Skip to content

Archives

Nevada unemployment direct deposit


nevada unemployment direct deposit

Nevada. Currently paying out? Yes. General unemployment portal: http://ui.nv.gov/css.html. Direct PUA Portal: N/A. Stimulus payments, unemployment benefits and state rules for remote provide updated bank information for direct deposits and use the. If you paid your taxes through direct deposit, the money will get The CARES Act will make it easier for individuals to get unemployment benefits.
nevada unemployment direct deposit

Chime is a financial technology company, not a bank. Banking services provided by The Bancorp Bank or Stride Bank N.A.; Members FDIC

Chime Home

If filing for unemployment has you feeling confused, you’re not alone. We’ve put together a guide to help you learn how to file for unemployment, as well as understand changes you might see in the wake of COVID-19 (Coronavirus). Things are changing fast, and we’re doing our best to stay up to date.

This guide is for informational purposes only. Chime does not provide financial, legal, or tax advice. You should check with your legal, financial, or tax advisor for advice specific to your situation. Your state or local unemployment agency is responsible for making all determinations on your eligibility for unemployment benefits. Please contact your state or local unemployment agency if you have questions.

Whether you’re receiving unemployment or don’t think you qualify, our new chat-style tool will help you get the most from your benefits with Chime!

Get started

We know this can be a confusing process, and we’re here to help. If you have additional questions about unemployment, see our list of FAQ’s below.

Do unemployment benefits apply to reduced hours, gig workers, and self-employed individuals?

The new C.A.R.E.S. Act (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act) has extended $600 per week of unemployment benefits to many who previously weren’t eligible through July 31, 2020. You might be eligible if you are:

  • Self-employed
  • 1099 Contract workers
  • Gig economy workers
  • Individuals whose hours have been reduced 

The application process is different by state, check with your state’s unemployment website to find out more.

How do I apply for the extended unemployment benefits under C.A.R.E.S. Act (Pandemic Unemployment Assistance)?

The additional unemployment benefits are released through individual states. Check with your state to find out how you can apply/receive it.

I’ve reached the maximum length of unemployment benefit with my state, what can I do now?

Good news! Wells fargo checking account bonus code the CARES Act, states are permitted to extend unemployment benefits by up to 13 weeks for anyone who’ve exhausted their unemployment from July 2019 – December 2020. Check with your state to learn more about whether you can take advantage of it.

What does it mean that my application is pending?

There could be many reasons depending on your state and your situation. Common reasons include:

  • state hss login portal still in the process of verifying information
  • more information is needed (you will be contacted if this is the case)

I’ve applied, when will I receive my unemployment benefit?

It typically takes 2-3 weeks for the government to process your application. Given the large amount of unemployment claims filed, many states are experiencing delays. If you have the option, we recommend direct depositing your unemployment benefits, so you won’t be stuck otherwise waiting for the unemployment prepaid card to arrive in the mail.

How come I don’t see direct deposit as an option with my state?

Unfortunately, at the moment, the following states do not have direct deposit options:

  • Maryland
  • Nevada
  • California (you can direct deposit payments from the prepaid card after the first payment)
  • Oklahoma (you can direct deposit payments from the prepaid card after the first payment)
  • Arizona (unless you mail in an original voided check from your bank account)

Once you receive your unemployment benefits, you can always transfer the money into your Chime Spending Account via your Chime app. This may help you avoid potential prepaid card fees and take advantage of the Chime app along with ourautomatic savings features.

How can I get my unemployment directly deposited into my Chime Spending Account?

For most states, direct depositing your unemployment is easy, even if you are already receiving unemployment benefits via prepaid card. Make sure the name on the payment matches the name on the bank account.

Information you’ll need differs by state but generally it includes:

You’ll need to log into your state’s unemployment website and enter your Chime Spending Account and routing numbers, which can be found in your Chime app under “Settings.”

If you live in Tennessee, New Jersey, and New Mexico, you might be experiencing issues depositing your unemployment with Chime. We are actively working with these states to have this problem resolved ASAP.

How long does it take to switch my unemployment to direct deposit?

Switching time varies from state to state. We’ve seen it range from 48 hours to over a week. Check with your state for more details and be sure to keep your unemployment prepaid card in the meantime.

Are my unemployment benefits taxable?

Yes, unemployment benefits may be taxable. You may have to pay federal income taxes and state income taxes, depending on your state.

States seacoast grace currently waive income taxes on unemployment include California, Montana, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania and Virginia. Additionally, seven states —Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington and Wyoming — do not levy any state income taxes. Check with your state to find out more details.

Could I use my Chime Spending Account to receive unemployment benefits for a loved one or someone else besides me?

No. As with all direct deposits, the name on the payment must match the name on the account. This means you cannot receive unemployment benefits deposits to your account on behalf of someone else.

If your family or loved ones aren’t Chime members, they canopen a Chime Spending Account today! Once they open a Chime Spending Account, they can then directly deposit their unemployment benefits.

Can my unemployment benefits be garnished?

Unemployment benefits are mostly exempt from garnishments. However, child or spousal support are subject to garnishment. Additionally, your state may also garnish your benefits if you owe money to the issuing state (i.e. tax).

How will I know when my deposit arrives?

If you have notifications enabled in the Settings screen of your Chime app, we will send you a push notification as soon as a deposit arrives!

Banking services provided by The Bancorp Bank or Stride Bank, N.A., Members FDIC. The Chime Visa® Debit Card is issued by The Bancorp Bank or Stride Bank pursuant to a license from Visa U.S.A. Inc. and may be used everywhere Visa debit cards are accepted. The Chime Visa® Credit Builder Card is issued by Stride Bank pursuant to a license from Visa U.S.A. Inc. and may be used everywhere Visa credit cards are accepted. Please see back of your Card for its issuing bank.

While Chime doesn’t issue personal checkbooks to write checks, Chime Checkbook gives you the freedom to send checks to anyone, anytime, from anywhere. See your issuing bank’s Deposit Account Agreement for full Chime Checkbook details.

By clicking on some of the links above, you will leave the Chime website and be directed to a third-party website. The privacy practices of those third parties may differ from those of Chime. We recommend you review the privacy statements of those third party websites, as Chime is not responsible for those third parties' privacy or security practices.

¹Out-of-Network cash withdrawal fees apply. Third-party and cash deposit fees may apply.
²Round ups automatically round up debit card purchases to the nearest dollar and transfers the round up from your Chime Spending Account to your Chime Savings Account. Save When I Get Paid automatically transfers 10% of direct deposits of $500 or nevada unemployment direct deposit to your savings account.
³Chime SpotMe is an optional, no fee service that requires you receive $500 in direct deposits a month to qualify to overdraw your account up to $20 on debit card purchases. Chime, in its sole discretion, may allow you to overdraw your account up to $100 or more based on your Chime Account history, direct deposit history and amount, spending activity and other risk-based factors. Your Limit will be displayed to you within the Chime mobile app. You will receive notice of any changes to your Limit. Your Limit may be increased or lowered at any time by Chime.

© 2013-2021 Chime. All Rights Reserved.

Источник: https://www.chime.com/unemployment/

Nevada unemployment office changing debit card providers for claimants in June

NEVADA (KTNV) — The Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation announced a change in debit card providers, from Bank of America to the Way2Go Card Debit Mastercard.

Throughout the month of June, Unemployment Insurance (UI) claimants will begin receiving their new green Way2Go Card. DETR representatives say it is vital for claimants to activate their new Way2Go Card immediately, even if there is no funding yet on the card.

TIMELINE: Nevada Dept. of Employment and handling of pandemic unemployment claims

Claimants can expect correspondence via email, mail, and their online claimant portal with more information regarding the debit card transition.

Benefit payments will not be deposited onto the new Way2Go Card Debit Mastercard until early July, according to DETR. And claimants should continue to use their current debit card as they normally would until then. Claimants should also continue filing their weekly claim as normal.

Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) claimants with direct deposit do not need to do anything and will see no change. All active UI claimants will receive a new card.

Источник: https://www.ktnv.com/news/nevada-unemployment-office-changing-debit-card-providers-for-claimants-in-june

How scammers siphoned $36B in fraudulent unemployment payments from US

In a Zoom session with the camera turned off, Mayowa describes how he scoops up U.S. unemployment benefits fattened by COVID-19 relief, an international imposter attack that has contributed to at least $36 billion being siphoned away from out-of-work Americans. 

Mayowa is an engineering student in Nigeria who estimates he’s made about $50,000 since the pandemic began. After compiling a list of real people, he turns to databases of hacked information that charge $2 in cryptocurrency to link that name to a date of birth and Social Security number. 

In most states that information is all it takes to file for unemployment. Even when state applications require additional verification, a little more money spent on sites such as FamilyTreeNow and TruthFinder provides answers – your mother’s maiden name, where you were born, your high school mascot. Mayowa said he is successful about one in six times he files a claim. 

“Once we have that information, it’s over,” Mayowa said. “It’s easy money.” 

Mayowa agreed to take USA TODAY inside the fraud in an interview arranged by security firm Agari, using only his first name to hide his identity. The security company gives him another source of cash: It pays him in Bitcoin to provide information about active scams.

Help us report on coronavirus scams

Are you a government contract officer? A vendor? A purchasing agent in the private sector? Do you know about a scam tied to coronavirus we should know about? Email us at [email protected]

Coronavirus-era unemployment fraud was first identified in the state of Washington in May and since has spread to all 50 states, skipping to new targets as government agencies plug holes exposed by the massive scams. Mayowa and his crew of foreign scammers focused in November on Hawaii, Florida and Pennsylvania.

In addition to the crushing volume of legitimate claims during COVID-19 and public pressure to speed up payments, mobile banking apps and prepaid debit cards issued by some state unemployment offices paved the way for fraud this year, security experts said.

The step-by-step playbook the scammers follow is shared on Telegram, an app that provides cloud-based anonymous messaging and acts as an internet bulletin board of tips and questions.

Asked whether he feels bad about stealing from unemployed Americans, Mayowa pointed out that 70% of his peers in school are working the scams as side hustles, too.  

“No, no remorse,” Mayowa said. “We don’t know them. We don’t know who they are; it’s nobody.”  

States for years had prepared for low-level fraud, focusing on whether actual state residents filing for unemployment were telling the truth. The recent wave of imposter fraud – including from overseas – caught them off guard. 

In Washington, alarms began flashing red for Suzi LeVine on May 12. It was 10 p.m. and the message was clear: We are under attack. 

The commissioner of the state’s unemployment system knew claims were increasing as the pandemic and its economic devastation spread. But suddenly claims were 10-fold what LeVine expected.  

Things got crazy quickly. Within two weeks of CARES Act funding enriching weekly benefits, $600 million had been bled from the state system – roughly 8% of the $8.6 billion paid over the summer. The state pulled the plug on all payments for two days while it struggled to figure out what was happening. 

Suzi LeVine, commissioner of Washington state's Employment Security Department, said she knew something was wrong this spring when the number of jobless claims being filed was 10-fold what she expected. The wave of imposter fraud led to $600 million in improper payments and calls for Gov. Jay Inslee to fire LeVine. The state has recovered $357 million so far.

Eventually, the state’s computers started to flag anomalies: out-of-state banks, duplicate email addresses and multiple names using the same bank accounts. But there and elsewhere, antiquated state computer systems failed to flag foreign IP addresses, repeated computer serial numbers and techniques to mask that number.

Washington generally sees a few dozen fraudulent claims from imposters a year. Since March, the state has identified 122,000. 

“When you consider the policy factors accelerating benefits and getting them to the neediest people and the expanded $600 available … we had the perfect storm,” said LeVine, who served as ambassador to Switzerland during the Obama administration. “They have been lying in wait for this moment.”

Washington should’ve been a wakeup call for every other state. Instead, it took some states six months or more to introduce new two-factor authentication systems and third-party ID verification tools and to block suspicious addresses. Many also began relying more heavily on a national shared database to detect suspicious actors.

A failure to move quickly combined with the ingenuity of the scammers has allowed the fraud to continue rippling across the country, contributing to delays in payments to out-of-work Americans, according to Michele Evermore, a policy analyst at the National Employment Law Project.

Key pieces of imposter unemployment scam

“These fraudsters are like velociraptors,” Evermore said. “Once they find one piece of the gate is mended, they’ll move on to another part to attack.” 

The Department of Labor’s Office of the Inspector General estimated in a November report that these schemes and others targeting pandemic unemployment payments represented about $36 billion in losses through November. 

