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Watch ken burns the west online free


watch ken burns the west online free

It was just the most spectacular thing. AP: Are you tempted down the road to leave PBS and make films for one of the streaming services? Burns. Watch Free The West (1996) in full HD online with Subtitle - Smooth Streaming It was directed by Stephen Ives and the executive producer was Ken Burns. Watch Ken Burns videos. Country Music S1 Ep3 - The Hillbilly Acclaimed documentary maker Ken Burns explores the history of country music - 51:56.

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Watch ken burns the west online free

The West: A Film by Stephen Ives and Presented by Ken Burns

I love it. It gives an invaluable perspective that's impossible, however good one's intentions, for the people who are living the moment and times to have or to see who and what is really going to influence things and make a difference. This perspective shows that while individual actions are not irrelevant - still they're probably not doing what we think they are, that the smallest thing can have the greatest effect and that there would appear to be some other invisible hand at play in our human doings. Boggling. Wonderful. And, it's very fair, revealing important factors, forces, people and issues that have been buried with time. I feel it gives, finally, a fair shake to all players -- whites, Indians, Spanish -- amen.
And it condenses this historical information that otherwise we'd have to read a million books to get -- without being superficial. I think this kind of information is so important for guiding how we live OUR moment(s) with better choices, wisdom and. . humility.

Источник: https://www.amazon.com/Ken-Burns-West-Season-1/dp/B0090X4BUI

Ken Burns

American documentarian and filmmaker

For the English football referee, see Ken Burns (referee). For other people named Kenneth Burns, see Kenneth Burns.

Kenneth Lauren Burns[1] (born July 29, 1953) is an American filmmaker, known for his style of using archival footage and photographs in documentary films.

His widely known documentary series include The Civil War (1990), Baseball (1994), Jazz (2001), The War (2007), The National Parks: America's Best Idea (2009), Prohibition (2011), The Roosevelts (2014), The Vietnam War (2017), and Country Music (2019). He was also executive producer of both The West (1996), and Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies (2015).[2]

Burns's documentaries have earned two Academy Award nominations (for 1981's Brooklyn Bridge and 1985's The Statue of Liberty) and have won several Emmy Awards, among other honors.

Early life and education[edit]

Burns was born on July 29, 1953,[1] in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Lyla Smith (née Tupper) Burns,[3] a biotechnician,[4] and Robert Kyle Burns, at the time a graduate student in cultural anthropology at Columbia University in Manhattan.[3] The documentary filmmaker Ric Burns is his younger brother.[5][6]

Burns's academic family moved frequently. Among places they called home were Saint-Véran, France; Newark, Delaware; and Ann Arbor, Michigan, where his father taught at the University of Michigan.[4] Burns's mother was found to have breast cancer when he was three, and she died when he was 11,[4] a circumstance that he said helped shape his career; he credited his father-in-law, a psychologist, with a significant insight: "He told me that my whole work was an attempt to make people long gone come back alive."[4] Well-read as a child, he absorbed the family encyclopedia, preferring history to fiction.

Upon receiving an 8 mm film movie camera for his 17th birthday, he shot a documentary about an Ann Arbor factory. He graduated from Pioneer High School in Ann Arbor in 1971.[7] Turning down reduced tuition at the University of Michigan, he attended Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts, where students are graded through narrative evaluations rather than letter grades and where students create self-directed academic concentrations instead of choosing a traditional major.[4]

Burns worked in a record store to pay his tuition. Living on as little as credit one offer com in two years in Walpole, New Hampshire,[8] Burns studied under photographers Jerome Liebling, Elaine Mayes, and others. He earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in film studies and design[9] in 1975.[4]

Florentine Films[edit]

In 1976, Burns, Elaine Mayes, and college classmate Roger Sherman founded a production company called Florentine Films in Walpole, New Hampshire. The company's name was borrowed from Mayes's hometown of Florence, Massachusetts. Another Hampshire College student, Buddy Squires, was invited to succeed Mayes as a founding member one year later.[10][11] The trio were later joined by a fourth member, Lawrence "Larry" Hott. Hott did not actually matriculate at Hampshire, but worked on films there. Hott had begun his career as an attorney, having attended nearby Western New England Law School.[10]

Each member works independently, but releases content under the shared name of Florentine Films.[12] As such, their individual "subsidiary" companies include Ken Burns Media, Sherman Pictures, and Hott Productions. Burns's oldest child, Sarah, is also an employee of the company as of 2020.[13]

Career[edit]

Burns initially worked as a cinematographer for the BBC, Italian television, and others. In 1977, having completed some documentary short films, he began work on adapting David McCullough's book The Great Bridge, about the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge.[9] Developing a signature style of documentary filmmaking in which he "adopted the technique of cutting rapidly from one still picture to another in a fluid, linear fashion [and] then pepped up the visuals with 'first hand' narration gleaned from contemporary writings and recited by top stage and screen actors",[14] Burns made the feature documentary Brooklyn Bridge navy federal set up online banking which was narrated by David McCullough, and earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Documentary and ran on PBS in the United States.

Following another documentary, The Shakers: Hands watch ken burns the west online free Work, Hearts to God (1984), Burns was Oscar-nominated again for The Statue of Liberty (1985). Burns frequently collaborates with author and historian Geoffrey C. Ward, notably on documentaries such as The Civil War, Jazz, Baseball, and the 10 part TV series The Vietnam War (aired September 2017).

Burns has built a long, successful career directing and producing well-received television documentaries and documentary miniseries. His oeuvre covers diverse subjects including art (Thomas Hart Benton, 1988), mass media (Empire of the Air: The Men Who Made Radio, 1991), sports (Baseball, 1994, updated with 10th Inning, 2010), political history (Thomas Jefferson, 1997), music (Jazz, 2001; Country Music, 2019), literature (Mark Twain, 2001), environmentalism (The National Parks, 2009), and war (the 15-hour World War II documentary The War, 2007; the 11-hour The Civil War, 1990, which All Media Guide says "many consider his 'chef d'oeuvre'").[14]

In 2007, Burns made an agreement with PBS to produce work for the network well into the next decade.[16] According to a 2017 piece in The New Yorker, Burns and his company, Florentine Films, have selected topics for documentaries slated for release by 2030. These topics include country music, the Mayo Clinic, Muhammad Ali, Ernest Hemingway, the American Revolution, Lyndon B. Johnson, Barack Obama, Winston Churchill, the American criminal justice system, and African-American history from the Civil War to the Great Migration.[17] On April 5, 2021, Hemingway, a three-episode, six-hour documentary, a recapitulation of Hemingway's life, labors, and loves, debuted on the Public Broadcasting System, co-produced and directed by Usaa bank credit card login and Lynn Novick.[18]

Personal life[edit]

In 1982, Burns married Amy Stechler. The couple had two daughters, Sarah and Lilly.[19][9] Their marriage ended in divorce in 1993.

As of 2017[update], Burns was residing in Walpole, New Hampshire, with his second wife, Julie Deborah Brown,[20] whom he married on October 18, 2003. She is the founder of the non-profit Room to Grow which aids soon-to-be parents living in poverty.[20] They have two daughters, Olivia and Willa Burns.

Burns is a descendant of Johannes de Peyster Sr. through Gerardus Clarkson, an American Revolutionary War physician from Philadelphia, and he is a distant relative of Scottish poet Robert Burns.[21][22] In 2014 Burns appeared in Henry Louis Gates's Finding Your Roots where he discovered that he is a descendant of a slave owner from the Deep South, in addition to having a lineage which traces back to Colonial Americans of Loyalist allegiance during the American Revolution.[23]

Burns is an avid quilt collector. About one-third of the quilts from his personal collection were displayed at The International Quilt Study Center & Museum at the University of Nebraska from January 19 to May 13, 2018.[24]

When asked if he would ever make a film regarding his mother Lyla, Burns responded: "All of my films are about her. I don't think I could do it directly, because of how intensely painful it is."[4]

Politics[edit]

Burns is a longtime supporter of the Democratic Party, contributing almost $40,000 in political donations.[25] In 2008, the Democratic National Committee chose Burns to produce the introductory video for Senator Ted Kennedy's August 2008 speech to the Democratic National Convention, a video described by Politico as a "Burns-crafted tribute casting him [Kennedy] as the modern Ulysses bringing his party home to port."[26][27]

In August 2009, Kennedy died, and Burns produced a short eulogy video at his funeral. In endorsing Barack Obama for the U.S. presidency in December 2007, Burns compared Obama to Abraham Lincoln.[28] He said he had planned to be a regular contributor to Countdown with Keith Olbermann on Current TV.[29] In 2016, he also gave a commencement speech for Stanford University criticizing Donald Trump.[30][31]

In 2020, Burns endorsed Ed Markey in the Massachusetts Senate Democratic Primary.[32]

Awards and honors[edit]

Altogether Burns's work has garnered several awards, including two Oscar nominations, two Grammy Awards and 15 Emmy Awards.[15][33]

The Civil War received more than 40 major film and television awards, including two Emmy Awards, two Grammy Awards (one for Best Traditional Folk Album), the Producer of the Year Award from the Producers Guild of America, a People's Choice Award, a Peabody Award, a duPont-Columbia Award, a D. W. Griffith Award, and the $50,000 Lincoln Prize.[36][37][38]

In 1991, Burns received the National Humanities Medal, then called the Charles Frankel Prize in the Humanities.

