot be used to buy hot meals or prepared foods, such as fast food or takeout pizza, unless a state has a Restaurant Meal Program allowing recipients who are elderly, disabled, or homeless to purchase prepared food at approved locations.

    Can SNAP Be Used on Campus?

    Campus stores may be eligible if approved to take SNAP benefits; however, stores must meet certain requirements, including selling a mixture of foods. SNAP cannot be used to pay for college cafeteria meals because SNAP generally can’t be used to purchase prepared meals unless a state has a Restaurant Meal Plan and the specific student qualifies for it based on homelessness or disability. If students live in a dorm and receive more than half of their meals from a meal plan, they are not eligible for SNAP. Due to the pandemic, the EBT online purchasing pilot program expanded across almost all states—allowing SNAP recipients to buy food online from certain grocery stores including Amazon food stamp office number near me Walmart.

    What Are the Income and Asset Requirements for SNAP?

    Eligibility for SNAP is determined by a household’s income and resources. Because the SNAP benefit is based on the funds available to the family to buy food, state agencies subtract deductions such as work expenses, child care, excess housing costs, and medical expenses from a household’s gross income to determine its net income. The net income is used to determine the SNAP benefit amount. 

    Under standard rules, gross monthly income—that is, income before any of the program's deductions are applied—must be under a gross income test. A handful of states use the 130 percent federal poverty level (FPL) gross income test, but 45 states use higher gross income tests between 150 percent and 200 percent FPL.  For example, the poverty line in federal fiscal year 2019 for a family of three is $1,778 per month; therefore, to be eligible for SNAP the income for a household of three must be less than $2,311, which is 130 percent of the poverty line, in states using that threshold. Broad based categorical eligibility (BBCE) allows states to raise the gross income limit, if they so choose, to allow for high living expenses such as housing or child care. Most states have taken up the option under BBCE to use higher gross income tests, typically between 150 and 200 percent FPL.  After applying deductions, an applicant’s net income must be at or below the poverty line unless the household has a member over age 60 or the applicant is getting major disability benefits such as SSDI or SSI. 

    Households receiving SNAP without an elderly or disabled member can’t have assets of more than $2,250, and households with an elderly or disabled member can’t have more than $3,500 in assets.  However, most states have taken up BBCE, which allows states to eliminate or increase the asset limit to allow people to build savings--an important tool to exiting poverty.

    What Other Expenses Are Taken into Account?

    A standard deduction accounts for unavoidable costs that may affect a SNAP recipient’s ability to afford food. Furthermore, if a household has earned income, the rules allow for a deduction equal to 20 percent of earnings. In addition, applicants are allowed to take a dependent care deduction for out-of-pocket child care or other dependent care expenses that are necessary police calls san jose a member to work or participate in education or training. Household members who are legally obligated to pay child support are allowed to take a child support deduction. Households with an elderly or disabled member with medical expenses over $35 a month that are not paid by insurance or someone else, receive a deduction for medical expenses. Lastly, rules provide for an excess shelter deduction that considers the household’s housing costs, including utilities, when they exceed more than half of a household’s income.

    Whose Income and Assets are Counted?

    According to federal SNAP policy, a household is considered to be a group of people who live together and buy groceries together for more than half of their meals, regardless of relation. However the relation is considered, when certain family members live in the household together—even if they purchase meals separately—they must be included in the same SNAP household. For example, 19-year-olds living at home full time must be included in the same SNAP household as their parents because children must be included in their parents’ SNAP household until they reach 22 years of age. This is true even for students who are living with their parents due to campus closures as a result of the COVID-19 public health crisis. Spouses must be included in one another’s SNAP household.

    If college students live with a roommate and they purchase and prepare food together for at least half of their meals, they are counted as a SNAP household and must apply together. All forms of income, including earned or unearned, for each household member over the age of 17 must be presented when applying for SNAP benefits. Special rules apply when one or more members of a household are ineligible for reasons that can include their immigration status or status as a student without ameria bank near me one of the student exemptions. While students can live in a household with other individuals receiving SNAP benefits, students are not counted in the total household number and their income and resources are not counted.

    Do Students Need to Report Their Parents’ Income?

    Income and assets of parents who do not live with the student are not counted. However, if parents or others provide students with ongoing financial support, that support may need to be reported as income unless it is clearly a loan. If students live at home with their parents but are at least 22 years old and buy and prepare their food independently, they can apply separately and do not need to report their parents’ income. For students who live at home with their parents and are under the age of 22, they would need to report their parents’ income and apply under the same SNAP household. 

    In What State Should Students Apply for SNAP if They Live in One State but Attend School in Another?

    SNAP benefits follow students where they live. Students should apply for SNAP benefits in the state where they currently reside. For example, if a student attends school in Virginia, but lives in Maryland, that student should apply for SNAP benefits in Maryland (assuming they meet all SNAP eligibility criteria). There is not a minimum amount of time that someone needs to live in a state to apply for SNAP. To verify their state residency, the student applicant will be required to provide documentation, for example a utility bill, a license from the state of residence, a rental agreement, etc.

