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nhl 3.5 lime near me

286 results · Lime Green Natural Hydraulic Lime Mortar NHL 3.5 (25kg) (Medium Mortar) · Womersleys Ironstone Lite Lime Mortar NHL 3.5 Based Pre Mixed 25kg Bag. Although NHL 3.5 seems to have become the go to, faster setting alternative to NHL2 is the closest in strength, flexibility and breathability to a. Singleton Birch Natural Hydraulic Lime NHL 3.5 (25kg). (1). £11.25 · Singleton Birch Natural Hydraulic Lime NHL 2 (20kg).

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Lime Mortar vs Portland Cement

If you’ve got a masonry building built before the 1930s there is a good a chance you’ve got lime mortar rather than portland cement mortar, and if it was built before the 1880’s then it’s almost certain to be lime. But why does that matter?

The argument on whether to use lime mortar vs portland cement is actually a very important one and using the wrong mortar can cause irreparable damage to historic brick. In this post, I’ll explain the differences between the two, how to determine which you have, and even where to source matching mortar for your old house.

Once you know the difference between lime mortar and portland cement you can undertake the work of repointing or repairing damaged historic masonry feeling confident you’re using the right mix of materials and techniques. Feel free to reference my previous post How To: Repoint Historic Mortar for the details of how the process works.

History of Lime Mortar

Lime mortar has been around since biblical times. It is essentially composed of only three ingredients (lime, sand, water) which are in abundant supply around the world. The slaked lime used to make lime mortar is created by cooking limestone rocks at 1,650°F. The heat burns off the carbon dioxide in the rock leaving calcium oxide, commonly called quicklime.

The powdery quicklime would then be submerged in water for weeks or months to create a lime putty called “slaked” lime that would be mixed with sand (or other aggregates) and water to make lime mortar. Once the lime mortar is exposed to the air it pulls in carbon dioxide and releases water as it endeavors to return to its original state of limestone.

Lime mortar is essentially self-healing, getting harder each day and constantly pulling CO2 out of the atmosphere (the original “green” building product!). Lime mortar and other natural cements were used almost exclusively in masonry structures prior to the introduction of portland cement in the 1870s.

History of Portland Cement

Portland cement was Invented in 1824 by Joseph Aspdin by mixing calcined hard limestone with clay and mixing it down into a slurry before heating it a second time. It got its name because it had a similar color to a widely used stone in the Isle of Portland off the coast of England.

Portland cement was able to attain very quick setting times compared to lime, but its strengths were fairly limited compared to natural cements and it didn’t catch on for about 50 years. The first manufacturer of portland cement in America was David Saylor in the Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania in 1871.

Portland cement came into rapid growth from 1871 to 1920 when its quick initial strength (though it had lower long term strength than natural cements) made it ideal in the rapid growth of America during the Industrial Revolution.

The thought was that stronger mortar is better (not always the case) and with that portland cement was king because of both its quick set time and high strength. It very quickly became a favored additive to residential and commercial lime mortars to attain a faster and higher compressive strength and eventually phased out the use of lime mortar almost entirely by the mid 20th-century.

Lime Mortar vs Portland Cement

For those restoring a historic building built before 1930 it’s important to select the right mortar to avoid spalling bricks. When the selected mortar is harder than the brick it surrounds then the brick will become sacrificial and worn away rather than the mortar. A sign of impending disaster.

Mortar should always be softer than the brick it is paired with.

The more portland cement is added to any mortar the harder it gets, and the harder it gets the greater potential you have to damage brick. In today’s home stores lime is largely missing from all mortars. The variety of strengths available today is mostly accomplished by other additives and air-entrenching in the mortar. You will find mortar available in the following types:

  • Type M   2,500 psi
  • Type S    1,800 psi
  • Type N    750 psi
  • Type O    350 psi
  • *Type K   75 psi

*Type K is largely not available today since that is true lime mortar, but the other types are available at most locations or for order.

But why does this matter for old houses? Well, as mortars got harder through the years so did bricks. As kiln technology improved we could cook bricks hotter and more consistently than in previous years. A brick from the mid-1800s can be extremely soft compared to one from the mid-1900s and the appropriate mortar has to be selected to pair with the appropriate brick.

What Should You Choose?

If your house was built before 1880 then you likely have traditional lime mortar and should use only that. If your house was built after 1930 you likely have only portland cement mortar and can pick up the right mortar at your local Home Depot. That was easy! But what about the rest of us in the transition years between 1880 and 1930?

It’s not quite as easy for us, but there is a simple way to tell what type of mortar you should be using. Take your house key out and scrape it across the mortar joint in question. If the mortar scrapes away and you could dig it out without turning your key into a nub then you likely have lime mortar or at least a mortar with higher lime content than portland cement.

If the key leaves a mark but doesn’t do any damage then you’re in the portland cement club. Congratulations, you’ve just diagnosed your mortar in the least scientific, but most convenient way possible! If you are a more particular person (you know who you are Mr. Color-Coded Socks!) then you can send a sample of your mortar off to a lab like Limeworks.us for a Historic Mortar Analysis. And Limeworks can even make a batch of mortar to match your sample in color and strength exactly!

Take good care of your brick and stone by choosing the right mortar when you need to make repairs and your historic masonry will be protected for centuries to come, use the wrong mortar and in only a few years you may end up with disintegrating brick that is extremely difficult to replace.

As it always goes with old houses it’s about proper methods and materials. I’d encourage you to check out my friends at Limeworks. They are an invaluable resource selling lime mortars, cleaning products, masonry tools and everything you need to restore or repair historic masonry. Good luck and happy mortaring!

Scott Sidler

Founder & Senior Editor

I love old houses, working with my hands, and teaching others the excitment of doing it yourself! Everything is teachable if you only give it the chance.

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Источник: https://thecraftsmanblog.com/lime-mortar-vs-portland-cement/

What’s the difference between hydraulic and non-hydraulic lime (incl. hydrated or putty)?

