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city gates ministries

Home · Ministries · Sermons · Leaders · About Us. Worship. Sunday. 10:00 am. Contact Us. Call (303) 994-2315. 3003 N Elizabeth St, Pueblo, CO 81008. City Gates Ministries To supply community needs: weekly trucks & vans to downtown olympia supply meals, clothing, street needs, hygiene needs; served 7800. Having already served in ministry for a number of years, they felt stirred by God to plant a new church, and in February 1997 they gathered together with a.

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Israel, The Church \u0026 The End Times - Scott Volk - October 4th, 2021

City gates ministries -

City Gates Ministries volunteers have been ministering on the streets in Thurston County, Washington since 1995. A State of Washington as a public charity, formally incorporated as a 501(C)(3) in 2/05.
City Gates Ministries cover
Mission City Gates Ministries reaches out to anyone isolated by need, fear, loss, hopelessness or homelessness. Our mission is to empower people to become fully self sufficient members of their community. DescriptionAdd informationFounded 1995 Products We adddress both hidden and visible poverty in Thurston County.

Through StreetLights, we reach to the homeless and offer a hand up, not a hand out. We meet and serve an average of 100 peopl every week on the street. We are the largest street ministry in the United States. We provide the Good News of the Gospel, a meal and basic supplies to street.

Through Church and Community, CGM is the only non-profit working to prevent homelessness from occurring. Through the mentoring process we help people chose to help themselves. When families or individuals need assistance due to ongoing hardship or emergency situations we network with our ministries, community members, churches and local agencies to provide genuine friendship, resources and new opportunities.

We have the only mobile food bank-free food delivered at no cost directly to client's homes-in Thurston County.

Our services include mentoring, food assistance, clothing, furniture, job referral, rental assitance and housing assistance.

We also provide great opportunities for volunteers!

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HISTORY of The City Gate

tcg_dining rm picThe City Gate was formally incorporated on April 26, 1988 as the result of several pastors from local churches banding together to create a church specifically for Spokane’s inner-city dwellers. The first location was on First Avenue across from the old bus station. Our second location was at the Otis Hotel. Both were “store front” operations with very small kitchens. It was recognized very early on that social needs were present in this population as well as spiritual needs, and so food and clothing banks were set up.

The present location at 170 S. Madison is in the heart of downtown. Purchased and renovated in June 2000 it continues to serve both the inner-city and homeless of Spokane as a church, social drop-in center, food bank,  clothing bank, life skills & social services as well as low cost housing and emergency shelter rooms.

The City Gate Staff

  • John Murinko – Pastor
  • James Gulbranson – Apt. Manager/Security
  • Eric Murinko – little bit of everything
  • Kathy Gibbons – Front Desk Manager
  • Dale Sanchez – Driver/Kitchen
  • Buffie Harmon – Clothing Bank
  • Jimmy Hahn – Food Bank
  • Misti Santos – Kitchen Manager
  • Kayla Paradise – Kitchen

From the Board of Trustees

The City Gate ministry is administered by a Board of Trustees composed of volunteer stewards who oversee the gifts that God brings in. Gifts come in several forms such as dedicated staff members, volunteers, food, clothing, and money. Each member of the board has love for our Lord and for the people who are struggling in the inner-city. The Trustees determine policies, generate new resources, watching carefully the expenditures of the monies donated as well as oversee the operations and staff. The Board of Trustees meet at least one time per month and many of them volunteer regularly serving meals and fellow-shipping with the people.

Board of Trustees Members

  • Bill Davis
  • John Murinko
  • John Kittel
  • Jeremy Meyer
  • Gail Stevers
  • Brock Pounder
  • Laura Wintersteen-Arleth

WHO IS The City Gate?

The City Gate is a non-profit organization that is first and foremost a church with the purpose of RECLAIMING, REBUILDING & RESTORING Lost and Broken Lives. We begin this mission by providing a “gathering place” at our downtown location that’s open to the public with no limitation of persons.

in line for breakfast 7 13

During REGULAR BUSINESS HOURS (Tue-Fri, 10am-3pm):

  • Clothing bank
  • 2nd Harvest Food Bank
  • Bread/Produce Sharing
  • Coffee, breakfast and lunch
  • Shower
  • Blankets, sleeping bags, toiletries and household items
  • Fellowship and activities such as crafts and movies

waiting for produce 7 13

IN ADDITION TO our regular business hours:

  • 10 am SUNDAY CHURCH SERVICE
  • 7 pm DINNER – Wednesday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday evenings
  • 12:30 pm LUNCH – Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Fridat
  • 8 am BREAKFAST  -Saturday morning
  • Alberta House low cost apartments above The City Gate
  • Two emergency shelter apartments

The City Gate Board of Trustees, staff and volunteers aren’t afraid to get their hands dirty. We are the ground roots of hope for those who so often aren’t in a position to see anything but hopelessness. From the homeless to low-income families, youth on the streets to those who are addicts, from the mentally ill to the outcast, The City Gate provides a place of refuge from the streets in a safe and family like atmosphere.

EVERYONE has a God given purpose and is worth reaching. Not all respond to our touch however in over 25 years of service we have seen countless men, women and children impacted by the love, support and provision from those who so selflessly give of their time, funds and resources here at The City Gate.

Источник: https://www.thecitygatespokane.org/about/

Gates to the Old City of Jerusalem and Their Meaning

The Meaning of Jerusalem

Jerusalem is unique among cities in the Bible. Most importantly, the Bible mentions it over 800 times. A person discovering the Bible for the first time would surely draw the conclusion that Jerusalem is very important to God, and for good reason. All the biblical prophets spoke of the walls and gates of Jerusalem also, in connection to God’s faithfulness. 

The city is described as “the place where God dwells” (Psalm 46:4). Believers are told that God himself “has set watchmen on her walls” (Isaiah 62:6) and are commanded to pray for her peace. They are instructed to “give God no rest… until he establishes Jerusalem and makes it a praise in the earth” (Isaiah 62:7). 

Walls and Gates in Jerusalem’s Old City

Let’s take a whistle-stop tour around the walls of Jerusalem’s Old City to better understand the biblical fascination.

My hope is to learn about some of the most pivotal events in Jerusalem’s history, from both the distant and recent past. We will discover how the story of Jerusalem mirrors our story as believers. Let’s get a glimpse into what the Bible has to say about its future. 

Below are just a few spots worth noting along Jerusalem’s city walls: 

1. Jaffa Gate

Like most tour groups, let’s begin at the famous Jaffa Gate. The Ottomans built this landmark in 1538. General Allenby famously entered the city through this gate when the British captured Jerusalem during the First World War in 1917. The General got off his horse and entered through the gate on foot, to show respect for the city.

The “gate” is a large, L-shaped open space. It is comprised of the same cobbled, sandy coloured rock that characterises the streets and architectural style of the Old City. Loud shouts of vendors offer street food, and market traders beckon you to purchase their rugs and religious ornaments.

The Jaffa Gate shows us viscerally that ancient city gates were not just entrances. Instead, they were the natural focal point for public life. 

The Bible itself records that city gates were used in various ways. At the gates people would finalise business deals (Genesis 23), arrange marriages (Ruth 4) and settle disputes in the presence of witnesses (Amos 5). The king used gates to address his subjects (2 Samuel 18).

2. Zion Gate

Moving south past the Armenian quarter along the Old City walls, we find the Zion Gate, built in 1540. The name points to its proximity to Mount Zion, which happens to be also a burial site of King David. Centuries later at this location Jesus shared His last supper with His disciples before being betrayed.

Visible bullet holes surround Zion Gate, from fierce fighting over the Old City during Israel’s war for independence in 1947. Despite the struggle, the Old City was not unified under Jewish control until 1967. As a result, many Christians have interpreted this event as fulfilment of Jesus’ end time prophecy in Luke 21:

“Jerusalem will be trampled on by the Gentiles until the times of the Gentiles are fulfilled”.

3. Dung Gate

Further along the southern wall is the Dung Gate, built in the 16th Century. The peculiar name corresponds with the name of an earlier gate from the first temple period (1200 – 600 BC), mentioned in the Bible. The gate earned its name by being a waste disposal. 

The gate is in close proximity to an archaeological park called City of David. Its name points to the fact that the unearthed ruins date back to the reigning period of the Bible’s most famous king. One of the park’s treasures is a partially submerged, 3000-year-old man made tunnel. The tunnel brought water to Jerusalem in Hezekiah’s time, according to the second book of Chronicles.

Entering the Old City through the Dung Gate brings us straight to the Western Wall plaza.

The famous Western Wall is a segment of the outer wall of the temple mount that is closest to where the Holy of Holies would have stood. Thus, it is the holiest site in all of Judaism, with millions of Jewish and Christian pilgrims visiting annually. 

Symbol of Restoration

The original Dung Gate is mentioned in the Book of Nehemiah. This gives a fascinating window into the Jewish mindset concerning Jerusalem and her walls. In the 6th Century BCE, the Babylonians completely destroyed Jerusalem’s walls. The city was open to an attack. It was an embarrassment to Israel’s honour. 

In Proverbs 25 (written around 250 years prior), Solomon reveals a common understanding of the great importance of city walls in ancient society: “Like a city whose walls are broken through is a person who lacks self-control”.

Through this lens we can understand why Nehemiah “sat down and wept”when he heard: “the wall of Jerusalem is broken down, and its gates have been burned with fire” (Nehemiah 1:3-4).

This stirred Nehemiah’s spiritual zeal for Jerusalem. He charged his fellow countrymen: “come let us rebuild the wall of Jerusalem so that we will no longer be a reproach” (Nehemiah 2:17). Night and day, in the face of great danger, the labourers “worked with one hand and held a weapon with the other”. They rebuilt the walls in just 52 days. 

The story is an amazing reminder that we too can be “watchmen on the walls”. We pray for the healing of our world and for the establishment of God’s kingdom on earth.

God calls us to pray and trust Him fervently. Similarly, we are called to work hard doing good deeds, wherever God calls us to be protectors, rebuilders, and reconcilers. If not for Nehemiah, the Jewish landscape of Israel – so key to Jesus’ life and ministry – may have looked vastly different.

4. Damascus Gate

Heading North through the city, we pass the hauntingly beautiful Church of the Holy Sepulchre. It is one of the two sites with the best claim to be the authentic burial place of Jesus.

The Church is the final stop on the Via Dolorosa – the traditional path that commemorates Jesus’ painful walk to Golgotha carrying his cross. If we continue north, we can exit the Old City through the Damascus Gate, built in 1537. 