In 1991, Burns received the Golden Plate Award of the American Academy of Achievement.[39]

In 2004, Burns received the S. Roger Horchow Award for Greatest Public Service by a Private Citizen, an award given out annually by Jefferson Awards.[40]

In 2008 Burns was honored by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences with a Lifetime Achievement Award.[15]

In 2010, the National Parks Conservation Association honored him and Dayton Duncan with the Robin W. Winks Award for Enhancing Public Understanding of National Parks. The award recognizes an individual or organization that has effectively communicated the values of the National Watch ken burns the west online free System to the American public.[41] As of 2010[update], there is a Ken Burns Wing at the Jerome Liebling Center for Film, Photography and Video at Hampshire College.[42]

Burns was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 2011.[43]

In 2012, Burns received the Washington University International Humanities Medal.[44] The medal, awarded usps office open today and accompanied by a cash prize of $25,000, is given to honor a person whose humanistic endeavors in scholarship, journalism, literature, or the arts have made a difference in the world. Past winners include Turkish novelist Orhan Pamuk in 2006, journalist Michael Pollan in 2008, and novelist and nonfiction writer Francine Prose in 2010.[45]

In 2013, Burns received the John Steinbeck Award, an award presented annually by Steinbeck's eldest son, Thomas, in collaboration with the John Steinbeck Family Foundation, San Jose State University, and The National Steinbeck Center.[46]

Burns was the Grand Marshal for the 2016 Pasadena Tournament of Roses' Rose Parade on New Year's Day in Pasadena, California.[47] The National Endowment for the Humanities selected Burns to deliver the 2016 Jefferson Lecture, the U.S. federal government's highest honor for achievement in the humanities, on the topic of race in America.[48] He was the 2017 recipient of The Nichols-Chancellor's Medal at Vanderbilt University.[49]

In 2019, he received an honorary degree from Brown University.[50]

Style[edit]

Burns frequently incorporates simple musical leitmotifs or melodies. For example, The Civil War features a distinctive violin melody throughout, "Ashokan Farewell", which was performed for the film by its composer, fiddler Jay Ungar. One critic noted, "One of the most memorable things about The Civil War was its haunting, repeated violin melody, whose thin, yearning notes seemed somehow to sum up all the pathos of that great struggle."[51]

Burns often gives life to still photographs by slowly zooming out subjects of interest and panning from one subject to another. It has long been used in film production where it is known as the "rostrum camera"; notably, it was used decades prior to Burns's career in the Canadian documentary short "City of Gold". An example of the technique as deployed by Burns: in a photograph of a baseball team, he might slowly pan across the faces of the players and come to rest on the player who is the subject of the narration. This technique, possible in many professional and home software applications, is now termed the "Ken Burns effect" in Apple's iPhoto, iMovie, and Final Cut Pro X software applications. Burns stated in a 2009 interview that he initially declined to have his name associated with the software because of his stance to refuse commercial endorsements. However, Apple chief Steve Jobs negotiated to give Burns Apple equipment, which Burns donated to nonprofit organizations.[52]

As a museum retrospective noted, "His PBS specials [are] strikingly out of step with the visual pyrotechnics and frenetic pacing of most reality-based TV programming, relying instead on techniques that are literally decades old, although Burns reintegrates these constituent elements into a wholly new and highly complex textual arrangement."[9]

In a 2011 interview, Burns stated that he admires and is influenced by filmmaker Errol Morris.[53]

Filmography[edit]

Conversation with Ken Burns about The Vietnam War. Video by the LBJ Library
  • Brooklyn Bridge (1981)[a]
  • The Watch ken burns the west online free Hands to Work, Hearts to God (1984)[a]
  • The Statue of Liberty (1985)[a]
  • Huey Long (1985)[a]
  • The Congress (1988)[a]
  • Thomas Hart Benton (1988)[a]
  • The Civil War (1990; 9 episodes)[a]
  • Empire of the Air: The Men Who Made Radio (1992)
  • Baseball (1994; 9 episodes – updated with The Tenth Inning in 2010, with Lynn Novick)
  • Thomas Jefferson (1997)
  • Lewis & Clark: The Journey of the Corps of Discovery (1997)
  • Frank Lloyd Wright (1998, with Lynn Novick)[54]
  • Not for Ourselves Alone: The Story of Elizabeth Cady Stanton & Susan B. Anthony (1999)[55]
  • Jazz (2001; 10 episodes)[56]
  • Mark Twain (2001)
  • Horatio's Drive: America's First Road Trip (2003)[57]
  • Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson (2005)[58]
  • The War (2007, with Lynn Novick; 7 episodes)
  • The National Parks: America's Best Idea (2009; 6 episodes)
  • Prohibition (2011, with Lynn Novick; 3 episodes)[59]
  • The Dust Bowl (2012; 4 episodes)[60]
  • The Central Park Five (2012, with Sarah Burns and David McMahon)[61]
  • Yosemite: A Gathering of Spirit (2013)[62]
  • The Address (2014)[63]
  • The Roosevelts: An Intimate History (2014; 7 episodes)[61][64]
  • Jackie Robinson (2016, with Sarah Burns and David McMahon; 2 episodes)[65]
  • Defying the Nazis: The Carolina realty of chapel hill War (2016, with Artemis Joukowsky)[66]
  • The Vietnam War (2017, with Lynn Novick; 10 episodes)[67]
  • The Mayo Clinic: Faith – Hope – Science (2018, with Erik Ewers and Christopher Loren Ewers)
  • Country Music (2019, 8 episodes)[68]
  • Hemingway (2021, with Lynn Novick; 3 episodes)[69]
  • Muhammad Ali (2021, with Sarah Burns and David McMahon)[70]

Future releases[edit]

Short films[edit]

These three short films are collected and distributed together as Seeing, Searching, Being: William Segal.

As an executive producer[edit]

As an actor[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ abcdefgListed as "Kenneth Lauren Burns".

References[edit]