Lime has been a building material for thousands of years and throughout the history of lime, it has gone through many stages and improvements. Here, we look at the two main types of lime- non-hydraulic and hydraulic - exploring how they are made, their differences and when is the best time to use one over the other.

For more information on lime plasters, mortars, renders and ancillaries, shop our lime products online or call us directly on 01793 847444.

What is non-hydraulic lime?

Non-hydraulic lime is produced by burning pure limestone (calcium carbonate) in a kiln. This results in quicklime (calcium oxide) which is then slaked with water to produce calcium hydroxide in the form of lime putty.

Once created, this can be mixed with aggregate to create a mortar that will become hard when in contact with the air (carbonation), resulting in a material similar to the limestone it was made from. This process is known as the ‘lime cycle’.

lime cycle diagram

It requires exposure to air in order to carbonate and does not set under water.

This lime is regarded as the most appropriate lime for old buildings or ‘softer’ substrates where maximum permeability, capillarity and flexibility is required.

Premixed ‘wet’ products are made from lime putty with the addition of an aggregate (or alternative) and/or fibre, andime wash and lime paints are also typically made from non-hydraulic lime.

Non-hydraulic lime is also known as slaked/high calcium/putty/air/‘fat’

What is hydraulic lime?

Hydraulic lime is produced in a similar way but from limestones with naturally occurring impurities and it’s these minerals that allow the mortar to set and harden through chemical reactions with water (hydration).

Available in powder form, hydraulic lime sets faster than non-hydraulic lime and has a higher strength but a lower permeability. Natural hydraulic lime (NHL) is sold in various strengths (NHL 2, 3.5 and 5) to suit different building’s needs.

Natural hydraulic lime (NHL)

NHL5 is the most hydraulic, then NHL3.5, and NHL2 the least hydraulic lime. They do not perform in the same way as modern cements, nor contain the same damaging components.

It should be noted however that limes marked with NHL-Z or just HL on the bag can contain some additions that could be potentially damaging and at worst be not much better than cement. Only use limes marked NHL - these meet the highest British and European standards.

How are they classified?

Natural hydraulic limes (NHL’s) are classified by British Standard according to their compressive strength. These grades are associated with the terms:

  • feebly hydraulic (NHL2)
  • moderately hydraulic (NHL 3.5)
  • eminently hydraulic (NHL5)

However, lime-based mortars have an inherent flexibility, are self-healing and strength is one of the less important characteristics.

NHL 2 is softer and slow setting, suitable for internal applications or where conservation is a primary concern with soft or deteriorating stones and bricks.

NHL 3.5 is an all-round general mortar. It can be used with bricks, facings, commons, blockwork, sandstone, limestone, terracotta, internal & external building work, cavity & solid wall construction, bedding, pointing and re-pointing.

NHL 5 is a very strong lime mortar to be used where there is severe exposure to weather and water, above rooflines, below DPC, including copings and cappings, and earth retaining walls.

How are hydraulic lime and non-hydraulic lime different?

Comparison table:

Hydraulic LimeNon-hydraulic Lime
 Sets by hydration (the addition of water) Sets by carbonation (through exposure to the air)
 Faster setting lime Slower setting time
 Stronger/harder Weaker/softer
 Less permeable More permeable
 General and conservation work For old buildings or ‘softer’ substrate

Hydraulic limes (so called because they set under water) are made in the same way as non-hydraulic lime but using different limestone. They are sold as hydrated lime and have an initial set when water is added, followed by hardening while they absorb carbon dioxide. The more hydraulic a lime is, the faster it sets and the higher its final strength, but this means that it is less breathable and flexible.

Non-hydraulic lime (CL or DL 70-90) is sold as either hydrated lime or putty lime; they set and harden through drying out and absorbing carbon dioxide from the air. This means they have a very slow set: CO2 is only absorbed when certain conditions are met. They are the softest, most breathable limes available.

Hydrated lime simply means that a controlled amount of water is added to quicklime to make a powder that is more stable and safe to handle. This can be done to hydraulic lime or non-hydraulic lime.

Different types of lime

Lime putty

Lime putty can be made from either type of lime, and is made by adding an excess of water to quicklime. Hydraulic lime putty will set underwater within hours or days making them impractical, whereas non-hydraulic lime putty will remain plastic and improve with age.

Pozzolans

Pozzolans are additions that may be added to achieve harder, faster sets to any sort of lime or cement. Pozzolans, when added, produce similar chemical reactions to those found in hydraulic limes, so they reduce breathability and flexibility in exactly the same way.

The disadvantage is that you will never know how strong, breathable or flexible a Pozzolan lime is beforehand, unless you have considerable experience or knowledge. Adding some types of Pozzolans or even the smallest amounts of cement can be very damaging or produce poor performing lime mortars.

Benefits of lime materials

Breathability

Lime materials are highly breathable. Their vapour permeability means they allow water to pass through them, as either a gas or a liquid. This avoids the build-up of moisture, reducing the risk of damp or condensation.

Durability

Lime is exceptionally durable. Buildings built with lime products are able to stand the test of time as they act to keep their underlying structure dry. This allows for a more sustainable building structure.

Workability

With a sticky, almost ‘fatty’, feel for the builder applying it, lime has remarkable workability. It’s the workability that showcases the craftsman’s skill in the beautiful aesthetic it lends any project, old or modern.

Age resilient

Avoiding the synthetic appearance offered by many of its alternatives, lime mortars and renders age gracefully. Like a fine wine, they often improve with age. Lime mortars, renders and plasters can also be produced in a variety of colours.

Considerations when buying lime

Lime is slower setting

Some limes require a more methodical working practice as they can take longer to set than their synthetic alternatives. This longer setting time is negated by working methodically.

Misleading terminology

Sometimes, it can be misleading as to what some so-called ‘lime’ mixes contain, particularly when dealing with imported products. As a result, it’s important to take care to ensure you don’t pay a premium for something that is simply white cement with a pinch of lime.

Fear of use

Sometimes, builders can be wary of switching to using lime products. They can dismiss them as too difficult. However, modern lime materials can be as easy to use as cementitious products which offer none of the long-term benefits of lime.