    What are the Special Rules for Non-Citizens and Mixed-Status Immigrant Families?

    Undocumented non-citizens and non-citizens with temporary status, including those who entered with student visas, are not eligible bank of america credit card pin number SNAP benefits. Students granted Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) are also not eligible for SNAP benefits. Non-citizen children under 18 who are “qualified immigrants” are eligible without a waiting period. However, non-citizen adults who are “qualified immigrants,” such as Lawful Permanent Residents (LPRs), typically are subject to a five-year waiting food stamp office number near me unless they are under age 18, have a disability, or meet other exemptions (for example, if they were previously refugees, granted asylum, etc.). Rules for non-citizens are complicated, and this section only captures a brief synopsis of the rules.

    For mixed-status households, if some members of a household are eligible for SNAP and others are not because of their immigration status, the eligible members can still receive SNAP benefits. Ineligible individuals can apply for benefits on behalf of eligible family members. While ineligible household members do not need to provide a Social Security number, they do have to report wells fargo checking account bonus code their income and assets. States have options on how to treat the income and resources of a non-applicant household member in determining eligibility and benefits.

    Interaction of Financial Aid and SNAP

    Does Financial Aid Count as Income?

    Federal financial aid is not treated as income for the purpose of determining eligibility for public benefit programs, including SNAP. This includes grants, scholarships, fellowships, work-study, and educational loans on which payment is deferred (including but not limited to Pell Grants and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG)).  SNAP regulations authorize states to count non-federal financial aid that is used for normal living expenses (e.g., room and board). States may, however, disregard all educational assistance for SNAP if they do so for TANF or Medicaid and choose to align their SNAP policies with the other program.  Students may also ask financial aid offices to prioritize or earmark their state and private financial food stamp office number near me for tuition and fees first, and thus avoid having any financial aid count toward SNAP. 

    SNAP does not count private loans (from individuals as well as commercial institutions) as income.

    Does Receiving SNAP Affect Financial Aid?

    SNAP benefits are not treated as income when calculating an expected family contribution (EFC) for financial aid. Any payment or reimbursements related to a student’s participation in an education component under SNAP E&T is also not counted as income.

    When students complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and report that they or their families have received SNAP or other benefits in the past 24 months, they are eligible for a simplified needs analysis that does not require them to answer questions about family assets. If students receive SNAP and have family income under $26,000, they qualify for an automatic zero EFC and can receive more financial aid.

    Conclusion

    People with low incomes trying to pursue economic security by earning a college degree often forgo working more hours to attend school, reducing their income. Furthermore, many students earn low to moderate incomes, work part time, and are financially independent from their parents—but still experience food insecurity. And the COVID-19 public health emergency has only made these economic struggles even more difficult for many. Research shows that having low income is the highest risk factor for food insecurity among undergraduate students, yet almost 60 percent do not participate in SNAP.  Today, postsecondary students face many non-academic challenges, therefore, access to SNAP is critical because food insecurity is one of the greatest threats to student health, wellbeing, and academic success—especially for community college students. Moving forward, we must increase access to SNAP for postsecondary students by simplifying the eligibility rules and intentionally informing students who are already eligible but not currently receiving SNAP benefits. 

    Citations:

    >>View full citations here

    Источник: https://www.clasp.org/publications/report/brief/frequently-asked-questions-about-snap-and-students

    Food Supplement

    Food Supplement (also known as SNAP) provides a monthly benefit to help low-income households purchase nutritious food.

    If you receive Food Supplement you may also be eligible to participate in Maine SNAP-Ed or the Food Supplement Employment and Training Program.

    What do I need to do to apply?

    Eligibility for Food Supplement is based on income, assets, expenses and household size.  You will need to fill out an application, complete an interview and provide verification of your household’s income, identity, citizenship status, assets and other items depending on your household circumstances.

    How do I apply?

    Option 1: Apply online through My Maine Connection.

    Option 2: Download and mail an application.

    Office for Family Independence
    114 Corn Shop Lane
    Farmington, ME 04938

    Option 3: E-mail an application to [email protected]

    Option 4: Fax an application to (207) 778-8429.

    Temporary Changes to Benefits

    In response to COVID-19 and related laws, the Office for Family Independence has made a number of temporary changes to safety net programs including Food Supplement.  Read our Summary of Changes (PDF).