USA TODAY contacted unemployment departments in all 50 states to ask how much fraud had been paid out, and how much had been recovered. Of the half that responded, only eight have released the amount of taxpayer dollars they improperly paid out in fraud – a fraction of the national estimate.

Many states are reticent to discuss the situation, citing security concerns as well as difficulty quantifying what meets the definition of a fraud scheme. Some declined to even estimate loss numbers – or downplayed their significance.  

Nevada officials say determining that a claim is fraudulent requires interviews with claimants and a “due process opportunity to present evidence.”

The Arkansas Division of Workforce Services “has chosen not to respond to this request,” wrote Zoë Calkins, spokeswoman for the unemployment insurance agency. 

In September, the federal Labor Department gave $100 million to state systems to combat fraud. But state unemployment commissioners say they’re still chronically underfunded, working with decades-old technology that can’t keep up with increasingly complex schemes to bypass identity safeguards. 

“One of the consequences of having a system that hasn’t been modernized is that it is extremely challenging to deal with the concerted fraudulent attacks,” said Rosa Mendez, a Nevada spokeswoman. 

The Department of Labor, the FBI and the Secret Service say they’re working together to uncover fraud, plug holes in identity verification systems and claw back millions in improper payments. 

Prosecutors have tracked down a handful of “threat actors” and “money mules” – U.S. residents who help carry out the schemes. Agari, the security contractor, estimated that Nigerians are responsible for half of all international scams that fall under the umbrella of business email compromise, including unemployment, romance and "get rich quick while you work from home" offers. About a quarter of those reach the U.S. 

The goal is to recover as much of the pilfered funds as possible. Washington state, for instance, has recovered $357 million of the $600 million stolen.

In late October, Kelly Maculan received a letter from the Illinois unemployment system confirming her last day of work had been April 3.  

Except Maculan wasn't out of work. She was employed full time as an office manager near Chicago. So, she called the number on the letter to notify the state of the error and figured that would be the end of it.

States say they are underfunded, using antiquated equipment to try to keep scammers at bay.

Days later, she received another notice that an $822 direct deposit to her had been flagged as fraud – and that she would need to repay it or face legal action. 

Maculan was irate. She has spent the past eight weeks struggling through long wait times and unfulfilled promises to call her back. After her employer got involved, the state told her this month to disregard all the notices.

Scammers need actual people to file their fictitious claims, looking for those who have not already filed on their own. In Maculan’s case, she has no idea how someone got her personal information, although she noted that her Discover card was breached years ago.

She blames the state for not having “a system set up to avoid this issue.”  

Read more

Illinois officials declined to comment specifically on Maculan’s case, and they were among those who wouldn’t estimate how much in improper payments they’ve issued since March. Spokesman Will Gomberg did say the Illinois Department of Employment Security has stopped over 341,000 claims due to identity theft since March 1.

“If a victim received a notice stating that they owe us money after they reported fraud, this notice of overpayment was sent in error,” Gomberg said. “We want to apologize for any anxiety this may have caused, and we want to reassure victims that they do not owe any money as a result of a fraudulent claim.” 

Unemployment payments rarely flow directly to the scammers. Instead, experts say fraudsters launder the money through online accounts and people with legitimate U.S. bank accounts. 

That not only obscures the scammer’s identity but makes it harder for the government to detect the fraud and recoup funds. 

Scammers avoid ATMs, which are equipped with cameras, in favor of online banking and new banking apps.

Mobile banking and other online money-transfer apps have opened up new avenues for moving money around more easily. They allow access to accounts without nevada unemployment direct deposit ever appearing in person – even avoiding cameras at ATMs – and offer debit cards that are easily moved on the black market. 

Scammers used Green Dot accounts to transfer funds in bulk in the Washington fraud, LeVine said. Mayowa, the scammer in Nigeria, said fraudsters also use Venmo, PayPal, Cash App and Walmart2Walmart to extract funds.

“Once those funds go to a Green Dot account, they’re often transferred through a series of movements into mules based in the U.S. probably, then moved offshore in two to three hops,” said Armen Najarian, chief identity officer of Agari, the security firm.  

Philip Lerma, chief risk officer at Green Dot, said the company is aware of its role in the unemployment fraud and is taking an active role in identifying problems. 

“For cases related to unemployment funds, we immediately engage state agencies and other third parties to make them aware of potentially fraudulent activity and help them assess, confirm and address it quickly and effectively,” Lerma wrote. “In many cases, using advanced device forensics, data analysis and other proprietary controls, we’ve been able to identify suspicious activity and prevent fraudulent transfers before they go through.” 

A network of so-called “money mules” includes full co-conspirators and those who have been groomed – sometimes for years – and may be unaware of their role. Najarian estimated that half are unwitting partners of puppeteers in Nigeria, South Africa or the United States.

Judy Middleton, 70, of Ridgeland, Mississippi, is accused by federal prosecutors of serving as a money mule for a sophisticated scam, one of those that targeted Washington’s unemployment system. She appears to have no other criminal history. The retiree and grandmother told the court she has two homes, a motor home and two vehicles.

Read more

Sign up

In a federal case filed in Jackson, Mississippi, in November, prosecutors said a criminal ring filed unemployment claims on behalf of eight people whose direct deposit payments flowed to Middleton’s bank account, $79,922 in total. It’s unclear from the court records who was orchestrating the scam. 

Prosecutors say Middleton withdrew the money via ATMs and cashier’s checks. She also bought Walmart and Kroger gift cards and sent money via wire transfers to other bank accounts. 

In one instance, prosecutors say, Middleton packaged up $19,000 in cash and mailed it through the U.S. Postal Service to a man in Colorado. 

If convicted of all 19 fraud charges, Middleton would face hundreds of years in prison, fines and supervision. Her trial has been delayed until March. Neither she nor her attorney answered phone calls seeking comment.  

Since March, backlogs and political pressure have forced the resignation of two state insurance commissioners in Florida and Oklahoma. Two others, in Kentucky and Wisconsin, have been fired.

Pressure mounted for Washington Gov. Jay Inslee to fire his commissioner, LeVine, too, after hundreds of millions in public funds were stolen. 

As unemployed Americans continue to file for assistance, scammers keep searching for workarounds to states' efforts to keep them out.

So far, LeVine has kept her job. She says the department worked quickly to find holes and plug them while alerting other states to prepare. She got training from her staff on verifying identification and worked alongside the National Guard, which had offered emergency help.

“We’ve been humbled by being the first out of the gate to suffer this attack, but we’ve grown and improved our responsiveness,” LeVine said.

California officials drew headlines recently for announcing they suspect as much as $2 billion was paid out in improper payments. Other states have reported lower losses:  $242 million in Massachusetts, $200 million in Michigan, $18 million in Rhode Island, $8 million in Arizona and $6 million in Wisconsin.

Read more

Three states that declined to share their numbers – Oregon, Tennessee and West Virginia – issued identical statements to USA TODAY, saying they “cannot discuss details involving ongoing fraud prevention tactics, investigations, or the scope of potentially fraudulent activity.”

None of those officials would say where the statement came from. All states belong to the same lobby organization, the National Association of State Workforce Agencies. That association did not respond to requests for comment.

Nick Penzenstadler is a reporter on the USA TODAY investigations team. He can be reached at [email protected] or @npenzenstadler, or on Signal at (720) 507-5273. 

More in this series

Источник: https://www.usatoday.com/in-depth/news/investigations/2020/12/30/unemployment-fraud-how-international-scammers-took-36-b-us/3960263001/

How Do State Unemployment Benefits Work?

Explore how unemployment insurance benefits work, who qualifies and how to apply in your state

January 8, 2021

Government prepaid debit cards

A cost-effective way for government nevada unemployment direct deposit to disburse payments.

The U.S. Bank ReliaCard® is an easy way for government agencies to provide a simple, safe way to access funds. For cardholder questions, visit the U.S. Bank ReliaCard cardholder website.

ReliaCard: A reloadable prepaid debit card for government agencies

As a government agency, you need a simple and cost effective way to deliver timely payments. The ReliaCard is that solution, allowing you to efficiently disburse payments while your recipients can safely access their funds.

Benefits for your government agency

  • Reduce costs associated with paper checks or vouchers, postage, reconciliation or replacement of lost checks
  • Maximize electronic payments with direct deposit
  • Complements your existing direct deposit processes

Benefits for your cardholders

  • Convenience of funds automatically loaded to their card for as long as they remain eligible, so there’s no need to cash or deposit a check
  • Make purchases or withdraw cash and get cash back at participating merchants anywhere Visa® or Mastercard® debit cards are accepted1
  • Security if the card is lost or stolen with Zero Liability2

Why choose ReliaCard for government disbursements?

Savings

Streamline your administration and eliminate costly paper checks, postage and reconciliation.

Convenience

There's no need for recipients to have a bank account or pay check-cashing fees. Deposits are made automatically to the card, and funds are available for immediate use wherever Visa or Mastercard debit cards are accepted.

Extra value

We offer cardholders online and mobile access, alerts, in-network ATMs, online bill pay and customer service.

Security

We invest in the data security, fraud protection and compliance programs needed to protect cardholder security.

What type of government agencies can benefit from a prepaid card program?

  • Child care
  • Child support
  • Health and human services
  • Housing authorities
  • Pension programs
  • Personal income tax returns
  • Temporary assistance for families in need
  • Trade adjustment assistance
  • Unemployment insurance
  • Worker's compensation

Ready to get started?

The U.S. Bank ReliaCard is an easy way for government agencies to provide a simple, safe way to access funds. For cardholder questions, visit the U.S. Bank ReliaCard cardholder website.

Start of disclosure content

Disclosures

    Start of disclosure content

    BS-047 ReliaCard licensing

    Источник: https://www.usbank.com/business-banking/business-services/business-prepaid-cards/government-prepaid-debit-card.html

    HKM Employment Attorneys - Employee Coronavirus Resource Center, Las Vegas, Nevada

    HKM is no longer taking specific inquiries or addressing specific questions as it relates to employees and the coronavirus pandemic. That being said, we intend to periodically update our main coronavirus site, https://hkm.com/coronavirus/, which contains a FAQ, recordings and transcripts of prior roundtables, and other resources helpful to employees. We feel that focusing on the FAQ in our website, https://hkm.com/coronavirus/ is the best way to assist as many employees and workers as possible.

    Disclaimer: Please note that this site, this email, and our roundtable are being presented as pro-bono short-term legal services without expectation by either the recipient of this email or HKM that HKM will provide continuing representation in the matter. HKM will maintain as confidential the information learned from and about the recipient of this email. HKM has no ongoing obligations to the recipient of this email after sending this email: an ongoing relationship between HKM and the recipient of this email can and will only be created with a written engagement letter signed by both HKM and the client. HKM does not have lawyers admitted in every jurisdiction. If individuals who have consulted with HKM would like to form an ongoing or future client-lawyer relationship, and HKM does not have a lawyer admitted in that jurisdiction, HKM will secure local counsel and expect to be admitted pro hac vice in any potential litigation. HKM has lawyers admitted in the following jurisdictions: California, Oregon, Washington, Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Pittsburgh, West Virginia, Georgia, Virginia, and Washington, DC. In the situation where we are not admitted in your state, we strongly encourage you to consult with a local attorney.

    Please note as well that the selection of an attorney is an important matter that should not be based solely on advertising materials. If you have specific questions, we ask that you contact a lawyer specifically. Further, please note that the situation surrounding COVID-19 is evolving and the subject matter discussed in this email may change on a daily basis. Please contact an attorney for timely, updated advice.

    HKM Employment Attorneys represents individuals and employees nationwide in all facets of employment litigation, counseling, and advice. In light of the Coronavirus pandemic, we are providing this resource, free of charge, to assist employees with common questions and concerns with issues surrounding Coronavirus and Covid-19.

    The next roundtable will take place on Tuesday, June 2nd at 11:00 AM PST. If you are interested in attending this roundtable, please enter your information and any questions to receive the conference call number and passcode for the roundtable. In addition, if you have any questions that you want answered at the roundtable, please list the question below.

    Our prior roundtables are also available for you to listen to, free of charge:

    May 12th:

    May 5th:

    April 14 Roundtable:

    April 7 Roundtable:

    Roundtable Transcripts

    This resource page will be updated frequently, and we encourage you to check it often.

    What does the coronavirus stimulus bill do?