General guidelines about lime

Usage

Any lime mortar must always be softer and more porous than the main building material. This is why issues such as spalling can occur when using OPC mortar to repair masonry of soft brick. The more exposed to the elements a lime mortar or lime render is, the greater the need for a faster set and greater durability, to cope with harsher freeze thaw cycles.

The less hydraulic a lime is, the more it will flex and move with a building. Timber structures therefore need a more flexible and breathable lime.

Lime putty or hemp lime mixes should be used with caution in houses where damp is a problem, if a wall is permanently very damp, a putty mix may never set. Low suction backgrounds (hard stone or blue/engineering bricks etc.) and damp cool weather also make the use of lime putty very slow, there are number of lime mortars, plasters and renders that can be used in these situations including Lime Green Duro and Ultra and Unilit 30.

Composition

The majority of lime mortars, renders and plasters are made of:

Sand or aggregate – a key component for the strength and durability of the mix. Sand also prevents the material from shrinking as it dries out.

A binder – acting to hold the mix together. This can be a range of materials from clay or cement to silicone or acrylic but for a long time, and increasingly more now as we’re favouring healthy building, the material of choice was lime.

The three key ingredients to any lime mix are: lime, water and sand. When mixed, these ingredients set to form a substance similar to man-made limestone.

Although there are many different kinds of lime which differ in both chemistry and strength, all limes are made when limestone is heated in a lime kiln. The heating process produces quicklime to which water is then added to form slaked lime.

Setting

Non-hydraulic limes set as they absorb CO2 from the atmosphere. This can mean they have a slower setting time than other limes as very specific environmental conditions must be met for this absorption to take place.

Hydraulic limes initially set when water is added, or even while underwater, and then harden over time as CO2 is absorbed, giving a harder mix which is more weather resilient. Although made in the same way as non-hydraulic limes, these are burnt from a different limestone.

For any further information, don’t hesitate to get in touch with our team of experts.

Источник: https://www.ecomerchant.co.uk/news/whats-the-difference-between-hydraulic-and-non-hydraulic-lime/

Hydraulic Or Hydrated Lime

There are essentially two sorts of lime available - hydraulic lime or non hydraulic lime. Below is a quick guide to choosing the correct grade and sort for your project.

 

Hydraulic limes (so called because they set under water) are made in the same way as non-hydraulic lime but using different limestone. They are sold as hydrated lime and have an initial set when water is added, followed by hardening while they absorb carbon dioxide. The more hydraulic a lime is the faster it sets and the higher it's final strength, but this means that it is less breathable and flexible. NHL5 is the most hydraulic, then NHL3.5, and NHL2 the least hydraulic lime. They do not perform in the same way as modern cements, nor contain the same damaging components. It should be noted however that limes marked with NHL-Z or just HL on the bag can contain some additions that could be potentially damaging and at worst be not much better than cement. Only use limes marked NHL - these meet the highest British and European standards.

Non-hydraulic lime (CL or DL 70-90) is sold as either hydrated lime or putty lime; they set and harden through drying out and absorbing carbon dioxide from the air. This means they have a very slow set: CO2 is only absorbed when certain conditions are met. They are the softest, most breathable limes available. These limes are also known as fat-lime, calcium-lime or air-lime.

Hydrated lime simply means that a controlled amount of water is added to quicklime to make a powder that is more stable and safe to handle. This can be done to hydraulic lime or non-hydraulic lime.

Lime putty can be made from either type of lime, and is made by adding an excess of water to quicklime. Hydraulic lime putty will set underwater within hours or days making them impractical, whereas non-hydraulic lime putty will remain plastic and improve with age.

Pozzolans are additions that may be added to achieve harder, faster sets to any sort of lime or cement. Pozzolans, when added, produce similar chemical reactions to those found in hydraulic limes, so they reduce breathability and flexibility in exactly the same way. The disadvantage is that you will never know how strong, breathable or flexible a pozzolan lime is beforehand, unless you have considerable experience or knowledge. Adding some types of pozzolans or even the smallest amounts of cement can be very damaging or produce poor performing lime mortars. We always recommend testing first.

 

Should You Choose Hydraulic or Hydrated Lime?

There is often no definitive "right" answer: more often, the specifier or builder is faced with a series of conflicting needs. The secret is in achieving the best compromise.

How hard is the material you are using?

Any lime mortar must always be softer and more porous than the main building material.

How exposed is the place you are using it?

The more exposed to the elements a lime mortar or lime render is, the greater the need for a faster set and greater durability, to cope with harsher freeze thaw cycles.

How much movement will the mortar have to cope with?

The less hydraulic a lime is, the more it will flex and move with a building. Timber structures therefore need a more flexible and breathable lime.

How much damp will the lime mortar have to cope with?

Lime putty or hemp lime mixes should be used with caution in houses where damp is a problem. (N.B. if a wall is permanently very damp, a putty mix may never set.) Low suction backgrounds (hard stone or blue bricks etc) and damp cool weather also make the use of lime putty very slow, consider using Lime Green Duro or Ultra instead in these situations.

Lime putty is typically the first choice for internal plastering due to its plasticity and better vapour exchange: in thin layers it is easy for it to absorb CO2 and set. Limewash and lime paints are also typically made from non-hydraulic lime.

 

Misconceptions

As long as its lime, it's all OK

Using a lime that is too strong can be very damaging for some historic structures. People should be cautious with strong mixes: these are best kept for harsh conditions and high strength applications and avoided on friable, soft masonry or timber structures.

Hydraulic lime contains the same damaging chemicals as cement.

We only use good quality Natural Hydraulic Lime (NHL) or air lime from Buxton, which we know not to contain any sort of potentially damaging components. Lime from our suppliers quarries has been used on historic buildings since Roman times without problems. The chemical composition of Natural hydraulic limes makes the problems associated with cement impossible.