    Pandemic EBT (P-EBT)

    The Maine Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Family Independence, has been approved by the Food and Nutrition Service to issue Summer 2021 Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer (P-EBT) benefits to qualified children.  Each child who was under the age of 6 receiving SNAP this past summer and each child that was in school in June 2021 that received free or reduced lunch funded by the National School Lunch Program (NLSP) was issued $375 in SNAP benefits on October 28, 2021.  Children on SNAP were issued the P-EBT benefit to their EBT card.  Additionally, over 12,000 students who are not on SNAP will have P-EBT benefits issued to new P-EBT cards.  You can call 1-800-477-7428 to request a replacement EBT or P-EBT card.  Cards can take 10 – 14 days or longer to be delivered due to postal delays.  If you need immediate nutrition assistance, apply for SNAP or contact 211 for information on food pantries in your area.

    • The deadline for Summer P-EBT eligibility has passed.

    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

    How do I set up my pin for my P-EBT card?

    Call the number on the back of the P-EBT card.  You will need to enter the child’s date of birth and the last for digits of their Social Security Number (SS#).  If the child does not have a SS# or it was not provided to us you will need to enter 9999.

    Why did I receive multiple cards?

    P-EBT cards are issued for each eligible child not on SNAP.  If your child was not on SNAP you will receive a P-EBT card for each eligible child.

    I didn’t ask for P-EBT and I do not want it.  What do I do with the P-EBT card?

    Please destroy the card.  P-EBT cards are for the individual child.  It a prosecutable offense to give the card and/or benefits away.

    Other people received P-EBT on their EBT card.  Why don’t I have my card(s) or benefits yet?

    P-EBT cards can take 14 days or longer to be delivered due to postal delays.  If you have not received card by November 14, 2021, you can contact the Department at [email protected] 

    Will P-EBT benefits be issued to the P-EBT card I received last year?

    Yes.  You can call 1-800-477-7428 if you need a replacement card.

    Do home-schooled children qualify for P-EBT

    No. To qualify, school aged children must be enrolled in a school that offers meals through the USDA National School Lunch Program and be eligible for the USDA National School Lunch and School Breakfast Program.

    If I got it last year is it automatic this year?

    No.  You would need to have been enrolled in school June 2021 and eligible for the USDA National School Lunch and School Breakfast Program for June, July, or August 2021.

    When will my child get P-EBT?

    Benefits for the Summer of 2021 were credited to EBT accounts October 28, 2021.  Please remember it may take 14 days or longer to receive a EBT or P-EBT card due to postal delays.

    Can I apply for Summer P-EBT?

    The deadline for Summer P-EBT eligibility has passed.  Neither OFI nor DOE can take P-EBT applications or requests.

    Online Purchase Options Available for Maine SNAP Recipients:

    The Maine Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) is excited to announce that Maine Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients are now be able to purchase eligible food items online at participating retailers using their Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) cards.

    How to use your EBT card for online purchases

    SNAP benefits can be used at Amazon and Amazon Fresh, BJ's Wholesale Club, Hannaford to go, and Walmart for delivery or curbside pick-up purchases. 

    • Amazon, BJ's, and Hannaford accept SNAP food benefits only.
    • Walmart accepts both SNAP and EBT cash benefits.
    SNAP recipients will be able to purchase the same food items online as they can in the store.  SNAP benefits cannot be used for delivery charges.
    • Amazon waives delivery fees on purchases of $35 or more.
    • Shoppers can visit their local BJ's, Hannaford, or Wal-Mart store online to find out what pick-up or delivery options are available near them.
    • Contact your local grocery store to see if they chose curbside pick-up as an option.  Any grocer is allowed to purchase wireless EBT equipment which makes curbside pick-up possible.
    For more information, please see these FAQs:
    Information for Retailers

    Current SNAP-eligible retailers interested in participating in online EBT purchases should visit the USDA website for more information, including program requirements and instructions for enrollment.

    Post-Secondary Student Eligibility

    The Office for Family Independence (OFI) has created a Community College Verification Form (PDF) to simplify verifying Food Supplement eligibility for post-secondary students at usps office open today colleges.  Community colleges can verify students are enrolled in an associate’s degree or certificate program that is considered a “career or technical education program”, as defined by the federal Carl D. Perkins Act (most certificate and associate degree programs fit the definition), OR a course the community college has determined will make the student more employable.  This information has been conveyed to Navigators at community colleges so that they are better able to assist OFI in the fight to reduce hunger.  Navigators are campus based staff who assist eligible students throughout their time in school. 

    USDA Non Discrimination Statement

    In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, religious creed, disability, age, political beliefs, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

    Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits.  Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339.  Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

    To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at: How to File a Complaint, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992.  Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by: 

    1. mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture
      Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
      1400 Independence Avenue, SW
      Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;
    2. fax: (202) 690-7442; or 
    3. email: [email protected]

    This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

    Maine SNAP-Ed

    In SNAP-Ed, participants receive nutrition education services with helpful information on how to eat healthy on a budget.  Learn more about SNAP-Ed.