This massive and very ornate gate is close to the second site that could have been the burial place of Jesus. It is the Garden Tomb. As we round the north-eastern corner of the city walls, we pass Herod’s Gate and Lion’s Gate, approaching the end of our unique tour.

5. Golden Gate

The last gate we will visit is the blocked Eastern Gate. The Ottoman emperor Sulieman sealed it shut in 1541. From the Bible, we know of a ‘Beautiful Gate’ on the eastern side of the city. It is where Peter and John healed a beggar, as we read in the Book of Acts.

As the gate closest to the Temple and opposite of the Mount of Olives, this could have been the gate that Jesus entered on Palm Sunday. 

Fascinatingly, the book of Ezekiel speaks of an eastern-facing temple gate being blocked, because “the LORD, Israel’s God, has entered through it” (Ezekiel 44:2).

Jewish tradition dictates that when the Messiah comes, the Eastern Gate will open, and He will enter through it.

In this context, Ezekiel’s description of the glory of the Lord coming down from the Mount of Olives and entering through the Eastern Gate is truly intriguing. It is parallel with Jesus’ initial entry from the Mount of Olives, and with the indication in Zechariah that the Messiah’s second coming will occur at the same location. 

12 Gates of the New Jerusalem

“The city had a great, high wall with twelve gates, and with twelve angels at the gates. On the gates were written the names of the twelve tribes of Israel.” – Revelation 21:12

This verse is referencing the city of the New Jerusalem or Heaven. It gives us insight to how many gates there are leading into Heaven — 12. Each gate representing one of the tribes of Israel. If we are planning on entering Heaven, we must walk through one of the gates of the tribes of Israel. Which one do you plan on walking through?

The nation of Israel originated from Jacob, the last of the three patriarchs — Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. The LORD changed Jacob’s name to Israel and blessed him with twelve sons. The sons became the twelve tribes of Israel.

The apostle Paul writes in Romans 9:4-5 that through the nation of Israel came, “the adoption, the glory, the covenant, the giving of the law, the worship, and the promises…and the Christ, who is God over all.”

12 Tribes of Israel

The reason, I believe, Paul writes this to Romans is to spur them on towards being thankful and supportive of Israel. They are the original people of faith and promise, and through them our salvation comes in Yeshua. In this day and age of threats and antisemitism towards the people of the promise, are you thankful for Israel? Are you supportive of Israel?

“You are to allot the land as an inheritance for yourselves and for the strangers residing among you… Along with you the strangers are to be allotted an inheritance among the tribes of Israel. In whatever tribe a stranger resides, there you are to give them their inheritance.” – Ezekiel 47:22-23

This passage described the LORD’s instruction for dividing up the Promise Land as an inheritance to each of the Israelites. Each person, according to their tribe, inherited a portion of the land. The “strangers” who wanted to serve the LORD and become part of the people of Israel were also a part of the inheritance as well. Their inheritance depended on the tribe they sojourned with.

Perhaps the LORD will highlight a tribe to each of us in our prayers for their peace, our efforts to bless them, and our love towards them. Because there is no stranger’s gate, that tribe might just be the gate we walk through into Heaven.

Gates of our Lives

Now that we have completed our tour, let’s take a moment to consider how the story of Jerusalem relates to us. Jerusalem is part of God’s great love story for humanity. The story of Jerusalem is our story too.

God chose us, just as He chose Jerusalem.

Jerusalem has often been wayward, captivated by idols, all of which has led to her fallenness and destruction. Yet just like us, in our brokenness and rebellion, God never forgot or gave up on Jerusalem. 

We are both chosen to be “His temple, the place where His glory dwells”. Like Nehemiah, Jesus wept over Jerusalem declaring, “you will not see me again until you say blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord” (Matthew 23:39).

Just as Jesus longs to return to the city He loves, He longs for the blocked gates of our hearts to open. 

Even whilst we wait today for His physical return, He stands knocking at the gate of every heart. He longs for His children to receive Him, to share a meal together as friends. Like Jesus, let us pray for the peace of Jerusalem. Let us long for Him to return to her soon, and to usher in a new, far better age.

Continue the Tour

In this time of limited international travel, we hope that this virtual tour has given you a taste of Jerusalem. We hope it opened your eyes to the past, present and future importance of God’s holy city. Once it is again possible, come to Jerusalem to discover the remaining gates leading to the Old City, and allow God to speak to you as you do! 

Did you catch our digital tour? Be sure to check out our YouTube to see all the other significant spots throughout Israel!

 

 

Источник: https://firmisrael.org/learn/gates-old-city-jerusalem-meaning/

Love God.
Love Others.

Gather.
Grow.
Go.

Gather for Worship.

Thanks to technology we can connect with just about anyone, anywhere. But there's still something special about being together in the same space. Every Sunday we gather for worship, with others forming a diverse group with a single goal; to know God and make Him known. We also gather in homes, on campus, and online throughout the week for worship, connection, and growth.

Grow in Faith.

we don't just want to survive our time in DC - we want to thrive. We hope to see people constantly growing in their faith through little steps and gigantic leaps as they continue to worship God and connect with each other. This key aspect of our church's culture is engrained in everything from our "Sprout" children's ministry to our adult home groups, Bible studies, and other ministries.

Go Where God Sends.

At City Gates our mission is to fulfill the Great Commandment – to love God with all our heart, soul, mind and strength and to love others as ourselves – while living out the Great Commission to “go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit” Matthew 28:16-20.  We support missionaries around the world and ministries around town, but we also know God has called each of us to be the hands and feet of Jesus, sharing His message and love with the people in our daily lives. 

Do you know that you were designed to love

God and love others? Do you know it all begins

by receiving the love God has shown to you in

Jesus and then reflecting this love to others?

Do you know that God is calling you to do that

here in the shadow of our nation’s capital?

Groups & Activities

Mens Ministry

Men of Honor is the City Gates Men’s group, equipping men to minister to their families and their communities. 

City Gates Women

City Gates Women is dedicated to meeting and cultivating the women of our community to grow. 

Small Groups and Classes

We meet in various locations and times around the Washington D.C. area click to find a group to join. 

Sprout

City Gates Children’s Ministry is committed to raising children in the love and admonition of Jesus. 

Awana

AWANA clubs focus on Scripture memorization, Christian service, Bible study and application, game time, and fellowship. 

CGYG

Gospel-centered ministry for students in 7th-12th grades that meets twice a week.  

Calendar & News Feed

Here you can find what events and happenings are taking place in the City Gates calendar.
You can also find all the latest church bulletins, prayer request, praise reports
& notifications from the various community groups here at the Gates.

Connect With Us

We'd love to hear from you. Fill out the form below to get started.

Источник: https://www.thecitygateschurch.com/

Ruth 4:1-4

1 Now Boaz went up to the gate and sat down there; and behold, the close relative of whom Boaz had spoken came by. So Boaz said, “Come aside, friend, sit down here.” So he came aside and sat down. 2 And he took ten men of the elders of the city, and said, “Sit down here.” So they sat down. 3 Then he said to the close relative, “Naomi, who has come back from the country of Moab, sold the piece of land which belonged to our brother Elimelech. 4 And I thought to inform you, saying, ‘Buy it back in the presence of the inhabitants and the elders of my people. If you will redeem it, redeem it; but if you will not redeem it, then tell me, that I may know; for there is no one but you to redeem it,and I am next after you.’”

And he said, “I will redeem it.

 

That morning, after Ruth had departed for home after making her request at the threshing floor, Boaz kept his word and went to the city gate to make his case.  City gates in those days were kinda like the town hall where business was transacted and judgments took place.

Biblical Personification.

In attendance at the gate, notice there were TEN ELDERS present to witness the business transaction of the two men.  “Ten” is a typology of the Law in Biblical numerics.  This unnamed man, the nearer Kinsman, is a personification of the Ten Commandments whom we shall call, “Mr. Law.”  Where do we get permission to personify the Law?  From the Apostle Paul himself in Romans 7, verse 4:

“Therefore, my brethren, you also have become dead to the law through the body of Christ,that you may be married to another—to Him who was raised from the dead, that we should bear fruit to God.”

You see?  All of us were, in effect, married to Mr. Law before we came to Christ.  How does one legally become unmarried to another according to the Law of Moses?  By dying.  Our wedding vows to this day echo that fact by saying, “Till death do us part.”

Here’s the problem:  If you die, how can you be married to another?  You can’t.  But Jesus, by dying at the cross, died our death for us and is credited to us.  This effectively breaks that which bound us to our former husband, “Mr. Law.”  He no longer has any claims on us.  He can make no demands of us either because we no longer belong to him:  WE BELONG TO JESUS. HALLELUJAH!!!

Exchange At The City Gates.

Boaz spoke to this this nearer kinsman and offered him the opportunity to purchase the property that had formerly belonged to Elimelek.  At first the man said, “Yes,” he would redeem the land.  Then, he found out that he would have to marry Ruth, the Moabitess, and produce and heir for her dead husband.

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I can just picture the color draining out of his face.  Marry a foreigner from Moab and ruin his inheritance?  No way!!!

In light of this startling information, he immediately relinquished his claim.  This gave Boaz permission to redeem it for himself and obtain Ruth as his wife, which no doubt pleased him greatly.  Though he may have appeared cool on the outside, inside I’m sure his heart jumped for joy!

You see, he had fallen head over heels in love with Ruth from the moment he saw her. He was genuinely thrilled that he would now be able to legally have her for his wife.  How like our dear Jesus who loved us long before we knew Him!  While we were still dead in our trespasses and sins, though we were strangers and far from Him, He died on the cross for us.  What a Savior!!!

God SO LOVEDthe world!   It would have been enough if God had said that He “LOVED” the world, meaning those outside of Christ.  But it’s that little word, “SO,” that reveals an intensity that we may never fully come to understand, even in eternity.

Sealing The Deal.

The two men legally sealed the deal by doing something that might seem very strange.  “Mr. Law” took off his sandal and handed it over to Boaz.  A man’s sandal in those days, you see, was a sign of ownership.  It indicated that he had the right to “Walk” on any property he owned.  This act accorded Boaz full and rightful claim to all the property that had formerly belonged to Elimelek and marry Ruth.

