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are the banks open tomorrow in scotland

Bank holidays today bank and public holidays in England and Wales, 9 in Scotland and 10 in Northern Ireland. Our contact centre is open 08:00 to 20:00, and you can report lost or stolen cards 24/7. Prefer to bank from home? Take a look at our online and mobile. Wherever you want to get to in life, Lloyds Bank has a range of bank accounts and personal banking services to suit you. Visit us today to find out more.

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Progress for Scotland’s National Investment Bank

Are the banks open tomorrow in scotland -

Virgin Money to close 31 branches across Scotland and north of England

Virgin Money has announced it will close 31 branches – almost all in Scotland and the north of England – in the latest stage of the UK banking sector’s retreat from the high street.

The bank said it expected to make 112 jobs redundant because of the closures after the coronavirus pandemic accelerated the shift to online and mobile app-based banking, a move that has rapidly reduced the profitability of physical bank branches.

Since the start of the pandemic HSBC, TSB and the Co-operative Bank have all closed branches, raising concerns about access to cash during lockdowns from the Financial Conduct Authority and consumer groups.

The latest closures represent almost a fifth of Virgin Money’s branches, meaning the bank will have only 131 left, down from 245 when it merged with Clydesdale and Yorkshire Bank in 2018.

Twelve of 55 branches will close in Scotland, while nine of 35 will close in Yorkshire, with the rest scattered across the north-east, north-west and the Midlands. No branches will close south of Nuneaton in Warwickshire.

The concentration of branch closures in Scotland and northern England reflects Virgin Money’s roots in Clydesdale and Yorkshire as well as the former Northern Rock, whose branches Virgin took over in 2011. Northern Rock was nationalised in 2007 after a run on the bank as people rushed to withdraw their money at the start of the financial crisis.

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Bank branch closures tend to be controversial because of the needs of generally older customers who are not able to manage their finances online.

However, Virgin Money argued that customers who previously relied on the branches will be able to use post offices for day‐to-day banking, including cash deposits and withdrawals, cheque deposits and balance inquiries, as well as coin exchange.

It said 28 of the 30 customer branches closing were located less than a third of a mile away from the nearest post office.

Fergus Murphy, Virgin Money’s group customer experience director, said: “As our customers change the way they want to bank with us and conduct fewer transactions in-store, we must continue to evolve the role of our stores into places where we showcase our products and bring our digital services to life.”

The bank said it intended to find alternative roles for some affected staff, either in nearby branches or other group functions.

The latest branches closures

  • Airdrie

  • Grantham

  • Northallerton

  • Ashton-Under-Lyne

  • Keighley

  • Newcastle, Northumberland St

  • Banchory

  • Leeds, Horsforth

  • Nuneaton

  • Beverley

  • Leeds, White Rose

  • Oban

  • Blackburn

  • Lincoln

  • Portree

  • Broughty Ferry

  • Macclesfield

  • Selby

  • Chesterfield

  • Mexborough

  • Sheffield, Meadowhall

  • Cumbernauld

  • Milngavie

  • Stenhousemuir

  • East Kilbride, Princes Square

  • Musselburgh

  • Whitby

  • Galashiels

  • Nelson

  • Wick

  • Gosforth (a branch for employees only, located in an office)

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/business/2021/sep/30/virgin-money-to-close-31-branches-across-scotland-and-north-of-england

Local public holidays

Each local council in Scotland has powers to make certain days 'local' public holidays.

Bank holidays

Bank holidays are the same across Scotland. If a bank holiday is on a weekend, a 'substitute' weekday becomes a bank holiday. This would normally be the Monday after the original date.

Your employer does not have to give you paid leave on bank or public holidays. Check your employment contract for what days your employer agreed you could take.

Bank holidays might affect how and when your benefits are paid. If the payment of benefits date is on a bank holiday, they will normally be paid on the day before the bank holiday.

Find bank holiday dates in England, Wales and Northern Ireland on GOV.UK.

Upcoming bank holidays

2021 Likely dates , but could still change.
30 NovemberTuesdaySt Andrew's Day
27 DecemberMondayChristmas Day (substitute day)
28 DecemberTuesdayBoxing Day (substitute day)
2022 Likely dates , but could still change.
3 JanuaryMondayNew Year's Day (substitute day)
4 JanuaryTuesday2 January (substitute day)
15 AprilFridayGood Friday
2 MayMondayEarly May bank holiday
2 JuneThursdaySpring bank holiday
3 JuneFridayPlatinum Jubilee bank holiday
1 AugustMondaySummer bank holiday
30 NovemberWednesdaySt Andrew's Day
26 DecemberMondayBoxing Day
27 DecemberTuesdayChristmas Day (substitute day)

Past bank holidays

2021  
2 AugustMondaySummer bank holiday
31 MayMondaySpring bank holiday
3 MayMondayEarly May bank holiday
2 AprilFridayGood Friday
4 JanuaryMonday2 January (substitute day)
1 JanuaryFridayNew Year's Day
2020  
28 DecemberMondayBoxing Day (substitute day)
25 DecemberFridayChristmas Day
30 NovemberMondaySt. Andrew's Day
3 AugustMondaySummer Bank Holiday
25 MayMondaySpring Bank Holiday
8 MayFridayEarly May Bank Holiday (VE day)
10 AprilFridayGood Friday
2 JanuaryThursday2 January
1 JanuaryWednesdayNew Year's Day
2019  
26 DecemberThursdayBoxing Day
25 DecemberWednesdayChristmas Day
2 DecemberMondaySt Andrew's Day (substitute day)
5 AugustMondaySummer bank holiday
27 MayMondaySpring bank holiday
6 MayMondayEarly May bank holiday
19 AprilFridayGood Friday
2 JanuaryWednesday2 January
1 JanuaryTuesdayNew Year's Day
2018  
26 DecemberWednesdayBoxing Day
25 DecemberTuesdayChristmas Day
30 NovemberFridaySt Andrew's Day
6 AugustMondaySummer bank holiday
28 MayMondaySpring bank holiday
7 MayMondayEarly May bank holiday
30 MarchFridayGood Friday
2 JanuaryTuesday2 January
1 JanuaryMondayNew Year's Day
2017  
26 DecemberTuesdayBoxing Day
25 DecemberMondayChristmas Day
30 NovemberThursdaySt Andrew's Day
7 AugustMondaySummer bank holiday
29 MayMondaySpring bank holiday
1 MayMondayEarly May bank holiday
14 AprilFridayGood Friday
3 JanuaryTuesdayNew Year's Day (substitute day)
2 JanuaryMonday2nd January
2016  
27 DecemberTuesdayChristmas Day (substitute day)
26 DecemberMondayBoxing Day
30 NovemberWednesdaySt Andrew's Day
1 AugustMondaySummer bank holiday
30 MayMondaySpring bank holiday
2 MayMondayEarly May bank holiday
25 MarchFridayGood Friday
4 JanuaryMonday2 January (substitute day)
1 JanuaryFridayNew Year's Day
2015  
28 DecemberMondayBoxing Day (substitute day)
25 DecemberFridayChristmas Day
30 NovemberMondaySt Andrew's Day
3 AugustMondaySummer bank holiday
25 MayMondaySpring bank holiday
4 MayMondayEarly May bank holiday
3 AprilFridayGood Friday
2 JanuaryFriday2 January
1 JanuaryThursdayNew Year's Day
2014  
26 DecemberFridayBoxing Day
25 DecemberThursdayChristmas Day
1 DecemberMondaySt Andrew's Day (substitute day)
4 AugustMondaySummer bank holiday
26 MayMondaySpring bank holiday
5 MayMondayEarly May bank holiday
18 AprilFridayGood Friday
2 JanuaryThursday2 January
1 JanuaryWednesdayNew Year's Day
2013  
26 DecemberThursdayBoxing Day
25 DecemberWednesdayChristmas Day
2 DecemberMondaySt Andrew's Day (substitute day)
5 AugustMondaySummer bank holiday
27 MayMondaySpring bank holiday
6 MayMondayEarly May bank holiday
29 MarchFridayGood Friday
2 JanuaryWednesday2 January
1 JanuaryTuesdayNew Year's Day
Источник: https://www.mygov.scot/scotland-bank-holidays

In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, the summer bank holiday is on the last Monday of August. In Scotland it is on the first Monday of August. This day marks the end of the summer holidays for many people who return to work or school in the autumn.