    SNAP-Ed has Gone Cellular

    Sign up to get text messages from Maine SNAP-Ed and they will help you and your family shop, cook and eat healthy on a budget.  You can look forward to simple tips for healthy eating, low-cost recipes, grocery shopping ideas, tips on getting the family to drink more water and more.  Sign up at Notifications - Maine SNAP-Ed (mainesnap-ed.org) today to get text messages sent straight to your phone.

    The Food Supplement Employment and Training Program (FSET)

    FSET helps connect Food Supplement participants with job training and education. There are lots of opportunities available at no cost. Learn more about FSET.

    Источник: https://www.maine.gov/dhhs/ofi/programs-services/food-supplement

    How can I apply for food stamps?

    To apply for food stamp benefits, or for information about the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), contact your local SNAP office. You can find local offices and each State's application on the USDA national map. Local offices are also listed in the State or local government pages of the telephone book. The office should be listed under "Food Stamps," "Social Services," "Human Services," "Public Assistance," or a similar title. You can also call your State's SNAP hotline numbers. Most are toll-free numbers.

    Each State has its own application form. If your State’s form is not on the web yet, you'll need to contact your local SNAP office to request one. Please don't call USDA or HHS headquarters as only your State accepts applications and determines eligibility.

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is administered by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), Food and Nutrition Service program.

    Posted in: Programs for Families and Children

    Источник: https://www.hhs.gov/answers/programs-for-families-and-children/how-can-i-apply-for-food-stamps/index.html

    3SquaresVT

    USDA Nondiscrimination Statement

    This institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, disability, age, sex and in some cases religion or political beliefs. The U.S. Department of Agriculture also prohibits discrimination based on race, color, national origin, sex, religious creed, disability, age, political beliefs or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or how to add money to venmo without bank account conducted or funded by USDA.

    Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program saving account interest rate in india (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

    To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027), found online at: https://www.usda.gov/oascr/filing-program-discrimination-complaint-usda-customer, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992.  Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

    •  Mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 0250-9410
    • Fax: (202) 690-7442
    • Email: [email protected]

    For any other information dealing with Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) issues, persons should either contact the USDA SNAP Hotline Number at (800) 221-5689, which is also in Spanish or call the State Information/Hotline Numbers (click the link for a listing of hotline numbers by State); found online at: https://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/state-directory.

    To file a complaint of discrimination regarding a program receiving Federal financial assistance through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), write: HHS Director, Office for Civil Rights, Room 515-F, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20201 or call (202) 619-0403 (voice) or (800) 537-7697 (TTY).

    This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

    Источник: https://dcf.vermont.gov/benefits/3SquaresVT

    Food Assistance

    Learn how to get nutritious food for yourself and your family through SNAP (food stamps), D-SNAP, and WIC for women, infants, and children. Apply for school meals for your kids and supplemental food for seniors. Find out how food programs can provide emergency help during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Immediate Food Assistance

    If you’re hungry now:

    • Call the USDA National Hunger Hotline at 1-866-3-HUNGRY (1-866-348-6479) or 1-877-8-HAMBRE (1-877-842-6273). Information is available in English and Spanish. The hotline operates Monday through Friday, 7:00 AM to 10:00 PM Eastern Time.

    • Contact community or religious organizations to find a local food bank or food pantry.

    Food Stamps (SNAP Food Benefits)

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is a federal nutrition program. Known previously as "food stamps," SNAP benefits can help you stretch your food budget if you have a low income.

    Learn About the Types of Food You Can Buy With SNAP Benefits

    If you’re eligible, you can purchase food using benefits that are issued to you monthly. You can use your SNAP benefits to buy a variety of foods for your household, including:

    • Fruits and vegetables

    • Meat, poultry, and fish

    • Dairy products

    • Breads and cereals

    See the United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) list of foods and products you can buy using SNAP benefits.

    Find Out If You Are Eligible for SNAP

    To determine if you are eligible for SNAP benefits, you must meet certain requirements. States have income limits for SNAP recipients. They can also factor in your resources, such as money in the bank, to decide if you qualify for SNAP.  

    Apply for SNAP Benefits

    Use the online map to apply for SNAP and to find your state and local offices and phone numbers. You may also apply in person at your state or local office.

    How Your SNAP Benefits Work

    File a Complaint About SNAP

    Whether you currently receive SNAP benefits or you're in the process of applying, you can file a complaint using these resources:

    SNAP Information For Retailers

    Learn how to work with SNAP if you are a retailer or if you operate a farmers market.

    Food Stamps and Meal Programs During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, it may be easier for you and your family to get food stamps and take part in meal programs. Contact your state's social services agency to see if you're eligible.

    During the pandemic:

    • Food stamp (SNAP) recipients may receive additional funding. More people may be eligible to receive SNAP during the pandemic than normally.

    • Parents whose kids' schools are closed can pick up school meals for their kids to eat at home.

    • People can enroll in food programs remotely rather than in person. This applies to programs for pregnant women, families, seniors, and people with disabilities.