In the same way, Jesus redeemed us from certain death and we became His bride!  Now, as in the story of the Prodigal son where the unnamed servant (there he is again!) was instructed to put shoes on his feet, He puts shoes on our feet, a sign that we are sons/daughters, heirs to all the property belonging to our Father. Because we are made holy by Jesus, we have the right to walk on holy groundWITH OUR SHOES ON!

Reminiscent Of Samson.

Just like the story of Samson who ripped up the gates of Hebron by the might of the Spirit of God, so Jesus championed us at the gates.  For additional information on the meaning of the city gates, you may follow the link below:

The City Gate is a picture of what happened at the cross.  Jesus went to that place of judgment.  And because He is now in possession of the “Shoe,” the devil can no longer walk all over us!  We belong to Him now. We have been rescued from the camp of the devil into the camp of our Lord and Savior, Jesus!


Please follow the link below to Part 10.  We’ll see that Boaz at last gets Ruth as his wife!

https://emmausroadministries.wordpress.com/2018/01/20/boaz-marries-ruth-the-story-of-ruth-part-10/

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Источник: https://emmausroadministries.international/2020/08/12/the-story-of-ruth-part-9-the-city-gate/

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CIty Gates Header

You’ve probably seen us around on Thursday nights doing Street Lights or handing out backpacks to families, delivering furniture, or hosting your group to help those in need. We are City Gates Ministries, are a 501(c)(3) charitable organization and are situated in Olympia, Washington.

Our mission:

“…to reach our friends and neighbors through the gospel of Jesus Christ. Using all donations as tools, we aim to bring a sense of hope and build long lasting relationships as we stabilize those who may be struggling with overwhelming poverty and hardship.”

We do this by reaching our friends and neighbors through the gospel of Jesus Christ, through partnerships with local communities, local businesses and churches to meet the homeless and street-dependent populations. Using tangible item donations as tools, we seek to bring a sense of hope and long-lasting relationships, as well as help stabilize those struggling with overwhelming poverty and hardship.

Sorting clothes for Thursday nights 2015

We rely solely on the help and generosity of those in the community. We welcome donations of the following items:

  • BLANKETS
  • Good used clothing (all sizes)
  • Coats and jackets
  • Food (non-perishable)
  • Hygiene items
  • Pet food and supplies
  • Diapers and wipes
  • Sippy cups
  • Batteries
  • Flashlights
  • Furniture
  • Tents and tarps
  • Financial donations

Ways to find us:
Website: http://www.citygatesministries.org/

Источник: https://cgolympia.wordpress.com/
city gates ministries

City gates ministries -

Gates to the Old City of Jerusalem and Their Meaning

The Meaning of Jerusalem

Jerusalem is unique among cities in the Bible. Most importantly, the Bible mentions it over 800 times. A person discovering the Bible for the first time would surely draw the conclusion that Jerusalem is very important to God, and for good reason. All the biblical prophets spoke of the walls and gates of Jerusalem also, in connection to God’s faithfulness. 

The city is described as “the place where God dwells” (Psalm 46:4). Believers are told that God himself “has set watchmen on her walls” (Isaiah 62:6) and are commanded to pray for her peace. They are instructed to “give God no rest… until he establishes Jerusalem and makes it a praise in the earth” (Isaiah 62:7). 

Walls and Gates in Jerusalem’s Old City

Let’s take a whistle-stop tour around the walls of Jerusalem’s Old City to better understand the biblical fascination.

My hope is to learn about some of the most pivotal events in Jerusalem’s history, from both the distant and recent past. We will discover how the story of Jerusalem mirrors our story as believers. Let’s get a glimpse into what the Bible has to say about its future. 

Below are just a few spots worth noting along Jerusalem’s city walls: 

1. Jaffa Gate

Like most tour groups, let’s begin at the famous Jaffa Gate. The Ottomans built this landmark in 1538. General Allenby famously entered the city through this gate when the British captured Jerusalem during the First World War in 1917. The General got off his horse and entered through the gate on foot, to show respect for the city.

The “gate” is a large, L-shaped open space. It is comprised of the same cobbled, sandy coloured rock that characterises the streets and architectural style of the Old City. Loud shouts of vendors offer street food, and market traders beckon you to purchase their rugs and religious ornaments.

The Jaffa Gate shows us viscerally that ancient city gates were not just entrances. Instead, they were the natural focal point for public life. 

The Bible itself records that city gates were used in various ways. At the gates people would finalise business deals (Genesis 23), arrange marriages (Ruth 4) and settle disputes in the presence of witnesses (Amos 5). The king used gates to address his subjects (2 Samuel 18).

2. Zion Gate

Moving south past the Armenian quarter along the Old City walls, we find the Zion Gate, built in 1540. The name points to its proximity to Mount Zion, which happens to be also a burial site of King David. Centuries later at this location Jesus shared His last supper with His disciples before being betrayed.

Visible bullet holes surround Zion Gate, from fierce fighting over the Old City during Israel’s war for independence in 1947. Despite the struggle, the Old City was not unified under Jewish control until 1967. As a result, many Christians have interpreted this event as fulfilment of Jesus’ end time prophecy in Luke 21:

“Jerusalem will be trampled on by the Gentiles until the times of the Gentiles are fulfilled”.

3. Dung Gate

Further along the southern wall is the Dung Gate, built in the 16th Century. The peculiar name corresponds with the name of an earlier gate from the first temple period (1200 – 600 BC), mentioned in the Bible. The gate earned its name by being a waste disposal. 

The gate is in close proximity to an archaeological park called City of David. Its name points to the fact that the unearthed ruins date back to the reigning period of the Bible’s most famous king. One of the park’s treasures is a partially submerged, 3000-year-old man made tunnel. The tunnel brought water to Jerusalem in Hezekiah’s time, according to the second book of Chronicles.

Entering the Old City through the Dung Gate brings us straight to the Western Wall plaza.

The famous Western Wall is a segment of the outer wall of the temple mount that is closest to where the Holy of Holies would have stood. Thus, it is the holiest site in all of Judaism, with millions of Jewish and Christian pilgrims visiting annually. 

Symbol of Restoration

The original Dung Gate is mentioned in the Book of Nehemiah. This gives a fascinating window into the Jewish mindset concerning Jerusalem and her walls. In the 6th Century BCE, the Babylonians completely destroyed Jerusalem’s walls. The city was open to an attack. It was an embarrassment to Israel’s honour. 

In Proverbs 25 (written around 250 years prior), Solomon reveals a common understanding of the great importance of city walls in ancient society: “Like a city whose walls are broken through is a person who lacks self-control”.

Through this lens we can understand why Nehemiah “sat down and wept”when he heard: “the wall of Jerusalem is broken down, and its gates have been burned with fire” (Nehemiah 1:3-4).

This stirred Nehemiah’s spiritual zeal for Jerusalem. He charged his fellow countrymen: “come let us rebuild the wall of Jerusalem so that we will no longer be a reproach” (Nehemiah 2:17). Night and day, in the face of great danger, the labourers “worked with one hand and held a weapon with the other”. They rebuilt the walls in just 52 days. 

The story is an amazing reminder that we too can be “watchmen on the walls”. We pray for the healing of our world and for the establishment of God’s kingdom on earth.

God calls us to pray and trust Him fervently. Similarly, we are called to work hard doing good deeds, wherever God calls us to be protectors, rebuilders, and reconcilers. If not for Nehemiah, the Jewish landscape of Israel – so key to Jesus’ life and ministry – may have looked vastly different.

4. Damascus Gate

Heading North through the city, we pass the hauntingly beautiful Church of the Holy Sepulchre. It is one of the two sites with the best claim to be the authentic burial place of Jesus.

The Church is the final stop on the Via Dolorosa – the traditional path that commemorates Jesus’ painful walk to Golgotha carrying his cross. If we continue north, we can exit the Old City through the Damascus Gate, built in 1537. 

This massive and very ornate gate is close to the second site that could have been the burial place of Jesus. It is the Garden Tomb. As we round the north-eastern corner of the city walls, we pass Herod’s Gate and Lion’s Gate, approaching the end of our unique tour.

5. Golden Gate

The last gate we will visit is the blocked Eastern Gate. The Ottoman emperor Sulieman sealed it shut in 1541. From the Bible, we know of a ‘Beautiful Gate’ on the eastern side of the city. It is where Peter and John healed a beggar, as we read in the Book of Acts.

As the gate closest to the Temple and opposite of the Mount of Olives, this could have been the gate that Jesus entered on Palm Sunday. 

Fascinatingly, the book of Ezekiel speaks of an eastern-facing temple gate being blocked, because “the LORD, Israel’s God, has entered through it” (Ezekiel 44:2).

Jewish tradition dictates that when the Messiah comes, the Eastern Gate will open, and He will enter through it.

In this context, Ezekiel’s description of the glory of the Lord coming down from the Mount of Olives and entering through the Eastern Gate is truly intriguing. It is parallel with Jesus’ initial entry from the Mount of Olives, and with the indication in Zechariah that the Messiah’s second coming will occur at the same location. 

12 Gates of the New Jerusalem

“The city had a great, high wall with twelve gates, and with twelve angels at the gates. On the gates were written the names of the twelve tribes of Israel.” – Revelation 21:12

This verse is referencing the city of the New Jerusalem or Heaven. It gives us insight to how many gates there are leading into Heaven — 12. Each gate representing one of the tribes of Israel. If we are planning on entering Heaven, we must walk through one of the gates of the tribes of Israel. Which one do you plan on walking through?

The nation of Israel originated from Jacob, the last of the three patriarchs — Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. The LORD changed Jacob’s name to Israel and blessed him with twelve sons. The sons became the twelve tribes of Israel.

The apostle Paul writes in Romans 9:4-5 that through the nation of Israel came, “the adoption, the glory, the covenant, the giving of the law, the worship, and the promises…and the Christ, who is God over all.”

12 Tribes of Israel

The reason, I believe, Paul writes this to Romans is to spur them on towards being thankful and supportive of Israel. They are the original people of faith and promise, and through them our salvation comes in Yeshua. In this day and age of threats and antisemitism towards the people of the promise, are you thankful for Israel? Are you supportive of Israel?

“You are to allot the land as an inheritance for yourselves and for the strangers residing among you… Along with you the strangers are to be allotted an inheritance among the tribes of Israel. In whatever tribe a stranger resides, there you are to give them their inheritance.” – Ezekiel 47:22-23

This passage described the LORD’s instruction for dividing up the Promise Land as an inheritance to each of the Israelites. Each person, according to their tribe, inherited a portion of the land. The “strangers” who wanted to serve the LORD and become part of the people of Israel were also a part of the inheritance as well. Their inheritance depended on the tribe they sojourned with.