    The stimulus bill,called the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act, which was signed on March 27, does four basic things:

    1. The bill provides money directly to many individuals;
    2. The bill expands unemployment benefits;
    3. The bill provides additional relief for student loan debt; and
    4. The bill provides an avenue for small businesses to obtain loans

    Tell me more about the direct payment to individuals

    Each qualifying adult nevada unemployment direct deposit receive $1,200 and $600 for each dependent child under 16. Single adults who earned less than $75,000 will get the full $1,200. Married couples who collectively earn less than $150,000 will get the full $2,400.

    If you earn (adjusted gross income) more than $75,000 for an individual, or more than $150,000 as a couple, then you will not get the entire amount. Above those income figures, the payment decreases until it stops altogether for single people earning $99,000 or married people who have no children and earn $198,000. A family with two children will no longer be eligible for any payments if its income surpassed $218,000.

    What year is looked at to determine how much money I get?

    2019. If you haven’t prepared a tax return yet, you can use your 2018 return.

    How will I get the money?

    If you paid your taxes through direct deposit, the money will get directly deposited into your account. Otherwise, you should receive a check.

    What about the expansion of unemployment benefits?

    The CARES Act will make it easier for individuals to get unemployment benefits.

    For employees, the Act adds the reasons for how an employee can obtain unemployment benefits to include:

    • The individual is diagnosed with COVID-19 or experiencing COVID-19 symptoms and seeking medical diagnosis;
    • A member of the individual’s household was diagnosed with COVID-19;
    • The individual is caring for a member of their family or household who was diagnosed with COVID-19;
    • A child or person for which the individual has primary caregiving responsibility is unable to attend school or another facility that is closed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency and such school/facility is required for the individual to work;
    • The individual is unable to reach the place of employment because of a quarantine imposed as a direct result of COVID-19 public health emergency;
    • The individual is unable to reach the place of employment because a health care provider advised to self-quarantine due to COVID-19 related concerns;
    • The individual was scheduled to commence employment and does not have a job or is unable to reach the job as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency;
    • The individual became the breadwinner or major support because the head of household died from COVID-19;
    • The individual has to quit as a direct result of COVID-19;
    • The individual’s place of employment is closed as a direct result of COVID-19 public health emergency; or
    • The individual meets additional criteria established by the Secretary of Labor.

    Further, the CARES Act now allows independent contractors/gig workers to obtain unemployment benefits as long as the independent contractor is willing to work, but unable to because of any of the reasons described above.  Prior to the CARES Act, independent contractors were not eligible for unemployment benefits.

    How much additional unemployment benefits will be provided?

    Each individual receiving unemployment benefits will receive the normal amount plus, until July 31, an additional $600 per week.  (This $600 additional pay will not be provided after July 31) Further, unemployment benefits are expanded from 26 weeks (the normal duration for most states) to 39 weeks.

    Does this stimulus bill affect student loans?

    For any student debt held by the federal government, you will have automatic suspension of paying any debt until September 30.

    Any other places to find out more information about what the stimulus bill does?

    Yes. For a more detailed explanation, we suggest you go here: https://www.nytimes.com/article/coronavirus-stimulus-package-questions-answers.html

    As an employee, are your rights changing and in flux?

    Yes. Sometimes daily. That is why it is very important to check back on this website for any updates. For example, many states are in the process of providing additional protections for employees as a result of the Coronavirus pandemic.

    The below information, however, is based on what the current state of the law without the federal law (which would take effect in early April, at the earliest).

    What is the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the “Act”)?

    The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the “Act”) is the bill passed by the federal government to provide some relief to some employees. The Act was passed on March 18, 2020, and will take effect until Nevada unemployment direct deposit 2, 2020. This Act will expire on December 31, 2020.

    What does the Families First Coronavirus Response bill do?

    The Act has three main provisions relevant to all employees nationwide.

    First, the Act amends the Family and Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”). The Emergency FMLA now provides that for employees of companies with less than 500 employees, employees who have been employed for at least 30 days are entitled to up to 12 weeks paid leave if they are care for a son or daughter following the closing of a school or child care and is unable to work or telework. The first ten days would not be paid. After that, employees would be paid by their employer 2/3 of their regular pay (up to $200 per day). Qualifying employees are only entitled to 12 weeks of FMLA for the entire year. For companies with less than 50 employees, the government can excuse them of the act if the paid leave “would jeopardize the viability of the business as a going concern.” Further, employers can exclude employees who are health-care workers for first responders.

    If an employee is part-time, the employee is paid based on the average number of hours the employee worked for the six months prior to taking Emergency FMLA.

    Second, the Act requires companies with less than 500 employees to provide up to 80 hours of sick leave pay (up to $511 per day) to any employee who is:

    1. subject to a federal, state or local quarantine or isolation order related to COVID-19;
    2. advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine due to COVID-19 concerns;
    3. experiencing COVID-19 symptoms and seeking medical diagnosis;
    4. caring for an individual subject to a federal, state or local quarantine or isolation order or advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine due to COVID-19 concerns;
    5. caring for the employee’s child if the child’s school or place of care is closed or the child’s care provider is unavailable due to public health emergency; or
    6. experiencing any other substantially similar condition specified by the Secretary of Health and Human Services in consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury and the Secretary of Labor.

    If you obtain sick leave because of reasons 1-3, you get 100% of your wages for up to 80 hours (with a maximum payment of $511 per day).

    If you obtain sick leave because of reasons 4-6, you get 66% of your wages to 80 hours (with a maximum payment of $200 per day).

    If an employee is part-time, then the employee is entitled to the same amount of leave as the employee works in an average two-week time period. As long as employees have worked for the company for one day, they are entitled to this sick leave if they meet the conditions described above.

    Similar to the emergency FMLA, an employer can exclude from the sick paid law any health-care workers or first responders.

    Third, the Act will make it easier (at least in theory) to obtain unemployment benefits if you are laid off. The Act provides a substantial amount of additional money to the states (who administer unemployment claims) for unemployment, but only if the states show that they are making it easier for applicants to obtain unemployment. For example, to receive the money, the states will need to show that the they are waiving some of the more onerous restrictions, such as work search requirements and waiting periods.

    For the first two weeks of unpaid Emergency FMLA leave, can I use my accrued vacation or accrued sick leave to get paid?

    Yes. If you get FMLA under the new act, the first two weeks will be unpaid. But if you have other accrued paid benefits (e.g., you have accrued vacation time), you could use those to get paid for those two weeks.

    I’m an independent contractor. How will the Act affect me?

    This bill will not entitle you to FMLA leave or sick leave. The bill, however, will give you some tax relief on your income tax via various tax credits.

    What if my employer already has a leave policy?

    If your employer has a leave policy already, the paid sick time required this new bill must be in addition to the leave policy that the employer already provides.

    How is my company supposed to pay for the new provisions in the Act?

    The company will get tax credits to offset sick leave and FMLA leave pay.

    Can my employer retaliate against me for taking the leave to care for my child?

    Absolutely not.

    Can my employer retaliate against me for taking sick leave?

    Again, absolutely not.

    But will my job be safe if I allpoint atm deposit cash locations emergency FMLA leave?

    If you work for a company with more than 25 employees, your job should be safe. If, however, you work for a company with 25 or less employees, your job may not be safe if your position is eliminated due to the economic downturn as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

    What happens if I work for a company with more than 500 employees?

    If you work for a company with more than 500 employees, then you are not covered by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the “Act”). This means that you do not get the protections from the Act. This means that you have no legal right to take FMLA leave to care for a child whose school has been closed, and you may not have legal right to obtain paid sick leave if you are experiencing COVID-like symptoms.

    But, even if you are not covered by the federal law, you may be covered under Nevada law.

    In Nevada, employers who have more than 50 employees must provide employees with one hour of sick leave for every hour 40 hours worked.

    You are entitled to use sick leave to care for yourself if you are ill or to care for the health needs of a family member. Indeed, under Nevada law, you do not have to even provide a reason.

    So although you are not entitled to the generous provisions of the federal law, you would still likely be covered under the state leave law.

    And finally, if you believe you have coronavirus or coronavirus-like symptoms, you may be entitled to traditional FMLA (not the Emergency FMLA leave, which was part of the bill just passed into law), which gives you the right to take up to 12 weeks off unpaid leave for a covered illness. It is still an open question as to whether having COVID-19, or having symptoms, would constitute a “covered illness” under the traditional FMLA.

    Do you have to go to work if you don’t want to?

    Depends, and there a few options for you.

    First, by executive order, unless you are in an essential business, you are prohibited, by order, to physically go to work if you work in Nevada.  You can find a list of what is an essential business here:  https://nvhealthresponse.nv.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/NV-Health-Response-COVID19.pdf

    Second, you should check to see if you are eligible under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the “Act”) (see above). If you are, then you are able to take Emergency FMLA leave to care for a child, or you are able to take up to two weeks of paid sick leave to treat yourself for coronavirus or coronavirus-type symptoms, or to care for nevada unemployment direct deposit family member. If any of these apply, yes, you would not have to go into work.

    Third, if eligible, you could use paid sick leave guaranteed to you by Nevada.

    Fourth, you can see if you have accrued vacation time or sick leave provided by your employer, and see if you can use that.

    Fifth, even if you are not covered by the Act, if you expect that you have Coronavirus, you may qualify for unpaid leave under the Family Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”). The FMLA allows covered employees up to 180 days of unpaid leave to care for themselves or a family member in a covered illness.

    What if I have Coronavirus or suspect that I have Coronavirus?

    If you have coronavirus, you have a few options:

    As a preliminary matter, you should not physically go into work until your time of self-quarantine has expired.

    Further, you have a few additional options:

    First, you should use employer-provided sick leave and/or vacation time if you have it.

    Second, if you do not have employer-provided sick leave and/or vacation time, you should see if you qualify for mandatory sick leave and/or vacation. For example, if you work for a company with less than 500 employees, you are entitled, under federal law, to two weeks of paid sick leave if you have coronavirus or symptoms of coronavirus.

    Third, if you cannot get paid or sick leave time, and you need to take off work for a couple weeks, you should apply for unemployment benefits, as you are likely eligible.

    Are you legally entitled to sick leave?

    Generally yes. If you work for a company with less than 500 employees, you are likely covered under the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Air france usa customer service phone number. But even if you work for a much larger company, you will likely be entitled to some sick leave under Nevada law.

    Further, many (but not all) companies with more than 500 employees provide sick leave, and I hope yours does. But if you work for an employer with more than 500 employees, mandatory sick leave is not required currently in the United States.

    If my child’s school is closed, what should I do?

    You should see if you qualify for Emergency FMLA under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the “Act”) (see above). If you qualify, your child’s school is closed, and you cannot work due to this closure, you are entitled to up to 12 weeks of Emergency FMLA leave, and 10 of weeks will be paid at 2/3 of your current pay (up to $511 per day).

    If you do not qualify under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, then you should be able to take the sick leave mandated by the state of Nevada.

    Can you decide not to attend meetings?

    If you are using your federal, state, or company-provided sick leave, you can choose not to attend meetings. If you are not using sick leave, you may need to discuss with your employer what options will be available to avoid community transmission and keep everyone safe and healthy. Simply deciding not to attend meetings without giving proper notice or checking with your manager is not protected by the law.

    If you are sick, do you HAVE to stay home, if you do not want to?

    There is not currently a mandatory self-isolation requirement in United States. If your employer has stated that sick employees are required to stay home or work from home if they show signs of sickness, you are required to do so. If they haven’t then you are likely expected to notify them of your sickness and let them determine the proper course of action.

    If an employer closes down an office because of Coronavirus, am I legally entitled to work from home?

    Unfortunately, for most at-will employees, the answer is “no.”

    If an employer closes down an office because of Coronavirus, does the employer have to pay me?

    Unfortunately, for most at-will employees, the answer is “no” again. There may be some employees covered by a union or a collective bargaining agreement. But for most employees, if you are not working for the employer, the employer does not have to pay you.

    If an employer closes down an office or business because of Coronavirus, can I use sick leave to get paid?

    No, there is currently no requirement that demands this at this time.

    Can an employer fire me because of the Coronavirus pandemic?

    Sadly, the answer is probably “yes.” An employer cannot fire you for an illegal reason (retaliation, discrimination etc.), but firing you because of an economic downturn as a result of Coronavirus would generally not be considered illegal.

    Can an employer put me on a furlough because of the Coronavirus pandemic?