    Read about these and other government meal program changes during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

    WIC Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children

    This short-term program can help you get healthy food for yourself and your young children.

    Learn About the WIC Program

    Many low-income women and young children can get healthy food to add to their diet. It’s available through the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). WIC also offers nutrition counseling and referrals to health, welfare, and social services.

    Find Out If You or Your Children Are Eligible for the WIC Program

    • If you’re applying for yourself, you must be at least one of the following:

      • Pregnant

      • Breastfeeding (up to the baby's first birthday)

      • Within six months of having given birth or pregnancy ending

    • If you’re applying for your children, they must be under 5 years old.

    • You must meet other WIC eligibility requirements based on your www cashplus usbank com, your health, and where you live.

    Apply for capital one online business banking login WIC Program

    Contact your state or local WIC agency for an appointment. When you call, someone will tell you where to apply and what to bring with you.

    Learn More About the WIC Program

    Your agency may not have enough money to serve everyone who needs WIC. In that case, it will maintain a waiting list and use a priority system to decide who will get WIC benefits first.

    For more information and help applying, contact your state or local WIC agency. You can also call its toll-free number.

    Free School Meals for Children

    These programs can help you get healthy meals for your children at their school, childcare center, or after-school program.

    Learn About School Meal Programs

    Children from qualified households with a low income can get healthy meals or milk.

    Find Out If Your Children Are Eligible for School Meal Programs 

    Your children automatically qualify for free meals or milk if:

    • They are foster children under the legal responsibility of a foster care agency or court

    Your children may qualify if your household income is within the Federal Income Eligibility Guidelines. These guidelines are based on federal poverty guidelines.

    • If your income is no more than 130 percent of the poverty level, they should qualify for free meals.

    • If your income is no more than 185 percent of the poverty level, they should qualify for reduced-price meals.

    The summer food service program is open to all children and teens 18 and under at locations around the country. Find a site near you.

    Learn How to Apply for School Meal Programs for Your Children

    Submit an application from the school. You can do this at the beginning of the school year or at any time if circumstances change.

    Learn How to Get Help or File a Complaint About School Meal Programs

    Contact your local school or school district for pokemon ex cards worth money information.

    Free Food Programs for Seniors

    Two federally-sponsored programs aim to get nutritious foods to seniors with a low income.

    Learn About State Food Programs for Seniors

    Most states offer these programs for seniors with a low income:

    Find Out If You're Eligible for Food stamp office number near me Food Programs for Seniors

    You may be eligible if you're:

    Learn How to Apply to State Food Programs for Seniors

    To apply for either program:

    • Select your state or territory from this nutrition programs contact map.

    • From the list discover online banking bonus available programs, choose a food program for seniors: 

      • Commodity Supplemental Food Program

      • Senior Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program

    If either program is not on the list, you may not live in an area that offers the program.

    Other Food Programs 

    You may qualify for other programs like:

    Check with your senior community center to learn about other local resources.

    D-SNAP Helps With Food Costs After a Declared Disaster

    If the president authorizes individual disaster assistance for your area, you may qualify for D-SNAP. 

    Learn About D-SNAP 

    The Disaster Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program is also called food stamps for disaster situations. D-SNAP provides one month of benefits on a debit-type card that you can use at most grocery stores.

    Find Out If You Qualify for D-Snap

    You live where:

    • The president has declared individual assistance for a disaster

    • The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food and Nutrition Service has approved states to operate D-SNAP

    • Yours has requested and received approval to operate D-SNAP

    You may qualify for D-SNAP even if you would not qualify for regular SNAP (food stamps) because:

    • You're out of work or have reduced or delayed income due to the disaster

    • You're facing costly home repairs or temporary shelter expenses

    If you already receive SNAP, you can apply for D-SNAP if you do not get the most allowable under SNAP and have disaster-related losses.

    As a separate benefit, you may be able to get free meals for your children or your entire family. School meals programs provide these meals.

    Apply for D-SNAP

    Contact your local SNAP office to apply for D-SNAP or find application sites throughout the affected disaster area. 

    Share This Page:
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    Ask a real person any government-related question for free. They'll get you the answer or let you know where to find it.

    Last Updated: October 29, 2021

    Источник: https://www.usa.gov/food-help

    Overview

    NEW!  November 16, 2021 - Connecticut’s SNAP-eligible households to receive additional emergency food benefits November 17

    The Connecticut Department of Social Services today announced that it will deliver $32.3 million in Emergency Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits to over 213,100 Connecticut households on Wednesday, November 17, 2021. Monthly allocations of emergency SNAP benefits are going to all enrolled households, based on continuance of a declared public health emergency related to COVID-19 in Connecticut.

    Authorized by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act of 2020, this federal allocation will provide a minimum of $95 in extra food aid to all enrolled families and individuals, raising the state’s total emergency SNAP funding to over $505.7 million since the COVID-19 pandemic began.