  1. ^ ab"Ken Burns Biography (1953–)". Filmreference.com. Retrieved August 19, 2011.
  2. ^ abGenzlinger, Neil (March 27, 2015). "Review: In 'Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies,' Battling an Opportunistic Killer". The New York Times. Retrieved March 31, 2015.
  3. ^ abKen Burns. Encyclopedia of World Biography via BookRags.com. n.d.
  4. ^ abcdefgWalsh, Joan (n.d.). "Good Eye: The Interview With Ken Burns". San Francisco Focus. KQED via Online-Communicator.com. Archived from the original on September 22, 2011.
  5. ^"Ken Burns". biography at FlorentineFilms.com. n.d. Archived from the original on May 17, 2016.
  6. ^Wadler, Joyce (November 17, 1999). "PUBLIC LIVES; No Civil War, but a Brotherly Indifference". The New York Times. Retrieved November 4, 2016.
  7. ^Ann Arbor Public Schools Educational Foundation, [1] (accessed October 29, 2013, recovered from Internet Archive).
  8. ^"The Online Communicator: Ken Burns". Online-communicator.com. Retrieved May 6, 2019.
  9. ^ abcdEdgerton, Gary (n.d.). "Burns, Ken: U.S. Documentary Film Maker". The Museum of Broadcast Communications. Archived from the original on June 29, 2011.
  10. ^ ab"The Florentine Four: Ken Burns and Partners Look Back on 30 Years of Documentary Production". International Documentary Association. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  11. ^"Outstanding Documentary Achievement in Cinematography Award: The Visual Poet: Buddy Squires". International Documentary Association. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  12. ^"Florentine Films – Burns, Hott, Sherman & Squires". Florentinefilms.com. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  13. ^"The Watch ken burns the west online free – Ken Burns". kenburns.com. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  14. ^ abErickson, Hal (2007). "Ken Burns biography". Movies & TV Dept. The New York Times. Archived from the original on October 29, 2007. Retrieved September 22, 2011. This single source gives two birthplaces. Under the header list, it reads "Birthplace: Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA." In the prose biography, it reads "Brooklyn-born Ken Burns."
  15. ^ abcMasterClass. "Academy Award Nominated and Emmy Winner Ken Burns Joins MasterClass to Teach Documentary Filmmaking" (Press release). PR Newswire. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  16. ^"Ken Burns Ken Burns". Unforgivable Blackness. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  17. ^"Prohibition". PBS.org. 2011. Archived from the original on May 3, 2012.
  18. ^"Ken Burns Seeking Dustbowl Stories". OETA. Archived from the original on September 6, 2011. Retrieved August 19, 2011.
  19. ^ ab"Introduction". FlorentineFilms.com. n.d. Archived from the original on January 2, 2013.
  20. ^The World Premiere of Yosemite: A Gathering of SpiritArchived October 23, 2013, at the Wayback Machine, Yosemite Conservancy Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  21. ^"Q&A: Ken Burns Discusses His New Documentary, The Address". National Geographic News. April 5, 2014. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  22. ^Moore, Frazier (September 10, 2014). "PBS' 'The Roosevelts' portrays an epic threesome". AP News. Retrieved September 10, 2014.
  23. ^Cladwell, Evita (May 14, 2014). "Filmmaker Ken Burns discusses upcoming projects, Wash U commencement discount tire national city ca 91950, more". St. Louis Public Radio. Retrieved August 26, 2015.
  24. ^"Defying the Nazis: The Sharps' War; A new film directed by Ken Burns and Artemis Joukowsky". Retrieved September 16, 2016.
  25. ^"Vietnam". Ken Burns media. August 26, 2015.
  26. ^"Upcoming Films". Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
  27. ^"Ernest Hemingway". Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  28. ^"Ali". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  29. ^"Benjamin Franklin". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  30. ^"The Holocaust & the United States". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  31. ^"Ken Burns". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved November 26, 2020.
  32. ^ abcd"Ken Burns". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  33. ^"LBJ & the Great Society". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  34. ^Jensen, Elizabeth (July 29, 2010). "PBS to Show Ken Burns Films on William Segal". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  35. ^"The Accidental Historian: Ken Burns Mines America's Past". International Documentary Association. December 10, 2002. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  36. ^"PBS – THE WEST – Stephen Ives". www.pbs.org. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  37. ^"Walden". ewers brothers production. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  38. ^"Country Music: Live at the Ryman DVD". Shop.PBS.org. Public Broadcasting Service. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  39. ^"College Behind Bars | PBS" – via www.pbs.org.
  40. ^"East Lake Meadows". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  41. ^Morgan, Jillian (February 19, 2020). "PBS sets April air date for Ken Burns documentary on human genetics". Realscreen. Brunico Communications Ltd. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  42. ^"Part I: My experience on set of the movie "Gettysburg"". National Museum of American History. October 17, 2012. Retrieved December 5, 2019.

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Ken Burns.
Wikiquote has quotations related to: Ken Burns
Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ken_Burns

Ken Burns releasing new, anticipated Muhammad Ali documentary

Considering the number of movies, documentaries and other entertainment vehicles made about Muhammad Ali, it would seem that — much like the former heavyweight champion at the end of his 1971 fight against Joe Frazier — there’s not much left to offer that’s fresh.

Will Smith played Ali. Ali even played Ali in “The Greatest.” The 1996 documentary “ When We Were Kings ” about Ali’s “Rumble in the Jungle” bout with George Foreman won an Oscar.

Documentary filmmaker Ken Burns knew there were more layers to reveal in Ali’s rise from his Louisville, Kentucky, roots into the source of Black pride who captivated America with his boxing braggadocio, his contentious refusal to fight in Vietnam, and all through his final years into his lengthy, heartbreaking battle with Parkinson’s disease.

Burns’ film “ Muhammad Ali ” explores the life of the boxer who floated and stung his way into greatness.

“He’s just so compelling,” Burns said. “He’s complicated, there’s undertow, there’s flaws and we don’t hesitate to remind people throughout this film that there are. At the end, he is a transcendent American character. He has so much, still today, to offer us. He was, of course, at the intersection of so many themes of race, of politics, of war, of faith, of fidelity.”

Burns began work on Ali, who died at 74 in 2016, nearly seven years ago and said the story on the boxer’s life “lifts up and we see instantly how it resonates in the moment.” Burns (who co-directed the how to cancel bill pay wells fargo with his oldest daughter, Sarah, and her husband, Dave McMahon) weaves archival footage and interviews with Ali’s daughters, ex-wives, sports writers, athletes and activists to stitch together pieces of the charismatic and complicated life of the three-time heavyweight boxing champion.

“There are a lot of really, really great documentary films on Muhammad Ali. I think the opening half-hour, 20 minutes of Michael Mann’s `Ali’ is one of the finest openings of any film, ever,” Burns said. “Yet nobody had said, let’s try to do it comprehensively. It’s not definitive. It’s, let’s try and understand him from birth in the early 40s in segregated Louisville, Kentucky, to the death by Parkinson’s.”

Burns talked with The Associated Press by phone from his home in Walpole, New Hampshire, to watch ken burns the west online free the four-part, eight-hour series on Ali that airs Sept. 19-22 at 8 p.m. on PBS.

AP: When you peeled back the layers, what was your biggest discovery about Ali?

Burns: I think it’s this sense of purpose. He puts on the gloves, he has a couple of fights and now declares he’s The Greatest. It’s like you’re hitting a double in tee ball and saying, “I am going to be the greatest baseball player ever.” OK, that’s good aspirations. The poise that he has at different points. The Frazier fight, he’d been bagging on Frazier, he’d been predicting, he’d been brash, he’d been bold. But then he talks about setting an example because everybody loses. In fact, everybody does lose. Nobody gets out of this alive. He gets that. He understands something really fundamental. In the midst of this loud, wonderful promoter, learning from Gorgeous George, he has this in him.

AP: What did you learn about how America’s opinion of Ali changed through the decades?

Burns: When he dies, we forget what a divisive figure he was. When he’s out lighting the torch in Atlanta, we forgot what a divisive figure he was. He was considered like a Buddha, like a religious figure. I think it’s the way that in the midst of this loud, cacophonous thing that was his life, how amazingly centered he was, how purposeful it was. (His image) is already improved after the loss to Frazier in the first of the three Frazier fights. He gets hit in the last round and he gets back up. In losing he wins. By that time, we’re beginning to realize he was right about Vietnam. He began to win people back.

AP: Did you feel Ali mirrored the Black experience decade by decade or did he set it by the nature of his celebrity and stances?

Burns: I think it’s a little bit of both. He reflected aspects of it in that he represented a new model of it that was less interested in the old tactics of the Southern, Christian civil rights movement which was about integration. His was a little bit more Northern, a little bit more adamant about separation, which has been a tradition in Black politics dating back to Marcus Garvey, certainly before that. But at the same time, as he becomes this huge symbol, and people begin to embrace the idea of a new form of Black masculinity, of the kind of confidence and willingness to say “I’m beautiful” and “Black is beautiful,” that’s part of that Black Power movement, that’s not just what the Panthers are doing, but many people are embracing a kind of sense of their own value and worth. He is both reflecting and also directing.

AP: Did you learn there were times Ali didn’t want the burden that came with who he was?

Burns: You can see in him sort of flashes of frustration, less about the burden than people getting it wrong. When he said, “I don’t have to box. It’s not about boxing.” At the very end of the film, (daughter) Rasheda (Ali) can you open two checking accounts at bank of america, “Boxing is just this much” (while pinching her fingers together). I think he understood he had a bigger thing that he was about. He could have been a simple carpenter.

AP: Did you meet Ali?

Burns: I met him once. It was in LA, mid-late 90s. Definitely way into Parkinson’s. I had a cold and I had gone into a coffee shop to get some tea. I was waiting to take it out and I turned around and in a booth, there was Muhammad Ali. I had the only wordless conversation I’ve ever had with anybody. It was spectacular. It was almost a religious experience. I looked at him and without opening my mouth, I said, “You’re Muhammad Ali.” And without opening his mouth, he looked at me and said, “Yes I am.” … I never shook his hand. It was just the most spectacular thing.

AP: Are you tempted down the road to leave PBS and make films for one of the streaming services?

Burns: I could go to those premium services or the streaming services and they’d give me the budget. The budget for “Vietnam” turned out to be $30 million and they’d do it. But they’d want it in two years. We needed to do 10 1/2 years. At PBS, they give me a little bit of money and I go out and raise the rest. They just want it to be what I want it to be. Not only do I publish each time a director’s cut, I also have the ability to have creative control over it.