Just gauge normal lime with cement

It has been shown that even small amounts of cement in traditional mortars leads to inferior less durable mortars that can cause problems.  If a mortar with a set is required then a hydraulic lime is more suitable. Building with cement and pointing with lime is also a waste of time technically and has no real advantages over a hydraulic lime mortar, which will allow building and pointing to be done in one operation.

 

Our simple to use,pre-mixed Natural Lime Mortar has been used for nearly 20 years across the country - see some of the stunning buildings it has been used on here in our gallery.

 

To find out more about any of our products and how you can use them effectively, call Lime Green today on 01952 728611 or email us and we'll be happy to answer your questions.

 

Education Guide A2

© Lime Green Products Ltd 2010

Источник: https://www.lime-green.co.uk/knowledgebase/hydraulic_or_hydrated_lime

Hydraulic lime

Hydraulic lime (HL) is a general term for varieties of lime (calcium oxide), which set through hydration. This contrasts with varieties of air limeslaked lime (calcium hydroxide), used to make lime mortar, the other common types of lime mortar, which set through carbonation (re-absorbing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air).

Hydraulic lime provides a faster initial set and higher compressive strength than air lime and eminently hydraulic lime will set in more extreme conditions including under water.

The terms hydraulic lime and hydrated lime are quite similar and may be confused but are not necessarily the same material: hydrated lime is any lime which has been slaked whether it sets through hydration, carbonation, or both.

Calcium reacts in the lime kiln with the clay minerals to produce silicates that enable some of the lime to set through hydration; any unreacted calcium is slaked to calcium hydroxide which sets through carbonation: These are sometimes called semi-hydraulic lime and include the classifications feebly and moderately hydraulic lime, NHL 2 and NHL 3.5.

Types[edit]

There are two basic types of hydraulic limes:

Natural hydraulic lime (NHL)[edit]

Natural hydraulic lime (NHL) is produced by heating (calcining) limestone that naturally contains clay and other impurities: no materials may be added to create the hydraulicity. In the United States NHL may be called hydrated hydraulic lime (HHL) per ASTM C-141 Standard Specification for Hydrated Hydraulic Lime for Structural Purposes.[1]

Artificial hydraulic lime (AHL)[edit]

Artificial hydraulic lime (AHL) or artificial lime (AL) becomes hydraulic when hydraulic and/or pozzolan materials are added either before or after burning in a lime kiln. Artificial limes are more specifically identified as hydraulic lime (HL), as defined European Norm 459 (EN-459), "Consists of lime and other materials such as Portland cement, blast furnace slag, fly ash, limestone filler and other suitable materials.";[1]formulated lime (FL) (EN-459) consists of "...mainly of hydrated lime and or NHL with added hydraulic and/or pozzolanic material. It is identical to HL but its composition must be declared on the CE marking.";[1]pozzolanic hydraulic lime (PHL) (ASTM C-1707)is "very similar to HL or FL. Consists mainly of hydrated lime with one or more pozzolans with possible inclusion of inert filler. When Portland cement, even traces, is present (can be up to 20% of binder weight), it has to be labeled as 'PHLc'."[1]

Characteristics[edit]

Hydraulic lime is a useful building material for the following reasons:

  • It has a low elastic modulus.
  • There is no need for expansion (movement) joints.
  • It allows buildings to "breathe", and does not trap moisture in the walls.
  • It has a lower firing temperature than Portland cement, and thus consumes less energy.
  • Stone and brickwork bonded with lime is easier to re-use.
  • Lime acts sacrificially in that it is weaker and breaks down more readily than the masonry, thus saving weaker stone such as sandstone and limestone from the harmful effects of temperature expansion and mortar freeze.
  • It is less dense than cement, thus less cold bridging.
  • Lime re-absorbs the carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted by its calcination (firing in a kiln), thus partially offsetting the large amount emitted during its manufacture. The more hydraulic a lime, the less CO2 is reabsorbed during set, for example, 50% of CO2 is reabsorbed by NHL 3.5 during the set, compared to 100% of CO2 being reabsorbed by pure calcium hydroxide (fat lime putty).

Hydraulic lime concrete[edit]

Hydraulic lime concretes have been in use since Roman times, either as mass foundation concretes or as lightweight concretes using tufa or pumice as aggregates and a wide range of pozzolans to achieve different strengths and speeds of set. This meant that lime could be used in a wide variety of applications including floors and even vaults or domes. An example is the Pantheon in Rome, which has survived for nearly two thousand years. The dome's diameter is equal to its height from the floor. It is constructed from six different lime mixes, which change the properties and lightness of the material.[citation needed]

Classification[edit]

Natural hydraulic lime (NHL) is classified for different uses[2] the first two of which are sometimes called semi-hydraulic lime because they initially set with water but continue to set in contact with carbon dioxide in the air.

Feebly hydraulic lime[edit]

Feebly hydraulic lime (NHL 2) is used for internal work and external work in sheltered areas.

Feebly hydraulic lime contains up to 10% clay / clay mixed with other impurities. It might take one week or more to set after the addition of water. Setting is the process of permanently taking the shape into which lime has been moulded.

Moderately hydraulic lime[edit]

Moderately hydraulic lime (NHL 3.5) can be used for external work in most areas.

Moderately hydraulic lime contains clay in the range of 11% to 20%. This type of lime sets (assumes given shape) within a few days after the addition of water.

Eminently hydraulic lime[edit]

Eminently hydraulic lime (NHL 5) is used for external work in exposed areas, such as chimneys and for floor slabs/underpinning.

Eminently hydraulic lime contains clay in the range of 21% to 30%. Properties of eminently hydraulic lime are close to those of cement. Eminently hydraulic lime sets within one day after the addition of water.