    Specifically:

    • All 213,100 SNAP-eligible households statewide will receive the emergency benefits on their Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) cards on November 17, 2021.
    • Households already eligible for the maximum monthly SNAP benefit will receive an extra $95.
    • The remaining households that don’t usually qualify for the maximum monthly SNAP benefit because of income or other factors will receive extra benefits of at least $95 but averaging an estimated $154 (depending on their specific benefit situation).
    • With this additional $32.3 million allocation by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service, emergency benefits are totaling over $505.7 million in additional SNAP assistance statewide over 19 months, with commensurate spending at supermarkets, groceries, farmers markets, and other food retailers.
    • The $95 increase results from President Biden’s January 22, 2021, executive order, which required the USDA to consider new cheap beach vacation rentals in north carolina allowing states to increase SNAP emergency benefit allocations for all households, including those previously ineligible to receive it. This increase is expected to be ongoing, contingent on the continuation of the state and federal public health emergencies.
    • All households also received their normal SNAP benefits, based on the new Thrifty Food Plan amounts, on one of the first three days of the month as they normally do, according to last name.
    • If a household is granted regular SNAP benefits on or after Monday November 15, the additional SNAP benefits will be added to the EBT card on a Friday, depending on the date of granting.

    ***  

    NEW! October 22, 2021 -  ‘Pandemic EBT’ Child Care program bringing extra food benefits to over 34,800 young children in Connecticut on October 24

    The Connecticut Department of Social Services (DSS), in consultation with the Department of Education amazon com apple pay Office of Early Childhood, today announced that $13 million in special food assistance benefits will be distributed Sunday, October 24, 2021, to the families of over 34,800 children under age 6 and who are enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

    This is the last major distribution in the current round of $119.1 million in food benefits going to nearly 282,900 schoolchildren, and 34,800 SNAP recipients in child care under age 6, through the federal Summer ‘Pandemic EBT’ (or P-EBT).

    Specific information about the October 24 distribution of Pandemic EBT Child Care benefits:

    • DSS will deposit benefits onto existing SNAP Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) cards on October 24, 2021, to nearly 27,400 households (34,800 eligible children) who were under age 6 and receiving SNAP benefits from DSS as of June 30, 2021, unless the child already received Pandemic EBT Children in School benefits by being eligible for the free or reduced-price meals program at their school.
    • DSS will also deposit benefits onto existing SNAP Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) cards of SNAP-eligible households who welcomed a newborn in either July or August 2021.
    • The planned one-time additional benefit is $375 per child.
    • DSS has already deposited benefits totaling $106 million dollars to 282,900 schoolchildren eligible to receive free and reduced-priced meals at their school as of the end of the 2020–2021 school year on September 26, 2021, and October 10, 2021.  In total, the P-EBT program has provided Connecticut children with an additional $452.6 in SNAP benefits since the beginning of the pandemic. 
    • Families third coast midstream not need to apply for P-EBT benefits, as DSS uses SNAP eligibility information to determine if children are eligible for P-EBT Child Care benefits.

    Benefits can be used at any location that accepts SNAP/EBT cards. This includes famers markets and direct market farms. In fact, enrollees can double the value of P-EBT or other SNAP benefits at farmers markets that are participating in CT Fresh Match. Additional information on that program can be found online at www.endhungerct.org/services/farmers-markets.

    P-EBT participants will also have online access to eligible food purchases through delivery or curbside pickup at participating retailers Amazon, Aldi and Price Chopper/Market 32 via Instacart, BJ’s Wholesale Clubs, Food Bazaar, ShopRite, Stop and Shop and Walmart. Additional information on that is available at www.ct.gov/snap.

    Food budgets can be stretched further with WIC. Households with kids under age 5, new parents, and pregnant or breastfeeding women may be eligible to receive healthy foods, free nutrition education, breastfeeding support, and referrals to helpful resources. To apply or learn more, visit portal.ct.gov/DPH/WIC/WIC.

    DSS received information from the Office of Early Childhood and the Department of Education to implement the P-EBT Child Care plan, which was approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service.  The P-EBT Child Care SNAP funding was authorized by the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act, with additional amendments made in the Continuing Appropriations Act and Other Extensions Act of 2021, as well as the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021.

    *** 

    UPDATED August 26, 2021 - Expansion of online purchasing of food with SNAP benefits; Stop & Highest paying interest rate savings account joins BJ’s Wholesale Club, Price Chopper, Aldi, Amazon, Walmart and ShopRite. 

    The Department of Social Services (DSS) is pleased to announce the expansion of its Online Purchasing Pilot to include Stop & Shop stores across Connecticut.  Stop & Shop now accepts EBT payments for SNAP-eligible items when placing online orders for Stop & Shop Pickup and Delivery for in-club pickup and curbside pickup (www.stopandshop.com/new-customer).

    Customers who prefer to use the Instacart marketplace may now also use their SNAP benefits to purchase grocery items from Stop & Shop at https://www.instacart.com/stop-shop.