Is 2 August 2021 a Public Holiday?

Summer Bank Holiday is a public holiday in 4 constituent countries, where it is a day off for the general population, and schools and most businesses are closed.

What Do People Do?

For many people, the summer bank holiday marks the end of the summer. Some people take trips or short vacations during the three day weekend. For others, it is another opportunity to work in their gardens or carry out home improvements.

In London the Notting Hill Carnival is held. This street festival is best known for its exuberant costumes, dancing and music played by steel drum bands. The festival has been held every year since 1965 and was originally organized by immigrants from the Caribbean, particularly Trinidad, to the United Kingdom. It started as a protest against the racism, poor working and housing conditions that they suffered.

Today, the Notting Hill Carnival is a multicultural celebration, attracting over two million people. It is thought to be the second largest street carnival in the world. In the past, a considerable amount of public disorder occurred round the event, but it has been calmer in recent years.

Public Life

On the summer bank holiday, many organizations, businesses and schools are closed. Stores may be open or closed, according to local custom. There is more local variation in Scotland, where local conditions, rather than national laws, dictate whether organizations and businesses close for the day. Public transport systems often run to a holiday timetable. As this three-day weekend marks the end of the summer holiday period, there can be a lot of congestion on roads and public transport systems.

Background

The summer bank holiday was introduced in the Bank Holidays Act 1871 and first observed in that year. It was originally intended to give bank employees the opportunity to participate and attend cricket matches. Exactly one hundred years later, the Banking and Financial Dealings Act 1971 moved this bank holiday to the last Monday in August for England, Wales and Northern Ireland. This followed a trial period from 1965 to 1970 of the new date. In Scotland, it remained on the first Monday in August.

Summer Bank Holiday Observances

While we diligently research and update our holiday dates, some of the information in the table above may be preliminary. If you find an error, please let us know.

Источник: https://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/uk/summer-bank-holiday

National Bank of Scotland Ltd

Brief history

This co-partnership bank was established in 1825 as National Banking Company of Scotland, with an authorised capital of £5m, and attracted more shareholders than any other bank in Britain. Its first governor was the Duke of Roxburghe and its first chairman was Alexander Henderson. It opened 13 branches in its first year, began to circulate notes through the offices of its provincial shareholders (£133,000 in circulation by 1826), and acquired head office premises in St Andrew Square, Edinburgh. In 1831 the bank received a royal charter, and changed its name to National Bank of Scotland.

It continued to expand, acquiring Commercial Banking Co of Aberdeen in 1833 and Perth Union Banking Co in 1836. In 1843 a bid to take over the Glasgow & Ship Bank (est. 1809) failed, leading National Bank of Scotland to open its own Glasgow office later the same year. In 1844 it acquired the short-lived Bank of Glasgow.

In 1864 National Bank of Scotland was the first Scottish bank to open an office in London. In 1882 it registered as a limited liability company. From 1881 until the outbreak of the First World War, it was - in terms of liabilities, deposits and advances - second only to Bank of Scotland among the Scottish banks.

In 1918 National Bank of Scotland and Lloyds Bank Ltd (est. 1765), bankers of London, building on an existing foreign exchange connection, reached an agreement by which Lloyds acquired the entire capital of National Bank of Scotland. Both banks, apart from an exchange of directors, remained entirely separate. National Bank of Scotland continued to trade successfully during the inter-war years, with a new head office building, commissioned in 1936, opened in 1947. In 1946 the bank introduced its first mobile banking service on the Isle of Lewis.

In 1959 Lloyds Bank approached Commercial Bank of Scotland, which was seeking amalgamation with a larger partner, offering to surrender its ownership of National Bank of Scotland for a stake in a new, merged bank. The proposal was readily accepted and resulted in the formation of National Commercial Bank of Scotland later that year.

Branches: In total, the bank opened 200 branches and sub-branches throughout Scotland between 1825 and 1959, and five offices in England (in London and Berwick). In 1959 198 branches were operating.

Published histories

  • The National Bank of Scotland: A Short History of the Bank (Edinburgh: Thomas Nelson & Sons, 1947)
  • The National Bank of Scotland Centenary, 1825-1925 (Edinburgh: William Blackwood & Sons, 1925)
  • SG Checkland, Scottish Banking: A History, 1695-1973 (Glasgow: Collins, 1975)

Summary of our archive holdings

Our archival records of National Bank of Scotland Ltd have the reference code NS.

For help understanding words used here, check our glossary of banking record types (PDF 68KB).

Corporate records

  • prospectus 1824
  • stock journals 1825-46
  • progressive stock ledger 1825-1918
  • directors' meeting minute books 1825-1959
  • agenda books 1831-5, 1918-55
  • stock ledgers 1833-48
  • constitution, contract of co-partnership, charter of incorporation and certificate of incorporation 1882
  • changes to constitution 1895, 1909
  • register of directors' fees 1914-(1915)
  • general manager's correspondence file 1914-34
  • confirmatory and supplementary charter 1927 and 1954
  • committee register 1938-59

Financial records

  • journals of the general ledger 1825-1959
  • general ledgers 1825-1959
  • annual reports and balance sheets 1826-1940, 1946, 1957
  • balance statements 1828-1958
  • annual balance papers 1874-1957
  • income tax account books 1878-1940
  • statement of interest account books 1900-40
  • head office charges book 1903-31
  • statement of losses 1911-56
  • abstract of weekly balance sheets 1913-43
  • liabilities to the public and reserves of cash and money at short notice book 1915-25
  • ledger of advances 1922-39
  • chief accountant's letterbooks 1923-33, 1936-8
  • chief accountant's mechanisation correspondence files 1931-59
  • foreign banks' agency files 1933-47
  • branch profit and loss books 1934-59
  • half-yearly balance papers 1937-50
  • cash book sheets 1938-40
  • chief accountant's branch letterbooks 1946-7
  • head office accountant's branch statements 1956-8

Legal records

  • legal opinions of counsel 1871-1933
  • memorandum re enlargement of powers of investment of the funds of the bank 1895
  • correspondence and papers re securities over shipbuilding contracts 1956-9

Customer records

  • statement of losses books 1826-1904
  • debt ledgers 1827-49
  • signature book 1831-45
  • consignation receipt books 1850-(1915)