Источник: https://www.sportsnet.ca/more/article/ken-burns-releasing-new-anticipated-muhammad-ali-documentary/

Ken Burns PBS Documentaries Leaving Netflix in February 2020

Ken Burns Collection – Pictures: PBS

Netflix is set to lose some of the best documentaries produced in history. Four of Ken Burns’s famous PBS documentaries are set to leave Netflix in the United States in February 2020. 

Ken Burns, for those who don’t know already, is a master documentary maker who has stuck with PBS over the years and produced a huge amount of documentaries over the years. He’s been an influential filmmaker with over 35 producer and directing credits to his name and countless awards including two Oscar nominations.

In total, Netflix is set to lose four Ken Burns series which include:

  • The War – perhaps one of Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s finest and definitive titles to date. It documents across seven episodes World War II with soldiers accounts of the battles that took place. If you’re going to watch any of the four titles listed here, it should be this one.
  • The Civil War – This documentary series is groundbreaking that looks back to the mid-1800s and looks at the key moments of the American civil war.
  • The Roosevelts: An Intimate History – Series that released in 2014 that profiles members of the Roosevelt family including Theodor, Franklin, and Eleanor.
  • Prohibition: A Film by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick – Watch ken burns the west online free us back to the inclusion of the 18th Amendment while also looking at the ban on alcohol and the repeal of Prohibition.

These four series mentioned are set to leave Netflix in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and multiple other regions on February 22nd, 2020.

Expiry date showing on The War on Netflix

You can see more of what’s scheduled to be removed from Netflix in February 2020 in our ongoing list here. It’s been a tough few months for documentary lovers particularly in the US as Netflix recently saw the removal of the entire BBC Earth library. There are plenty of Original productions coming to help fill the watch ken burns the west online free but many won’t be ready for a number of years.


What Ken Burns series will remain mercury travels san jose Netflix?

Once these four leave, there will still be several of Ken Burns documentaries remaining.

These include:

  • Defying the Nazis: The Sharps’ War – “This film documents the story of minister Waitstill Sharp and his wife, Martha, who risked everything to save thousands of refugees fleeing the Nazis.”
  • The Vietnam War: A Film by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick – “Ken Burns presents an epic 10-part, 18-hour chronicle of the Vietnam War, featuring the soldiers, protesters, politicians and families that lived it.”
  • Ken Burns: The West – “Historian Ken Burns and his team bring to life the challenges Americans faced in the 19th century as they embarked on westward expansion.”
  • The Mayo Clinic – “A look at how a world-renowned medical institution prioritizes patients’ needs and has adapted to healthcare’s evolving demands for over 150 years.”

These will likely leave in the future, however, although we can’t give you a precise date as of yet.

Will you miss these Ken Burns series once they leave Netflix? Let us know in the comments.

Источник: https://www.whats-on-netflix.com/leaving-soon/ken-burns-pbs-documentaries-leaving-netflix-in-february-2020/

Where To Stream Every Ken Burns Documentary

Do you watch documentaries to learn or to be entertained? With the really, really good ones, you don’t have to make that choice. And when, it comes to accessible, and smart documentaries, it’s hard to beat Ken Burns. From documentaries about the Civil War, immersion in country music, a good Burns documentary has it all.

And now, thanks to the stream-ability of over 900 hours of PBS documentaries, including the complete filmography of the man, the myth, the legend: Kenneth Lauren Burns.

That’s right, PBS has made everything Ken Burns has ever made, from 1981’s Brooklyn Bridge to his more recent series watch ken burns the west online free Muhammad Ali and Ernest Hemingway, available to watch at two different online venues: an Amazon Prime video channel ($3.99/month on top of a Prime membership) and PBS Passport, the streaming service for everyone who gives at least $5 a month to their local PBS station.

If it’s been a while since you had ten hours to spend on a historical the skeleton key in hindi download full of talking heads and panned and zoomed black and white photos. Here are five great titles to start with.

Hemingway (2021)

Alongside the likes of Mark Twain and Herman Melville, Ernest Hemingway is one of the foundational figures in American literature. And over the course of six episodes, Burns provides a meticulous and fascinating glimpse into the mind behind The Sun Also Rises, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and several other classics. Beyond simply telling the story of Hemingway’s life, this docuseries allows viewers to hear from the man himself, as well as his friends and family, by sharing letters written by and to him over the course of his life.

The Civil War (1990)

Burns’s first epic docuseries, The Civil War remains a prime example of his style and its potential: to tell a complicated, historically remote story in an engaging, educational way.

Muhammad Ali (2021)

Five years after his death from Parkinson’s, Ali remains one of the most celebrated and iconic athletes in American history. And the life of this larger-than-life figure gets an in-depth exploration in this eight-hour series that dives into Ali do playstation store gift cards expire as a fighter and as a man. As usual, Burns manages to examine the complexity and nuance of his subject, giving new insight into the legendary boxer beyond his bravado and skill in the ring.

Horatio’s Drive: America’s First Road Trip (2003)

While he’s better known for his work on famous subjects, Horatio’s Drive shows that the Burns method can also tell a smaller story, about the first person to drive across the country in a car.

The Central Park Five (2012)

Continually relevant for the worst of reasons, The Central Park Five chronicles the wrongful conviction of five Black and Latino teens in the 1989 rape of a white woman in Central Park. If you found Ava Duvernay’s When They See Us, it’s definitely worth taking in this documentary version of the story.

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Источник: https://www.fatherly.com/play/ken-burns-filmography-pbs-streaming-amazon-prime/

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Ken Burns". Unforgivable Blackness. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  • ^"Prohibition". PBS.org. 2011. Archived from the original on May 3, 2012.
  • ^"Ken Burns Seeking Dustbowl Stories". OETA. Archived from the original on September 6, 2011. Retrieved August 19, 2011.
  • ^ ab"Introduction". FlorentineFilms.com. n.d. Archived from the original on January 2, 2013.
  • ^The World Premiere of Yosemite: A Gathering of SpiritArchived October 23, 2013, at the Wayback Machine, Yosemite Conservancy Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  • ^"Q&A: Ken Burns Discusses His New Documentary, The Address". National Geographic News. April 5, 2014. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  • ^Moore, Frazier (September 10, 2014). "PBS' 'The Roosevelts' portrays an epic threesome". AP News. Retrieved September 10, 2014.
  • ^Cladwell, Evita (May 14, 2014). "Filmmaker Ken Burns discusses upcoming projects, Wash U commencement speech, more". St. Louis Public Radio. Retrieved August 26, 2015.
  • ^"Defying the Nazis: The Sharps' War; A new film directed by Ken Burns and Artemis Joukowsky". Retrieved September 16, 2016.
  • ^"Vietnam". Ken Burns media. August 26, 2015.
  • ^"Upcoming Films". Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
  • ^"Ernest Hemingway". Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  • ^"Ali". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  • ^"Benjamin Franklin". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  • ^"The Holocaust & the United States". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  • ^"Ken Burns". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved November 26, 2020.
  • ^ abcd"Ken Burns". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  • ^"LBJ & the Great Society". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  • ^Jensen, Elizabeth (July 29, 2010). "PBS to Show Ken Burns Films on William Segal". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  • ^"The Accidental Historian: Ken Burns Mines America's Past". International Documentary Association. December 10, 2002. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  • ^"PBS – THE WEST – Stephen Ives". www.pbs.org. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  • ^"Walden". ewers brothers production. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  • ^"Country Music: Live at the Ryman DVD". Shop.PBS.org. Public Broadcasting Service. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  • ^"College Behind Bars | PBS" – via www.pbs.org.
  • ^"East Lake Meadows". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  • ^Morgan, Jillian (February 19, 2020). "PBS sets April air date for Ken Burns documentary on human genetics". Realscreen. Brunico Communications Ltd. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  • ^"Part I: My experience on set of the movie "Gettysburg"". National Museum of American History. October 17, 2012. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  • External links[edit]

    Wikimedia Commons has media related to Ken Burns.
    Wikiquote has quotations related to: Ken Burns
    Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ken_Burns
    The Civil War Ken Burns". Jazz. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  • ^"Home

    Ken Burns PBS Documentaries Leaving Netflix in February 2020

    Ken Burns Collection – Pictures: PBS

    Netflix is set to lose some of the best documentaries produced in history. Four of Ken Burns’s famous PBS documentaries are set to leave Netflix in the United States in February 2020. 