Benefits[edit]

  • Hydraulic limes gain strength over time hence providing flexibility and avoiding the need for expansion joints.
  • Considered to be more environmentally friendly than portland cement as they are burnt at a lower temperature and uniquely re-absorb some of the carbon dioxide given off during burning as they cure/carbonate in/on the wall.
  • Enable building components to be reclaimed and reused as they are 'softer' than cement.
  • Set under water hence making them ideal for applications in contact with the sea, canals, rivers etc.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydraulic_lime

Transition Culture

29 Sep 2008

Hemp Lime Plastering my Kitchen

We knew it was time to do something to address the energy inefficiency of our kitchen when energy-in-buildings expert Rob Scott McLeod was doing an energy efficiency makeover plan for our house in January, and he put his hand on our kitchen floor and said “touch the floor… now put your hand in the fridge” – the floor was colder.  It used to be a garage, so the roof is uninsulated, and the floor is clay tiles laid onto an uninsulated concrete slab.  The cavity in the walls is uninsulated. So, all in all, a freezing kitchen, impossible to raise to any tolerable temperature.  With winter looming once again, it was time to sort it out.  Over the next few days I will tell you about what we did, but having just spent a couple of days hemp and lime plastering, I want to wax lyrical about that.

I love hemp and lime plaster. If you are used to plastering with normal plaster, hemp and lime is odd stuff.  It is a bit like trying to plaster with tuna and mayonnaise. What it produces is a wonderfully soft, warmand sculptural plaster.  It is wonderful for taking the square edges off right angles and corners, and for breathing some beauty back into unloveable spaces.

When I was in Ireland I knew a few places to get hemp for construction, but in England it took a bit more looking for.  In the end I got it from the Cornish Lime Company, who were very helpful and who got it to me pretty quick.  Because I had rather left it to the last minute I didn’t have time to find a cheaper way of doing it, which would have consisted of finding a source for agricultural lime or more locally grown  hemp…   Using agricultural lime greatly reduces the amount of hydraulic lime you need to buy in.  Provided you have some kind of trailer to go and collect it in, agricultural lime is dirt cheap.

The recipe for hemp/lime plaster I used to use in Ireland replaced a lot of the expensive lime with agricultural stuff;

  • 1/6th bucket of NHL 3.5 hydraulic lime
  • ¾ bucket hydrated lime (i.e. White Rhino)
  • ½ bucket ground limestone (the kind farmers use on their fields, dead cheap…)
  • 1¼ bucket of water

Mix to a slurry, then add 1 and 2/3rds bucket of hemp.

When I rang Cornish Lime to ask for recipes for hemp/lime using the stuff I got from them (NHL 2 lime and dried, chipped hemp), they directed me to the website of St Astier, and to their fact sheet on hemp building.  This was very informative, however I always get a bit fed up with mix recipes that refer to 200 litres of hemp and so on, I want to know how many buckets of this and that.  Much easier.  So, after a bit of fiddling about and experimentation, here is the recipe that worked for me, and which made a gorgeous sticky plaster which went on lovely…

  • 2 buckets of water
  • 3 buckets of NHL2 hydraulic lime
  • 4 buckets of dry shredded hemp.

Gorgeous.  When you mix it in a mixer, you put the water in first, then the lime (watch out for that lime dust, horrible stuff…), then the hemp. Wet the wall first, and then apply the hemp.  Getting hemp to stick to the wall is not like normal plaster.  You kind of press it onto the wall, takes a bit of practice, but once it is stuck to the wall you can then add to it or smooth it.  You can get various finishes to it, from the rough to the very smooth.  I tend to like it being smooth, you do that by waiting until it has been on the wall for 30 minutes to an hour, and then go over it with a rubber glove on and rub it vigorously.  The final result is worth the effort.

You can put it on at various thicknesses.  I put on about 2 inches, but in a couple of weeks I intend to do our porch bit, and it will go on a lot thicker there….  fabulous stuff.  Thanks to Rowan (my eldest) and his mates Sam and Alex who helped, and also to Sky and Robert for their help too.

Источник: https://www.transitionculture.org/2008/09/29/hemp-lime-plastering-my-kitchen/

Saint Astier Lime Plasters and Finishes, NHL 3.5 – 55 lbs

Product Description

This moderately Hydraulic lime is used for laying or repointing brick, stone and terra cotta units even in extreme freeze-thaw climate cycles. It can be used to make scratch, brown and finish coats of exterior stucco or interior plaster.

NHL 3.5 must have 15-25% “free lime” content and no more than 30% which is responsible for self-healing mortars. The available free lime goes into solution during subsequent rains and then re-crystallizes across open fissures, similar to the process that occurs in historic pure lime mortars.

NHL maintains a hexagonal plate crystal structure which allows the plates to go in between each other for greater elasticity. In contrast, Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) has a needle-like crystal structure which is brittle; buildings using OPC must incorporate numerous control joints to accommodate movement. Once properly installed and cured NHL 3.5 will reach over 750 p.s.i. in six months when blended with 2-1/2 parts clean, sharp and well-graded sand. ”

Источник: http://sipeast.ca/product/saint-astier-lime-plasters-and-finishes-nhl-3-5-55-lbs/

Here at LBS we offer you both bagged and putty lime from our quality suppliers.Our lime putty is suitable for blending in the correct ratios with appropriate sands to produce plasters and mortars (coarse is ideal for this purpose) and diluting with water to produce limewash or lime water (fine is ideal for this purpose).


Premixed ‘wet’ products are made from lime putty with the addition of an aggregate and/or fibre to save you having to blend on site and include mortar, plaster, glaster and lime hemp plaster. This lime is regarded as the most appropriate lime for old buildings where maximum permeability and flexibility is required especially suitable for pointing brick and soft stone work and is highly suitable for nearly all internal plastering and rendering onto cob, straw etc.


We also stock bagged, powdered lime. This is a dry powder lime produced from limestone containing clay and other impurities which enable it to set without exposure to air; it is therefore used for providing a faster initial set in more extreme conditions including under water. This can be used in situations where a bright white lime mortar is required and in applications that require a faster initial set.

 

LBSBM Online – Buy Online via our new websiteИсточник: http://www.lbsbm.co.uk/sub-category.asp?Category_ID=4&Sub_Category_ID=29

Hydraulic lime Distributors

Click the drop-down below to select the region you are interested in.