Head office branch records

  • branch inspection reports 1857-64
  • circular books 1883-(1915)
  • list of offices and correspondents 1913
  • branch procedural circulars 1938-58
  • audit statements of general balances of branches, 1948-56
  • memoranda for branches 1958-9

Staff records

  • lists of principal office officials 1825
  • register of officers 1825-(1915)
  • head office salary register 1843-65
  • widows and orphans fund letterbook 1850-82
  • annuity fund: entrance fee book 1851-96, membership books 1898-(1915), cash books 1851-1931, ledger 1851-99, accounts books 1875-96, lists of contributors 1851-1900, deaths, marriages and retirement book 1896-(1915)
  • staff photographs 1866-c.1950s
  • officers' guarantee fund: letterbook 1871-94, rules and abstract accounts 1919-38, register of contributors 1910-(1915)
  • minutes and papers re Glasgow officials' social meetings 1888-(1915)
  • golf club minutes and fixture cards 1891-1968
  • agents' instruction book 1897
  • staff report book 1910-(1915)
  • Glasgow branches annual dinner programme 1925
  • instruction manual 1927
  • staff magazine 1929-40, 1946-59
  • brochure re officers' pension scheme 1933
  • staff association quarterly reports 1951-2

Property records

  • agencies register 1825-1959
  • heritable property ledgers 1825-1959
  • premises register 1833-1950
  • drawings: Glasgow office 1849, head office 1935, 1950s
  • bank plans and architectural drawings 1863-1959
  • branch photographs 1864-1959
  • agency houses and furniture books 1914-59
  • property and alterations day book 1938-50
  • statement of rent accounts 1939-47
  • mobile bank photographs c.1946-56
  • expenditure accounts book 1946-59
  • property expenditure ledger 1955-9
  • list of tenants and rent paid 1957
  • valuation and rating book 1957-9
  • summary valuations 1958

Note issue records

  • banknote registers 1825-7
  • banknotes 1825-1957
  • banknote specimen album 1883-95
  • note cancellation ledger for 5 pound notes 1912-c.1920 and 20 pound notes 1914-c.1920
  • cashier's register of note circulation 1930-78

Marketing records

Branch records

Summary of archive holdings elsewhere

  • Glasgow University Archive Services: Photocopies of extracts from minutes, annual reports, letterbook, balance sheets 1825-1958 (Ref: UGD 129/2/3), annual reports 1879-1925 (Ref: UDG 94/10/3)
  • Bank of England Archive: Governor's file re bank amalgamations, including merger of National Bank of Scotland with Commercial Bank of Scotland to form National Commercial Bank of Scotland 1956-9 (Ref: G1/12)
Источник: https://www.natwestgroup.com/heritage/companies/national-bank-of-scotland.html

Safety & Inclusivity

Ensuring that you feel safe, welcome and part of our family is incredibly important to us, which is why we are incredibly proud of our world-renowned reputation for providing a warm and open welcome to everyone. Afterall, we strongly believe that diversity and inclusivity are fundamental to what makes Scotland great. 

So, whether it’s our dedicated police force working in communities to keep people safe, or our world-leading stances on everything from LGBTI rights to humanitarian crises, we’re constantly striving to create a society free from crime, prejudice and inequality.

Find out more about safety and inclusivity in Scotland

Coronavirus

You can find up to date information on Scotland's response to the Coronavirus pandemic, current restrictions and potential impacts on on the Scottish Government website.

Find out more at gov.scot

Real life Stories

Don’t want to take our word for it? No problem! If you’d like to hear from real people who have already made the move to Scotland, check out our Real Life Stories section. Here people from all around the world share their experiences of how and why they moved to Scotland.

Источник: https://www.scotland.org/live-in-scotland/moving-to-scotland

Complete list of remaining bank holidays in Scotland for the rest of 2021

 

The Scots have enjoyed their sunny banking holiday weekend as good weather has finally descended on the country.

With experts top 10 home remedies for migraine us to meet our friends and family outside of the coronavirus pandemic, many people have flocked to beer gardens and parks in recent days.

Today is the fifth banking holiday the Scots have been able to enjoy this year so far – with previous ones including both New Year’s Day and Good Friday.

National holidays have been in the lives of people across the UK since the late 19th century.



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The term bank leave was coined to indicate the days of the week that banks were closed to trading to seize accounts and regulate bookkeeping.

But now people use bank holidays to enjoy going shopping, going out to dinner or meeting loved ones over the three-day weekend.

Businesses such as the Post Office, government offices and departments, and banks keep their doors closed during bank holidays.

Days can often affect business opening hours that stay open, with early closing time in place at some supermarkets and malls.



Did you know that you can keep up to date with the latest news by subscribing to our daily newspaper?

We send out a breakfast and lunch newsletter covering the latest headlines every day.

We also send coronavirus updates at 5pm vibe bank account weekdays and a summary of the stories of the week you should read on Sunday afternoons.

Registration is simple, easy and free.

You can enter your email address in the checkbox above, press Subscribe and we will do the rest.

Alternatively, you can subscribe and view the rest of our newsletters here.

Public transport operators usually switch to a Sunday service for that day.

May 31st is certainly not the last banking holiday of the year – in fact, there are still four to do before the end of the year.

Below is a list of all the bank holidays coming up for the rest are the banks open tomorrow in scotland the year and those in pencil for 2022.

2021

August 2 – Summer vacation at the bank

November 30 – St. Andrews Day

December 27 – Monday after Christmas Day

December 28 – the following Tuesday of Boxing Day

2022

January 3 – Monday after New Year’s Day

January 4 – replacement for January 2

April 15 – Good Friday

May 2 – Beginning of May bank where can i donate cat food 2 – Bank Holiday in the spring

June 3 – Platinum Jubilee Bank Holiday

August 1 – Summer vacation at the bank

November 30 – St. Andrews Day

December 26 – Boxing Day

December 27 – Tuesday after Christmas Day

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In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, the summer bank holiday is on the last Monday of August. In Scotland it is on the first Monday of August. This day marks the end of the summer holidays for many people who return to work or school in the autumn.

Is 2 August 2021 a Public Holiday?

Summer Bank Holiday is a public holiday in 4 constituent countries, where it is a day off for the general population, and schools and most businesses are closed.

What Do People Do?

For many people, the summer bank holiday marks the end of the summer. Some people take trips or short vacations during the three day weekend. For others, it is another opportunity to work in their gardens or carry out home improvements.

In London the Notting Hill Carnival is held. This street festival is best known for its exuberant costumes, dancing and music played by steel drum bands. The festival has been held every year since 1965 and was originally organized by immigrants from the Caribbean, particularly Trinidad, to the United Kingdom. It started as a protest against the racism, poor working and housing conditions that they suffered.

Today, the Notting Hill Carnival is a multicultural celebration, attracting over two million people. It is thought to be the second largest street carnival in the world. In the past, a considerable amount of public disorder occurred round the event, but it has been calmer in recent years.

Public Life

On the summer bank holiday, many organizations, businesses and schools are closed. Stores may be open or closed, according to local custom. There is more local variation in Scotland, where local conditions, rather than national laws, dictate whether organizations and businesses close for the day. Public transport systems often run to a holiday timetable. As this three-day weekend marks the end of the summer holiday period, there can be a lot of congestion on roads and public transport systems.