    Ken Burns, for those who don’t know already, is a master documentary maker who has stuck with PBS over the years and produced a huge amount of documentaries over the years. He’s been an influential filmmaker with over 35 producer and directing credits to his name and countless awards including two Oscar nominations.

    In total, Netflix is set to lose four Ken Burns series which include:

    • The War – perhaps one of Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s finest and definitive titles to date. It documents across seven episodes World War II with soldiers accounts of the battles that took place. If you’re going to watch any of the four titles listed here, it should be this one.
    • The Civil War – This documentary series is groundbreaking that looks back to the mid-1800s and looks at the key moments of the American civil war.
    • The Roosevelts: An Intimate History – Series that released in 2014 that profiles members of the Roosevelt family including Theodor, Franklin, and Eleanor.
    • Prohibition: A Film by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick – Takes us back to the inclusion of the 18th Amendment while also looking at the ban on alcohol and the repeal of Prohibition.

    These four series mentioned are set to leave Netflix in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and multiple other regions on February 22nd, 2020.

    Expiry date showing on The War on Netflix

    You can see more of what’s scheduled to be removed from Netflix in February 2020 in our ongoing list here. It’s been a tough few months for documentary lovers particularly in the US as Netflix recently saw the removal of the entire BBC Earth library. There are plenty of Original productions coming to help fill the hole but many won’t be ready for a number of years.


    What Ken Burns series will remain on Netflix?

    Once these four leave, there will still be several of Ken Burns documentaries remaining.

    These include:

    • Defying the Nazis: The Sharps’ War – “This film documents the story of minister Waitstill Sharp and his wife, Martha, who risked everything to save thousands of refugees fleeing the Nazis.”
    • The Vietnam War: A Film by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick – “Ken Burns presents an epic 10-part, 18-hour chronicle of the Vietnam War, featuring the soldiers, protesters, politicians and families that lived it.”
    • Ken Burns: The West – “Historian Ken Burns and his team bring to life the challenges Americans faced in the 19th century as they embarked on westward expansion.”
    • The Mayo Clinic – “A look at how a world-renowned medical institution prioritizes patients’ needs and has adapted to healthcare’s evolving demands for over 150 years.”

    These will likely leave in the future, however, although we can’t give you a precise date as of yet.

    Will you miss these Ken Burns series once they leave Netflix? Let us know in the comments.

    Источник: https://www.whats-on-netflix.com/leaving-soon/ken-burns-pbs-documentaries-leaving-netflix-in-february-2020/

    Ken Burns Shows

    Muhammad Ali

    Muhammad Ali

    Muhammad Ali brings to life one of the most indelible figures of the 20th century, a three-time heavyweight boxing champion who captivated millions of fans across the world with his mesmerizing combination of speed, grace, and power in the ring, and charm and playful boasting outside of it. Ali insisted on being himself unconditionally and became a global icon and inspiration to people everywhere.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

    Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

    Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies matches the epic scale of the disease, reshaping the way the public sees cancer and stripping away some of the fear and misunderstanding that has long surrounded it. The story of cancer is a story of human ingenuity, resilience, and perseverance but also of hubris, paternalism and misperception.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    Central Park Five

    Central Park Five

    The story of the five black and Latino teenagers from Harlem who were wrongly convicted of raping a white woman in New York City's Central Park in 1989. Directed and produced by Ken Burns, David McMahon and Sarah Burns, the film chronicles the Central Park Jogger case, from the perspective of the five teenagers whose lives were upended by this miscarriage of justice.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    Prohibition

    Prohibition

    PROHIBITION tells the story of the rise, rule, and fall of the Eighteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and the entire era it encompassed. Prohibition was intended to protect all Americans from the devastating effects of alcohol abuse. But, paradoxically, the enshrining of a faith-driven moral code in the Constitution caused millions of Americans to rethink their definition of morality.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    The National Parks

    The National Parks

    Filmed over the course of more than six years at some of nature's most spectacular locales, the film is a story of people from every conceivable background—rich and poor, soldiers and scientists, natives and newcomers—who were willing to devote themselves to saving some precious portion of the land they loved and in doing so reminded their fellow citizens of the full meaning of democracy.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    Источник: https://www.pbs.org/franchise/ken-burns/

    Ken Burns Shows

    Muhammad Ali

    Muhammad Ali

    Muhammad Ali brings to life one of the most indelible figures of the 20th century, a three-time heavyweight boxing champion who captivated millions of fans across the world with his mesmerizing combination of speed, grace, and power in the ring, and charm and playful boasting outside of it. Ali insisted on being himself unconditionally and became a global icon and inspiration to people everywhere.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    East Lake Meadows

    East Lake Meadows

    Learn the history of East Lake Meadows, a former public housing community in Atlanta. Stories from residents reveal hardship and resilience, and raise critical questions about race, poverty, and who is deserving of public assistance.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    Country Music

    Country Music

    Explore the history of country music – from its roots in ballads, hymns and the blues to its mainstream popularity – and meet the unforgettable characters and storytellers who made it “America’s Music.” Directed by Ken Burns.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

    Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies

    Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies matches the epic scale of the disease, reshaping the way the public sees cancer and stripping away some of the fear and misunderstanding that has long surrounded it. The story of cancer is a story of human ingenuity, resilience, and perseverance but also of hubris, paternalism and misperception.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    Central Park Five

    Central Park Five

    The story of the five black and Latino teenagers from Harlem who were wrongly convicted of raping a white woman in New York City's Central Park in 1989. Directed and produced by Ken Burns, David McMahon and Sarah Burns, the film chronicles the Central Park Jogger case, from the perspective of the five teenagers whose lives were upended by this miscarriage of justice.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    Prohibition

    Prohibition

    PROHIBITION tells the story of the rise, rule, and fall of the Eighteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and the entire era it encompassed. Prohibition was intended to protect all Americans from the devastating effects of alcohol abuse. But, paradoxically, the enshrining of a faith-driven moral code in the Constitution caused millions of Americans to rethink their definition of morality.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    The Tenth Inning

    The Tenth Inning

    Introducing an unforgettable array of players, teams and fans, the film showcases the era's extraordinary accomplishments as well as its devastating disappointments. Combining extraordinary highlights, stunning still photographs, and insightful commentary by players, managers, and fans, The Tenth Inning interweaves the story of the national pastime with the story of America.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    The National Parks

    The National Parks

    Filmed over the course of more than six years at some of nature's most spectacular locales, the film is a story of people from every conceivable background—rich and poor, soldiers and scientists, natives and newcomers—who were willing to devote themselves to saving some precious portion of the land they loved and in doing so reminded their fellow citizens of the full meaning of democracy.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    The War

    The War

    The War is the story of the Second World War through the personal accounts of a handful of men and women from four American towns. The war touched the lives of every family on every street in every town in America and demonstrated that in extraordinary times, there are no ordinary lives.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    Horatio's Drive

    Horatio's Drive

    In the spring of 1903, on a whim and a fifty-dollar bet, Dr. Horatio Nelson Jackson set off from San Francisco in a 20-horsepower Winton touring car hoping to become the first person to cross the United States in the new-fangled "horseless carriage." Most people doubted that the automobile had much of a future. Jackson's trip would prove them wrong.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    Lewis & Clark

    Lewis & Clark

    The remarkable story of the entire Corps of Discovery – not just of the two Captains, but the young army men, French-Canadian boatmen, Clark’s African-American slave, and the Shoshone woman named Sacagawea, who brought along her infant son. As important to the story as these many characters, however, was the land itself, and the promises it held.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    The Congress

    The Congress

    For 200 years, the United States Congress has been one of the country's most important and least understood institutions. Using historical photographs and newsreels, evocative live footage and interviews, Ken Burns chronicles the events that have shaped the first 200 years of congress and, in turn, our country.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    Huey Long

    Huey Long

    He was hailed as a champion of the poor and reviled as a dictator. Louisiana's Huey Long rose to Governor and U.S. Senator on a platform of social reform and justice, all the while employing graft and corruption to get what he wanted. Ken Burns reveals a complex and comprehensive portrait of the man, his politics and the power he so obsessively sought.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    The Shakers

    The Shakers

    They called themselves the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, but because of their ecstatic dancing, the world called them Shakers. Ken Burns creates a moving portrait of this particularly American movement, and in the process, offers us a new and unusually moving way to understand the Shakers.

    Watch VideosVisit the Official Website
    Источник: https://video.vermontpbs.org/franchise/ken-burns/

    Where To Stream Every Ken Burns Documentary

    Do you watch documentaries to learn or to be entertained? With the really, really good ones, you don’t have to make that choice. And when, it comes to accessible, and smart documentaries, it’s hard to beat Ken Burns. From documentaries about the Civil War, immersion in country music, a good Burns documentary has it all.