    Sadly, the answer is probably “yes.” An employer cannot furlough you for an illegal reason (retaliation, discrimination etc.), but putting you on a furlough because of an economic downturn as a result of Coronavirus would generally not be considered illegal.

    What is the difference between a furlough and a termination?

    In a furlough, you would still get employee benefits. In a termination, you would not.

    Can I get unemployment benefits if I am furloughed?

    Yes.

    Can my employer close down the office and require me to work from home?

    Probably. As a condition of employment, the employer can require you to work in different locations, even at your home, if that is what the employer wishes to insist on.

    Can my employer require me to leave work if my employer suspects that I have been exposed to COVID-19?

    Yes.

    Can I stay home if I am feeling a little freaked out, and I don’t want to be around large groups?

    Unless you are using sick leave that your employer has provided you, or sick leave that you are legally entitled to receive from the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (see above to see if you and your company are covered), the answer is “no.” Absent sick leave, you have no legal right not to come into work, even though it may be the wise and prudent course of action.

    If I get laid off as a result of Coronavirus, am I entitled to unemployment?

    Yes, assuming you meet the other qualifications (e.g., worked for more than 6 months, worked a certain number of hours in the previous year etc.).

    If I have to miss work because there is a concern that I have Coronavirus, can I get unemployment?

    Again, yes.

    If I have to miss work because I am immuno-compromised, can I get unemployment benefits?

    Again, yes.

    I’m an hourly-paid employee. If my employer closes down, how many hours does my employer have to pay me for?

    Only for the hours that you’ve worked.

    Can my employer ask me if I am experiencing COVID symptoms before letting me work at the office?

    Yes. Although, if you have COVID-19, or similar symptoms, your employer must keep this information confidential from others.

    Can your employer require you to take your temperature before coming into work?

    Yes.  Although this is considered a “medical exam” under the American with Disabilities Act, the EEOC recently issued guidelines specifically allowing your employer to take your temperature prior to you entering the workplace.

    If you were sick, can your employer require you to present a doctor’s note showing that you are now healthy?

    Yes.  Based on recent EEOC guidelines, this is specifically allowed.

    Can you take sick leave (and apply for unemployment) while you are furloughed?

    Generally speaking, if you are receiving paid leave or paid sick leave, you cannot obtain both the paid sick leave and the unemployment benefits. That being said, if this is your situation, you should still apply as the requirements for unemployment are changing rapidly.

    Can someone get an accommodation for someone that has a family member who is immuno-compromised?

    Probably not. Although you can get an accommodation if you have a disability, there is no law allowing you to get an accommodation if a family member or friend is immune-compromised.

    Am I entitled to unemployment benefits?

    This depends on the state.  Further even based on the rules it is difficult to tell.  The reason is because every state has significant discretion on who will get unemployment benefits and who will not, and it is hard to tell how strict or relaxed each state will be with their requirements.  For this reason, if you have lost work or hours, we encourage you to apply for unemployment benefits.  

    That being said, the basic rules are as follows:

    1. You are generally entitled to unemployment if you are unemployed or furloughed through no fault of your own (e.g., no misconduct on your part).  You are sometimes entitled to unemployment if you lose a part-time job, you lose one of your jobs (e.g., you have two jobs, and you lose), or your hours are reduced.
    2. You are also entitled to unemployment if you cannot work due to the coronavirus.  This will often include situations where you are quarantined or where you are caring for a family member suffering from the coronavirus or coronavirus-like symptoms.  Also, if you cannot work because you are staying home to take care of a child as a result of a school closure, you may be entitled to unemployment benefits.
    3. You are generally not entitled to unemployment if you decide to stay home because you are nervous about contracting the coronavirus. 
    4. If you are an independent contractor, or gig worker, you are generally entitled to unemployment if you have lost income as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.
    5. If you get unemployment benefits, you will get, every week, (1) an amount of unemployment benefits determined by your state based on how much you normally earned plus (2) $600.  The $600 extra benefit, however, will not apply after July 31, 2020. You will be entitled to 39 weeks of unemployment benefits in most states, although some states (Idaho, Missouri, Arkansas, Alabama, Florida, South Carolina, and North Carolina), you will be entitled to less than 39 weeks. 

    What occurs if my business is not applying social distancing guidelines or not properly cleaning?

    If you work for an essential business, and your employer is not abiding by social distancing guidelines, or not properly cleaning, you have a few, but unfortunately, limited options.  As a preliminary matter, nevada unemployment direct deposit should note that there are few specific laws that require or mandate that employers apply social distancing guidelines (or properly clean) at the workplace.  

    But first, you can contact your employer to emphasize that it needs to abide by the law, and hope that your employer will follow the necessary steps.  

    Second, you can report your employer to your state’s attorney general’s office.

    Third, you can see if you can use your vacation time and/or nevada unemployment direct deposit time to avoid going into work.

    Fourth, you can report the situation to OSHA, although they have merely submitted “guidelines” for employers, rather than strict requirements. https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3990.pdf

    Do I have to go into work if someone at work has COVID or COVID-like symptoms?

    If you work for an essential business, and someone has COVID-19 or symptoms then, again, nevada unemployment direct deposit have limited options.  As a preliminary matter, you should note that there are few specific laws that require or mandate employers to take a certain action if someone has coronavirus or coronavirus-like symptoms.  

    But first, you should contact your employer to emphasize that it needs to take the necessary precautions to ensure that everyone is safe at the workplace.  We hope that your employer will follow the most recent guidance of what to do (e.g., send the ill person home etc.) in this situation.

    Second, you can see if you can use your vacation time and/or leave time to avoid going into work.

    Third, you can report the situation to OSHA, although they have merely submitted “guidelines” for employers, rather than strict requirements. https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3990.pdf

    If I work for an essential business, do I have to go into work if I am immunocompromised or I live with someone who is immunocompromised?

    This is a tough situation, and there are no clear rules that protect people here.

    That being said, there are a few options that you have:

    First, you should double check to see if your employer is an essential business.  If it is not, then you should talk to your employer to see if they will allow everyone to work from home (if possible).

    Second, if you have a child who is home from school as a result of a school closure, then, if you work for an employer with less than 500 employees, you are likely eligible for 12 weeks off under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (see details below).  

    Third, if you have a disability that makes you immunocompromised, then you could ask for a reasonable accommodation, a reasonable accommodation being that you need to stay home to work.

    Fourth, you can see if you are entitled to paid leave and/or vacation, either under a state or federal law, or based on the employer’s policy.

    Fifth, you can see if you qualify for unpaid leave under the Family Medical Leave Act.  If you or a family member have coronavirus, or similar symptoms, you may qualify for unpaid leave. The FMLA allows covered employees up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave to care for themselves or a family member in a covered illness.

    That being said, if none of these situations apply, you are wyoming com risk of being terminated (and not being able to collect unemployment) if you do not go into work. 

    Additional Resources

    United States Department of Labor, COVID-19 or Other Public Health Emergencies and the Fair Labor Standards Act Questions and Answers, March 2020, https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd/flsa/pandemic (last visited March 11, 2020).

    United States Department of Labor, COVID-19 or Other Public Health Emergencies and the Family and Medical Leave Act Questions and Answers, March 2020, https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd/fmla/pandemic (last visited March 11, 2020).

    United States Department of Labor, Division of Federal Employees (DFEC) Information on FECA Coverage for Coronavirus Disease – 2019/COVID-19, https://www.dol.gov/owcp/dfec/InfoFECACoverageCoronavirus.htm (last visited March 11, 2020).

    Источник: https://hkm.com/lasvegas/coronavirus/

    youtube video

    FULL INTERVIEW: Nevada unemployment director: 'Start looking' for work as federal benefits expire

    : Nevada unemployment direct deposit

    GREAT AMERICA HOURS
    Nevada unemployment direct deposit
    Nevada unemployment direct deposit
    2018 bmw 320i m sport shadow edition
    nevada unemployment direct deposit

    Nevada unemployment direct deposit -

    The Nevada Independent

    Since Nevada switched to a new unemployment benefits debit card provider on July 1, delivery issues with the new cards and at-times conflicting messages have left some claimants frustrated and waiting for weeks for benefits.

    In early June, the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (DETR) announced that it would transition from Bank of America to the Way2Go Card to administer regular unemployment benefits, with payments loaded onto the new cards beginning in early July.

    The change was necessary after Bank of America informed the state that it did not plan to renew its previous contract as the state’s unemployment benefits card provider. But after DETR rushed to select a replacement provider for the more than 50,000 Nevadans who currently claim regular unemployment benefits, the changeover left some claimants waiting on benefits while the transition took place.

    A spokesman for Bank of America declined to comment on the company’s decision to not renew its contract with the state, but the bank has also publicly expressed a desire to exit its contract with California for the administration of unemployment benefits. The bank has told California lawmakers that it lost hundreds of millions of dollars to unemployment fraud during the pandemic.

    Corey Bailey, a Las Vegas resident who has been unemployed since March 2020 and is a moderator for a  17,000-plus member unemployment support Facebook group, said he received three different unemployment debit cards over a month-long period before he could activate the final card.

    “Now at this point, I've learned my lesson not to depend on what they're telling me, and stop canceling cards and ordering new cards,” Bailey said.

    Before receiving his most recent card, Bailey said he was given conflicting information by different customer service agents and supervisors from the card provider, Conduent. He said one agent told him that it would cost $15 to expedite the delivery of his card, and another told him that it would cost $12 to pay for expedited delivery. He also said he was told that his card could not be charged for expedited delivery and that he could not activate his first two cards because another card was coming.

    “I call them back, and this lady says not only was my card not expedited, but they can't expedite because in order to expedite, there has to be funds on the card to charge the $12 fee,” Bailey said. “So now I'm frustrated.”

    Bailey estimates that hundreds of members of his Facebook group have faced similar challenges. Bailey said he’s heard from individuals in the group who have not received their new cards, while others have been locked out of the Way2Go online portal for security reasons and some have waited for more than a week for their funds to transfer from their Way2Go cards to their personal bank accounts.

    DETR has acknowledged that there have been bumps in the road with the new system, but a spokesperson for the agency, Heidi Saucedo, wrote in an email that the agency expects the administration of benefits through the Way2Go cards to operate similarly to previous providers.

    “As with any new program launch, there can be some unexpected problems,” Saucedo wrote. “However the dedicated team at DETR continues to work through the issues to ensure accurate and timely distribution of new debit cards and benefits to unemployed Nevadans.”

    As of July 10, there were 51,625 Nevadans receiving weekly regular unemployment benefits from DETR, with the vast majority receiving benefits through the cards rather than paper checks. During that same week, more than 130,000 Nevadans claimed some other form of unemployment benefits, though a far smaller portion of that group elected to receive those benefits through the Way2Go debit cards.

    Unlike the regular unemployment system, Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) and Pandemic Unemployment Emergency Compensation (PUEC) claimants are able to receive benefits through direct deposit, rather than through prepaid debit cards, because they are federal programs. During the week ending July 17, more than 28,000 PUA claimants were paid through direct deposits, while close to 10,000 were paid through debit card deposits, according to Saucedo.

    Though delivery problems have been limited because early delivery of the new cards began in early June, some residents have run into another issue — street addresses that were too long. DETR’s online claimant portal allows for longer street addresses, but the Way2Go system has two address lines, with the first line limited to 30 characters.

    DETR has advised claimants through its online messaging to update their addresses in the system, but the character limit has led to some delays with the delivery process. DETR has stated some claimants may not have received a card until the first week of July.

    Fred Shaheen, a 68-year-old Las Vegas resident who was laid off from his job in November, said a portion  of his apartment number was cut off by the character limit, which prevented his card from being delivered and opened up a host of other issues in attempting to correct the issue.

    Shaheen said he called DETR on June 21 and updated his address with the agency. He called back a few days later and was told that no change to his address had been made. After repeated calls to both DETR and Conduent, Shaheen said he was finally able to have his case expedited, and his card was delivered on July 15, two weeks after the transition to the new provider.

    An “unusual” situation for DETR

    DETR’s transition to a new provider for unemployment debit cards happened swiftly in a process that Saucedo described as “unusual.”

    “Last year, mid-pandemic, Bank of America let us know they were re-evaluating and were not planning to renew or bid on the next [request for proposals] for debit cards. Because of the pandemic, we were allowed and Bank of America agreed to extend the contract into 2021 until a new debit card vendor could be brought on board,” Saucedo wrote.