Merkko Enterprises Ltd

Merkko Enterprises Ltd
Unit S12
Kingston Business Park
Kingston Bagpuize
Abingdon
OX13 5AS

Hendry & Sons Ltd

Hendry & Sons Ltd
4 Station Rd
Foulsham
Dereham
NR20 5RG

Telephone Number: 01362 683249
Fax: 01362 680191

Ty-Mawr Lime Ltd

Ty-Mawr Lime Ltd
Unit 12 Brecon Enterprise Park
Brecon
Powys
LD3 8BT

Simmons of Stafford ltd

Simmons of Stafford ltd
Unit 11 Brindley Close
Beaconside
Stafford
ST16 3SU

Telephone Number: 01785 227766
Fax: 01785 227733

Universal Stone Ltd

Universal Stone Ltd
Grange Farm Business Centre
Woodham Road
Wickford
SS11 7QU

Ecolime Ltd

Ecolime Ltd
Southwood Farm
Mowthorpe Lane
Terrington N Yorks
York
YO60 6PZ

Cornell Building Supplies

Cornell Building Supplies
Rougham Industrial Estate
Rougham
Bury Nhl 3.5 lime near me Edmunds
IP30 9ND

Between Time Ltd for Building Restoration

Between Time Ltd for Building Restoration
Ambler House
Marsh Ln
Stanstead Abbotts
Ware
SG12 8HH

Armstrong Builders Merchant

Armstrong Builders Merchant
Low Bentham Rd
Bentham
Lancaster
LA2 7EB, UK

AE Spink Ltd

AE Spink Ltd
Kelham Street
Doncaster
South Yorkshire
DN1 3RA

We Sell Lime

We Sell Lime
12A Nasmyth Court
Houston Industrial Estate
Livingston
West Lothian
Scotland
EH54 5EG

Mike Wye and Associates Ltd

Mike Wye and Associates Ltd
Buckland Filleigh Sawmills
Buckland Buckland Filleigh Sawmills
Shebbear
Beaworthy,
EX21 5RN

Limebase Products Ltd

Limebase Discover online banking bonus Ltd
Walronds Park
Isle Brewers
Taunton
Somerset
TA3 6QP

Lime Stuff Nhl 3.5 lime near me Stuff Ltd
Unit 12
Glendale Farm
Southampton Road
Whiteparish
Salisbury
Wiltshire
SP5 2QW

J & J Sharpe

J & J Sharpe
Furzedon Merton
Okehampton
Devon
EX20 3DS

Hendry & Sons Contact wells fargo mortgage customer service & Sons Ltd
4 Station Rd
Foulsham
Dereham
NR20 5RG

Telephone Number: 01362 683249
Fax: 01362 680191

Dragon Alfa Cement

Dragon Alfa Cement
The Cement Terminal
Sharpness Docks
Sharpness
Gloucester
GL13 9UX

Источник: https://www.singletonbirch.co.uk/birch-lime/news-resources/hydraulic-lime-distributors/

Here at LBS we offer you both bagged and putty lime from our quality suppliers.Our lime putty is suitable for blending in the correct ratios with appropriate sands to produce plasters and mortars (coarse is ideal for this purpose) and diluting with water to produce limewash or lime water (fine is ideal for this purpose).


Premixed ‘wet’ products are made from lime putty with the addition of an aggregate and/or fibre to save you having to blend on site and include mortar, plaster, glaster and lime hemp plaster. This lime is regarded as the most appropriate lime for old buildings where maximum permeability and flexibility is required especially suitable for pointing brick and soft stone work and is highly suitable for nearly all internal plastering and rendering onto cob, straw etc.


We also stock bagged, powdered lime. This is a dry powder lime produced from limestone containing clay and other impurities which enable it to set without exposure to air; it is therefore used for providing a faster initial set in more extreme conditions including under water. This can be used in situations where a bright white lime mortar is required and in applications that require a faster initial set.

 

LBSBM Online – Buy Online via our new websiteИсточник: http://www.lbsbm.co.uk/sub-category.asp?Category_ID=4&Sub_Category_ID=29

What’s the difference between hydraulic and non-hydraulic lime (incl. hydrated or putty)?

Lime has been a building material for thousands of years and throughout the history of lime, it has gone through many stages and improvements. Here, we look at the two main types of lime- non-hydraulic and hydraulic - exploring how they are made, their differences and when is the best time to use one over the other.

For more information on lime plasters, mortars, renders and ancillaries, shop our lime products online or call us directly on 01793 847444.

What is non-hydraulic lime?

Non-hydraulic lime is produced by burning pure limestone (calcium carbonate) in a kiln. This results in quicklime (calcium oxide) which is then slaked with water to produce calcium hydroxide in the form of lime putty.

Once created, this can be mixed with aggregate to create a mortar that will become hard when in contact with the air (carbonation), resulting in a material similar to the limestone it was made from. This process is known as the ‘lime cycle’.

lime cycle diagram

It requires exposure to air in order to carbonate and does not set under water.

This lime is regarded as the most appropriate lime for old buildings or ‘softer’ substrates where maximum permeability, capillarity and flexibility is required.

Premixed ‘wet’ products are made from lime putty with the addition of an aggregate (or alternative) and/or fibre, andime wash and lime paints are also typically made from non-hydraulic lime.

Non-hydraulic lime is also known as slaked/high calcium/putty/air/‘fat’

What is hydraulic lime?

Hydraulic lime is produced in a similar way but from limestones with naturally occurring impurities and it’s these minerals that allow the mortar to set and harden through chemical reactions with water (hydration).

Available in powder form, hydraulic lime sets faster than non-hydraulic lime and has a higher strength but a lower permeability. Natural hydraulic lime (NHL) is sold in various strengths (NHL 2, 3.5 and 5) to suit different building’s needs.

Natural hydraulic lime (NHL)

NHL5 is the most hydraulic, then NHL3.5, and NHL2 the least hydraulic lime. They do not perform in the same way as modern cements, bank of eastman magnolia state bank contain the same damaging components.

It should be noted however that limes marked with NHL-Z or just HL on the bag can contain some additions that could be potentially damaging and at worst be not much better than cement. Only use limes marked NHL - these meet the highest British and European standards.