    And now, thanks to the stream-ability of over 900 hours of PBS documentaries, including the complete filmography of the man, the myth, the legend: Kenneth Lauren Burns.

    That’s right, PBS has made everything Ken Burns has ever made, from 1981’s Brooklyn Bridge to his more recent series about Muhammad Ali and Ernest Hemingway, available to watch at two different online venues: an Amazon Prime video channel ($3.99/month on top of a Prime membership) and PBS Passport, the streaming service for everyone who gives at least $5 a month to their local PBS station.

    If it’s been a while since you had ten hours to spend on a historical docuseries full of talking heads and panned and zoomed black and white photos. Here are five great titles to start with.

    Hemingway (2021)

    Alongside the likes of Mark Twain and Herman Melville, Ernest Hemingway is one of the foundational figures in American literature. And over the course of six episodes, Burns provides a meticulous and fascinating glimpse into the mind behind The Sun Also Rises, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and several other classics. Beyond simply telling the story of Hemingway’s life, this docuseries allows viewers to hear from the man himself, as well as his friends and family, by sharing letters written by and to him over the course of his life.

    The Civil War (1990)

    Burns’s first epic docuseries, The Civil War remains a prime example of his style and its potential: to tell a complicated, historically remote story in an engaging, educational way.

    Muhammad Ali (2021)

    Five years after his death from Parkinson’s, Ali remains one of the most celebrated and iconic athletes in American history. And the life of this larger-than-life figure gets an in-depth exploration in this eight-hour series that dives into Ali both as a fighter and as a man. As usual, Burns manages to examine the complexity and nuance of his subject, giving new insight into the legendary boxer beyond his bravado and skill in the ring.

    Horatio’s Drive: America’s First Road Trip (2003)

    While he’s better known for his work on famous subjects, Horatio’s Drive shows that the Burns method can also tell a smaller story, about the first person to drive across the country in a car.

    The Central Park Five (2012)

    Continually relevant for the worst of reasons, The Central Park Five chronicles the wrongful conviction of five Black and Latino teens in the 1989 rape of a white woman in Central Park. If you found Ava Duvernay’s When They See Us, it’s definitely worth taking in this documentary version of the story.

    Oops! Please try again.

    Thanks for subscribing!

    Источник: https://www.fatherly.com/play/ken-burns-filmography-pbs-streaming-amazon-prime/
    watch ken burns the west online free

    Watch ken burns the west online free -

    Ken Burns

    American documentarian and filmmaker

    For the English football referee, see Ken Burns (referee). For other people named Kenneth Burns, see Kenneth Burns.

    Kenneth Lauren Burns[1] (born July 29, 1953) is an American filmmaker, known for his style of using archival footage and photographs in documentary films.

    His widely known documentary series include The Civil War (1990), Baseball (1994), Jazz (2001), The War (2007), The National Parks: America's Best Idea (2009), Prohibition (2011), The Roosevelts (2014), The Vietnam War (2017), and Country Music (2019). He was also executive producer of both The West (1996), and Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies (2015).[2]

    Burns's documentaries have earned two Academy Award nominations (for 1981's Brooklyn Bridge and 1985's The Statue of Liberty) and have won several Emmy Awards, among other honors.

    Early life and education[edit]

    Burns was born on July 29, 1953,[1] in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Lyla Smith (née Tupper) Burns,[3] a biotechnician,[4] and Robert Kyle Burns, at the time a graduate student in cultural anthropology at Columbia University in Manhattan.[3] The documentary filmmaker Ric Burns is his younger brother.[5][6]

    Burns's academic family moved frequently. Among places they called home were Saint-Véran, France; Newark, Delaware; and Ann Arbor, Michigan, where his father taught at the University of Michigan.[4] Burns's mother was found to have breast cancer when he was three, and she died when he was 11,[4] a circumstance that he said helped shape his career; he credited his father-in-law, a psychologist, with a significant insight: "He told me that my whole work was an attempt to make people long gone come back alive."[4] Well-read as a child, he absorbed the family encyclopedia, preferring history to fiction.

    Upon receiving an 8 mm film movie camera for his 17th birthday, he shot a documentary about an Ann Arbor factory. He graduated from Pioneer High School in Ann Arbor in 1971.[7] Turning down reduced tuition at the University of Michigan, he attended Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts, where students are graded through narrative evaluations rather than letter grades and where students create self-directed academic concentrations instead of choosing a traditional major.[4]

    Burns worked in a record store to pay his tuition. Living on as little as $2,500 in two years in Walpole, New Hampshire,[8] Burns studied under photographers Jerome Liebling, Elaine Mayes, and others. He earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in film studies and design[9] in 1975.[4]

    Florentine Films[edit]

    In 1976, Burns, Elaine Mayes, and college classmate Roger Sherman founded a production company called Florentine Films in Walpole, New Hampshire. The company's name was borrowed from Mayes's hometown of Florence, Massachusetts. Another Hampshire College student, Buddy Squires, was invited to succeed Mayes as a founding member one year later.[10][11] The trio were later joined by a fourth member, Lawrence "Larry" Hott. Hott did not actually matriculate at Hampshire, but worked on films there. Hott had begun his career as an attorney, having attended nearby Western New England Law School.[10]

    Each member works independently, but releases content under the shared name of Florentine Films.[12] As such, their individual "subsidiary" companies include Ken Burns Media, Sherman Pictures, and Hott Productions. Burns's oldest child, Sarah, is also an employee of the company as of 2020.[13]

    Career[edit]

    Burns initially worked as a cinematographer for the BBC, Italian television, and others. In 1977, having completed some documentary short films, he began work on adapting David McCullough's book The Great Bridge, about the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge.[9] Developing a signature style of documentary filmmaking in which he "adopted the technique of cutting rapidly from one still picture to another in a fluid, linear fashion [and] then pepped up the visuals with 'first hand' narration gleaned from contemporary writings and recited by top stage and screen actors",[14] Burns made the feature documentary Brooklyn Bridge (1981),[15] which was narrated by David McCullough, and earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Documentary and ran on PBS in the United States.

    Following another documentary, The Shakers: Hands to Work, Hearts to God (1984), Burns was Oscar-nominated again for The Statue of Liberty (1985). Burns frequently collaborates with author and historian Geoffrey C. Ward, notably on documentaries such as The Civil War, Jazz, Baseball, and the 10 part TV series The Vietnam War (aired September 2017).

    Burns has built a long, successful career directing and producing well-received television documentaries and documentary miniseries. His oeuvre covers diverse subjects including art (Thomas Hart Benton, 1988), mass media (Empire of the Air: The Men Who Made Radio, 1991), sports (Baseball, 1994, updated with 10th Inning, 2010), political history (Thomas Jefferson, 1997), music (Jazz, 2001; Country Music, 2019), literature (Mark Twain, 2001), environmentalism (The National Parks, 2009), and war (the 15-hour World War II documentary The War, 2007; the 11-hour The Civil War, 1990, which All Media Guide says "many consider his 'chef d'oeuvre'").[14]

    In 2007, Burns made an agreement with PBS to produce work for the network well into the next decade.[16] According to a 2017 piece in The New Yorker, Burns and his company, Florentine Films, have selected topics for documentaries slated for release by 2030. These topics include country music, the Mayo Clinic, Muhammad Ali, Ernest Hemingway, the American Revolution, Lyndon B. Johnson, Barack Obama, Winston Churchill, the American criminal justice system, and African-American history from the Civil War to the Great Migration.[17] On April 5, 2021, Hemingway, a three-episode, six-hour documentary, a recapitulation of Hemingway's life, labors, and loves, debuted on the Public Broadcasting System, co-produced and directed by Burns and Lynn Novick.[18]

    Personal life[edit]

    In 1982, Burns married Amy Stechler. The couple had two daughters, Sarah and Lilly.[19][9] Their marriage ended in divorce in 1993.

    As of 2017[update], Burns was residing in Walpole, New Hampshire, with his second wife, Julie Deborah Brown,[20] whom he married on October 18, 2003. She is the founder of the non-profit Room to Grow which aids soon-to-be parents living in poverty.[20] They have two daughters, Olivia and Willa Burns.