Background

The summer bank holiday was introduced in the Bank Holidays Act 1871 and first observed in that year. It was originally intended to give bank employees the opportunity to participate and attend cricket matches. Exactly one hundred years later, the Banking and Financial Dealings Act 1971 moved this bank holiday to the last Monday in August for England, Wales and Northern Ireland. This followed a trial period from 1965 to 1970 of the new date. In Scotland, it remained on the first Monday in August.

Summer Bank Holiday Observances

While we diligently research and update our holiday dates, some of the information in the table above may be preliminary. If you find an error, please let us know.

Источник: https://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/uk/summer-bank-holiday

Out About Scotland includes affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Scotland has 10 bank holidays each year; New Year’s Day, 2nd January, Good Friday, Easter Monday, Early May, Spring Bank Holiday, August Bank Holiday, St Andrew’s Day, Christmas Day and Boxing Day. Discover suggestions for things to do and places to visit on a bank holiday in Scotland with this fact-packed guide.

relaxing in forest

The best things to do on a bank holiday in Scotland 2021

There’s surely nothing better in life than waking up in the morning, peeking your head out from under the duvet and suddenly realising there’s no work today, not because it’s the weekend but because it’s a bank holiday.

A bank holiday is a perfect opportunity to do something fun and exciting, but sadly too many people choose to waste it with a load of boring household chores that can be done any day of the week.

So what are you going to do with yourself on this bonus day off work? Cut the grass? Wash the car?

Or will you get out and exploring Scotland’s amazing attractions instead?

If you’re not sure about where to go to make the most of your time off you can look around this website to get a few pointers about the places you could visit, and I hope you’ll find something that takes your fancy out of all the categories you’ll find listed.

If you’re not sure where to start head to the front page and have a look through the menu at the top where you’ll also find out about the current weather situation and a route finder to help you plan your journey.

I’m guessing you’ll also want to know the dates of Scotland’s future bank holidays and which events are being held on those days along with a few suggestions for attractions you could visit, which is why I’ve compiled all this information (and more) into this handy guide.

deckchairs beach

List of bank holidays in Scotland 2021

The table below lists Scotland’s official bank holidays for 2021.

Note: If a bank holiday is on a weekend, a ‘substitute’ weekday becomes a bank holiday, normally the following Monday.

New Year’s DayFri, 1 Jan 2021
2nd JanuaryMon, 4 Jan 2021
Good FridayFri, 2 Apr 2021
Easter MondayMon, 5 Apr 2021
Early May Bank HolidayMon, 3 May 2021
Spring Bank HolidayMon, 31 Are the banks open tomorrow in scotland 2021
Summer Bank HolidayMon, 2 Aug 2021
St. Andrew’s DayTue, 30 Nov 2021
Christmas DayMon, 27 Dec 2021
Boxing DayTue, 28 Dec 2021

The best bank holiday events in Scotland

This list could take up an entire article on its own so I’ve limited it to just a few of my favourites, but if you’d like an overview of recommended events check out the Scottish Events page and the Events Listings page which is a continually updated list of everything that’s happening throughout Scotland.

Edinburgh’s Christmas: 14th November – 2nd January

Edinburgh Christmas

Edinburgh’s Christmas has grown from a small collection of German market stalls in Princes Street into one of the country’s biggest festivals, where Christmas is celebrated with a dizzying array of fun-filled activities and shows for family members of all ages.

There’s certainly no shortage of things to do in Edinburgh at Christmas time and the city’s annual winter-wonderland spectacular firmly cements Edinburgh as one of the top destinations in Europe to visit from November to January, and that’s before you’ve explored all the other famous attractions in the city.

The Edinburgh’s Christmas event is located across several areas of the city centre so visitors can explore some of the best parts of Edinburgh during their visit, although to be honest even a full weekend isn’t going to be enough time to fit it all in.

The main area is in Princes Street Gardens where you’ll find the majority of the market stalls and fun rides, while another location is a short walk away at St. Andrew Square where you’ll find more food stalls and rides. In recent years the event organizers have included several Christmas-themed attractions in nearby George Street as well.

If you want to learn more about this festival, take a look at my Complete Guide to Edinburgh’s Christmas.

Hogmanay: 31st December (New Years Day)

No other country in the world has as much passion as Scotland when it comes to seeing the end of one year and the beginning of the next, and you only have to look at Edinburgh’s Hogmanay to see the monumental efforts the Scots put into celebrating it.

Each year around 75,000 people attend the concert in Princes Street Gardens while another 100,000 watch the fireworks over Edinburgh Castle in an end-of-year blowout that’s often described as the biggest street party in the world.

The scale of Edinburgh’s Hogmanay is enormous and maybe a little overwhelming if you’re a new visitor to the city, but you’re guaranteed a warm and friendly welcome and you’ll find you’ve suddenly got more new friends than you know what to do with as you dance the night away.

Highlights include live music, DJs, outside bars and the world’s biggest rendition of Auld Lang Syne. Great fun!

Oh, and if you want to learn about Edinburgh’s Torchlight Procession (a must-do if you’re in the city at this time of year), head on over to my Complete Guide to the Edinburgh’s Hogmanay Torchlight Procession.

Atholl Gathering and Highland Games: 29th – 30th May (Spring bank holiday)

highland games

The Atholl Gathering takes place on the bank holiday at the end of May with a spectacle that treats visitors to two days of military parades and Highland games.

Held at Blair Castle near the town of Blair Atholl, the event is one of the highlights of the Highland calendar and is well worth attending if you want to experience the traditions that this part of Scotland has become famous for.

The parades begin with an inspection of Europe’s last remaining private army, the Atholl Highlanders, who are accompanied by the sounds of their own pipe and drum band in a memorable event that showcases the best of Scotland’s rich cultural heritage.

The second day of the gathering involves contestants battling it out to win traditional contests like tossing the caber and throwing the hammer, which trace their roots back hundreds of years to Highland warriors practising their battle techniques.

There are also Highland dancing competitions, piping competitions and tug of war competitions, so if you want to see Scotland’s best local athletes in action the Atholl games are definitely worth seeing.

Edinburgh Fringe Festival: 6th – 30th August (Summer bank holiday)

are the banks open tomorrow in scotland Fringe">

Edinburgh is home to the world’s biggest annual multi-arts event which has been running consecutively since its inception in 1947.

Originally created as an alternative to the already-popular Edinburgh International Festival, the Fringe has grown in strength each year to the point where the annual figures can only be described as astounding.

Over 25 days there are an average of more than 50,000 performances of nearly 2,500 different color by number pages for adults printable, held in 300 different venues which are attended by nearly half a million visitors, and an incredible 2.8 million tickets are purchased (as of 2019) with ticket sales totalling over £4 million.

The festival runs for most of August so you should be able to see it on the summer bank holiday, but if not you’ll have plenty of time to visit the event during the rest of the month.

The Fringe draws artists from all over the world and many big-name comedians started their careers there, but you’ll also find loads of street performers and amateur acts at venues located throughout the city.

It’s one of the biggest festivals of the year in Scotland and I can’t even begin to recommend it highly enough so if you want to learn more about it head over to my Complete Guide to the Edinburgh Fringe.

The Saltire Festival – November (St. Andrews Day)

The Saltire festival runs during the last week of November throughout Scotland in a series of events that celebrate Scotland and Scottish culture.

You’ll find a variety of hosts providing the very best of Scottish music, food and entertainment across the country, although one of the best events is held in East Lothian which is the birthplace of the Saltire – Scotland’s national flag.