    In April, DETR and Conduent, a business services company that provides welfare benefits for other government programs, such as food stamps, agreed on a two-year contract running through the end of June 2023 that allowed Conduent to replace Bank of America as the state’s unemployment benefits provider starting on July 1. 

    Saucedo said that state contracts are typically four years long and that DETR is working on a request for proposals for a four year-long contract with “a vendor that can solve many of the agency’s needs.”

    “This situation was unusual and we will soon be getting back to the regular order,” she wrote.

    Conduent did not respond to requests for comment.

    The other companies that applied for the contract awarded to Conduent were U.S. Bank, Wells Fargo and FiServ, and the state’s contract with Conduent is paid for through federal dollars and comes at zero cost to the state, according to documents from a Board of Examiners meeting in June.

    DETR still only allows claimants to receive benefits through the prepaid debit cards or paper checks, making Nevada one of only two states that does not allow claimants in the regular unemployment insurance program to receive benefits through direct deposit. The lack of a direct deposit option is criticized by national consumer advocates, as it can create headaches for claimants trying to access benefits.

    In line with the agency’s efforts to find a new banking vendor, Saucedo said DETR is working to modernize its outdated unemployment system and plans to offer direct deposit for regular unemployment under the modernized system. The upgrades to the system may take several years to implement.

    Источник: https://thenevadaindependent.com/article/detrs-transition-to-new-unemployment-benefits-debit-card-provider-creates-obstacles-for-some

    How scammers siphoned $36B in fraudulent unemployment payments from US

    In a Zoom session with the camera turned off, Mayowa describes how he scoops up U.S. unemployment benefits fattened by COVID-19 relief, an international imposter attack that has contributed to at least $36 billion being siphoned away from out-of-work Americans. 

    Mayowa is an engineering student in Nigeria who estimates he’s made about $50,000 since the pandemic began. After compiling a list of real people, he turns to databases of hacked information that charge $2 in cryptocurrency to link that name to a date of birth and Social Security number. 

    In most states that information is all it takes to file for unemployment. Even when state applications require additional verification, a little more money spent on sites such as FamilyTreeNow and TruthFinder provides answers – your mother’s maiden name, where you were born, your high school mascot. Mayowa said he is successful about one in six times he files a claim. 

    “Once we have that information, it’s over,” Mayowa said. “It’s easy money.” 

    Mayowa agreed to take USA TODAY inside the fraud in an interview arranged by security firm Agari, using only his first name to hide his identity. The security company gives him another source of cash: It pays him in Bitcoin to provide information about active scams.

    Help us report on coronavirus scams

    Are you a government contract officer? A vendor? A purchasing agent in the private sector? Do you know about a scam tied to coronavirus we should know about? Email us at [email protected]

    Coronavirus-era unemployment fraud was first identified in the state of Washington in May and since has spread to all 50 states, skipping to new targets as government agencies plug holes exposed by the massive scams. Mayowa and his crew of foreign scammers focused in November on Hawaii, Florida and Pennsylvania.

    In addition to the crushing volume of legitimate claims during COVID-19 and public pressure to speed up payments, mobile banking apps and prepaid debit cards issued by some state unemployment offices paved the way for fraud this year, security experts said.

    The step-by-step playbook the scammers follow is shared on Telegram, an app that provides cloud-based anonymous messaging and acts as an internet bulletin board of tips and questions.

    Asked whether he feels bad about stealing from unemployed Americans, Mayowa pointed out that 70% of his peers in school are working the scams as side hustles, too.  

    “No, no remorse,” Mayowa said. “We don’t know them. We don’t know who they are; it’s nobody.”  

    States for years had prepared for low-level fraud, focusing on whether actual state residents filing for unemployment were telling the truth. The recent wave of imposter fraud – including from overseas – caught them off guard. 

    In Washington, alarms began flashing red for Suzi LeVine on May 12. It was 10 p.m. and the message was clear: We are under attack. 

    The commissioner of the state’s unemployment system knew claims were increasing as the pandemic and its economic devastation spread. But suddenly claims were 10-fold what LeVine expected.  

    Things got crazy quickly. Within two weeks of CARES Act funding enriching weekly benefits, $600 million had been bled from the state system – roughly 8% of the $8.6 billion paid over the summer. The state pulled the plug on all payments for two days while it struggled to figure out what was happening. 

    Suzi LeVine, commissioner of Washington state's Employment Security Department, said she knew something was wrong this spring when the number of jobless claims being filed was 10-fold what she expected. The wave of imposter fraud led to $600 million in improper payments and calls for Gov. Jay Inslee to fire LeVine. The state has recovered $357 million so far.

    Eventually, the state’s computers started to flag anomalies: out-of-state banks, duplicate email addresses and multiple names using the same bank accounts. But there and elsewhere, antiquated state computer systems failed to flag foreign IP addresses, repeated computer serial numbers and techniques to mask that number.

    Washington generally sees a few dozen fraudulent claims from imposters a year. Since March, the state has identified 122,000. 

    “When you consider the policy factors accelerating benefits and getting them to the neediest people and the expanded $600 available … we had the perfect storm,” said LeVine, who served as ambassador to Switzerland during the Obama administration. “They have been lying in wait for this moment.”

    Washington should’ve been a wakeup call for every other state. Instead, it took some states six months or more to introduce new two-factor authentication systems and third-party ID verification tools and to block suspicious addresses. Many also began relying more heavily on a national shared database to detect suspicious actors.

    A failure to move quickly combined with the ingenuity of the scammers has allowed the fraud to continue rippling across the country, contributing to delays in payments to out-of-work Americans, according to Michele Evermore, a policy analyst at the National Employment Law Project.

    Key pieces of imposter unemployment scam

    “These fraudsters are like velociraptors,” Evermore said. “Once they find one piece of the gate is mended, they’ll move on to another part to attack.” 

    The Department of Labor’s Office of the Inspector General estimated in a November report that these schemes and others targeting pandemic unemployment payments represented about $36 billion in losses through November. 

    USA TODAY contacted unemployment departments in all 50 states to ask how much fraud had been paid out, and how much had been recovered. Of the half that responded, only eight have released the amount of taxpayer dollars they improperly paid out in fraud – a fraction of the national estimate.

    Many states are reticent to discuss the situation, citing security concerns as well as difficulty quantifying what meets the definition of a fraud scheme. Some declined to even estimate loss numbers – or downplayed their significance.  

    Nevada officials say determining that a claim is fraudulent requires interviews with claimants and a “due process opportunity to present evidence.”

    The Arkansas Division of Workforce Services “has chosen not to respond to this request,” wrote Zoë Calkins, spokeswoman for the unemployment insurance agency. 

    In September, the federal Labor Department gave $100 million to state systems to combat fraud. But state unemployment commissioners say they’re still chronically underfunded, working with decades-old technology that can’t keep up with increasingly complex schemes to bypass identity safeguards. 

    “One of the consequences of having a system that hasn’t been modernized is that it is extremely challenging to deal with the concerted fraudulent attacks,” said Rosa Mendez, a Nevada spokeswoman. 

    The Department of Labor, the FBI and the Secret Service say they’re working together to uncover fraud, plug holes in identity verification systems and claw back millions in improper payments. 

    Prosecutors have tracked down a handful of “threat actors” and “money mules” – U.S. residents who help carry out the schemes. Agari, the security contractor, estimated that Nigerians are responsible for half of all international scams that fall under the umbrella of business email compromise, including unemployment, romance and "get rich quick while you work from home" offers. About a quarter of those reach the U.S. 

    The goal is to recover as much of the pilfered funds as possible. Washington state, for instance, has recovered $357 million of the $600 million stolen.

    In late October, Kelly Maculan received a letter from the Illinois unemployment system confirming her last day of work had been April 3.  

    Except Maculan wasn't out of work. She was employed full time as an office manager near Chicago. So, she called the number on the letter to notify the state of the error and figured that would be the end of it.

    States say they are underfunded, using antiquated equipment to try to keep scammers at bay.

    Days later, she received another notice that an $822 direct deposit to her had been flagged as fraud – and that she would need to repay it or face legal action. 

    Maculan was irate. She has spent the past eight weeks struggling through long wait times and unfulfilled promises to call her back. After her employer got involved, the state told her this month to disregard all the notices.

    Scammers need actual people to file their fictitious claims, looking for those who have not already filed on their own. In Maculan’s case, she has no idea how someone got her personal information, although she noted that her Discover card was breached years ago.

    She blames the state for not having “a system set up to avoid this issue.”  

    Read more

    Illinois officials declined to comment specifically on Maculan’s case, and they were among those who wouldn’t estimate how much in improper payments they’ve issued since March. Spokesman Will Gomberg did say the Illinois Department of Employment Security has stopped over 341,000 claims due to identity theft since March 1.

    “If a victim received a notice stating that they owe us money after they reported fraud, this notice of overpayment was sent in error,” Gomberg said. “We want to apologize for any anxiety this may have caused, and we want to reassure victims that they do not owe any money as a result of a fraudulent claim.” 

    Unemployment payments rarely flow directly to the scammers. Instead, experts say fraudsters launder the money through online accounts and people with legitimate U.S. bank accounts. 

    That not only obscures the scammer’s identity but makes it harder for the government to detect the fraud and recoup funds. 

    Scammers avoid ATMs, which are equipped with cameras, in favor of online banking and new banking apps.

    Mobile banking and other online money-transfer apps have opened up new avenues for moving money around more easily. They allow access to accounts without anyone ever appearing in person – even avoiding cameras at ATMs – and offer debit cards that are easily moved on the black market. 

    Scammers used Green Dot accounts to transfer funds in bulk in the Washington fraud, LeVine said. Mayowa, the scammer in Nigeria, said fraudsters also use Venmo, PayPal, Cash App and Walmart2Walmart to extract funds.

    “Once those funds go to a Green Dot account, they’re often transferred through a series of movements into mules based in the U.S. probably, then moved offshore in two to three hops,” said Armen Najarian, chief identity officer of Agari, the security firm.  

    Philip Lerma, chief risk officer at Green Dot, said the company is aware of its role in the unemployment fraud and is taking an active role in identifying problems. 

    “For cases related to unemployment funds, we immediately engage state agencies and other third parties to make them aware of potentially fraudulent activity and help them assess, confirm and address it quickly and effectively,” Lerma wrote. “In many cases, using advanced device forensics, data analysis and other proprietary controls, we’ve been able to identify suspicious activity and prevent fraudulent transfers before they go through.” 

    A network of so-called “money mules” includes full co-conspirators and those who have been groomed – sometimes for years – and may be unaware of their role. Najarian estimated that half are unwitting partners of puppeteers in Nigeria, South Africa or the United States.

    Judy Middleton, 70, of Ridgeland, Mississippi, is accused by federal prosecutors of serving as a money mule for a sophisticated scam, one of those that targeted Washington’s unemployment system. She appears to have no other criminal history. The retiree and grandmother told the court she has two homes, a motor home and two vehicles.

    Read more

    Sign up

    In a federal case filed in Jackson, Mississippi, in November, prosecutors said a criminal ring filed unemployment claims on behalf of eight people whose direct deposit payments flowed to Middleton’s bank account, $79,922 in total. It’s unclear from the court records who was orchestrating the scam. 

    Prosecutors say Middleton withdrew the money via ATMs and cashier’s checks. She also bought Walmart and Kroger gift cards and sent money via wire transfers to other bank accounts. 

    In one instance, prosecutors say, Middleton packaged up $19,000 in cash and mailed it through the U.S. Postal Service to a man in Colorado. 

    If convicted of all 19 fraud charges, Middleton would face hundreds of years in prison, fines and supervision. Her trial has been delayed until March. Neither she nor her attorney answered phone calls seeking comment.  

    Since March, backlogs and political pressure have forced the resignation of two state insurance commissioners in Florida and Oklahoma. Two others, in Kentucky and Wisconsin, have been fired.

    Pressure mounted for Washington Gov. Jay Inslee to fire his commissioner, LeVine, too, after hundreds of millions in public funds were stolen. 

    As unemployed Americans continue to file for assistance, scammers keep searching for workarounds to states' efforts to keep them out.

    So far, LeVine has kept her job. She says the department worked quickly to find holes and plug them while alerting other states to prepare. She got training from her staff on verifying identification and worked alongside the National Guard, which had offered emergency help.

    “We’ve been humbled by being the first out of the gate to suffer this attack, but we’ve grown and improved our responsiveness,” LeVine said.