Perhaps the LORD will highlight a tribe to each of us in our prayers for their peace, our efforts to bless them, and our love towards them. Because there is no stranger’s gate, that tribe might just be the gate we walk through into Heaven.

Gates of our Lives

Now that we have completed our tour, let’s take a moment to consider how the story of Jerusalem relates to us. Jerusalem is part of God’s great love story for humanity. The story of Jerusalem is our story too.

God chose us, just as He chose Jerusalem.

Jerusalem has often been wayward, captivated by idols, all of which has led to her fallenness and destruction. Yet just like us, in our brokenness and rebellion, God never forgot or gave up on Jerusalem. 

We are both chosen to be “His temple, the place where His glory dwells”. Like Nehemiah, Jesus wept over Jerusalem declaring, “you will not see me again until you say blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord” (Matthew 23:39).

Just as Jesus longs to return to the city He loves, He longs for the blocked gates of our hearts to open. 

Even whilst we wait today for His physical return, He stands knocking at the gate of every heart. He longs for His children to receive Him, to share a meal together as friends. Like Jesus, let us pray for the peace of Jerusalem. Let us long for Him to return to her soon, and to usher in a new, far better age.

Continue the Tour

In this time of limited international travel, we hope that this virtual tour has given you a taste of Jerusalem. We hope it opened your eyes to the past, present and future importance of God’s holy city. Once it is again possible, come to Jerusalem to discover the remaining gates leading to the Old City, and allow God to speak to you as you do! 

Did you catch our digital tour? Be sure to check out our YouTube to see all the other significant spots throughout Israel!

 

 

Источник: https://firmisrael.org/learn/gates-old-city-jerusalem-meaning/

GATE CITY CHURCH

A WORD & SPIRIT CHURCH

WORD & SPIRIT

Here at Gate City Church, we believe in the importance of building our spiritual foundation on Biblical truth and on the direction of the Holy Spirit. Jesus answered and said, "It is written, 'Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceeds from the mouth of God.'"

Matthew 4:4

Monthly Memory Verse

"Thanks be to God

for his inexpressible gift!"

2 Corinthians 9:15

Read More

Book of the Month

Panic Attack

by Nicole Saphier, MD

Read More

Sermons

Listen to our latest sermon

Read More

GCC young adults group

Every Thursday, 6:30-8pm

If you have any questions

and would like to know how to get involved,

please contact Paul Kumar

GATE CITY CHURCH

Building bridges to greater Nashua and the World

About Us

Источник: https://www.gatecitychurch.org/

HISTORY of The City Gate

tcg_dining rm picThe City Gate was formally incorporated on April 26, 1988 as the result of several pastors from local churches banding together to create a church specifically for Spokane’s inner-city dwellers. The first location was on First Avenue across from the old bus station. Our second location was at the Otis Hotel. Both were “store front” operations with very small kitchens. It was recognized very early on that social needs were present in this population as well as spiritual needs, and so food and clothing banks were set up.

The present location at 170 S. Madison is in the heart of downtown. Purchased and renovated in June 2000 it continues to serve both the inner-city and homeless of Spokane as a church, social drop-in center, food bank,  clothing bank, life skills & social services as well as low cost housing and emergency shelter rooms.

The City Gate Staff

  • John Murinko – Pastor
  • James Gulbranson – Apt. Manager/Security
  • Eric Murinko – little bit of everything
  • Kathy Gibbons – Front Desk Manager
  • Dale Sanchez – Driver/Kitchen
  • Buffie Harmon – Clothing Bank
  • Jimmy Hahn – Food Bank
  • Misti Santos – Kitchen Manager
  • Kayla Paradise – Kitchen

From the Board of Trustees

The City Gate ministry is administered by a Board of Trustees composed of volunteer stewards who oversee the gifts that God brings in. Gifts come in several forms such as dedicated staff members, volunteers, food, clothing, and money. Each member of the board has love for our Lord and for the people who are struggling in the inner-city. The Trustees determine policies, generate new resources, watching carefully the expenditures of the monies donated as well as oversee the operations and staff. The Board of Trustees meet at least one time per month and many of them volunteer regularly serving meals and fellow-shipping with the people.

Board of Trustees Members

  • Bill Davis
  • John Murinko
  • John Kittel
  • Jeremy Meyer
  • Gail Stevers
  • Brock Pounder
  • Laura Wintersteen-Arleth

WHO IS The City Gate?

The City Gate is a non-profit organization that is first and foremost a church with the purpose of RECLAIMING, REBUILDING & RESTORING Lost and Broken Lives. We begin this mission by providing a “gathering place” at our downtown location that’s open to the public with no limitation of persons.

in line for breakfast 7 13

During REGULAR BUSINESS HOURS (Tue-Fri, 10am-3pm):

  • Clothing bank
  • 2nd Harvest Food Bank
  • Bread/Produce Sharing
  • Coffee, breakfast and lunch
  • Shower
  • Blankets, sleeping bags, toiletries and household items
  • Fellowship and activities such as crafts and movies

waiting for produce 7 13

IN ADDITION TO our regular business hours:

  • 10 am SUNDAY CHURCH SERVICE
  • 7 pm DINNER – Wednesday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday evenings
  • 12:30 pm LUNCH – Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Fridat
  • 8 am BREAKFAST  -Saturday morning
  • Alberta House low cost apartments above The City Gate
  • Two emergency shelter apartments

The City Gate Board of Trustees, staff and volunteers aren’t afraid to get their hands dirty. We are the ground roots of hope for those who so often aren’t in a position to see anything but hopelessness. From the homeless to low-income families, youth on the streets to those who are addicts, from the mentally ill to the outcast, The City Gate provides a place of refuge from the streets in a safe and family like atmosphere.

EVERYONE has a God given purpose and is worth reaching. Not all respond to our touch however in over 25 years of service we have seen countless men, women and children impacted by the love, support and provision from those who so selflessly give of their time, funds and resources here at The City Gate.

Источник: https://www.thecitygatespokane.org/about/

Social

CIty Gates Header

You’ve probably seen us around on Thursday nights doing Street Lights or handing out backpacks to families, delivering furniture, or hosting your group to help those in need. We are City Gates Ministries, are a 501(c)(3) charitable organization and are situated in Olympia, Washington.

Our mission:

“…to reach our friends and neighbors through the gospel of Jesus Christ. Using all donations as tools, we aim to bring a sense of hope and build long lasting relationships as we stabilize those who may be struggling with overwhelming poverty and hardship.”

We do this by reaching our friends and neighbors through the gospel of Jesus Christ, through partnerships with local communities, local businesses and churches to meet the homeless and street-dependent populations. Using tangible item donations as tools, we seek to bring a sense of hope and long-lasting relationships, as well as help stabilize those struggling with overwhelming poverty and hardship.

Sorting clothes for Thursday nights 2015

We rely solely on the help and generosity of those in the community. We welcome donations of the following items:

  • BLANKETS
  • Good used clothing (all sizes)
  • Coats and jackets
  • Food (non-perishable)
  • Hygiene items
  • Pet food and supplies
  • Diapers and wipes
  • Sippy cups
  • Batteries
  • Flashlights
  • Furniture
  • Tents and tarps
  • Financial donations