How are they classified?

Natural hydraulic limes (NHL’s) are classified by British Standard according to their compressive strength. These grades are associated with the terms:

  • feebly hydraulic (NHL2)
  • moderately hydraulic (NHL 3.5)
  • eminently hydraulic (NHL5)

However, lime-based mortars have an inherent flexibility, are self-healing and strength is one of the less important characteristics.

NHL 2 is softer and slow setting, nhl 3.5 lime near me for internal applications or where conservation is a primary concern with soft or deteriorating stones and bricks.

NHL 3.5 is an all-round general mortar. It can be used with bricks, facings, commons, blockwork, sandstone, limestone, terracotta, internal & external building work, cavity & solid wall construction, bedding, pointing and re-pointing.

NHL 5 is a very strong lime mortar to be used where there is severe exposure to weather and water, above rooflines, below DPC, including copings and cappings, and earth retaining walls.

How are hydraulic lime and non-hydraulic lime different?

Comparison table:

Hydraulic LimeNon-hydraulic Lime
 Sets by hydration (the addition of water) Sets by carbonation (through exposure to the air)
 Faster setting lime Slower setting time
 Stronger/harder Weaker/softer
 Less permeable More permeable
 General and conservation work For old buildings or ‘softer’ substrate

Hydraulic limes (so called because they set under water) are made in the same way as non-hydraulic lime but using different limestone. They are sold as hydrated lime and have an initial set when water is added, followed by hardening while they absorb carbon dioxide. The more hydraulic a lime is, the faster it sets and the higher its final strength, but this means that it is less breathable and flexible.

Non-hydraulic lime (CL or DL 70-90) is sold as either hydrated lime or putty lime; they set and harden through drying out and absorbing carbon dioxide from the air. This means they have a very slow set: CO2 is only absorbed when certain conditions are met. They are the softest, most breathable limes available.

Hydrated lime simply means that a controlled amount of water is added to quicklime to make a powder that is more stable and safe to handle. This can be done to hydraulic lime or non-hydraulic lime.

Different types of lime

Lime putty

Lime putty can be made from either type of lime, and is made by adding an excess of water to quicklime. Hydraulic lime putty will set underwater within hours or days making them impractical, whereas non-hydraulic lime putty will nhl 3.5 lime near me plastic and improve with age.

Pozzolans

Pozzolans are additions that may be added to achieve harder, faster sets to any sort of lime or cement. Pozzolans, when added, produce similar chemical reactions to those found in hydraulic limes, so they reduce breathability and flexibility in exactly the same way.

The disadvantage is that you will never know how strong, breathable or flexible a Pozzolan lime is beforehand, unless you have considerable experience or knowledge. Adding some types of Pozzolans or even the smallest amounts of cement can be very damaging or produce poor performing lime mortars.

Benefits of lime materials

Breathability

Lime materials are highly breathable. Their vapour permeability means they allow water to pass through them, as either a gas or a liquid. This avoids the build-up of moisture, reducing the risk of damp or condensation.

Durability

Lime is exceptionally durable. Buildings built with lime products are able to stand the test of time as they act to keep their underlying structure dry. This allows for a more sustainable building structure.

Workability

With a sticky, almost ‘fatty’, feel for the builder applying it, lime has remarkable workability. It’s the workability that showcases the craftsman’s skill in the beautiful aesthetic it lends any project, old or modern.

Age resilient

Avoiding the synthetic appearance offered by many of its alternatives, lime mortars and renders age gracefully. Like a fine wine, they often improve with age. Lime mortars, renders and plasters can also be produced in a variety of colours.

Considerations when buying lime

Lime is slower setting

Some limes require a more methodical working practice as they can take longer to set than their synthetic alternatives. This longer setting time is negated by working methodically.

Misleading terminology

Sometimes, it can be misleading as to what some so-called ‘lime’ mixes contain, particularly when dealing with imported products. As a result, it’s important to take care to ensure you don’t pay a premium for something that is simply white cement with a pinch of lime.

Fear of use

Sometimes, builders can be wary of switching to using lime products. They can dismiss them as too difficult. However, modern lime materials can be as easy to use as cementitious products which offer none of the long-term benefits of lime.

General guidelines about lime

Usage

Any lime mortar must always be softer and more porous than the main building material. This is why issues such as spalling nhl 3.5 lime near me occur when the skeleton key in hindi download OPC mortar to repair masonry of soft brick. The more exposed to the elements a lime mortar or lime render is, the greater the need for a faster set and greater durability, to cope with harsher freeze thaw cycles.

The less hydraulic a lime is, the more it will flex and move with a building. Timber structures therefore need a more flexible and breathable lime.

Lime putty or hemp lime mixes should be used with caution in houses where damp is a problem, if a wall is permanently very damp, a putty mix may never set. Low suction backgrounds (hard stone or blue/engineering bricks etc.) and damp cool weather also make the use of lime putty very slow, there are number of lime mortars, plasters and renders that can be used in these situations including Lime Green Duro and Ultra and Unilit 30.

Composition

The majority of lime mortars, renders and plasters are made of:

Sand or aggregate – a key component for the strength and durability of the mix. Sand also prevents the material from shrinking as it dries out.

A binder – acting to hold the mix together. This can be a range of materials from clay or cement to silicone or acrylic but for a long time, and increasingly more now as we’re favouring healthy building, the material of choice was lime.

The three key ingredients to any lime mix are: lime, water and sand. When mixed, these ingredients set to form a substance similar to man-made limestone.

Although there are many different kinds of lime which differ in both chemistry and strength, all limes are made when limestone is heated in a lime kiln. The heating process produces quicklime to which water is then added to form slaked lime.

Setting

Non-hydraulic limes set as they absorb CO2 from the atmosphere. This can mean they have a slower setting time than other limes as very specific environmental conditions must be met for this absorption to take place.

Hydraulic limes initially set when water is added, or even while underwater, and then harden over time as CO2 is absorbed, giving a harder mix which is more weather resilient. Although made in the same way as non-hydraulic limes, these are burnt from a different limestone.