    California officials drew headlines recently for announcing they suspect as much as $2 billion was paid out in improper payments. Other states have reported lower losses:  $242 million in Massachusetts, $200 million in Michigan, $18 million in Rhode Island, $8 million in Arizona and $6 million in Wisconsin.

    Read more

    Three states that declined to share their numbers – Oregon, Tennessee and West Virginia – issued identical statements to USA TODAY, saying they “cannot discuss details involving ongoing fraud prevention tactics, investigations, or the scope of potentially fraudulent activity.”

    None of those officials would say where the statement came from. All states belong to the same lobby organization, the National Association of State Workforce Agencies. That association did not respond to requests for comment.

    Nick Penzenstadler is a reporter on the USA TODAY investigations team. He can be reached at [email protected] or @npenzenstadler, or on Signal at (720) 507-5273. 

    More in this series

    Источник: https://www.usatoday.com/in-depth/news/investigations/2020/12/30/unemployment-fraud-how-international-scammers-took-36-b-us/3960263001/

    Nevada COVID-19 Resources

    EN ESPAÑOL


    My office's top priority throughout the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak is to keep Nevadans safe and ensure they have access to current and accurate information. We've put together pages with health information, small business assistance, and a regularly-updated list of resources and programs for Nevadans. Access each of them below.

    The COVID-19 pandemic is rapidly evolving and changing. I want to be sure you have the most up-to-date and accurate information. Check back in on this page regularly, as we update our existing pages with additional information and add new pages.

    If you need additional small business assistance with a federal agency, please email [email protected] or call my office at 702-388-0205 or 775-337-0110. 

    If you see a resource we're missing on any of our pages, please email [email protected]

    If you need additional assistance with a federal agency, please email [email protected] or call my office at 702-388-0205. For other policy or scheduling questions, please click here.



    CARES Act FAQs

    How does the new law help people who have been laid off due to the pandemic?

    • Workers receiving unemployment benefits will get the normal weekly benefit plus an additional $600 per week, until the end of July. Together, this is enough to replace 100% of lost wages for a large portion of workers, especially lower-income workers.
    • The length of time workers can receive unemployment benefits is increased by an additional 13 weeks.  
    • Unemployment insurance has been expanded to cover part-time workers, the self-employed, and many other workers who aren’t eligible for traditional unemployment insurance.  
    • While these additional funds come from the federal government, they are passed on to the State of Nevada, which administers Unemployment Insurance (UI) benefits. Apply here for Nevada unemployment insurance.

    How much will Nevadans receive in stimulus payments?

    • Most households with incomes under $150,000 ($75,000 for singles) will receive $1,200 per adult and $500 per child from the Department of Treasury.  

    • Payments will phase out for those with incomes between $150,000 and $198,000 for couples (the phase out starts at $75,000 for singles).  Couples whose incomes exceed $198,000 will not be eligible for payments.

    How will Nevadans get their payments?

    • The funds are expected to arrive automatically via mail or direct deposit in the coming weeks and will go to those who filed a tax return for tax years 2018 or 2019, according to the U.S. Treasury. 
    • In addition, the Department of Treasury has announced they will make the payment automatically to Social Security and Railroad Retirement beneficiaries, even if they haven’t filed a tax return. 
    • Click HERE to access the Department of Treasury's online tool to ensure that you still receive your stimulus payment if you don't normally file a tax return.
    • Otherwise, according to the U.S. Treasury, those who didn’t file a return will have to file a tax return to get the funds.
    • No income tax will be owed on these payments.
    • What about those without a social security number? Immigrants with valid social security numbers and those who file taxes as “resident aliens” qualify for the one-time payment. If you file taxes as a family, all family members need valid social security numbers. If you are in a mixed-status family and anyone in the family uses an ITIN (individual taxpayer identification number), the family does not qualify for the payment. Military families may be excluded from this limitation if one spouse has a valid social security number and at least one spouse is in the military.

    How does this law help struggling small businesses?

    • The Stimulus package’s Paycheck Protection Program pays for up to two months of employee wages for small businesses that keep workers employed or rehire those who have been laid off.  It also provides funding for rent, utilities, and similar expenses.  These funds do not need to be paid back if employees are kept on the payroll or rehired.  
    • Under the stimulus package, the Small Business Administration can provide small businesses with up to $10,000 in grants (usually on the day of application) that don’t need to be repaid, plus provide additional access to loans for businesses in need of funding.  Applications here.
    • Small businesses with existing SBA loans will receive up to six months of forgiveness of their current loans, including principal, interest, and fees.  This forgiveness is also available for borrowers to take certain new SBA loans in the next six months.  
    • Additional resources are available for Small Business Development Centers, Women’s Business Centers, and Minority Business Development Agency Business Centers.  
    • For businesses who don’t use the Paycheck Protection Program, the law provides employee retention tax credits to support a portion of an employer’s payroll expenses for certain workers.

    What supports are included for hospitals and health systems?

    • The stimulus bill includes $100 billion for hospitals across the country to prepare for and handle the surge in demand. Funds will pay for temporary hospital structures, specialized medical equipment, personalized protective equipment, and testing supplies.
    • Funds will also go to emergency Medicare funding for critical access hospitals in rural Nevada.
    • More than $27 billion will help health systems develop and purchase COVID-19 tests, vaccines, and therapeutics and invest in telehealth infrastructure.
    • Provides a $1.32 billion increase in funding for Community Health Centers to support community health centers deliver care at over 70 sites across the state.
    • Extends federal funding for Nevada's Certified Community Behavioral Health Centers (CCBHCs).
    • Provides regulatory flexibility to expand access to telehealth services, protecting both patients and providers during this period of social distancing.
    • Includes a $16 billion increase in funding for the Strategic National Stockpile to expand the national supply of personal protective equipment and diagnostic tests.
    • FEMA will receive $45 billion to provide immediate relief to state, local, tribal, and territorial governments for medical response, personal protective equipment, and deployment of the National Guard.
    • Provides $1 billion for Defense Production Act to bolster supply chains for personal protective equipment, ventilators, and other needed medical supplies.
    • Additional resources are available for Small Business Development Centers, Women’s Business Centers, and Minority Business Development Agency Business Centers.  
    • For businesses who don’t use the Paycheck Protection Program, the law provides employee retention tax credits to support a portion of an employer’s payroll expenses for certain workers.

    Will this law help states, local governments, and Tribal governments?

    • It includes a total of $150 billion to help states, local governments and tribal governments cover the costs of necessary expenses due to the coronavirus outbreak.
    • Nevada will receive funding directly from the U.S. Treasury within 30 days of enactment, and localities with a population over 500,000 can also apply directly to the Treasury to receive their relative share by population of Nevada's allocation.
    • $8 billion is reserved for a tribal relief fund. The U.S. Treasury will develop a funding distribution model so that tribal governments and tribally-owned entities can receive funding. 

    Will it help schools in Nevada?

    • The stimulus bill provides $30 billion to stabilize K-12 schools, colleges and universities in Nevada and across the country as they respond to coronavirus and transition to distance learning.

    Do I still have to pay back my student loans?

    • Federally held student loan payments are suspended through September 30.  No interest will accrue during this time.  
    • Borrowers on income-driven repayment plans, or those working towards Public Service Loan Forgiveness will still be able to count the suspension time towards progress under those programs.

    What does the new law to do help childcare providers?

    • The new law provides $3.5 billion to support childcare in Nevada and across the country. Funds will go to Nevada and other states to support frontline health care workers, emergency responders, and other essential personnel who need childcare services.

    Popular Links


    Learn more about my work on behalf of all Nevadans during this crisis:


    Rosen, Kelly Send Letter Urging HHS to Implement COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Plan for Seniors

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, U.S. Senators Jacky Rosen (D-NV) and Mark Kelly (D-AZ), both members of the Senate Special Committee on Aging, sent a letter to the U.S Department of Health and Human Services urging them to build and implement a comprehensive plan for seniors to receive COVID-19 vaccine booster shots as soon as recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

    “The CDC reports cite that over time, vaccinated adults over the age of 75 become more vulnerable to hospitalizations as...

    Read More

    Rosen Visits Touro University’s East Las Vegas Vaccine Clinic, Highlights Importance of Getting Vaccinated

    LAS VEGAS, NV – Today, U.S. Senator Jacky Rosen (D-NV), a member of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP), visited a vaccine clinic hosted by Touro University Nevada, Immunize Nevada, and the City of Las Vegas at the East Las Vegas Community Center. During her visit, Senator Rosen spoke with Touro University faculty and students about their vaccination efforts in Nevada and urged community members to get vaccinated in order to protect their health.  

    “The COVID-19...

    Read More

    Rosen Transcript Following HELP Hearing with Dr. Fauci on Efforts to Combat COVID-19

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, during a hearing of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP), U.S. Senator Jacky Rosen (D-NV) questioned Dr. Anthony Facui, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) about research and studies being conducted on those who are experiencing long-term symptoms from COVID-19, the long-term health impacts of those who have recovered from acute illness, as well as the...

    Read More

    Rosen Applauds $2.2 Million in CDC Funding to Support COVID-19 Vaccine Education in Nevada

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, U.S. Senator Jacky Rosen (D-NV), a member of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP), released the following statement applauding news of a grant totaling $2,261,337 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) awarded to Nevada to increase vaccine education and outreach across the state.

    “During this time of uncertainty, we must ensure Nevadans and all Americans have access to timely, accurate, and culturally competent...

    Read More

    more

    Источник: https://www.rosen.senate.gov/nevada-covid-19-resources

    The Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (NV DETR) administers the unemployment compensation program for the state. The DETR is responsible for processing unemployment compensation claims and paying out benefits, including the federally funded enhanced unemployment benefits.

    As many claimants realized, NV DETR had struggled to pay benefits in a timely manner given their antiquated systems and processing for a record number of claimants.

    Further, widespread reports of fraudulent claims meant longer processing periods and mass rejections of valid claims. However following DETR system and process upgrades many of these issues have now been addressed as you can see in the comments forum following this article. You can also more on recent topics of interest around pandemic unemployment benefits in the sections below.

    End of Federal Enhanced Benefits (PUA, PEUC, $300 FPUC and $100 MEUC)

    The Nevada DETR has confirmed that claimants on the PEUC, PUA, MEUC and FPUC programs will file/certify for benefits for the last time covering the week ending September 4, 2021. Any active claims with or without remaining balances will expire after this date.

    While there has been a lot of discussion around extending pandemic unemployment benefits, the Biden administration has confirmed (see video) that states will have to use already allocated stimulus funding to expand or extend traditional state unemployment programs. The NV DETR has not indicated that is planning to do so at this stage, but I will post updates if things change.

    Claimants who were eligible for State Extended Benefits (SEB) will get an extra week of benefits, as the SEB program expires the week ending September 11. After September 4th and 11th, claimants must have a regular UI claim to continue receiving benefits.

    Stay In the Know:Subscribe via email or follow us on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube

    ID.Me Identity Validation Issues

    Thousands of unemployed claimants are reporting issues with the new identity verification system/vendor the DETR is using to tackle issues with fraudulent claims. Earlier this year claimants were asked to use little known third party vendor ID.me, whose system uses proprietary A.I. facial recognition software, to verity their identity in order to receive unemployment benefits.

    However many claimants in Nevada are reporting this system has not worked for them and have already faced several weeks (or months in some cases) of delays in getting the unemployment payments they are eligible for. The issues ranged from a failure of the ID.me facial recognition technology to having to wait for hours to reach a human for a video chat to troubleshoot issues – a service provided via the vendor, and not the DETR.  

    You can see examples in the comments forum below this article and across social media issues are being reported with this technology which is also used in several other states to verify identities for unemployment payments. The DETR and ID.me have said most issues have been worked through and only a handful of complex cases remain to be resolved.

    Is the $300 weekly benefit, PUA and PEUC ending early in Nevada?

    No. Despite several other states ending benefits earlier than planned, Gov. Steve Sisolak has announced that he is NOT considering ending federal unemployment programs ahead of the current September 6th expiry. Unlike most states, pay rates in Nevada are higher than average and unemployment benefits lower than average. This has meant business for the most part have been able to fill open vacancies as activity picks up in a post-pandemic environment.


    Biden Stimulus Bill – Unemployment Benefit Extensions to September 2021

    Under President Biden’s $1.9 trillion federal coronavirus relief package, known as the American Rescue Plan (ARP), enhanced unemployment benefits have been extended until September 6th. This includes further extensions to the PUA program, PEUC program, $300 weekly payment under the FPUC program and $100 Mixed Earners (MEUC) program. There were also provisions in the Biden Stimulus package for Unemployment tax breaks on the first $10,200 of benefits received in 2020.