    Burns is a descendant of Johannes de Peyster Sr. through Gerardus Clarkson, an American Revolutionary War physician from Philadelphia, and he is a distant relative of Scottish poet Robert Burns.[21][22] In 2014 Burns appeared in Henry Louis Gates's Finding Your Roots where he discovered that he is a descendant of a slave owner from the Deep South, in addition to having a lineage which traces back to Colonial Americans of Loyalist allegiance during the American Revolution.[23]

    Burns is an avid quilt collector. About one-third of the quilts from his personal collection were displayed at The International Quilt Study Center & Museum at the University of Nebraska from January 19 to May 13, 2018.[24]

    When asked if he would ever make a film regarding his mother Lyla, Burns responded: "All of my films are about her. I don't think I could do it directly, because of how intensely painful it is."[4]

    Politics[edit]

    Burns is a longtime supporter of the Democratic Party, contributing almost $40,000 in political donations.[25] In 2008, the Democratic National Committee chose Burns to produce the introductory video for Senator Ted Kennedy's August 2008 speech to the Democratic National Convention, a video described by Politico as a "Burns-crafted tribute casting him [Kennedy] as the modern Ulysses bringing his party home to port."[26][27]

    In August 2009, Kennedy died, and Burns produced a short eulogy video at his funeral. In endorsing Barack Obama for the U.S. presidency in December 2007, Burns compared Obama to Abraham Lincoln.[28] He said he had planned to be a regular contributor to Countdown with Keith Olbermann on Current TV.[29] In 2016, he also gave a commencement speech for Stanford University criticizing Donald Trump.[30][31]

    In 2020, Burns endorsed Ed Markey in the Massachusetts Senate Democratic Primary.[32]

    Awards and honors[edit]

    Altogether Burns's work has garnered several awards, including two Oscar nominations, two Grammy Awards and 15 Emmy Awards.[15][33]

    The Civil War received more than 40 major film and television awards, including two Emmy Awards, two Grammy Awards (one for Best Traditional Folk Album), the Producer of the Year Award from the Producers Guild of America, a People's Choice Award, a Peabody Award, a duPont-Columbia Award, a D. W. Griffith Award, and the $50,000 Lincoln Prize.[36][37][38]

    In 1991, Burns received the National Humanities Medal, then called the Charles Frankel Prize in the Humanities.

    In 1991, Burns received the Golden Plate Award of the American Academy of Achievement.[39]

    In 2004, Burns received the S. Roger Horchow Award for Greatest Public Service by a Private Citizen, an award given out annually by Jefferson Awards.[40]

    In 2008 Burns was honored by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences with a Lifetime Achievement Award.[15]

    In 2010, the National Parks Conservation Association honored him and Dayton Duncan with the Robin W. Winks Award for Enhancing Public Understanding of National Parks. The award recognizes an individual or organization that has effectively communicated the values of the National Park System to the American public.[41] As of 2010[update], there is a Ken Burns Wing at the Jerome Liebling Center for Film, Photography and Video at Hampshire College.[42]

    Burns was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 2011.[43]

    In 2012, Burns received the Washington University International Humanities Medal.[44] The medal, awarded biennially and accompanied by a cash prize of $25,000, is given to honor a person whose humanistic endeavors in scholarship, journalism, literature, or the arts have made a difference in the world. Past winners include Turkish novelist Orhan Pamuk in 2006, journalist Michael Pollan in 2008, and novelist and nonfiction writer Francine Prose in 2010.[45]

    In 2013, Burns received the John Steinbeck Award, an award presented annually by Steinbeck's eldest son, Thomas, in collaboration with the John Steinbeck Family Foundation, San Jose State University, and The National Steinbeck Center.[46]

    Burns was the Grand Marshal for the 2016 Pasadena Tournament of Roses' Rose Parade on New Year's Day in Pasadena, California.[47] The National Endowment for the Humanities selected Burns to deliver the 2016 Jefferson Lecture, the U.S. federal government's highest honor for achievement in the humanities, on the topic of race in America.[48] He was the 2017 recipient of The Nichols-Chancellor's Medal at Vanderbilt University.[49]

    In 2019, he received an honorary degree from Brown University.[50]

    Style[edit]

    Burns frequently incorporates simple musical leitmotifs or melodies. For example, The Civil War features a distinctive violin melody throughout, "Ashokan Farewell", which was performed for the film by its composer, fiddler Jay Ungar. One critic noted, "One of the most memorable things about The Civil War was its haunting, repeated violin melody, whose thin, yearning notes seemed somehow to sum up all the pathos of that great struggle."[51]

    Burns often gives life to still photographs by slowly zooming out subjects of interest and panning from one subject to another. It has long been used in film production where it is known as the "rostrum camera"; notably, it was used decades prior to Burns's career in the Canadian documentary short "City of Gold". An example of the technique as deployed by Burns: in a photograph of a baseball team, he might slowly pan across the faces of the players and come to rest on the player who is the subject of the narration. This technique, possible in many professional and home software applications, is now termed the "Ken Burns effect" in Apple's iPhoto, iMovie, and Final Cut Pro X software applications. Burns stated in a 2009 interview that he initially declined to have his name associated with the software because of his stance to refuse commercial endorsements. However, Apple chief Steve Jobs negotiated to give Burns Apple equipment, which Burns donated to nonprofit organizations.[52]

    As a museum retrospective noted, "His PBS specials [are] strikingly out of step with the visual pyrotechnics and frenetic pacing of most reality-based TV programming, relying instead on techniques that are literally decades old, although Burns reintegrates these constituent elements into a wholly new and highly complex textual arrangement."[9]

    In a 2011 interview, Burns stated that he admires and is influenced by filmmaker Errol Morris.[53]

    Filmography[edit]

    Conversation with Ken Burns about The Vietnam War. Video by the LBJ Library
    • Brooklyn Bridge (1981)[a]
    • The Shakers: Hands to Work, Hearts to God (1984)[a]
    • The Statue of Liberty (1985)[a]
    • Huey Long (1985)[a]
    • The Congress (1988)[a]
    • Thomas Hart Benton (1988)[a]
    • The Civil War (1990; 9 episodes)[a]
    • Empire of the Air: The Men Who Made Radio (1992)
    • Baseball (1994; 9 episodes – updated with The Tenth Inning in 2010, with Lynn Novick)
    • Thomas Jefferson (1997)
    • Lewis & Clark: The Journey of the Corps of Discovery (1997)
    • Frank Lloyd Wright (1998, with Lynn Novick)[54]
    • Not for Ourselves Alone: The Story of Elizabeth Cady Stanton & Susan B. Anthony (1999)[55]
    • Jazz (2001; 10 episodes)[56]
    • Mark Twain (2001)
    • Horatio's Drive: America's First Road Trip (2003)[57]
    • Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson (2005)[58]
    • The War (2007, with Lynn Novick; 7 episodes)
    • The National Parks: America's Best Idea (2009; 6 episodes)
    • Prohibition (2011, with Lynn Novick; 3 episodes)[59]
    • The Dust Bowl (2012; 4 episodes)[60]
    • The Central Park Five (2012, with Sarah Burns and David McMahon)[61]
    • Yosemite: A Gathering of Spirit (2013)[62]
    • The Address (2014)[63]
    • The Roosevelts: An Intimate History (2014; 7 episodes)[61][64]
    • Jackie Robinson (2016, with Sarah Burns and David McMahon; 2 episodes)[65]
    • Defying the Nazis: The Sharps' War (2016, with Artemis Joukowsky)[66]
    • The Vietnam War (2017, with Lynn Novick; 10 episodes)[67]
    • The Mayo Clinic: Faith – Hope – Science (2018, with Erik Ewers and Christopher Loren Ewers)
    • Country Music (2019, 8 episodes)[68]
    • Hemingway (2021, with Lynn Novick; 3 episodes)[69]
    • Muhammad Ali (2021, with Sarah Burns and David McMahon)[70]

    Future releases[edit]

    Short films[edit]

    These three short films are collected and distributed together as Seeing, Searching, Being: William Segal.

    As an executive producer[edit]

    As an actor[edit]

    Notes[edit]

    1. ^ abcdefgListed as "Kenneth Lauren Burns".