For any further information, don’t hesitate to get in touch with our team of experts.

Источник: https://www.ecomerchant.co.uk/news/whats-the-difference-between-hydraulic-and-non-hydraulic-lime/

We're here to help

If you’re working on local projects you will definitely want to check out our lime ranges! As well as being a staple product for traditional builds, lime is also an incredibly efficient material for nhl 3.5 lime near me building projects.

If you can’t find what you’re looking for and need assistance, please call our team of experts on 01179 777681, or pop into our Bristol site.

  • Lime Putty Based Mixes

    Lime Putty Based Mixes

    Mixing lime putty and sand on site can be exhausting, with kneading, chopping or beating the mix until a uniform colour & consistency is achieved. That is why we’ll always happily mix for you here.

    A mix of sand, non-hydraulic lime and optionally hair, straw or other fibres. Read more.

  • Hydraulic Mortars

    Hydraulic Mortars

    A pre-mixed general purpose mortar for pointing and building stone, block and brick. Available both coarse and nhl 3.5 lime near me.

    Hydraulic limes are available as NHL 2 (Feeble), NHL 3.5 (Moderate) and NHL 5 (Eminent) and are able to set without exposure to air, making them suitable for use in wet environments such as foundations, paving and general building works. Read more.

  • Cornerstone Promix

    Cornerstone Promix

    Professional grade lime mortar and render for pointing and rendering with a premium finish.

    Through the controlled addition of work aids, Promix is formulated to give improved workability, reduced risk of shrinkage & lime bleed, reduced risk of mortar drying too quickly and an improved cure. Read more.

  • Limelite

    Limelite

    The durable, breathable alternative to gypsum based plaster.

    Difficult to find in the South West, Limelite is the lightweight, easy to work range of renovation plasters that you can use without having to worry about damp, mould or trapped moisture.

    Find out more.

Get a quote

Have an idea of what you need? We provide an estimating service that provides you with quick and accurate materials and supplies estimates. Just click to fill in the form and we’ll get right on it.

Источник: http://www.chardsbuildingsupplies.co.uk/

Transition Culture

29 Sep 2008

Hemp Lime Plastering my Kitchen

We knew it was time to do something to address the energy inefficiency of our kitchen when energy-in-buildings expert Rob Scott McLeod was doing an energy efficiency makeover plan for our house in January, and he put his hand on our kitchen floor and said “touch the floor… now put your hand in the fridge” – the floor was colder.  It used to be a garage, so the roof is uninsulated, and the floor is clay tiles laid onto an uninsulated concrete slab.  The cavity in the walls is uninsulated. So, all in all, a freezing kitchen, impossible to raise to any tolerable temperature.  With winter looming once again, it was time to sort it out.  Over the next few days I will tell you about what we did, but having just spent a couple of days hemp and lime plastering, I want to wax lyrical about that.

I love hemp and lime plaster. If you are used to plastering with normal plaster, hemp and lime is odd stuff.  It is a bit like trying to plaster with tuna and mayonnaise. What it produces is a wonderfully soft, warmand sculptural plaster.  It is wonderful for taking the square edges off right angles and corners, and for breathing some beauty back into unloveable spaces.

When I was in Ireland I knew a few places to get hemp for construction, but in England it took a bit more looking for.  In the end I got it from the Cornish Lime Company, who were very helpful and who got it to me pretty quick.  Because I had rather left it to the last minute I didn’t have time to find a cheaper way of doing it, which would have consisted of finding a source for agricultural lime or more locally luxury mobile homes for rent near me hemp…   Using agricultural 5 3 bank locations missouri greatly reduces the amount of hydraulic lime you need to buy in.  Provided you have some kind of trailer to go and collect it in, td bank sunset park brooklyn lime is dirt cheap.

The recipe for hemp/lime plaster I used to use in Ireland replaced a lot of the expensive lime with agricultural stuff;

  • 1/6th bucket of NHL 3.5 hydraulic lime
  • ¾ bucket hydrated lime (i.e. White Rhino)
  • ½ bucket ground limestone (the kind farmers use on their fields, dead cheap…)
  • 1¼ bucket of water

Mix to a slurry, then add 1 and 2/3rds bucket of hemp.

When I rang Cornish Lime to ask for recipes for hemp/lime using the stuff I got from them (NHL 2 lime and dried, chipped hemp), they directed me to the website of St Astier, and to their fact sheet on hemp building.  This was very informative, however I always get a bit fed up with mix recipes that refer to 200 litres of hemp and so on, I want to know how many buckets of this and that.  Much easier.  So, after a bit of fiddling about and experimentation, here is the recipe that worked for me, and which made a gorgeous sticky plaster which went on lovely…

  • 2 buckets of water
  • 3 buckets of NHL2 hydraulic lime
  • 4 buckets of dry shredded hemp.

Gorgeous.  When you mix it in a mixer, you put the water in first, then the lime (watch out for that lime dust, horrible stuff…), then the hemp. Wet the wall first, and then apply the hemp.  Getting hemp to stick to the wall is not like normal plaster.  You kind of press it onto the wall, takes a bit of practice, but once it is stuck to the wall you can then add to it or smooth it.  You can get various finishes to it, from the rough to the very smooth.  I tend to like it being smooth, you do that by waiting until it has been on the wall for 30 minutes to an hour, and then go over it with a rubber glove on and rub it vigorously.  The final result is worth the effort.

You nhl 3.5 lime near me put it on at various thicknesses.  I put on about 2 inches, but in a couple of weeks I intend to do our porch bit, and it will go on a lot thicker there….  blake lively amazon baby registry stuff.  Thanks to Rowan (my eldest) and his mates Sam and Alex who helped, and also to Sky and Robert for their help too.

Источник: https://www.transitionculture.org/2008/09/29/hemp-lime-plastering-my-kitchen/
nhl 3.5 lime near me

Comments

  1. @R S Not according to the real world. There are many more cards in circulation compared to mobiles.

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