Ways to find us:
Website: http://www.citygatesministries.org/

Источник: https://cgolympia.wordpress.com/

Hope for the
Homeless
In Southwestern PA since 1941

From Homeless to Hero

Recovery, homelessness, hero

November 17, 2021

According to Joseph Campbell, the late professor and author of The Hero With a Thousand Faces, “A hero is someone who has given his or her life to something bigger than oneself.” The heroes we read about in books or watch in movies are simply pictures of that heroic spirit that lies somewhere within all of us. Those heroes represent our collective search for what it really means and what it takes for a human to give themselves to something greater. But real heroes are actually all around us, and I have found that they show up in the unlikeliest places. The battles that our homeless residents at City Mission fight every day require true courage. During my three years here, working alongside our residents, I have seen that heroic spirit in more ways than I have in my entire life. It continually amazes me how their recovery requires heroic effort, sacrificing themselves in order to restore hope, purpose, and strength in their lives. Even the second step of the Alcoholics Anonymous’ twelve-step program (“Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity”) requires you to begin living for something greater. I am convinced that the path our residents take from brokenness to independence is the Hero’s Journey. The Ordinary World Every hero’s journey begins in the place he or she knows and understands the best – a place that feels normal and predictable. The story of Moses, for example, in the book of Exodus, finds Moses in a place of relative comfort and predictability in the mountainous, desert region of Midian. He is performing the very ordinary task of shepherding his father-in-law’s sheep. He has a wife and at least two children. He has built an ordinary life for himself in an ordinary place. For many of us, the ordinary world we grew up in elicits happy, nostalgic feelings and memories. Some of us, perhaps, never leave our ordinary world precisely because it is so pleasant and comfortable. Unfortunately, for many of our residents at City Mission their ordinary world is filled with chaos, violence, and addiction. Sadly, that world becomes normal, predictable, even comfortable for them. A large percentage of City Mission residents are in drug and/or alcohol recovery, and at one time in their lives, drugs became a kind of saving grace, the only thing perhaps that got them from day to day – an integral part of what makes their ordinary world feel normal. “Addiction is a dark, comfortable place,” explained Rob, a former City Mission resident. “You know what it feels like, so you’re ok with it. Change is the scary thing, especially if you don’t know how.” According to Drugs, Brains, and Behavior: The Science of Addiction, an article produced by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, “Over time, if drug use continues, other pleasurable activities become less pleasurable, and the person has to take the drug just to feel ‘normal.’” Eventually, drug use can become the defining characteristic of what “ordinary” feels like to a user. It alters your perspective so that the drug becomes your new normal. On their website, alcoholrehab.com, the American Addiction Centers explain that, “The life of an addict can be terribly miserable, but it is familiar,” and “there is comfort in the familiarity…Those who are addicted to alcohol or drugs can find it almost impossible to imagine how they can possibly live without these substances.” “All of our residents can remember a time when their addiction helped them,” said Paul Granger, City Mission’s former Manager of Men’s Services. “We’re all trying to find our shield or our helmet that’s going to protect us against this world that hurts us.” Unfortunately, many people turn to drugs and alcohol, because it can be a temporary escape from the challenges and the trauma of their reality. Many, like Rob, use opioids and other drugs as armor against physical pain. Rob suffered severe complications after gastric-bypass surgery. When his prescription ran out, he was already addicted. He turned to street drugs to numb the pain. Others, like Tara, another former City Mission resident, turn to drugs to escape psychological and emotional pain. She grew up in fear of her father. “I really didn’t have a childhood,” she explained. “My Dad took that from me. He was very abusive, mentally. And physically with my Mom and sister. He could put the fear of God in you with just a look, because we knew how crazy he was.” Lance Dodes M.D., in his article The Psychology of Addiction for Psychology Today, explains, “Every addictive act is preceded by a feeling of helplessness or powerlessness…Addictive behavior functions to repair this underlying feeling of helplessness. It is able to do this because taking the addictive action (or even deciding to take this action) creates a sense of being empowered--of regaining control--over one's emotional experience and one's life.” For far too many, drugs and alcohol become normal life, a kind of armor that protects users from the day-to-day trials and tribulations of life. Drugs start out as a solution. It’s only over time that they become the problem – an even more devastating problem than the original one users were trying to escape. The Unknown The absolute most crucial step in the hero’s journey, the one that all heroes must undertake, the step that in many ways defines a hero, is crossing the threshold into the unknown. When Moses encounters the burning bush, he suddenly has an important decision to make, a decision that will ultimately impact the world for thousands of years to come. He can either stay in the comfortable little cocoon he is currently living in where everything is safe and predictable, or he can venture off into the wilderness of the unknown where life is dangerous, and the future is uncertain. If he chooses to stay in Midian, then he never really becomes a hero. He must set out on the path to Egypt before his life can take a heroic turn. Similarly, our residents at City Mission must leave behind the very thing that makes them feel normal and venture off into the unknown of recovery and life transformation. The hero must find the courage to step outside of the life cycle he is stuck in. He must leave behind his addiction, the very thing that makes him feel safe and normal. “It’s a paradox,” explained Granger. “Everything our residents think they need, they need to risk giving that stuff up. And now they have to walk through this world without any armor, without those things that had always protected them. Being caught in that struggle is the essence of life. I respect that immensely. It takes an enormous amount of courage to trust that you can live a different life through this process when everyone and everything in your life is telling you the opposite.” Rob had been to rehab many times, but he didn’t really want to change. His addiction was the last thing he wanted to let go of. “I was a rehab Rockstar,” he said. “I was never a troublemaker. I knew how to play the game.” Because of his addiction, he lost everything – his family, his house, his job. He was evicted from his apartment and living on the street, thinking about how he had become the hobo he remembered laughing at as a child. For him, it was scarier to give up his addiction than it was to be homeless. Pete is another former resident and staff member at City Mission. At one time, he owned his own business. He had a nice house, a nice car, and a family. But he was an alcoholic. His drinking nearly killed him on three separate occasions. “I almost drank myself to death,” he explained. “I couldn’t stop. I was in the grips.” In 2008, he nearly died of an overdose. His wife made him go to rehab, but he continued to drink and was divorced in 2009. In September of 2009, he was diagnosed with cirrhosis of the liver, which turned quickly into ascites, a severe swelling in the abdomen caused by his drinking. His skin turned a fire-hydrant yellow, and he ballooned up to 330 pounds. “The doctor told me I was in the twelfth hour,” he said. Somehow, he was miraculously healed, and he quit drinking for 37 months. In 2013, he nearly died again when he overdosed on anxiety medication and a fifth of scotch. “I had to come within an inch of my life,” he said. “Pain is one of my best teachers. It’s the only thing I ever listened to. God throws pebbles. If that doesn’t work, he throws boulders. I needed the boulders.” The journey into the unknown often comes at a price. There is nothing easy about it. For addicts to change, they often need to hit rock bottom, because change not only means giving up a substance but giving up everything they had built their life around, everything they thought protected them from a painful world. Rock bottom looks different for everyone. Pete had to come within an inch of his life. For others, it could be going to jail, losing a loved one, or getting fired from a job. In their article, Change is Possible for Addicts, the American Addiction Centers explain, “Those who have a high rock bottom do not need to lose very much before they decide that they have had enough. Other people hold onto their addiction until it destroys everything good in their life.” But when the fear of the unknown world without drugs or alcohol is finally overshadowed by the pain of life with drugs or alcohol, life-change is possible. When an addict reaches their rock bottom, they are willing to do anything to escape. Pete agreed, “The pain got to the point where I was willing to do anything other than what I had been doing.” The American Addiction Centers explain, “When people reach this stage, they have the motivation and potential to completely turn their life around.” “When you’re at your weakest, that’s when Christ is at His strongest in you,” Rob told me one day in the City Mission chapel. “He is always there. He draws us real close. He whispers in your ear, ‘I’m right here.’ That’s the start of the change.” Tara explains her venture into the unknown this way, “I could still be in Virginia curled up in bed crying my eyes out in a completely dark room. Instead, I’m here at City Mission trying to be the woman I never thought I could be. Me sitting here right now, that’s enough proof for me that change is possible.” Tests and The Inmost Cave Once heroes venture into the unknown, they are met with enemies and obstacles that test their new resolve. At each obstacle, the hero must renew his decision to carry on into a new future or revert back to his old ways. Joseph Campbell tells us, “Opportunities to find deeper powers within ourselves come when life seems most challenging.” Moses is met with many obstacles on his journey. Pharoah refuses nine times to let the Israelites go, and then once the Israelites are free, they run out of food and water in the desert. They are met in battle by the Amalekites. The people complain and grumble against Moses as they are forced to wander the desert for 40 years. At each stage, Moses must find the courage to push forward. According to the American Addiction Centers, people with addictive personalities (those who are more likely to fall into addiction) often “find life too uncomfortable to deal with. In recovery the individual has to find a new way of dealing with things.” Navigating through the challenges of life without drugs or alcohol requires you to adopt more effective and healthy coping strategies, develop stronger interpersonal skills, discover new ways to build your confidence, and handle difficult situations and feelings. You find strength deep within yourself that you never knew was there. “This can be a place of adversity that they don’t want to walk into,” said Steve Nicholas, City Mission’s former Director of the Career, Training, and Education Program. “It can be a battle area. How do they respond when they face adversity? What is their choice? Do they back down and return to a place of comfort or fight for something better?” Tara says, “You got to get comfortable with being uncomfortable. Sharing in meetings, speaking with a complete stranger, trying to put yourself out there in the fellowship of other addicts. Helping the next addict is without parallel. It will shape and mold you into a completely different person. I am not the same person I was a year ago.” When faced with new challenges, instead of turning inward, Tara learned to reach out to others and live for something greater than herself. There comes a time in recovery when you must confront your deepest fear or your greatest weakness – your inmost cave. It is a moment of truth in your hero’s journey. Just a few months into his sobriety, Pete was kicked out of a treatment facility for “drug-seeking behavior,” and with no other options, he was forced to come to City Mission. It was an obstacle in his journey that filled him with anger -- an anger born in the heart of who he was. He was angry over losing his family, his home. He was angry over the four DUI’s that landed him in jail for 47 weekends. It was an anger that had perhaps always been there – an anger that perhaps drove him to drink in the first place. It was this same anger that nearly got him kicked out of the Mission as well. After lashing out against a City Mission staff member in August of 2014, he was given a stern warning that if he didn’t change his behavior, he would have to leave. That same day, while at church, he had an epiphany. “I cried out to the Lord with literal tears running down my face.” “Tears are some of our best prayers,” Pete said. “Psalms 56:8 tells us, ‘God collects each tear in a bottle.’” That challenge proved to be an opportunity for Pete to find a deeper power, and his life was renewed. From that day, Pete began living for something greater than himself. “I call that day Humility Monday,” he explained. “Something happened. I had come to the end of myself. Either I found God or He found me, but I realized on that day that it ain’t about me anymore. And I just experienced some type of joy, some sort of peace in my life that could only come from the Holy Ghost.” Every resident’s story is unique, but if they truly desire life-change, they must all square off against their deepest, darkest fears and discover something greater, something that eclipses those fears and leads them to a full and abundant life. Death and Rebirth Often, there comes a time in the course of a hero’s journey when part of the hero dies. The person who finishes the journey is simply not the same person who started out. A transformation must take place for the hero to complete the journey. The greatest example of this in all of history and all of literature is the story of Jesus Christ. For Him to accomplish his purpose on Earth, He had to die and be resurrected. And His life is a model for us all to live by. In Luke 9:23, He tells us, ““If anyone wants to come with Me, he must deny himself, take up his cross daily, and follow Me.” We are all to be transformed. “I tell people, if you see the old Tara, shoot her,” said Tara one day in the City Mission chapel. “She was a very sick, broken individual just looking for a way out. The old Tara died. I’m not that person anymore. Today, I’m completely different.” Pete added, “I am a witness to the transformation power of God. I experienced it. Just like the Apostle Paul was changed on the Road to Damascus and saw everything differently from then on.” Rob chimed in, “If I was still the same person I was, there’s no way I’d ever be able to stay clean. If I didn’t change everything, I would never say that there could be redemption.” “Recovery is a strange word,” he said. “I don’t want to recover anything of who I was. I want to see who I can become. A new creation. This journey is about finding the person that I can become, the man I can be, not recovering the old man. The old things have passed away. All things have become new.” Return With the Elixir The very last step in the hero’s journey is when the hero returns to his ordinary world and shares everything he learned on his journey with others. This last stage in the journey just so happens to coincide with the twelfth and final step of the Alcoholics Anonymous program (“Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these Steps, we try to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs”). Reaching out to help others is a crucial aspect of both the hero’s journey and recovery. “I have hope today, because I want to help others,” said Tara. “It does something for me when I can help someone and see a smile on their face. Knowing that I did something for them just like someone did for me.” This part of the story makes the hero’s journey complete, but it also represents a new beginning. They can finally leave their own wants and needs behind and see a bigger world for themselves. Now, they have a purpose, a calling, a mission – a future. Jeremiah 29:11 tells us, “’For I know the plans I have for you,’ declares the Lord, ‘plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.’” Conclusion I have been blessed to meet and have meaningful conversations with Rob, Tara, and Pete. When I think about these beautiful, heroic souls trapped in their old lives of addiction, pain, fear, and despair, it breaks my heart. But they are new creations now. They are children of God. They are beloved. Their honesty, love, compassion, and humility are truly stunning. It was a treacherous journey that brought them to the place where they are, and today, they represent the very best of us. They are my heroes! Note: Some of the names and biographical details have been changed to protect the anonymity of the residents.