    References[edit]

    1. ^ ab"Ken Burns Biography (1953–)". Filmreference.com. Retrieved August 19, 2011.
    2. ^ abGenzlinger, Neil (March 27, 2015). "Review: In 'Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies,' Battling an Opportunistic Killer". The New York Times. Retrieved March 31, 2015.
    3. ^ abKen Burns. Encyclopedia of World Biography via BookRags.com. n.d.
    4. ^ abcdefgWalsh, Joan (n.d.). "Good Eye: The Interview With Ken Burns". San Francisco Focus. KQED via Online-Communicator.com. Archived from the original on September 22, 2011.
    5. ^"Ken Burns". biography at FlorentineFilms.com. n.d. Archived from the original on May 17, 2016.
    6. ^Wadler, Joyce (November 17, 1999). "PUBLIC LIVES; No Civil War, but a Brotherly Indifference". The New York Times. Retrieved November 4, 2016.
    7. ^Ann Arbor Public Schools Educational Foundation, [1] (accessed October 29, 2013, recovered from Internet Archive).
    8. ^"The Online Communicator: Ken Burns". Online-communicator.com. Retrieved May 6, 2019.
    9. ^ abcdEdgerton, Gary (n.d.). "Burns, Ken: U.S. Documentary Film Maker". The Museum of Broadcast Communications. Archived from the original on June 29, 2011.
    10. ^ ab"The Florentine Four: Ken Burns and Partners Look Back on 30 Years of Documentary Production". International Documentary Association. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
    11. ^"Outstanding Documentary Achievement in Cinematography Award: The Visual Poet: Buddy Squires". International Documentary Association. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
    12. ^"Florentine Films – Burns, Hott, Sherman & Squires". Florentinefilms.com. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
    13. ^"The Filmmakers – Ken Burns". kenburns.com. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
    14. ^ abErickson, Hal (2007). "Ken Burns biography". Movies & TV Dept. The New York Times. Archived from the original on October 29, 2007. Retrieved September 22, 2011. This single source gives two birthplaces. Under the header list, it reads "Birthplace: Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA." In the prose biography, it reads "Brooklyn-born Ken Burns..."
    15. ^ abcMasterClass. "Academy Award Nominated and Emmy Winner Ken Burns Joins MasterClass to Teach Documentary Filmmaking" (Press release). PR Newswire. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
    16. ^"Ken Burns

      Library Services for Faculty

      What is Films on Demand?

      Films on Demand offers a large collection of streaming, closed captioned, quality films from well-known producers. This database allows you to embed full-length films into your Canvas course without having to log in to it separately for both you and your students. Films on Demand is a streaming video database provided by the Golden West College Library.

      Quick instructions:

      Films on Demand is listed as an external tool in Canvas. 

      • From within a module, choose to add an external tool
      • Select Films on Demand
      • Type in the title of the film or some keywords
      • Click the embed link of the film or segment you want to add
      • Save and publish

      Note about Accessibility:

      Films are both closed captioned and have interactive transcripts. If the one you select does not have these features, please contact Alana Krause, Online Distance Education Librarian to request captioning.

      Источник: https://goldenwestcollege.libguides.com/facultyinfo/streamingvideo
      Ken Burns". Unforgivable Blackness. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
    17. ^"Prohibition". PBS.org. 2011. Archived from the original on May 3, 2012.
    18. ^"Ken Burns Seeking Dustbowl Stories". OETA. Archived from the original on September 6, 2011. Retrieved August 19, 2011.
    19. ^ ab"Introduction". FlorentineFilms.com. n.d. Archived from the original on January 2, 2013.
    20. ^The World Premiere of Yosemite: A Gathering of SpiritArchived October 23, 2013, at the Wayback Machine, Yosemite Conservancy Retrieved October 21, 2013.
    21. ^"Q&A: Ken Burns Discusses His New Documentary, The Address". National Geographic News. April 5, 2014. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
    22. ^Moore, Frazier (September 10, 2014). "PBS' 'The Roosevelts' portrays an epic threesome". AP News. Retrieved September 10, 2014.
    23. ^Cladwell, Evita (May 14, 2014). "Filmmaker Ken Burns discusses upcoming projects, Wash U commencement speech, more". St. Louis Public Radio. Retrieved August 26, 2015.
    24. ^"Defying the Nazis: The Sharps' War; A new film directed by Ken Burns and Artemis Joukowsky". Retrieved September 16, 2016.
    25. ^"Vietnam". Ken Burns media. August 26, 2015.
    26. ^"Upcoming Films". Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
    27. ^"Ernest Hemingway". Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
    28. ^"Ali". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
    29. ^"Benjamin Franklin". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
    30. ^"The Holocaust & the United States". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
    31. ^"Ken Burns". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved November 26, 2020.
    32. ^ abcd"Ken Burns". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
    33. ^"LBJ & the Great Society". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
    34. ^Jensen, Elizabeth (July 29, 2010). "PBS to Show Ken Burns Films on William Segal". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
    35. ^"The Accidental Historian: Ken Burns Mines America's Past". International Documentary Association. December 10, 2002. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
    36. ^"PBS – THE WEST – Stephen Ives". www.pbs.org. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
    37. ^"Walden". ewers brothers production. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
    38. ^"Country Music: Live at the Ryman DVD". Shop.PBS.org. Public Broadcasting Service. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
    39. ^"College Behind Bars | PBS" – via www.pbs.org.
    40. ^"East Lake Meadows". Ken Burns. Ken Burns Media, LLC. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
    41. ^Morgan, Jillian (February 19, 2020). "PBS sets April air date for Ken Burns documentary on human genetics". Realscreen. Brunico Communications Ltd. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
    42. ^"Part I: My experience on set of the movie "Gettysburg"". National Museum of American History. October 17, 2012. Retrieved December 5, 2019.

    External links[edit]

    Wikimedia Commons has media related to Ken Burns.
    Wikiquote has quotations related to: Ken Burns
    Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ken_Burns
    Ken Burns". Jazz. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  • ^"Home

    Where To Stream Every Ken Burns Documentary

    Do you watch documentaries to learn or to be entertained? With the really, really good ones, you don’t have to make that choice. And when, it comes to accessible, and smart documentaries, it’s hard to beat Ken Burns. From documentaries about the Civil War, immersion in country music, a good Burns documentary has it all.

    And now, thanks to the stream-ability of over 900 hours of PBS documentaries, including the complete filmography of the man, the myth, the legend: Kenneth Lauren Burns.

    That’s right, PBS has made everything Ken Burns has ever made, from 1981’s Brooklyn Bridge to his more recent series about Muhammad Ali and Ernest Hemingway, available to watch at two different online venues: an Amazon Prime video channel ($3.99/month on top of a Prime membership) and PBS Passport, the streaming service for everyone who gives at least $5 a month to their local PBS station.

    If it’s been a while since you had ten hours to spend on a historical docuseries full of talking heads and panned and zoomed black and white photos. Here are five great titles to start with.

    Hemingway (2021)

    Alongside the likes of Mark Twain and Herman Melville, Ernest Hemingway is one of the foundational figures in American literature. And over the course of six episodes, Burns provides a meticulous and fascinating glimpse into the mind behind The Sun Also Rises, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and several other classics. Beyond simply telling the story of Hemingway’s life, this docuseries allows viewers to hear from the man himself, as well as his friends and family, by sharing letters written by and to him over the course of his life.

    The Civil War (1990)

    Burns’s first epic docuseries, The Civil War remains a prime example of his style and its potential: to tell a complicated, historically remote story in an engaging, educational way.

    Muhammad Ali (2021)

    Five years after his death from Parkinson’s, Ali remains one of the most celebrated and iconic athletes in American history. And the life of this larger-than-life figure gets an in-depth exploration in this eight-hour series that dives into Ali both as a fighter and as a man. As usual, Burns manages to examine the complexity and nuance of his subject, giving new insight into the legendary boxer beyond his bravado and skill in the ring.

    Horatio’s Drive: America’s First Road Trip (2003)

    While he’s better known for his work on famous subjects, Horatio’s Drive shows that the Burns method can also tell a smaller story, about the first person to drive across the country in a car.

    The Central Park Five (2012)

    Continually relevant for the worst of reasons, The Central Park Five chronicles the wrongful conviction of five Black and Latino teens in the 1989 rape of a white woman in Central Park. If you found Ava Duvernay’s When They See Us, it’s definitely worth taking in this documentary version of the story.

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    Источник: https://www.fatherly.com/play/ken-burns-filmography-pbs-streaming-amazon-prime/

    The West: A Film by Stephen Ives and Presented by Ken Burns

    I love it. It gives an invaluable perspective that's impossible, however good one's intentions, for the people who are living the moment and times to have or to see who and what is really going to influence things and make a difference. This perspective shows that while individual actions are not irrelevant - still they're probably not doing what we think they are, that the smallest thing can have the greatest effect and that there would appear to be some other invisible hand at play in our human doings. Boggling. Wonderful. And, it's very fair, revealing important factors, forces, people and issues that have been buried with time. I feel it gives, finally, a fair shake to all players -- whites, Indians, Spanish -- amen.
    And it condenses this historical information that otherwise we'd have to read a million books to get -- without being superficial. I think this kind of information is so important for guiding how we live OUR moment(s) with better choices, wisdom and . . . humility.

    Источник: https://www.amazon.com/Ken-Burns-West-Season-1/dp/B0090X4BUI

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