    The new user-friendly experience offers online grocery shoppers the option to add their EBT card to their account on www.StopandShop.com  and shop using their SNAP funds.  While browsing online aisles, SNAP customers can sort products to show eligible items, and a "SNAP Eligible" label will appear within the product details.  At checkout, customers can select the "Apply SNAP Benefits" option and select the amount to charge to their EBT card, allowing personalized budgeting throughout the month.

    Please click here to read the Stop & Shop news release, with full information about placing online orders for SNAP-eligible items.

    We are also proud to have other major food retailers – BJ’s Wholesale Club,Aldi,Amazon, Walmart and ShopRite-- offering online purchasing of food with SNAP benefits in Connecticut.

    **Please note:  Only Price Chopper, Aldi and Stop & Shop stores participate in Instacart.  Amazon, Walmart, ShopRite and BJ’s Wholesale Club have their own online delivery methods; please see links below. 

    Online contact points are www.amazon.com/snap-ebt;  www.walmart.com/grocery; https://shoprite.com/Store-Locator; SNAP/EBT - Price Chopper - Market 32; www.BJs.com and BJs.com/help/ebt/; and www.stopandshop.com/new-customer.

    Please note:  only SNAP benefits on EBT cards can be used for online purchases.  At this time, cash assistance benefits on EBT cards cannot be used for any part of online shopping, including shipping, delivery or service fees. Customers will need a secondary form of payment for non-food items, such as taxes, tips and fees, per federal SNAP guidelines.

    While federal rules do not allow any SNAP benefits to be used for shipping, delivery or service fees, some food retailers may choose to waive fees, if applicable.  To help subsidize costs for EBT SNAP beneficiaries, through June 16, 2021, Instacart (representing ALDI & Price Chopper) will waive delivery and/or pickup fees on up to the first three EBT SNAP orders for each customer with a valid EBT card associated with their Instacart account.  After this period, online shopping customers using SNAP benefits best buy credit card chase bank use another means of payment for any fees and/or any non-SNAP-eligible items they wish to purchase.

    Customary shipping/delivery fees are:

    • Instacart pickup fees are $1.99 and delivery starts at $3.99.
    • ShopRite has a $10 service fee and a separate delivery fee.
    • Walmart fees vary between $7.95 and $9.95 (or a flat fee of $98/year).
    • Amazon waives delivery fees for orders over $35 with free 2-day shipping for Prime members. For non-Prime members, orders of $25 or more of receive free shipping in 5-8 business days.
    • Stop & Shop Pickup orders are subject to a $2.95 fee.  Stop & Shop Delivery orders are subject to a delivery fee of $9.95 for orders less than $100 and $6.95 for orders greater than $100.  Customers new to Pickup and Delivery can use promo code “SSONLINE50” for $50 off and free* delivery and pickup for 60 days.  *$50 off is obtained by getting $25 off your first two orders of $100 or more each (before taxes and after all other coupons and savings are applied). Stop & Shop will waive your Delivery and Pickup fee on first order and then on all subsequent orders of $100 or more if placed within 60 days of first order. Valid for first-time residential customers. Order calculation excludes alcoholic beverages, gift cards, postage stamps and any other purchases prohibited by law. Offer not transferable. Limit 1 per household. Fuel charges may apply. Enter code at first order checkout. Not valid with any food stamp office number near me offer. Expires 12/31/21.

    SNAP benefits are funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), which also regulates which foods are eligible for purchase with the benefits.   FNS is the authorizing agency for food retailers participating in the program.  For information about enrolling in SNAP EBT and online food sales through SNAP, food retailers can visit www.fns.usda.gov/snap/retailer-requirements-provide-online-purchasing.

    To read the federal approval announcement, click here. For more information about the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program in Connecticut, visit www.ct.gov/snap

    *** 

    Elderly Simplified Application Project (ESAP)

    Overview

    The Department of Social Services is pleased to announce a Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) demonstration project for older adults and those with disabilities.  Once enrolled in SNAP, eligible households qualifying for the Elderly Simplified Application Project (ESAP) will experience additional flexibilities to support continued enrollment.

    Flexibilitiesin ESAP include:

    • An expanded three-year SNAP certification period of eligibility;
    • No periodic report formwill be due halfway through the certification cycle, as is usually the case for SNAP enrollees;
    • Revised reporting requirements (explained in greater detail below); and
    • The opportunity for some relaxed renewal flexibilities, when households meet additional requirements.

    ESAP Eligibility Criteria:

    • All adult (18 years or older) household members must be determined elderly (60years or older) or with a disability, per SNAP regulations and
    • No household members can be employed (i.e., receive countable earned income).