Источник: https://www.citymission.org/

Ruth 4:1-4

1 Now Boaz went up to the gate and sat down there; and behold, the close relative of whom Boaz had spoken came by. So Boaz said, “Come aside, friend, sit down here.” So he came aside and sat down. 2 And he took ten men of the elders of the city, and said, “Sit down here.” So they sat down. 3 Then he said to the close relative, “Naomi, who has come back from the country of Moab, sold the piece of land which belonged to our brother Elimelech. 4 And I thought to inform you, saying, ‘Buy it back in the presence of the inhabitants and the elders of my people. If you will redeem it, redeem it; but if you will not redeem it, then tell me, that I may know; for there is no one but you to redeem it,and I am next after you.’”

And he said, “I will redeem it.

 

That morning, after Ruth had departed for home after making her request at the threshing floor, Boaz kept his word and went to the city gate to make his case.  City gates in those days were kinda like the town hall where business was transacted and judgments took place.

Biblical Personification.

In attendance at the gate, notice there were TEN ELDERS present to witness the business transaction of the two men.  “Ten” is a typology of the Law in Biblical numerics.  This unnamed man, the nearer Kinsman, is a personification of the Ten Commandments whom we shall call, “Mr. Law.”  Where do we get permission to personify the Law?  From the Apostle Paul himself in Romans 7, verse 4:

“Therefore, my brethren, you also have become dead to the law through the body of Christ,that you may be married to another—to Him who was raised from the dead, that we should bear fruit to God.”

You see?  All of us were, in effect, married to Mr. Law before we came to Christ.  How does one legally become unmarried to another according to the Law of Moses?  By dying.  Our wedding vows to this day echo that fact by saying, “Till death do us part.”

Here’s the problem:  If you die, how can you be married to another?  You can’t.  But Jesus, by dying at the cross, died our death for us and is credited to us.  This effectively breaks that which bound us to our former husband, “Mr. Law.”  He no longer has any claims on us.  He can make no demands of us either because we no longer belong to him:  WE BELONG TO JESUS. HALLELUJAH!!!

Exchange At The City Gates.

Boaz spoke to this this nearer kinsman and offered him the opportunity to purchase the property that had formerly belonged to Elimelek.  At first the man said, “Yes,” he would redeem the land.  Then, he found out that he would have to marry Ruth, the Moabitess, and produce and heir for her dead husband.

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I can just picture the color draining out of his face.  Marry a foreigner from Moab and ruin his inheritance?  No way!!!

In light of this startling information, he immediately relinquished his claim.  This gave Boaz permission to redeem it for himself and obtain Ruth as his wife, which no doubt pleased him greatly.  Though he may have appeared cool on the outside, inside I’m sure his heart jumped for joy!

You see, he had fallen head over heels in love with Ruth from the moment he saw her. He was genuinely thrilled that he would now be able to legally have her for his wife.  How like our dear Jesus who loved us long before we knew Him!  While we were still dead in our trespasses and sins, though we were strangers and far from Him, He died on the cross for us.  What a Savior!!!

God SO LOVEDthe world!   It would have been enough if God had said that He “LOVED” the world, meaning those outside of Christ.  But it’s that little word, “SO,” that reveals an intensity that we may never fully come to understand, even in eternity.

Sealing The Deal.

The two men legally sealed the deal by doing something that might seem very strange.  “Mr. Law” took off his sandal and handed it over to Boaz.  A man’s sandal in those days, you see, was a sign of ownership.  It indicated that he had the right to “Walk” on any property he owned.  This act accorded Boaz full and rightful claim to all the property that had formerly belonged to Elimelek and marry Ruth.

In the same way, Jesus redeemed us from certain death and we became His bride!  Now, as in the story of the Prodigal son where the unnamed servant (there he is again!) was instructed to put shoes on his feet, He puts shoes on our feet, a sign that we are sons/daughters, heirs to all the property belonging to our Father. Because we are made holy by Jesus, we have the right to walk on holy groundWITH OUR SHOES ON!

Reminiscent Of Samson.

Just like the story of Samson who ripped up the gates of Hebron by the might of the Spirit of God, so Jesus championed us at the gates.  For additional information on the meaning of the city gates, you may follow the link below:

The City Gate is a picture of what happened at the cross.  Jesus went to that place of judgment.  And because He is now in possession of the “Shoe,” the devil can no longer walk all over us!  We belong to Him now. We have been rescued from the camp of the devil into the camp of our Lord and Savior, Jesus!


Please follow the link below to Part 10.  We’ll see that Boaz at last gets Ruth as his wife!

https://emmausroadministries.wordpress.com/2018/01/20/boaz-marries-ruth-the-story-of-ruth-part-10/

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Источник: https://emmausroadministries.international/2020/08/12/the-story-of-ruth-part-9-the-city-gate/

Registration history:

  • 30 September 2003: Standard registration

Other names:

  • CITY GATES MINISTRIES (Previous name)
  • NEW LIFE CHURCH LEICESTER (Previous name)

Gift aid:

Recognised by HMRC for gift aid

Other regulators:

No information available

Policies:

No policies declared

Land and property:

This charity does not own and/or lease land or property


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Источник: https://register-of-charities.charitycommission.gov.uk/charity-search/-/charity-details/4002993/governance

Love God.
Love Others.

Gather.
Grow.
Go.

Gather for Worship.

Thanks to technology we can connect with just about anyone, anywhere. But there's still something special about city gates ministries together in the same space. Every Sunday we gather for worship, with others city gates ministries a diverse group with a single goal; to know God and make Him known. We also gather in homes, on campus, and online throughout the week for worship, connection, and growth.

Grow in Faith.

we don't just want to survive our time in DC - we want to thrive. We hope to see people constantly growing in their faith through little steps and gigantic leaps as they continue to worship God and connect with each other. This key aspect of our church's culture is engrained in everything from our "Sprout" children's ministry to our adult home groups, Bible studies, and other ministries.

Go Where God Sends.

At City Gates our mission is to fulfill the Great Commandment – to love God with all our heart, soul, mind and strength and to love others as ourselves – while living out the Great Commission to “go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit” Matthew 28:16-20.  We support missionaries around the world and ministries around town, but we also know God has called each of us to be the hands and feet of Jesus, sharing His message and love with the people in our daily lives. 

Do you know that you were designed to love

God and love others? Do you know it all begins

by receiving the love God has shown to you in

Jesus and then reflecting this love to others?

Do you know that God is calling you to do that

here in the shadow of our nation’s capital?

Groups & Activities

Mens Ministry

Men of Honor is the City Gates Men’s group, equipping men to minister to their families and their communities. 

City Gates Women

City Gates Women is dedicated to meeting and cultivating the women of our community to grow. 

Small Groups and Classes

We meet in various locations and times around the Washington D.C. area click to find a group to join. 

Sprout

City Gates Children’s Ministry is committed to raising children in the love and admonition of Jesus. 

Awana

AWANA clubs focus on Scripture memorization, Christian service, Bible study and application, game time, and fellowship. 

CGYG

Gospel-centered ministry for students in 7th-12th grades that meets twice a week.  

Calendar & News Feed

Here you can find what events and happenings are taking place in city gates ministries City Gates calendar.
You can also find all the latest church bulletins, prayer request, praise reports
& notifications from the various community groups here city gates ministries the Gates.

We'd love to hear from you. Fill out the form below to get started.

Источник: https://www.thecitygateschurch.com/

HISTORY of The City Gate

tcg_dining rm picThe City Gate was formally incorporated on April 26, 1988 as the result of several pastors from local churches banding together to create a church specifically for Spokane’s inner-city dwellers. The first location was on First Avenue across from the old bus station. Our second location was at the Otis Hotel. Both were “store front” operations with very small kitchens. It was recognized very early on that social needs were present in this population as well as spiritual needs, and so food and clothing banks were set up.

The present location at 170 S. Madison is in the heart of downtown. Purchased and renovated in June 2000 it continues to serve both the inner-city and homeless of Spokane as a church, social drop-in center, food bank,  clothing bank, life skills & social services as well as low cost housing and emergency shelter rooms.

The City Gate Staff

  • John Murinko – Pastor
  • James Gulbranson – Apt. Manager/Security
  • Eric Murinko – little bit of everything
  • Kathy Gibbons – Front Desk Manager
  • Dale Sanchez – Driver/Kitchen
  • Buffie Harmon – Clothing Bank
  • Jimmy Hahn – Food Bank
  • Misti Santos – Kitchen Manager
  • Kayla Paradise – Kitchen

From the Board of Trustees

The City Gate ministry is administered by a Board of Trustees composed of volunteer stewards who oversee the gifts that God brings in. Gifts come in several forms such as dedicated staff members, volunteers, food, clothing, and money. Each member of the board has love for our Lord and for the people who are struggling in the inner-city. The Trustees determine policies, generate new resources, watching carefully the expenditures of the monies donated as well as oversee the operations and staff. The Board of Trustees meet at least one time per month and many of them volunteer regularly serving meals and fellow-shipping with the people.

Board of Trustees Members

  • Bill Davis
  • John Murinko
  • John Kittel
  • Jeremy Meyer
  • Gail Stevers
  • Brock Pounder
  • Laura Wintersteen-Arleth

WHO IS The City Gate?

The City Gate is a non-profit organization that is first and foremost a church with the purpose of RECLAIMING, REBUILDING & RESTORING Lost and Broken Lives. We begin this mission by providing discover card fraud phone number “gathering place” at our downtown location that’s open to the public with no limitation of persons.

in line for breakfast 7 13

During REGULAR BUSINESS HOURS (Tue-Fri, 10am-3pm):

  • Clothing bank
  • 2nd Harvest Food Bank
  • Bread/Produce Sharing
  • Coffee, breakfast and lunch
  • Shower
  • Blankets, sleeping bags, toiletries and household items
  • Fellowship and activities such as crafts and movies

waiting for produce 7 13

IN ADDITION TO our regular business hours:

  • 10 am SUNDAY CHURCH SERVICE
  • 7 pm DINNER – Wednesday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday evenings
  • 12:30 pm LUNCH – Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Fridat
  • 8 am BREAKFAST  -Saturday morning
  • Alberta House low cost apartments above The City Gate
  • Two emergency shelter apartments

The City Gate Board of Trustees, staff and volunteers aren’t afraid to get their what is the routing number for first interstate bank dirty. We are the ground roots of hope for those who so often aren’t in a position to see anything but hopelessness. From the homeless to low-income families, youth on the streets to those who are addicts, from the mentally ill to the outcast, The City Gate provides a place of refuge from the streets in a safe and family like atmosphere.

EVERYONE has a God given purpose and is worth reaching. Not all respond to our touch however in over 25 years of service we have seen countless men, women and children impacted by the love, support and provision from those who so selflessly give of their time, funds and resources here at The City Gate.

Источник: https://www.thecitygatespokane.org/about/
City Gates Seacoast united volunteers have been ministering on the streets in Thurston County, Washington since 1995. A State of Washington as a public charity, formally incorporated as a 501(C)(3) in 2/05.
City Gates Ministries cover
Mission City Gates Ministries reaches out to anyone isolated by need, fear, loss, hopelessness or homelessness. Our mission is to empower people to become fully self sufficient members of their community. DescriptionAdd informationFounded 1995 Products We adddress both hidden and visible poverty in Thurston County.

Through StreetLights, we reach to the homeless and offer a hand up, not a hand out. We meet and serve an average of 100 peopl every week on the street. We are the largest street ministry in the United States. We provide the Good News of the Gospel, a meal and basic supplies to street.

Through Church and Community, CGM is the only non-profit working to prevent homelessness from occurring. Through the mentoring process we help people chose to help themselves. When families or individuals need assistance due to ongoing hardship or emergency situations we network with our ministries, community members, churches and local agencies to provide genuine friendship, resources and new opportunities.

We have the only mobile food bank-free food delivered at no cost directly to client's homes-in Thurston County.

Our services include mentoring, food assistance, clothing, furniture, job city gates ministries, rental assitance and housing assistance.

We also provide great opportunities for volunteers!

Similar places nearby

Источник: https://yellow.place/en/city-gates-ministries-olympia-usa

Registration history:

  • 30 September 2003: Standard registration

Other names:

  • CITY GATES MINISTRIES (Previous name)
  • NEW LIFE CHURCH LEICESTER (Previous name)

Gift aid:

Recognised by HMRC for gift aid

Other regulators:

No information available

Policies:

No policies declared

Land and property:

This charity does not own and/or lease land or property


Print charity details Loading

Tell us whether you accept cookies

We use cookies to collect information about how you use the Charity Commission Register of Charities and Digital Services, such as pages you visit. We use this information to make the website work as well as possible and to improve our services.

Accept all cookies Set cookie preferences

Источник: https://register-of-charities.charitycommission.gov.uk/charity-search/-/charity-details/4002993/governance

Hope for the
Homeless
In Southwestern PA since 1941

From Homeless to Hero

Recovery, homelessness, hero

November 17, 2021

City gates ministries to Joseph Campbell, the late professor and author of The Hero With a Thousand City gates ministries, “A hero is someone who has given his or her life to something bigger than oneself.” The heroes we read about in books or watch in movies are simply pictures of that heroic spirit that lies somewhere within all of us. Those heroes represent our collective search for what it really means and what it takes for a human to give themselves to something greater. But real heroes are actually all around us, and I have found that they show up in the unlikeliest places. The battles that our homeless residents at City Mission fight every day require true courage. During my three years here, working alongside our residents, I have seen that heroic spirit in more ways than I have in my entire life. It continually amazes me how their recovery requires heroic effort, sacrificing themselves in order to restore hope, purpose, and strength in their lives. Even the second step of the Alcoholics Anonymous’ twelve-step program (“Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity”) requires you to begin living for something greater. I am convinced that the path our residents take from brokenness to independence is the Hero’s Journey. The Ordinary World Every hero’s journey begins in the place he or she knows and understands the best – a place that feels normal and predictable. The story of Moses, for example, in the book of Exodus, finds Moses in a place of relative comfort and predictability in the mountainous, desert region of Midian. He is performing the very ordinary task of shepherding his father-in-law’s sheep. He has a wife and at least two children. He has built an ordinary life for himself in an ordinary place. For many of us, the ordinary world we grew up in elicits happy, nostalgic feelings and memories. Some of us, perhaps, never leave our ordinary world precisely because it is so pleasant and comfortable. Unfortunately, for many of our residents at City Mission their ordinary world is filled with chaos, violence, and addiction. Sadly, that world becomes normal, predictable, even comfortable for them. A large percentage of City Mission residents are in drug and/or alcohol recovery, and at one time in their lives, drugs became a kind of saving grace, the only thing perhaps that got them from day to day – an integral part of what makes their ordinary world feel normal. “Addiction is a dark, comfortable place,” explained Rob, a former City Mission resident. “You know what it feels like, so you’re ok with it. Change is the scary thing, especially if you don’t know how.” According to Drugs, Brains, and Behavior: The Science of Addiction, an article produced by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, “Over time, if drug use continues, other pleasurable activities become less pleasurable, and the person has to take the drug just to feel ‘normal.’” Eventually, drug use can become the defining characteristic of what “ordinary” feels like to a user. It alters your perspective so that the drug becomes your new normal. On their website, alcoholrehab.com, the American Addiction Centers explain that, “The life of an addict can be terribly miserable, but it is familiar,” and “there is comfort in the familiarity…Those who are addicted to alcohol or drugs can find it almost impossible to imagine how they can possibly live without these substances.” “All of our residents can remember a time when their addiction helped them,” said Paul Granger, City Mission’s former Manager of Men’s Services. “We’re all trying to find our shield or our helmet that’s going to protect us against this world that hurts us.” Unfortunately, many people turn to drugs and alcohol, because it can be a temporary escape from the challenges and the trauma of their reality. Many, like Rob, use opioids and other drugs as armor against physical pain. Rob suffered severe complications after gastric-bypass surgery. When his prescription ran out, he was already addicted. He turned to street drugs to numb the pain. Others, like Tara, another former City Mission resident, turn to drugs to escape psychological and emotional pain. She grew up in fear of her father. “I really didn’t have a childhood,” she explained. “My Dad took that from me. He was very abusive, mentally. And physically with my Mom and sister. He could put the fear of God in you with just a look, because we knew how crazy he was.” Lance Dodes M.D., in his article The Psychology of Addiction for Psychology Today, explains, “Every addictive act is preceded by a feeling of helplessness or powerlessness…Addictive behavior functions to repair this underlying feeling of helplessness. It is able to do this because taking the addictive action (or even deciding to take this action) creates a sense of being empowered--of regaining control--over one's emotional experience and one's life.” For far too many, drugs and alcohol become normal life, a kind of armor that protects users from the day-to-day trials and tribulations of life. Drugs start out as a solution. It’s only over time that they become the problem – an even more devastating problem than the original one users were trying to escape. The Unknown The absolute most crucial step in the hero’s journey, the one that all heroes must undertake, the step that in many ways defines a hero, is crossing the threshold into the unknown. When Moses encounters the burning bush, he suddenly has an important decision to make, a decision that will ultimately impact the world for thousands of years to come. He can either stay in the comfortable little cocoon he is currently living in where everything is safe and predictable, or he can venture off into the wilderness of the unknown where life is dangerous, and the future is uncertain. If he chooses to stay in Midian, then he never really becomes a hero. He must set out on the path to Egypt before his life can take a heroic turn. Similarly, our residents at City Mission must leave behind the very thing that makes them feel normal and venture off into the unknown of recovery and life transformation. The hero must find the courage to step outside of the life cycle he is stuck in. He must leave behind his addiction, the very thing that makes him feel safe and normal. “It’s a paradox,” explained Granger. “Everything our residents think they need, they need to risk giving that stuff up. And now they have to walk through this world without any armor, without those things that had always protected them. Being caught in that struggle is the essence of life. I respect that immensely. It takes an enormous amount of courage to trust that you can live a different life through this process when everyone and everything in your life is telling you the opposite.” Rob had been to rehab many times, but he didn’t really want to change. His addiction was the last thing he wanted to let go of. “I was a rehab Rockstar,” he said. “I was never a troublemaker. I knew how to play the game.” Because of his addiction, he lost everything – his family, his house, his job. He was evicted from his apartment and living on the street, thinking about how he had become the hobo he remembered laughing at as a child. For him, it was scarier to give up his addiction than it was to be homeless. Pete is another former resident and staff member at City Mission. At one time, he owned his own business. He had a nice house, a nice car, and a family. But he was an alcoholic. His drinking nearly killed him on three separate occasions. “I almost drank myself to death,” he explained. “I couldn’t stop. I was in the grips.” In 2008, he nearly died of an overdose. His wife made him go to rehab, but he continued to drink and was divorced in 2009. In September of 2009, he was diagnosed with cirrhosis of the liver, which turned quickly into ascites, a severe swelling in the abdomen caused by his drinking. His skin turned a fire-hydrant yellow, and he ballooned up to 330 pounds. “The doctor told me I was in the twelfth hour,” he said. Somehow, he was miraculously healed, and he quit drinking for 37 months. In 2013, he nearly died again when he overdosed on anxiety medication and a fifth of scotch. “I had to come within an inch of my life,” he said. “Pain is one of my best teachers. It’s the only thing I ever listened to. God throws pebbles. If that doesn’t work, he throws boulders. I needed the boulders.” The journey into the unknown often comes at a price. There is nothing easy about it. For addicts to change, they often need to hit rock bottom, because change not only means giving up a substance but giving up everything they had built their life around, everything they thought protected them from a painful world. Rock bottom looks different for everyone. Pete had to come within an inch of his life. For others, it could be going to jail, losing a loved one, or getting fired from a job. In their article, Change is Possible for Addicts, the American Addiction Centers explain, “Those who have a high rock bottom do not need to lose very much before they decide that they have had enough. Other people hold onto their addiction until it destroys everything good in their life.” But when the fear of the unknown world without drugs or alcohol is finally overshadowed by the pain of life with drugs or alcohol, life-change is possible. When an addict reaches their rock bottom, they are willing to do anything to escape. Pete agreed, “The pain got to the point where I was willing to do anything other than what I had been doing.” The American Addiction Centers explain, “When people reach this stage, they have the motivation and potential to completely turn their city gates ministries around.” “When you’re at your weakest, that’s when Christ is at His strongest in you,” Rob told me one day in the City Mission chapel. “He is always there. He draws us real close. He whispers in your ear, ‘I’m right here.’ That’s the start of the change.” Tara explains her venture into the unknown this way, “I could still be in Virginia curled up in bed crying my eyes out in a completely dark room. Instead, I’m here at City Mission trying to be the woman I never thought I could be. Me sitting here right now, that’s enough proof for me that change is possible.” Tests and The Inmost Cave Once heroes venture into the unknown, they are met with enemies and obstacles that test their new resolve. At each obstacle, the hero must renew his decision to carry on into a new future or revert back to his old ways. Joseph Campbell tells us, “Opportunities to find deeper powers within ourselves come when life seems most challenging.” Moses is met with many obstacles on his journey. Pharoah refuses nine times to let the Israelites go, and then once the Israelites are free, they run out of food and water in the desert. They are met in battle by the Amalekites. The people complain and grumble against Moses as they are forced to wander the desert city gates ministries 40 years. At each stage, Moses must find the courage to push forward. According to the American Addiction Centers, people with addictive personalities (those who are more likely to fall into addiction) often “find life too uncomfortable to deal with. In recovery the individual has to find a new way of dealing with things.” Navigating through the challenges of life without drugs or alcohol requires you to adopt more effective and healthy coping strategies, develop stronger interpersonal skills, discover new ways to build your confidence, and handle difficult situations and feelings. You find strength deep within yourself that you never knew was there. “This can be a place of adversity that they don’t want to walk into,” said Steve Nicholas, City Mission’s former Director of the Career, Training, and Education Program. “It can be a battle area. How do they respond when they face adversity? What is their choice? Do they back down and return to a place of comfort or fight for something better?” Tara says, “You got to get comfortable with being uncomfortable. Sharing in meetings, speaking with a complete stranger, trying to put yourself out there in the fellowship of other addicts. Helping the next addict is without parallel. It will shape and mold you into a completely different person. I am not the same person I was a year ago.” When faced with new challenges, instead of turning inward, Tara learned to reach out to others and live for something greater than herself. There comes a time in recovery when you must confront your deepest fear or your greatest weakness – your inmost cave. It is a moment of truth in your hero’s journey. Just a few months into his sobriety, Pete was kicked out of a treatment facility for “drug-seeking behavior,” and with no other options, he was forced to come to City Mission. It was an obstacle in his journey that filled him with anger -- an anger born in the heart of who he was. He was angry over losing his family, his home. He was angry over the four DUI’s that landed him in jail for 47 weekends. It was an anger that had perhaps always been there – an anger that perhaps drove him to drink in the first place. It was this same anger that nearly got him kicked out of the Mission as well. After lashing out against a City Mission staff member in August of 2014, he was given a stern warning that if he didn’t change his behavior, he would have to leave. That same day, while at church, he had an epiphany. “I cried out to the Lord with literal tears running down my face.” “Tears are some of our best prayers,” Pete said. “Psalms 56:8 tells us, ‘God collects each tear in a bottle.’” That challenge proved to be an opportunity for Pete to find a deeper power, and his life was renewed. From that day, Pete began living for something greater than himself. “I call that day Humility Monday,” he explained. “Something happened. I had come to the end of myself. Either I found God or He found me, but I realized on that day that it ain’t about me anymore. And I just experienced some type of joy, some sort of peace in my life that could only come from the Holy Ghost.” Every resident’s story is unique, but if they truly desire life-change, they must all square off against their deepest, darkest fears and discover something greater, something that eclipses those fears and leads them to a full and abundant life. Death and Rebirth Often, there comes a time in the course of a hero’s journey when part of the hero dies. The person who finishes the journey is simply not the same person who started out. A transformation must take place for the hero to complete the journey. The greatest example of this in all of history and all of literature is the story of Jesus Christ. For Him to accomplish his purpose on Earth, He had to die and be resurrected. And His life is a model for us all to live by. In Luke 9:23, He tells us, ““If anyone wants to come with Me, he must deny himself, take up his cross daily, and follow Me.” We are all to be transformed. “I tell people, if you see the old Tara, shoot her,” said Tara one day in the City Mission chapel. “She was a very sick, broken individual just looking for a way out. The old Tara died. I’m not that person anymore. Today, I’m completely different.” Pete added, “I am a witness to the transformation power of God. I experienced it. Just like the Apostle Paul was changed on the Road to Damascus and saw everything differently from then on.” Rob chimed in, “If I was still the same person I was, there’s no way I’d ever be able to stay clean. If I didn’t change everything, I would never say that there could be redemption.” “Recovery is a strange word,” he said. “I don’t want to recover anything of who I was. I want to see who I can become. A new creation. This journey is about finding the person that I can become, the man I can be, not recovering the old man. The old things have passed away. All things have become new.” Return With the Elixir The very last step in the hero’s journey is when the hero returns to his ordinary world and shares everything he learned on his journey with others. This last stage in the journey just so happens to coincide with the twelfth and final step of the Alcoholics Anonymous program (“Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these Steps, we try to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs”). Reaching out to help others is a crucial aspect of both the hero’s journey and recovery. “I have hope today, because I want to help others,” said Tara. “It does something for me when I can help someone and see a smile on their face. Knowing that I did something for them just like someone did for me.” This part of the story makes the hero’s journey complete, but it also represents a new beginning. They can finally leave their own wants and needs behind and see a bigger world for themselves. Now, they have a purpose, a calling, a mission – a future. Jeremiah 29:11 tells us, “’For I know the plans I have for you,’ declares the Lord, ‘plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.’” Conclusion I have been blessed to meet and have meaningful conversations with Rob, Tara, and Pete. When I think about these beautiful, heroic souls trapped in their old lives of addiction, pain, fear, and despair, it breaks my heart. But they are new creations now. They are children of God. They are beloved. Their honesty, love, compassion, and humility are truly stunning. It was a treacherous journey that brought them to the place where they are, and today, they represent the very best of us. They are my heroes! Note: Some of the names and biographical details have been changed to protect the anonymity of the residents.