You’ll be treated to traditional massed pipe and drum bands along with dancing, comedy, special horse racing events and charity runs, and at most occasions you’ll be able to sample Scotland’s best produce in a gastronomic adventure that includes single-malt whisky and traditional food like haggis and bridies (similar to a Cornish pasty).

The Saltire Festival is great family fun and it’s a fantastic way to experience Scottish culture away from the usual tourist marketing hype.


The best attractions to visit on a bank holiday in Scotland

Edinburgh

Water of Leith

The Water of Leith: You’ve got loads of options when it comes to finding a place to visit on a bank holiday in Scotland so choosing one really comes down to one question – what’s the weather going to be like?

If it’s going to be a sunny day (admittedly a rare experience on a bank holiday) then you might think about going for a walk, and I can’t think of many nicer places than the Water of Leith.

This 22-mile stretch of water runs from the Pentland Hills on the outskirts of Midlothian all the way to Leith bordering the Firth of Forth, and there are miles and miles of picturesque paths along the route.

The best point to enter the walkway is at Stockbridge but as the entire Water of Leith walkway runs for 12 miles you might consider taking a bike if you want to see as much as possible in one day.

Failing that, I recommend you follow the Water of Leith to Dean Village which is a popular tourist attraction in its own right, and after exploring the architecture of Edinburgh’s old mill town you’ll find an excellent selection of nearby cafés and restaurants.

You can find out much more about this river in my Complete Guide to The Water of Leith.

Camera Obscura and World of Illusions: Weather a bit damp? How about heading indoors? The camera obscura attraction has been wowing crowds since the early 1800s when Edinburgh telescope maker Thomas Short started exhibiting his prized collection of telescopes and prisms on top of Calton Hill.

After his death, his daughter Maria took over the collection and in time it developed into the World of Illusions that’s now located on The Royal Mile a short way down from Edinburgh Castle (I wouldn’t bother with the castle on a bank holiday due to the crowds).

The camera obscura is the main exhibit at this attraction and you’ll find it near the end of your tour at the highest point of the building. It’s a fine example of Victorian engineering where an image of Edinburgh is painted onto a display table using a series of optics, and by all acccounts it absolutely blew the minds of Edinburgh’s residents nearly two hundred years ago.

It’s not quite as impressive in today’s PlayStation generation but it’s an interesting thing to see – much like the rest of the exhibits.

As you make your way through the attraction you’ll find a swirling-vortex tunnel of lights, laser-generated 3D optical illusions, galleries of image-altering mirrors and lots of modern video trickery.

Holyrood Park: If you’re visiting Edinburgh but the weather’s changeable you might consider heading somewhere that offers a nice outdoor space that’s close to the city centre. If that’s the case then you need to go to Holyrood Park, situated around a mile to the east of Edinburgh Castle.

As the city’s residents know, Holyrood Park is the remnant of a long-extinct volcano, and across its how to activate walmart prepaid debit card of wilderness you’ll find a wee bit of the Highlands in miniature – minus the are the banks open tomorrow in scotland and midges.

See my guide to the best midge repellent to use in Scotland.

What you’ve got instead are peaceful lochans, mountain-like ridges, great expanses of gorse and wide open stretches of grassland that look like they’ve come straight out of a Diana Gabaldon novel.

In fact, if you closed your eyes and were suddenly plonked down in the middle of Holyrood Park you could be forgiven for thinking you’d been transported into the Highlands, especially if you look up at the peak of Arthur’s Seat towering 800 feet above you.

Arthur’s Seat is the highest point of the park and it offers stunning views across Edinburgh in all directions, so if you manage to make the steep climb up there I highly recommend you make sure you’ve got your camera with you.

Discover this attraction with my Complete Guide to Holyrood Park.


Glasgow

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Musuem

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum: Scotland’s most-visited free attraction barely needs an article written about it as pretty much everyone in the country knows all about the vast museum and art gallery that dominates Kelvingrove Park in Glasgow’s city centre.

This is a great attraction and there’s so much to see and do at Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum it’ll make your head spin. The attraction has been cleverly designed so that all ages will enjoy it from young children right up to pensioners, and there are displays and interactive exhibitions that cover themes of art, science, history, culture and much more.

The museum consists of two sections – the art galleries and the museum – with a collection of some of Europe’s greatest artworks housed in the twenty-two galleries and over 8,000 objects housed in the museum.

There are lots of temporary exhibitions to browse at all times of the year as well as several permanent displays like the arms and armour gallery and the Charles Rennie Mackintosh gallery.

Perhaps best of all, the museum is situated in the lovely Kelvingrove Park so you can get some fresh air on a sunny day and it’s easy to hop on a bus to get into the city centre to enjoy Glasgow’s world-class shopping too.

You can find out more about this are the banks open tomorrow in scotland with my complete guide to Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum.

The Necropolis: I’ll grant you, this is one of the more odd-ball suggestions on this list, but bear with me because I think a visit to Glasgow’s Necropolis is well worth visiting on a bank holiday, whatever the weather.

This attraction (except it’s not really an ‘attraction’ in the strictest sense of the word) is located next door to the city’s beautiful Cathedral and just a short distance from the fascinating St. Mungo Museum of Religious Life.

The Necropolis is an enormous Victorian cemetery that’s the final resting place for over 50,000 Glasgow residents. The site covers more than 37 acres and contains over 3,500 monuments, many of which are dedicated to some of the greatest Scots that have ever lived.

What makes a visit to the Necropolis so good is that it has an other-worldly atmosphere that you can’t quite put your finger on – perhaps due to the fact that the gravestones and monuments are so elaborately decorated – and the site is really the skeleton key in hindi download beautiful even if it is a graveyard.

The top of the hill where John Knox’s impressive memorial stands offers fantastic views across the city and as it’s so close service credit union branches near me the cathedral it’s easy to head indoors if the clouds threaten to dampen your day.

You can learn more with my Complete Guide to the Glasgow Necropolis.

The Riverside Museum of Transport

The Riverside Museum of Transport: This is another really good museum that’s free to visit (well done Glasgow) and in my opinion it rivals Kelvingrove for the amount of enjoyment you’ll get from it.

The location of the museum is in the name and you’ll find it on the bank of the mighty River Clyde alongside the restored Victorian Tall Ship that’s also free to visit.

Inside the Riverside Museum you’ll be able to explore the world of transport from the earliest days of horse and carriage right up to the ultra-modern racing cars of the Formula One era, along with a few oddities thrown in for ok google key bank login please measure.

Remember the Sinclair C1? Or how about the Raleigh Chopper? These and many more restored forms of transport are included in the collection and I think you’ll be amazed by the quality of the displays are the banks open tomorrow in scotland show.

Perhaps the highlight of the entire attraction is the recreation of a Glasgow street where you’ll find coffee shops, a pub, clothes citibank student checking account review and even an underground subway to explore.

Not only that but turn the corner and are the banks open tomorrow in scotland find a couple of full-size locomotives to look inside, as well as trams, buses, and more cars than I’ve got time to list in this article.

Just believe me when I say a time spent on a bank holiday trip to The Riverside Museum of Transport is time well spent.

I’ve written an article about the Riverside Museum of Transport that goes into the attraction in much greater detail.


scotland mountains

Scottish bank holiday weather

It’s impossible to predict exactly what the weather will be like on any given day but you’ll get a good indication of the expected weather during Scotland’s seasons with the information I’ve provided below.