    Revised Reporting Requirements:

    Please note that ESAP-eligible SNAP households need to report information to DSS before their renewal is due if they experience a household change that would disqualify them from ESAP(for example, if the household no longer includes an older adult or adult with disability, or if they start working). All SNAP households must report if they receive lotto/gambling winnings equal to or in excess of $3,500.   

    SNAP Definition of a Disability:

    An individual who meets one or more of the following:

    • Receives disability or blindness benefits from any of these programs: Social Security, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Medicaid, or SSI-related Medicaid.

    • Receives a federally or state administered SSI supplement based on disability or blindness, or section 212(a) of PL 93-66.
      Receives a disability retirement benefit from a government agency for a disability considered permanent by SSA.
    • Is a veteran the VA considers totally disabled or permanently housebound or in need of regular aid and attendance.
    • Is a veteran’s surviving spouse who the VA considers:
      • in need of regular aid and attendance,
      • permanently housebound, or
      • approved for benefits because of the veteran’s death and has a disability considered permanent by SSA.
      • Is a veteran’s surviving child who the VA considers:
        • incapable of self-support, or
        • approved for benefits because of the veteran’s death and has a disability considered permanent by SSA
    • receives interim assistance benefits pending the receipt of Supplemental Security Income, receives disability related medical assistance under title XIX of the Social Security Act, or receives disability-based State general assistance (SAGA) benefits provided that the eligibility to receive any of these benefits is based upon disability or blindness criteria established by the State agency which are at least as stringent as those used under title XVI of the Social Security Act.

    ESAP is designed to increase the efficiency of SNAP and reduce food insecurity among a population whose household circumstances generally stay the same and can have additional barriers associated with age or disability, such as transportation or mobility. The Connecticut Department of Social Services was approved for this demonstration project by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service, the agency that administers and funds SNAP nationwide.   We look forward to serving you!  [updated 10-30-20]

    *** 

    Pandemic EBT (P-EBT) - The Department of Social Services (DSS), in collaboration with the Connecticut State Department of Education (CSDE), received approval to operate this program in response to the COVID-19 related school closures for the 2019 – 2020 school year. P-EBT provides food supports to help families with children who were receiving free and reduced-price school meals pay for food. For more information please follow this link.

    *** 

    Food Resources for Kids During COVID-19 Emergency:  Special information from the Office of Early Childhood  (En Espanol)

    Suspension of ‘ABAWD’ work requirements.  ABAWD work requirements and three-month SNAP time limit for enrollees in all towns in Connecticut has been suspended for the duration of the public health emergency, per Congressional action (ABAWD=Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependent Children enrolled in the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program).

    *** 

    Extension of SNAP eligibility.  If your SNAP renewal form or periodic review form (PRF) was due in March 2020—benefits are automatically continued through September 2020.  If your SNAP renewal form or PRF is due in April 2020—benefits will be automatically continued through October 2020.  If your SNAP renewal form or PRF is due in May 2020—benefits will be automatically continued through November 2020.  If your SNAP renewal for or PRF is due in June 2020—benefits will automatically be continued through  December 2020.

    *** 

    For Expedited SNAP cases:  DSS will still food stamp office number near me SNAP benefits for one or two months, depending on whether the application was received before or after the 15th of the month, while the interview and verifications are pending.  Just as above, If the household then responds with the needed information before completing the interview, and all the criteria above are met, the DSS worker will process the case without the interview.  Please note:  Expedited SNAP cases are those where the household has gross income less than $150 and liquid assets less than $100 in the month of application, whose combined income and assets are less than their combined rent/mortgage and utility expenses, or who are migrant or seasonal farmworkers who are destitute and have liquid assets less than $100 while residing in Connecticut.

    *** 

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as Food Stamps, helps eligible individuals and families afford the cost of food at supermarkets, grocery stores and farmers’ markets.

    SNAP Time Limits for Able-Bodied Adults without Dependents (ABAWDs): What you should know

     

    *** 

    SNAP recipients in Connecticut must report when their household’s total monthly gross income goes above 130% of the federal poverty level (FPL). Please follow this link to learn more about income reporting requirements.

    Mensaje Importante sobre SNAP

    Beneficiarios de SNAP en Connecticut tienen que reportar cuando el total del ingreso bruto mensual de su hogar exceda el 130% del nivel federal food stamp office number near me pobreza (FPL) Oprime aquí para obtener más información.

     

    Click this link to view the CT SNAP Policy Handbook.

    USDA Non-Discrimination Statement 

    USDA Aviso de No Discriminación 

    For full information about getting delicious, healthy foods at Connecticut farmers’ markets and farms, please follow this link.

     

    ****************************************

    FREE ADMISSION TO MYSTIC AQUARIUM FOR SNAP EBT CARD HOLDERS

     

    For your safety, ALL Aquarium visits now require a timed ticket and must be reserved online. Click Here to Learn More

     

    Источник: https://portal.ct.gov/dss/SNAP/Supplemental-Nutrition-Assistance-Program---SNAP

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