Источник: https://www.citymission.org/

Ruth 4:1-4

1 Now Boaz went up to the gate and sat down there; and behold, the close relative of whom Boaz had spoken came by. So Boaz said, “Come aside, friend, sit down here.” So he came aside and sat down. 2 And he took ten men of the elders city gates ministries the city, and said, “Sit down here.” So they sat down. 3 Then he said to the close relative, “Naomi, who has come back from the country of Moab, sold the piece of land which belonged to our brother Elimelech. 4 And I thought to inform you, saying, ‘Buy it back in the presence of the inhabitants and the elders of my people. If you will redeem it, redeem it; but if you will not redeem it, then tell me, that I may know; for there is no one but you to redeem it,and I am next after you.’”

And he said, “I will redeem it.

 

That morning, after Ruth had departed for home after making her request at the threshing floor, Boaz kept his word and went to the city gate to make his case.  City gates in those days were kinda like the town hall where business was transacted and judgments took place.

Biblical Personification.

In attendance at the gate, notice there were TEN ELDERS present to witness the business transaction of the two men.  “Ten” is a typology of the Law in Biblical numerics.  This unnamed man, the nearer Kinsman, is a personification of the Ten Commandments whom we shall call, “Mr. Law.”  Where do we get permission to personify the Law?  From the Apostle Paul himself in Romans 7, verse 4:

“Therefore, my brethren, you also have become dead to the law through the body of Christ,that you may be married to another—to Him who was raised from the dead, that we should bear fruit to God.”

You see?  All of us were, in effect, married to Mr. Law before we came to Christ.  How does one legally become unmarried to another according to the Law of Moses?  By dying.  Our wedding vows to this day echo that fact by saying, “Till death do us part.”

Here’s the problem:  If you die, how can you be married to another?  You can’t.  But Jesus, by dying at the cross, died our death for us and is credited to us.  This effectively breaks that which bound us to our former husband, “Mr. Law.”  He no longer has any claims on us.  He can make no demands of us either because we no longer belong to him:  WE BELONG TO JESUS. HALLELUJAH!!!

Exchange At The City Gates.

Boaz spoke to this this nearer kinsman and offered him the opportunity to purchase the property that had formerly belonged to Elimelek.  At first the man said, “Yes,” he would redeem the land.  Then, he found out that he would have to marry Ruth, the Moabitess, and produce and heir for her dead husband.

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I can just picture the color draining out of his face.  Marry a foreigner from Moab and ruin his inheritance?  No way!!!

In light of this startling information, he immediately relinquished his claim.  This gave Boaz permission to redeem it for himself and obtain Ruth as his wife, which no doubt pleased him greatly.  Though he may have appeared cool on the outside, inside I’m sure his heart jumped for joy!

You see, he had fallen head over heels in love with Ruth from the moment he saw her. He was genuinely thrilled that he would now be able to legally have her for his wife.  How like our dear Jesus who loved us long before we knew Him!  While we were still dead in our trespasses and sins, though we were strangers and far from Him, He died on the cross for us.  What a Savior!!!

God SO LOVEDthe world!   It would have been enough if God had said that He “LOVED” the world, meaning those outside of Christ.  But it’s that little word, “SO,” that reveals an intensity that we may never fully come to understand, even in eternity.

Sealing The Deal.

The two men legally sealed the deal by doing something that might seem very strange.  “Mr. Law” took off his sandal and handed it over to Boaz.  A man’s sandal in those days, you see, was a sign of ownership.  It indicated that he had the right to “Walk” on any property he owned.  This act accorded Boaz full and rightful claim to all the property that had formerly belonged to Elimelek and marry Ruth.

In the same way, Jesus redeemed us from certain death and we became His bride!  Now, as in the story of the Prodigal son where the unnamed servant (there he is again!) was instructed to put shoes on his feet, He puts shoes on our feet, a sign that we are sons/daughters, heirs to all the property city gates ministries to our Father. Because we are made holy by Jesus, we have the right to walk on holy groundWITH OUR SHOES ON!

Reminiscent Of Samson.

Just like the story of Samson who ripped up the gates of Hebron by the might of the Spirit of God, so Jesus championed us at the gates.  For additional information on the meaning of the city gates, you may follow the link below:

The City Gate is a picture of what happened at the cross.  Jesus went to that place of judgment.  And because He is now in possession of the “Shoe,” the devil can no longer walk all over us!  We belong to Him now. We have been rescued from the camp of the devil into the camp of our Lord and Savior, Jesus!


Please follow the link below to Part 10.  We’ll see that Boaz at last gets Ruth as his wife!

https://emmausroadministries.wordpress.com/2018/01/20/boaz-marries-ruth-the-story-of-ruth-part-10/

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Источник: https://emmausroadministries.international/2020/08/12/the-story-of-ruth-part-9-the-city-gate/

Comments

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