    Nevada DETR Latest News and Status on PUA, PEUC and $300 FPUC Payment Schedule

    The Federal Department of Labor (DOL) has now issued formal guidelines to implement the latest round of unemployment extensions until September 6th. The Nevada DETR has implemented the system changes to enable it to apply up to an additional 25 weeks for all eligible claimants, through week ending September 4, 2021.  This was much faster than prior extensions and federal unemployment programs (per updates below).

    There were some issues with applying extended weeks to the PUA program claimants but that has now been resolved. Claimants should be aware of the following general guidelines around the extended coverage period funded under the Biden ARP stimulus bill.

    • You do not need to reapply for benefits. DETR will automatically enroll you in the appropriate extension and notify if additional information is needed.
    • You should continue to file your weekly claim for benefits as you normally would as long as you remain unemployed.
    • You will not need to contact DETR in order for these program extensions to take effect.
    • This legislation would extend the various benefit programs through the week ending September 4, 2021. This is approximately 25 weeks of extra coverage (the ARP bill had legislated 29 weeks in total).
    • The additional weekly payment of $300 under the FPUC program will be extended through September 4, 2021 as well.
    • Several PUA claimants reported issues with verifying their identity through ID.me, but the agency is working with impacted or technically challenged folks to address identity verification issues.

    March 17th, 2021 Update on rollout of ARPA extensions

    Nevada’s DETR is still updating systems to apply the additional coverage weeks under this extension. They are also still having challenges paying out extended weeks under the CAA given their antiquated systems, and have said PUA and PEUC recipients should be prepared to experience several weeks of delays to get the extra weeks of coverage under ARP.

    PEUC Claimants ongoing delays expected – The Nevada DETR UI system cannot process all of the existing claims at one time. Because the system must evaluate and update the payment amount for each week for each claimant, they process payments in batches. In general, they are processing from oldest to newest claims. Some complex claims require manual processing to ensure that claimants receive all of the weeks they are eligible for. As a result PEUC recipients will experience a delay of several weeks before benefits become available. Claimants will retroactively receive all weeks they are eligible for.

    I will post updates as more information is provided. So get the latest updates via the options below.


    2021 Unemployment Program Extensions Under COVID Relief Bill – PUA and PEUC 11-week Extension Updates

    The $900 billion COVID-19 relief package was passed into law on Dec. 27, 2020, which among several other pandemic relief measures extends and provides additional funding for enhanced unemployment benefits. This includes the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA), Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) and a reinstatement, but halving of the Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC) Program which provides a $300 supplemental weekly unemployment payment. These programs have been funded and extended for 11 weeks, covering the weeks of December 27th, 2020 to March 14th, 2021. Existing PUA and PEUC claims can be claimed until the week ending April 10th (phase out period).

    [Update Feb 17th] The 11-week extension has been rolled out for the PUA and PEUC programs, but DETR continues to see technical issues with paying claims. For PUA they are not expecting to make payments until the end of May. The latest one (per the screenshot below) was one asking existing PUA claimants who were filing for the 11-week extension to file a new claim and be subject to a waiting period. This was incorrect and has caused payment delays which the DETR is looking to fix.

    How long will it take before I can get PUA payments for the 11-week extension?

    DETR is seeing thousands of applications being submitted and each claim requires a review for each week of PUA eligibility and will take some time. The Division recommends checking the website and your PUA account for any current/updated changes. They are also recommending choosing direct deposit for payment, which will process more quickly. Debit cards will take 7-14 days to arrive. Payments for PUA weekly claims are scheduled to begin by the end of May.

    Image

    Will I Get the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) 11-weeks automatically?

    While the PEUC updates for the new legislation have been applied there are some new rules to be aware of. Those who are currently receiving PEUC benefits under the CARES act, will continue to be on PEUC and their eligible weeks will be automatically extended.

    Any claimant who had a balance on their PEUC extension as of 12/26/20 but had already filed a State Extended Benefits (SEB) claim early, will be automatically placed back on PEUC in order to capture the additional weeks. This may results in a weeks gap in benefit payments. Any claimant who had exhausted PEUC prior to 12/26/20 and went on SEB will stay on SEB. At the end of SEB, the claimant will be placed back on PEUC up to the expiration of the program.

    [Update Jan 12th] – While Nevada has started paying the $300 FPUC payment to active claimants, it has not paid week 6 of the $300 LWA program (per updates below in LWA section). These are two separate programs and funded differently – the FPUC is federally funded under the COVID relief bill, the LWA program was funded via FEMA. Note that Nevada DETR also has to roll-out updates to PUA programs to cover the extended periods and allow those claimants to also get the extra weekly $300 FPUC.

    Due to additional requirements for new PUA filers, DETR must update the PUA application programming before new PUA claims can be filed. Depending on the complexity of DOL guidance on changes, it is anticipated that these changes should be implemented within four weeks [so likely won’t be ready till end of January 2020]

    Nevada DETR

    According to the Nevada DETR claimants with existing or expired claim balances should be aware of the following:

    • PUA and PEUC, FPUC will be automatically added to the claimants’ benefits if they are eligible for the weeks outlined in the legislation.
    • Claimants with weeks remaining in UI should continue to file weekly claims.
    • Claimants who will have additional weeks in UI and PUA or PEUC due to the Continued Assistance Act should watch the DETR website for updates that will allow additional weeks to be filed.
    • Claimants will be caught up on payments for all weeks they are eligible.

    Stay In the Know:Subscribe via email or follow us on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube


    Fifth Week of the Lost Wages Assistance Program Now Being Paid. Week 6 STILL NOT PAID

    [Update Jan 12th, 2020] Week 5 has been paid, but week 6 is still pending as DETR is currently waiting to hear back from FEMA for funding to make this payment. While FEMA or DETR has not made an official comment I doubt this payment will be made as the overall program expired at the end of 2020. And with the new $300 FPUC payment (discussed above) already being sent, Week 6 may not ever happen.

    [Updated December 16th] – While Weeks 4 and 5 have now been paid for most eligible claimants, there are still many reports of missing and delayed payments (see quote below). It does seem that PUA recipients are being paid first, likely due to the fact they had already certified their job loss was COVID related (an LWA requirement). Other UI program recipients, per comments below, are still awaiting Week 4 and Week 5 payments in particular.

    Week 6 payments were scheduled to start this week, but it now appears that the DETR is awaiting more funding from FEMA to pay for week 6. Per their official statement, “As to the potential of the last week of assistance (week 6), unless FEMA approves additional funding to pay for a week 6, there will not be a payment for a week 6. DETR is currently waiting to hear back from FEMA.” Again this does NOT mean that Week 6 is definitely not being paid, it just means that it is subject to FEMA funding which was budgeted for 6 weeks per state. But given the delays in Nevada’s DETR LWA roll-out the program expiry date of December 31st may be the bigger risk of this payment being missed vs. FEMA funding approval.

    You can see this video for a summary of the issues and potential solutions if you are having trouble with getting information on your LWA payment.

    Lost Wages Assistance (LWA) in Nevada – Payments now processing and being paid

    The Nevada DETR said that it made a small test run of $300 LWA payments during the week of October 12th to claimants in the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program. Actual LWA payments to all eligible claimants will take place over the next several weeks and payments will be processed in several batches given the significant number of claimants and system constraints.

    [Updated November 30th] LWA Payments for weeks 1 through 4 have been issued. DETR has started making payments for week 5 of LWA to eligible claimants. As in round one, the process is expected to last up to 10 days. After week 5 is completed, DETR will make sure there is enough money left in the grant to pay the final week (week 6) of LWA.

    [Updated November 11th] The Nevada DETR has said it has started processing ($300) payments for week 4 of LWA to eligible claimants this week. As in round one, the process is expected to last up to 10 days, DETR said. After Week 4 is paid, DETR will pay subsequent weeks for which they have funding.

    Many claimants are not eligible for LWA payments because they are not receiving at least $100 in existing UI benefits (via regular state unemployment, PUA or PEUC) to be eligible for the program.

    First 3 weeks of LWA payments now paid

    DETR spokesperson, Rosa Mendez, said the first 3 weeks of LWA payments of $900 for those on PUA were paid in batches through 10/23 (confirmed based on article comments). From 10/23 to the end of October, those not on PUA will start getting their first ($900) batch of payments. The remaining LWA payments will also begin processing towards the end of October for ALL unemployment recipients, until Nevada runs out of LWA funding (max 6 weeks).

    How to tell if you have been approved and how to tell how much you’re getting

    (Thanks to Brent for this comment) Login to your Claimant homepage. Go to the dates of 8/1, 8/8, and 8/15, and if you look at the deductions it should be “Y” for yes click on the “Y” and it will say “Lost wage Assistance” then -300 dollars for those 3 dates. This is good don’t freak out it means your approved. Sorry if this is confusing its hard to explain because it shows up in a weird spot.

    Amounts to qualified applicants will be paid retroactively to August 1 for 6 weeks (up to $1800 in total if you qualified for all 6 weeks). Several readers have acknowledged the lack of information and delayed payment relative to other states as you can see in the comments below. I will continue to post updates if new information comes to hand. See further details in the section below including a link to the NV DETR LWA page.

    2020 COVID 19 Enhanced Benefits under CARES Act

    Under the CARES act, there are three types of federal unemployment assistance available:

    • Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA): expands eligibility for traditionally ineligible individuals for unemployment benefits, including independent contractors and self-employed individuals.  Recipients may receive up to 39 weeks of benefit payments under this program.

    • Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC): adds $600 per week and the regular benefits that recipients of Unemployment Insurance are entitled to receive; the benefit is retroactive to the week beginning March 29, 2020, and the program expired on July 31, 2020.

    • Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC): provides an additional 13 weeks of Unemployment benefits to regular unemployment insurance recipients.

    If you have exhausted benefits paid through the regular unemployment and PEUC program, you may be entitled to receive up to 50% of the total amount received on your regular unemployment benefits through the Extended Benefit (EB) program. This program covers an additional 6 to 13 weeks of unemployment benefits, depending upon the number of weeks you were eligible for benefits on your original unemployment insurance claim.

    Lost Wages Assistance (LWA) Payment Details and Schedule

    In addition to the above enhanced benefits, you may be eligible for Lost Wage Assistance (LWA) if you are out of work due to COVID-19. If your weekly benefit payment is at least $100, and you were eligible for unemployment benefits, you may receive an additional $300 in assistance retroactive through weeks ending August 1, 2020 to September 5th, 2020. You do not need to file a separate request/application for LWA; however, you may need to self-certify to confirm that you are unemployed or partially unemployed because of COVID-19.

    Applicants only need to self-certify that they are unemployed/partially unemployed due to disruptions caused by COVID-19. If they don’t self-certify they may not be eligible to receive any of the $300 due to FEMA funding limitations.

    Claimants do not need to apply separately for the benefit, or reactivate a claim if they were eligible during the qualifying weeks but have since returned to work. Those still in the backlog will be eligible for Lost Wages benefits if their claim is approved, DETR officials said. See more on the NV DETR LWA page.

    Web and/or phone issues with accessing the unemployment systems

    The DETR has experienced a high volume of unemployment benefits claims filed since the pandemic began. Given its lack of staff, the agency has had significant delays in processing claims and answering incoming calls. Also, federal assistance received required changes to their online processing systems, which delayed the processing of claims and benefits.

    Initial Claims: If this is the first time that you are filing an unemployment claim under any of the federal or state programs available, you must first file an initial unemployment insurance claim to determine your eligibility and which programs may apply to you.

    If you are eligible for regular unemployment benefits, you will receive a Monetary Determination Letter and PIN, typically within 7 to 10 business days of filing your initial claim. Your Monetary Determination letter lets you know what financial benefits you may possibly be eligible for; however, this may change based on the weekly claims you submit (addressed under Existing Claimants below).

    Existing Claimants:  Claimants receiving unemployment benefits due to the coronavirus pandemic must continue to certify every week to receive unemployment benefits under any state or federal program. This includes the additional FPUC $600/week benefit and the PUA program.

    The extra $600/week compensation is retroactive to the week beginning on March 29 and ends on July 31. FPUC payments are automatically added to the weekly benefit payment.

    Upon exhausting regular unemployment benefits, you must file a separate application to receive PEUC benefits.