If you want a more in-depth look city bank lubbock texas phone number the current weather in the major tourist hot spots take a look at my weather page which will tell you the current conditions throughout Scotland.

Spring – You can expect average maximum temperatures to range from around 7°C to 13 °C during March, April and May, although this can vary significantly each year (just look at 2018’s ‘Beast from the East‘…).

Generally though, spring is a beautiful time to visit Scotland with flowers bursting into bloom and wildlife beginning to get active again after a long slumber.

The only downside is the frequent April showers that can put a bit of a dampener on things but at least there’s a great range of galleries, museums and other attractions to keep you entertained, regardless of the weather.

walk in forest

Summer – Summer in Scotland can be a bit hit or miss with lots of overcast days competing with beautifully clear skies, but even so, June, July and August are normally the warmest months with average maximum temperatures ranging between 15 °C to 17 °C.

For me, the best thing about Scotland’s summers is that the days are long thanks to our high latitude and you’ll often find it’s still light at 10 pm even in southerly regions like the Borders.

If you head to the far north of the Shetlands you’ll discover that it doesn’t even get completely dark in summer which means you’ve got more time to pack in extra activities.

Autumn – From September to November the nights begin to draw in and the temperatures drop, although you’ll usually experience between 8 °C  to 14 °C thanks to our increasingly temperate climate.

This is one of the best times of the year to get outdoors to explore Scotland’s vast wilderness areas, especially our woodland and forests which explode with vibrant colours as the trees change from green to fiery reds, oranges, and yellows. Be aware though, that you can expect a lot (a LOT) of grey, drizzly days, so pack to stay dry and take a waterproof jacket with you.

Winter – December, January and February are generally the coldest months in Scotland, with average maximum temperature hovering around 0 °C to 5 °C, and even colder in the mountain regions which hover around 0 °C.

Note that these temperatures don’t take wind chill into consideration so if you’re planning to go on an outdoor excursion make sure you pack plenty of extra thermal layers into your bag.

While the lowlands are generally snow-free for much of the winter months you can expect significant snowfall on the peaks and mountains of the Highlands, with around 100 days of falling snow throughout the season.

If you’re coming to Scotland for skiing you’ll find zillow homes for rent st cloud fl snow sports season lasts from November to April, but check the snow forecast before you head out.


Facts about bank holidays in Scotland

Edinburgh's Christmas

Christmas Day

By far the most popular day of celebration in the entire calendar, Christmas Day has become an event that lasts for the whole month of December in the UK, with shopping and preparations often beginning much earlier in November.

While the modern origins of Christmas are religious – it’s a celebration of the birth of Jesus after all – it was introduced into the modern calendar to coincide with pre-Christian celebrations of the winter solstice.

Foremost among these ancient rites was Yule, the pagan are the banks open tomorrow in scotland festival that was originally observed by the Germanic people, with the date being dictated by the lunar cycle (normally between late December and early January).

The date of December 25th was at one time a popular Roman holiday dedicated to the god Saturnalia, the god of agriculture, but over time it became mixed in with the celebrations of several sun gods into one large annual festival.

It wasn’t until AD 350 that Pope Julius I officially named December 25th as the day to mark the birth of Jesus, a date which was likely chosen to replace the pre-existing pagan festivals.

Boxing Day

While the exact origins of this tradition are unknown there are are the banks open tomorrow in scotland couple of theories that are widely believed to be the most likely explanations for the term ‘Boxing Day’.

First, we know that although wealthy families gave presents to each other on the 25th, their servants had to wait until the 26th, at which time they would be given gifts presented in a box as a way of saying thank you for their loyal service, hence the phrase ‘Boxing Day’.

The second theory stems from the custom of priests opening up their charity boxes which had been filled over Christmas so they could hand out money to the poor, a tradition which continues to this day in many churches in Scotland.

But wherever the meaning of Boxing Day comes from, today we tend to use it as an extra day to recover from the excesses of Christmas, at least until the celebrations begin again on Hogmanay.

fireworks

New Years Day

In the old Roman calendar, New Years Day was actually observed on the 15th March and it wasn’t until 153 BC that the Romans changed the start of the year to the 1st January. Before then both January and February were actually at the end of the calendar year.

The name for the first month of the year comes from the name given to the Roman god of doors and gates, Janus, who had two heads – one looking forward and one looking backwards, which I guess makes sense for a month that’s saying goodbye to one year and hello to the next.

After the Romans departed from Britain there were a number of different dates that were used to mark the start of the new year, but in 1582 the Roman Catholic church officially adopted January 1st as the official date in the Gregorian calendar, and it’s remained that way ever since

Good Friday

This is another bank holiday that stems from an event in Christianity, this time the death and resurrection of Jesus. While Good Friday was originally seen as a day of mourning it has lost a lot of its significance in modern British culture, although there’s still a large percentage of the population that regards it as a religious festival.

The name Good Friday is believed to have come from several possible origins throughout history, but the most common theories are:

  1. ‘Good’ Friday derives from ‘Holy’ Friday, back when good meant holy in old English.
  2. Good Friday is a corruption of the phrase ‘God’s Friday’.
  3. Good Friday stems from Jesus’s resurrection, which was service credit union branches near me ‘good’ day.

Whatever the original meaning, unless you’re particularly religious the day is generally blended into a long weekend, with Good Friday at the start and Easter Sunday/Monday at the end, and while the religious principles behind it are waning in popular culture it’s still celebrated to a certain degree as part of the Easter event.


Scotland’s bank holidays compared to other countries

working

The UK has one of the lowest numbers of public and banks holidays of all the countries in the world, which is a bit unfair when you consider we also work some of the longest hours in Europe.

While workers in countries like India and Colombia are taking 18 public holidays each year, here in the UK we have to deal with a measly 10.

That’s pretty depressing for us Brits, especially when you consider we work longer days than most of our European neighbours.

France beats us at 11 days off annually and Spain is way ahead with 14. It’s enough to give you a serious case of work/life balance envy.

According to a study by The Daily Telegraph, at an centerstatebank com online banking average of 1,676 hours worked each year we’re putting in more office time than Belgium (1,551 hours), France (1,472 hours), Holland (1,430 hours) and Germany (1,363 hours).

The good news is this figure is slowly but surely falling, with our current 1,676 hours worked dropping from 1,700 20 years ago.

But fear not, because while we work long days without many breaks we have at least got a good quality of life compared to some of those other countries (according to socialprogress.org), especially in Scotland which is above England, Wales and Ireland in the Social Progress Index.

So it’s not all bad news, is it? Yes we work hard in the UK, and yes our are the banks open tomorrow in scotland off are few and far between, but at least we’ve got this amazing country to enjoy which has some of the best attractions on the planet.

Well, I hope this guide to bank holidays in Scotland has not only helped you understand a little bit more about Scottish attractions but has helped you understand the history and the culture of British bank holidays.

You’ll find lots of sightseeing tips and advice throughout the website so please take a look around, and if you’d like to offer any suggestions of your own you can message me on my contact page.

If you’d like to find romantic places to visit check out this guide: The Most Romantic Places in Scotland – The Ultimate Guide, or if you’re near the capital city on a bank holiday take a look at my Itinerary for a One-Day Drive 1st grade reading comprehension worksheets pdf free Edinburgh. Feeling the bank holiday blues with an empty wallet? Turn that frown upside down and check out my article: Top Free Things to do in Scotland.

Frequently Asked Questions

When are Scotland’s bank holidays?

New Year’s Day: Fri, 1 Jan 2021
2nd January: Mon, 4 Jan 2021
Good Friday: Fri, 2 Apr 2021
Easter Monday: Mon, 5 Apr 2021
Early May Bank Holiday: Mon, 3 May 2021
Spring Bank Holiday: Mon, 31 May 2021
Summer Bank Holiday: Mon, 2 Aug 2021
St. Andrew’s Day: Tue, 30 Nov 2021
Christmas Day: Mon, 27 Dec 2021
Boxing Day: Tue, 28 Dec 2021

What will the weather be like on Scotland’s bank holidays?

Spring: Expect average maximum temperatures to range from around 7°C to 13 °C during March, April and May.
Summer: June, July and August are normally the warmest months with average maximum temperatures ranging between 15°C to 17°C.
Autumn: From September to November the nights begin to draw in and the temperatures drop, although you’ll usually experience between 8°C  to 14°C.
Winter: December, January and February are generally the coldest months in Scotland, with average maximum temperature hovering around 0°C to 5°C

What are the most popular bank holiday events in Scotland?

Edinburgh’s Christmas – (Christmas Day), Edinburgh’s Hogmanay – (New Years Day), Are the banks open tomorrow in scotland Gathering and Highland Games – (Spring bank holiday), Edinburgh Fringe Festival – (Summer bank holiday), The Saltire Festival – (St. Andrews Day).

How many annual bank holidays does Scotland have?

Scotland has 10 bank holidays annually.

More articles about Scotland

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    360° Virtual Tours of Attractions in Edinburgh

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  • Northern Lights Pin
    Where Can You See the Northern Lights in Scotland?

    The dancing, skipping, multi-coloured lights of the aurora borealis are caused by charged particles from the sun colliding with the earths magnetic field, and they are most visible in northern countries like Scotland. In this article you’ll discover the best places to view the northern lights in Scotland, as well tips to help you see them and information on Scotland’s fabulous dark sky parks.

  • Munros Scotland
    The Best Munros in Scotland – Ultimate Visitor Guide

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Bank Holidays in Scotland Pinterest

Don’t forget to bookmark Out About Scotland to discover the best places to visit in Scotland, learn what to do in each region and get suggestions for top tourist attractions to add to your Scottish sightseeing itinerary.

By Craig Neil

Scotland travel writer and specialist 360° photographer. Founder of the Out About Scotland travel website and Vartour virtual tours.

View all of Craig Neil's posts.
Источник: https://outaboutscotland.com/a-guide-to-bank-holidays-in-scotland/

As Scotland begins to ease out of lockdown, our focus now is on supporting charities through the ongoing challenges they face and Helping Scotland Recover.

We're delighted to announce our grant programmes for the rest of 2021 which see a mix of our Reach and Change programmes. We're also offering funding for unrestricted core costs through our Change programme for the first time.

We have a long journey ahead for all of us and funding, as well as strategic support, will be as crucial as ever for are the banks open tomorrow in scotland as the impact of the pandemic continues. Working in partnership with our sole funder, Lloyds Banking Group, we’re proud to play our part in Helping Scotland Recover.

Helping Scotland Recover

Grant programmes 2021

ProgrammeOpens to applicationsCloses to applicationsGrants Awarded
Reach Feb 2022

What We Do

Bank of Scotland Foundation receives an annual donation from Lloyds Banking Group as part of the Group's commitment to Helping Scotland Prosper.  We donate these funds to charities across Scotland through our Grants Programmes and a Matched Giving Programme for Lloyds Banking Group employees in Scotland.

Launched in March 2019, ‘Supporting Positive Change Across Scotland’ is the Foundation’s five year strategic plan which will see a range of new funding programmes open in 2019 and 2020. See About Us for more information.

Источник: https://www.bankofscotlandfoundation.org/

Virgin Money to close 31 branches across Scotland and north of England

Virgin Money has announced it will close 31 branches – almost all in Scotland and the north of England – in the latest stage of the UK banking sector’s retreat from the high street.

The bank said it expected to make 112 jobs redundant because of the closures after the coronavirus pandemic accelerated the shift to online and mobile app-based banking, a move that has rapidly reduced the profitability of physical bank branches.

Since the start of the pandemic HSBC, TSB and the Co-operative Bank have all closed branches, raising concerns about access to cash during lockdowns from the Financial Conduct Authority and consumer groups.

The latest closures represent almost a fifth of Virgin Money’s branches, meaning the bank will have only 131 left, down from 245 when it merged with Clydesdale and Yorkshire Bank in 2018.

Twelve of 55 branches will close in Scotland, while nine of 35 will close in Yorkshire, with the rest scattered across the north-east, north-west and the Midlands. No branches will close south of Nuneaton in Warwickshire.

The concentration of branch closures in Scotland and northern England reflects Virgin Money’s roots in Clydesdale and Yorkshire as well as the former Northern Rock, whose branches Virgin took over in 2011. Northern Rock was nationalised in 2007 after a run on the bank as people rushed to withdraw their money at the start of the financial crisis.

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Bank branch closures tend to be controversial because of the needs of generally older customers who are not able to manage their finances online.

However, Virgin Money argued that customers who previously relied on the branches will be able to use post offices for day‐to-day banking, including cash deposits and withdrawals, cheque deposits and balance inquiries, as 2019 lexus gs 350 f sport awd as coin exchange.

It said 28 of the 30 customer branches closing were located less than a third of a mile away from the nearest post office.

Fergus Murphy, Virgin Money’s group customer experience director, said: “As our customers change the way they want to bank with us and conduct fewer transactions in-store, we must continue to evolve the role of our stores into places where we showcase our products and bring our digital services to life.”

The bank said it intended to find alternative roles for some affected staff, either in nearby branches or other group functions.

The latest branches closures

  • Airdrie

  • Grantham

  • Northallerton

  • Ashton-Under-Lyne

  • Keighley

  • Newcastle, Northumberland St

  • Banchory

  • Leeds, Horsforth

  • Nuneaton

  • Beverley

  • Leeds, White Rose

  • Oban

  • Blackburn

  • Lincoln

  • Portree

  • Broughty Ferry

  • Macclesfield

  • Selby

  • Chesterfield

  • Mexborough

  • Sheffield, Meadowhall

  • Cumbernauld

  • Milngavie

  • Stenhousemuir

  • East Kilbride, Princes Square

  • Musselburgh

  • Whitby

  • Galashiels

  • Nelson

  • Wick

  • Gosforth (a branch for employees only, located in an office)

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/business/2021/sep/30/virgin-money-to-close-31-branches-across-scotland-and-north-of-england

National Bank of Scotland Ltd

Brief history

This co-partnership bank was established in 1825 as National Banking Company of Scotland, with an authorised capital of £5m, and attracted more shareholders than any other bank in Britain. Its first governor was the Duke of Roxburghe and its first chairman was Alexander Henderson. It opened 13 branches in its first year, began to circulate notes through the offices of its provincial shareholders (£133,000 in circulation by 1826), and acquired head office premises in St Andrew Square, Edinburgh. In 1831 the bank received a royal charter, and changed its name to National Bank of Scotland.

It continued to expand, acquiring Commercial Banking Co of Aberdeen in 1833 and Perth Union Banking Co in 1836. In 1843 a bid to take over the Glasgow & Ship Bank (est. 1809) failed, leading National Bank of Scotland to open its own Glasgow office later the same year. In 1844 it acquired the short-lived Bank of Glasgow.

In 1864 National Bank of Scotland was the first Scottish bank to open an office in London. In 1882 it registered as a limited liability company. From 1881 until the outbreak of the First World War, it was - in terms of liabilities, deposits and advances - second only to Bank of Scotland among the Scottish banks.

In 1918 National Bank of Scotland and Lloyds Bank Ltd (est. 1765), bankers of London, building on an existing foreign exchange connection, reached an agreement by which Lloyds acquired the entire capital of National Bank of Scotland. Both banks, apart from an exchange of directors, remained entirely separate. National Bank of Scotland continued to trade successfully during the inter-war years, with a new head office building, commissioned in 1936, opened in 1947. In 1946 the bank introduced its first mobile banking service on the Isle of Lewis.

In 1959 Lloyds Bank approached Commercial Bank of Scotland, which was seeking amalgamation with a larger partner, offering to surrender its ownership of National Bank of Scotland for a stake in a new, merged bank. The proposal was readily accepted and resulted in the formation of National Commercial Bank of Scotland later that year.

Branches: In total, the bank opened 200 branches and sub-branches throughout Scotland between 1825 and do playstation store gift cards expire, and five offices in England (in London and Berwick). In 1959 198 branches were operating.

Published histories

  • The National Bank of Scotland: A Short History of the Bank (Edinburgh: Thomas Nelson & Sons, 1947)
  • The National Bank of Scotland Centenary, 1825-1925 (Edinburgh: William Blackwood & Sons, 1925)
  • SG Checkland, Scottish Banking: A History, 1695-1973 (Glasgow: Collins, 1975)

Summary of our archive holdings

Our archival records of National Bank of Scotland Ltd have the reference code NS.

For help understanding words used here, check our glossary of banking record types (PDF 68KB).

Corporate records

  • prospectus 1824
  • stock journals 1825-46
  • progressive stock ledger 1825-1918
  • directors' meeting minute books 1825-1959
  • agenda books 1831-5, 1918-55
  • stock ledgers 1833-48
  • constitution, contract of co-partnership, charter of incorporation and certificate of incorporation 1882
  • changes to constitution 1895, 1909
  • register of directors' fees 1914-(1915)
  • general manager's correspondence file 1914-34
  • confirmatory and supplementary charter 1927 and 1954
  • committee register 1938-59

Financial records

  • journals of the general ledger 1825-1959
  • general ledgers 1825-1959
  • annual reports and balance sheets 1826-1940, 1946, 1957
  • balance statements 1828-1958
  • annual balance papers 1874-1957
  • income tax account books 1878-1940
  • statement of interest account books 1900-40
  • head office charges book 1903-31
  • statement of losses 1911-56
  • abstract of weekly balance sheets 1913-43
  • liabilities to the public and reserves of cash and money at short notice book 1915-25
  • ledger of advances 1922-39
  • chief accountant's letterbooks 1923-33, 1936-8
  • chief accountant's mechanisation correspondence files 1931-59
  • foreign banks' agency files 1933-47
  • branch profit and loss books 1934-59
  • half-yearly balance papers 1937-50
  • cash book sheets 1938-40
  • chief accountant's branch letterbooks 1946-7
  • head office accountant's branch statements 1956-8

Legal records

  • legal opinions of counsel 1871-1933
  • memorandum re enlargement of powers of investment of the funds of the bank 1895
  • correspondence and papers re securities over shipbuilding contracts 1956-9

Customer records

  • statement of losses books 1826-1904
  • debt ledgers 1827-49
  • signature book 1831-45
  • consignation receipt books 1850-(1915)

Head office branch records

  • branch inspection reports 1857-64
  • circular books 1883-(1915)
  • list of offices and correspondents 1913
  • branch procedural circulars 1938-58
  • audit statements of general balances of branches, 1948-56
  • memoranda for branches 1958-9

Staff records

  • lists of principal office officials 1825
  • register of officers 1825-(1915)
  • head office salary register 1843-65
  • widows and orphans fund letterbook 1850-82
  • annuity fund: entrance fee book 1851-96, membership books 1898-(1915), cash books 1851-1931, ledger 1851-99, accounts books 1875-96, lists of contributors 1851-1900, deaths, marriages and retirement book 1896-(1915)
  • staff photographs 1866-c.1950s
  • officers' guarantee fund: letterbook 1871-94, rules and abstract accounts 1919-38, register of contributors 1910-(1915)
  • minutes and papers re Glasgow officials' social meetings 1888-(1915)
  • golf club minutes and fixture cards 1891-1968
  • agents' instruction book 1897
  • staff report book 1910-(1915)
  • Glasgow branches annual dinner programme 1925
  • instruction manual 1927
  • staff magazine 1929-40, 1946-59
  • brochure re officers' pension scheme 1933
  • staff association quarterly reports 1951-2

Property records

  • agencies register 1825-1959
  • heritable property ledgers 1825-1959
  • premises register 1833-1950
  • drawings: Glasgow office 1849, head office 1935, 1950s
  • bank plans and architectural drawings 1863-1959
  • branch photographs 1864-1959
  • agency houses and furniture books 1914-59
  • property and alterations day book 1938-50
  • statement of rent accounts 1939-47
  • mobile bank photographs c.1946-56
  • expenditure accounts book 1946-59
  • property expenditure ledger 1955-9
  • list of tenants and rent paid 1957
  • valuation and rating book 1957-9
  • summary valuations 1958

Note issue records

  • banknote registers 1825-7
  • banknotes 1825-1957
  • banknote specimen album 1883-95
  • note cancellation ledger for 5 pound notes 1912-c.1920 and 20 pound notes 1914-c.1920
  • cashier's register of note circulation 1930-78

Marketing records

Branch records

Summary of archive holdings elsewhere

  • Glasgow University Archive Services: Photocopies of extracts from minutes, annual reports, letterbook, balance sheets 1825-1958 (Ref: UGD 129/2/3), annual reports 1879-1925 (Ref: UDG 94/10/3)
  • Bank of England Archive: Governor's file re bank amalgamations, including merger of National Bank of Scotland with Commercial Bank of Scotland to form National Commercial Bank of Scotland 1956-9 (Ref: G1/12)
Источник: https://www.natwestgroup.com/heritage/companies/national-bank-of-scotland.html

Safety & Inclusivity

Ensuring that you feel safe, welcome and part of our family is incredibly important to us, which is why we are incredibly proud of our world-renowned reputation for providing a warm and open welcome to everyone. Afterall, we strongly believe that diversity and inclusivity are fundamental to what makes Scotland great. 

So, whether it’s our dedicated police force working in communities to keep people safe, or our world-leading stances on everything from LGBTI rights to humanitarian crises, we’re constantly striving to create a society free from crime, prejudice and inequality.

Find out more about safety and inclusivity in Scotland

Coronavirus

You can find up to date information on Scotland's response to the Coronavirus pandemic, current restrictions and potential impacts on on the Scottish Government website.

Find out more at gov.scot

Real life Stories

Don’t want to take our word for it? No problem! If you’d like to hear from real people who have already made the move to Scotland, check out our Real Life Stories section. Here people from all around the world share their experiences of how and why they moved to Scotland.

Источник: https://www.scotland.org/live-in-scotland/moving-to-scotland

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