    Claimants that have exhausted both regular unemployment and PEUC benefits may be eligible for an additional 6 to 13 weeks of unemployment benefits under the Extended Benefits program. A separate application is required.

    Filing an Initial and Weekly Claim + FAQs

    You must file your initial unemployment claim through the DETR here. You will need the following information to file your first claim. 

    • Social Security Number
    • Personal mailing address and contact information
    • Employment history for the past 18 months, including:
      • Employers’ business names
      • The physical address for each employer
      • First and the last date that you worked for each employer
      • The reason you are no longer employed
    • Alien Registration number and the date your work authorization expires if you are not a US citizen
    • The name and local number of the union hall (if you obtain work through a union)

    To file a new claim over the phone, the Customer Call Center is available at (866) 832-2363. Phone assistance is available from Monday-Friday 8:15 AM – 4:30 PM; Saturday 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM.  You may also file an existing claim over the phone by calling (800) 897-5630.

    To be eligible for Unemployment Insurance benefits in Virginia, you must meet the following eligibility requirements during the pandemic:

    • Unemployed or had a reduction in hours due to no fault of your own
    • Earned enough wages to be eligible for unemployment benefits

    Filing Weekly Claims

    You must file a weekly claim to prove that you are still eligible and qualify for unemployment benefits.  Your weekly claim cannot be filed until the end of the workweek, which is Saturday at midnight. You have up to 28 days after the end of each week that you are unemployed to file this weekly claim. Weekly claims can be filed online or over the phone.

    If you don’t file your weekly claim within the required time, you will not be paid unemployment benefits for the week. 

    Existing claimants who are eligible for PUA log in here to file their weekly claims.

    If there is a problem with your claim that must be resolved before benefits can be paid or you have appealed a denial in benefits, you must still file a weekly claim online or over the phone. If it is determined that you are eligible or if you win your appeal, you will be paid these benefits retroactively. However, if you win the appeal but have not claimed benefits, you will not be paid for these weeks.

    I filed my unemployment claim several weeks ago. Will I receive back pay once my claim is approved?

    Over the past few months, the DETR has improved its telephone response and claim processing time. However, the large volume of unemployment claims will result in continued delays. If you are eligible to receive benefits but have not heard anything back yet, you will receive retroactive benefit payments up to the date that you were determined eligible as long as you filed your claims each week.

    This also applies to the FPUC $600 per week additional benefit, which expired on July 31. If you have filed an unemployment claim before that date and are still awaiting a response regarding your eligibility for unemployment, you will receive retroactive payments for the back weeks of FPUC. This is the case even if the decision is not made until after the July 31 expiration date. 

    If you are not eligible for regular unemployment, you may collect benefits under the PUA program.  To determine eligibility, you must file a new unemployment insurance claim if you have not already done so. Once your eligibility is determined, you may complete a separate PUA application. You should continue to file weekly certifications during this process. If you are eligible for PUA benefits for weeks that have already passed, you may recover back pay if you submitted weekly certifications.

    Can I still collect unemployment benefits if my hours have been reduced?

    Individuals who work reduced hours due to the COVID-19 pandemic may still be eligible to collect partial unemployment benefits if your gross earnings are less than the weekly benefit amount. You must continue to file your weekly certification and report any of your wages in the week they were earned, not received. Wages earned may reduce your unemployment benefit.

    Related

    Subscribe via email or follow us on Facebook, Twitter or YouTube to get the latest news and updates

    Источник: https://savingtoinvest.com/nevada-nv-detr-unemployment-benefits-news-and-updates-on-300-lwa-pua-peuc-and-600-fpuc/

    Chime is a financial technology company, not a bank. Banking services provided by The Bancorp Bank or Stride Bank N.A.; Members FDIC

    Chime Home

    If filing for unemployment has you feeling confused, you’re not alone. We’ve put together a guide to help you learn how to file for unemployment, as well as understand changes you might see in the wake of COVID-19 (Coronavirus). Things are changing fast, and we’re doing our best to stay up to date.

    This guide is for informational purposes only. Chime does not provide financial, legal, or tax advice. You should check with your legal, financial, or tax advisor for advice specific to your situation. Your state or local unemployment agency is responsible for making all determinations on your eligibility for unemployment benefits. Please contact your state or local unemployment agency if you have questions.

    Whether you’re receiving unemployment or don’t think you qualify, our new chat-style tool will help you get the most from your benefits with Chime!

    Get started

    We know this can be a confusing process, and we’re here to help. If you have additional questions about unemployment, see our list of FAQ’s below.

    Do unemployment benefits apply to reduced hours, gig workers, and self-employed individuals?

    The new C.A.R.E.S. Act (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act) has extended $600 per week of unemployment benefits to many who previously weren’t eligible through July 31, 2020. You might be eligible if you are:

    • Self-employed
    • 1099 Contract workers
    • Gig economy workers
    • Individuals whose hours have been reduced 

    The application process is different by state, check with your state’s unemployment website to find out more.

    How do I apply for the extended unemployment benefits under C.A.R.E.S. Act (Pandemic Unemployment Assistance)?

    The additional unemployment benefits are released through individual states. Check with your state to find out how you can apply/receive it.

    I’ve reached the maximum length of unemployment benefit with my state, what can I do now?

    Good news! Under the CARES Act, states are permitted to extend unemployment benefits by up to 13 weeks for anyone who’ve exhausted their unemployment from July 2019 – December 2020. Check with your state to learn more about whether you can take advantage of it.

    What does it mean that my application is pending?

    There could be many reasons depending on your state and your situation. Common reasons include:

    • state is still in the process of verifying information
    • more information is needed (you will be contacted if this is the case)

    I’ve applied, when will I receive my unemployment benefit?

    It typically takes 2-3 weeks for the government to process your application. Given the large amount of unemployment claims filed, many states are experiencing delays. If you have the option, we recommend direct depositing your unemployment benefits, so you won’t be stuck otherwise waiting for the unemployment prepaid card to arrive in the mail.

    How come I don’t see direct deposit as an option with my state?

    Unfortunately, at the moment, the following states do not have direct deposit options:

    • Maryland
    • Nevada
    • California (you can direct deposit payments from the prepaid card after the first payment)
    • Oklahoma (you can direct deposit payments from the prepaid card after the first payment)
    • Arizona (unless you mail in an original voided check from your bank account)

    Once you receive your unemployment benefits, you can always transfer the money into your Chime Spending Account via your Chime app. This may help you avoid potential prepaid card fees and take advantage of the Chime app along with ourautomatic savings features.

    How can I get my unemployment directly deposited into my Chime Spending Account?

    For most states, direct depositing your unemployment is easy, even if you are already receiving unemployment benefits via prepaid card. Make sure the name on the payment matches the name on the bank account.

    Information you’ll need differs by state but generally it includes:

    You’ll need to log into your state’s unemployment website and enter your Chime Spending Account and routing numbers, which can be found in your Chime app under “Settings.”

    If you live in Tennessee, New Jersey, and New Mexico, you might be experiencing issues depositing your unemployment with Chime. We are actively working with these states to have this problem resolved ASAP.

    How long does it take to switch my unemployment to direct deposit?

    Switching time varies from state to state. We’ve seen it range from 48 hours to over a week. Check with your state for more details and be sure to keep your unemployment prepaid card in the meantime.

    Are my unemployment benefits taxable?

    Yes, unemployment benefits may be taxable. You may have to pay federal income taxes and state income taxes, depending on your state.

    States that currently waive income taxes on unemployment include California, Montana, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania and Virginia. Additionally, seven states —Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington and Wyoming — do not levy any state income taxes. Check with your state to find out more details.

    Could I use my Chime Spending Account to receive unemployment benefits for a loved one or someone else besides me?

    No. As with all direct deposits, the name on the payment must match the name on the account. This means you cannot receive unemployment benefits deposits to your account on behalf of someone else.

    If your family or loved ones aren’t Chime members, they canopen a Chime Spending Account today! Once they open a Chime Spending Account, they can then directly deposit their unemployment benefits.

    Can my unemployment benefits be garnished?

    Unemployment benefits are mostly exempt from garnishments. However, child or spousal support are subject to garnishment. Additionally, your state may also garnish your benefits if you owe money to the issuing state (i.e. tax).

    How will I know when my deposit arrives?

    If you have notifications enabled in the Settings screen of your Chime app, we will send you a push notification as soon as a deposit arrives!

    Banking services provided by The Bancorp Bank or Stride Bank, N.A., Members FDIC. The Chime Visa® Debit Card is issued by The Bancorp Bank or Stride Bank pursuant to a license from Visa U.S.A. Inc. and may be used everywhere Visa debit cards are accepted. The Chime Visa® Credit Builder Card is issued by Stride Bank pursuant to a license from Visa U.S.A. Inc. and may be used everywhere Visa credit cards are accepted. Please see back of your Card for its issuing bank.

    While Chime doesn’t issue personal checkbooks to write checks, Chime Checkbook gives you the freedom to send checks to anyone, anytime, from anywhere. See your issuing bank’s Deposit Account Agreement for full Chime Checkbook details.

    By clicking on some of the links above, you will leave the Chime website and be directed to a third-party website. The privacy practices of those third parties may differ from those of Chime. We recommend you review the privacy statements of those third party websites, as Chime is not responsible for those third parties' privacy or security practices.

    ¹Out-of-Network cash withdrawal fees apply. Third-party and cash deposit fees may apply.
    ²Round ups automatically round up debit card purchases to the nearest dollar and transfers the round up from your Chime Spending Account to your Chime Savings Account. Save When I Get Paid automatically transfers 10% of direct deposits of $500 or more to your savings account.
    ³Chime SpotMe is an optional, no fee service that requires you receive $500 in direct deposits a month to qualify to overdraw your account up to $20 on debit card purchases. Chime, in its sole discretion, may allow you to overdraw your account up to $100 or more based on your Chime Account history, direct deposit history and amount, spending activity and other risk-based factors. Your Limit will be displayed to you within the Chime mobile app. You will receive notice of any changes to your Limit. Your Limit may be increased or lowered at any time by Chime.

    © 2013-2021 Chime. All Rights Reserved.

    Источник: https://www.chime.com/unemployment/

    Government prepaid debit cards

    A cost-effective way for government agencies to disburse payments.

    The U.S. Bank ReliaCard® is an easy way for government agencies to provide a simple, safe way to access funds. For cardholder questions, visit the U.S. Bank ReliaCard cardholder website.

    ReliaCard: A reloadable prepaid debit card for government agencies

    As a government agency, you need a simple and cost effective way to deliver timely payments. The ReliaCard is that solution, allowing you to efficiently disburse payments while your recipients can safely access their funds.

    Benefits for your government agency

    • Reduce costs associated with paper checks or vouchers, postage, reconciliation or replacement of lost checks
    • Maximize electronic payments with direct deposit
    • Complements your existing direct deposit processes

    Benefits for your cardholders

    • Convenience of funds automatically loaded to their card for as long as they remain eligible, so there’s no need to cash or deposit a check
    • Make purchases or withdraw cash and get cash back at participating merchants anywhere Visa® or Mastercard® debit cards are accepted1
    • Security if the card is lost or stolen with Zero Liability2

    Why choose ReliaCard for government disbursements?

    Savings

    Streamline your administration and eliminate costly paper checks, postage and reconciliation.

    Convenience

    There's no need for recipients to have a bank account or pay check-cashing fees. Deposits are made automatically to the card, and funds are available for immediate use wherever Visa or Mastercard debit cards are accepted.

    Extra value

    We offer cardholders online and mobile access, alerts, in-network ATMs, online bill pay and customer service.

    Security

    We invest in the data security, fraud protection and compliance programs needed to protect cardholder security.

    What type of government agencies can benefit from a prepaid card program?

    • Child care
    • Child support
    • Health and human services
    • Housing authorities
    • Pension programs
    • Personal income tax returns
    • Temporary assistance for families in need
    • Trade adjustment assistance
    • Unemployment insurance
    • Worker's compensation

    Ready to get started?

    The U.S. Bank ReliaCard is an easy way for government agencies to provide a simple, safe way to access funds. For cardholder questions, visit the U.S. Bank ReliaCard cardholder website.

    Start of disclosure content

    Disclosures

      Start of disclosure content

      BS-047 ReliaCard licensing

      Источник: https://www.usbank.com/business-banking/business-services/business-prepaid-cards/government-prepaid-debit-card.html

      Comments

      Leave a Reply

      Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *