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1st corinthians 13 4 8 the message


1st corinthians 13 4 8 the message

1. 1 Corinthians 13:4-8. 4 Love is patient, love is kind. 16 Let the message of Christ dwell among you richly as you teach and admonish. 4-8 Framed Artwork. 99. Add family name, a special message, wedding date and other custom details printed on the bible's cover. The meaning of 1 Corinthians 13:4-7 KJV & NIV. In 1 Corinthians 13 or what is called "The Love Chapter", Paul gives a.

1st corinthians 13 4 8 the message -

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1 Corinthians 13, also referred to as "the hymn of love" is often noted for being the most loved chapter in the entire New Testament (Barclay, 116).[1] 1 Corinthians 13, following 12, reflects and adds to what Paul has just discussed in 1 Corinthians 12. Chapter 12 addresses individual's spiritual gifts and in chapter 13 he hopes to drown out the Corinthians high level of competition they hold with one another. The Corinthian are wondering whose spiritual gifts are greater and better than the others in order to establish some sort of superiority, but Paul follows up their intentions and questions with chapter 13, telling them that they need to love one another. Not only should they love each other, but they should love everyone else as well because we are all children of God. The Corinthians are wondering whose gifts are more important or considered more spiritual. Paul is trying to tell them that all of their gifts are equally important, and in exercising their gifts they should make sure that they are doing so with love seeping through their every action (Garland, 605) [2]

The setting of this letter takes place in Corinth. Note on the illustration below that the surrounding cities were other areas that Paul wrote letters to such as his letter to the Philippians in Philippi.

[3]

Structure[edit edit source]

1 Corinthians 13 is a chapter that is accessible and applicable to generations of any time frame. It is one that addresses the core characteristics of what it means to be a Christian, and these things will never change no matter the generation. To be a follower of Christ is to take a stand on the values of faith, hope and love, with love prevailing above all else. This chapter of Corinthians is addressing themes of integrity, and of the heart. Paul is saying that we need to use love as the driving characteristic of what motivates our actions. Actions without love, are meaningless. The definition of love in this passage takes on many forms, and ultimately the reader can take from it that with Christ in our lives, our behaviours will naturally take on positive characteristics that reflect Christ through us.

Love in this chapter is not solely an emotion, but it is our actions that we should show towards other people. To love all others is to get to the core of what Christ intended for our lives; the very essence and purpose of his life. We can also apply this to our lives by thinking about our intentions and motives behind the actions we take, particularly positions of authority. If an individual for example is in a position of leading music at church, they should examine why they want to play for the church, because if their intentions are not to glorify God, then they are not out of love. Such an example could easily be shown as the worship leader being a person who hopes to glorify and self exalt themselves by being the one in front of the crowd that everyone looks at. This same concept can be applied to any leadership position, not just in the Church. To take on a Christ-like attitude in all areas of our lives, is to show love in every aspect of our lives. Whether in the corporate world, or in the Church, as followers of God we should make sure that we are expressing genuine care in our actions for the people that surround us on a daily basis. Chapter 13 is not referring to modern day societies interpretation of love, or rather in a sexual manner, but in actions and deeds that come from a sincere heart that hopes to help brothers and sisters in Christ.

Works Cited[edit edit source]

13:1"If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal."

The word agape, meaning love, is often used in the New Testament describing the intimate and close affections of God and Jesus for people. This could also be described as being a word describing communal relationship, and covenant between Christians and one another (Mare, 267) [10] Some scholars suggest that the "tongues" being referred to here is the gift of speaking in tongues, yet it should recognized that these "tongues" can be reference to speech of "any kind" (Morris, 177).[11] Contrary to positive implication of tongues of angels presumably referring to holy speech of angels, the reference to "tongues" may be referring to heathen worship, "especially the worship of Dionysus and Cybele" because "the clanging of cymbals and the braying of trumpets" was a characteristic of these "heathens" (Barclay, 117).[12] This suggests that "even the coveted gift of tongues was no better than the uproar of heathen worship if love was absent" (Barclay, 117).[13] Further expanding on the "resounding gong or clanging cymbal," the gong was more than likely really bronze because Corinth was very famous for its bronzes. Whatever noisy device this is, it is clearly something very loud. Some suggest that it may be a trumpet (Morris, 177–178).[14]

13:2"If I have the gift of prophecy and can fathom all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have a faith that can move mountains, but have not love, I am nothing."

It should be noted in this verse that prophecy more than likely is referenced to preaching. According to William Barclay, "there are two kinds of preachers. There is a preacher whose one aim is to save the souls of his people and who woos them with the accents of love...On the other hand there is a preacher who dangles his hearers over the flames of hell and gives the impression that he would rejoice in their damnation as much as in their salvation" (Barclay, 118).[15] Furthering this discussion, the second type of preaching should be addressed that this type of preaching may in fact scare individuals, but it will not show love, and it will not save individuals.

13:3"If I give all I possess to the poor and surrender my body to the flames, but have not love, I gain nothing."

In this verse, it is suggested by scholars that Paul is stating that even if you give all of your material possessions to those who are poor, that does not mean that you did it out of pure love. Also, Paul is saying that you can be persecuted and martyred for your faith, but still do so not out of love for others (Mare, 268).[16] Ending this section, Paul concludes his point with this verse that "religious action is meaningless unless encompassed by agape" (Hays, 228).[17]

Passage of Focus: Vss. 4-7[edit edit source]

Contextual Pre-verse Analysis: Vss. 1-3[edit

Scripture

1 Corinthians 13:4–8a (ESV)Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. Love never ends.

Discussion

Love is the common denominator in how we relate—to God, to others, or to ourselves. As followers of Christ, love is our trademark.

Love is a tricky word. It’s most often understood as an intense feeling of deep affection. Biblically, love has a much deeper and richer meaning; it transcends a feeling or emotion. This is what we see in 1 Corinthians 13. Paul tells us that love isn’t merely a feeling but a way of relating to others.

While most of us are fairly familiar with 1 Corinthians 13, slowing down to read it empowers us to enjoy subtle beauties we may otherwise miss. In this timeless passage on love, Paul uses poetic symmetry to deepen his point. He lists eight things love embraces and eight things love resists.

In these verses, Paul instructs us about what we need to hold close and what we need to let go. He empowers us with a framework to respond to any situation in love. Sometimes we will need to do things that are out of our comfort zone; sometimes we will need to not do things that feel natural to us. In both situations, love empowers us to respond beyond our feelings so we may impart life to others.

We can begin by putting these into practice with those closest to us, our family. Although as Christians, we don’t stop there. As outlined in 1 Corinthians, we’re called to love everyone God brings into our lives. As I write this, we’re experiencing extremely anxious and unsetting times as a deadly virus spreads throughout the world. It’s easy for fear to take hold and control our thoughts, emotions, and actions. The good news of the Gospel is that we have a remedy for fear—courageous love (1 John 4:18). We have experienced this love personally, and now we have the opportunity to share it with others.

So how can we live this out?

When quarantines are lifted, and people are able to resume typical schedules, many people are going to need help. When a family is in crisis, kids can become vulnerable to neglect and, unfortunately, abuse. At Bethany we believe no family should experience this. Through the Safe Families for Children ministry, volunteer Host Families offer loving care to parents, watching over their children and providing compassionate community to their entire family while parents regain stability. Our Host Families demonstrate the courageous love of Jesus to families in their moment of need. Learn more about becoming a Host Family.

Deeper Engagement

Choose one item from each list above (embrace and resist) and make a plan to put it into practice. What actions can you take to love those closest to you? How can you love your neighbor by practicing these responses?

Prayer

Father, thank You for the courageous love You’ve expressed to me through Christ. Thank You for the patience, kindness, and perseverance You embrace me with each day. As I celebrate Your goodness in my life, I pray You would also use me as an instrument of goodness in the lives of others. Open my heart and mind to ways I can demonstrate the love and compassion of Christ to those nearby, in my community, and around the world. Amen.

Learn more about Bethany

Источник: https://bethany.org/resources/love-embraces-and-resists
1st corinthians 13 4 8 the message

You can watch a thematic video

************ Sermon on 1 Corinthians 13:4-8 ************


By: Rev. Adrian Dieleman


This sermon was preached on July 17, 2004


1 Corinthians 13:4-8
Wedding Message for Jack Holcomb & Sandy Bosman

Jack & Sandy, there are so many things I can talk about when we look at the love mentioned by Paul in 1 Corinthians 13. But let's start off allen edmonds anniversary sale 2020 admitting that the love Paul talks about is naturally shown by God but is unnatural for us to show and to have. For us to show and have this love we need to not only follow Christ's example but we also need the love of Christ to fill us to overflowing.

With this in mind, let's take a look at what your wedding text says about love.

"Love is patient." How patient? The King James translation uses the phrase "long-suffering." This gives us an idea of how patient love is supposed to be. This is not the picture of an indulgent husband waiting for his wife to finish applying her makeup. This is not the picture of a mother waiting for her son to eat all of his broccoli. Instead, we are to think of anguish, of choosing to endure what we do not want to endure. Your heart is broken, your hopes are dashed, 1st corinthians 13 4 8 the message you continue to endure. It is not natural for us sinful humans to love this way; but, this is the way God loves us and this is the way He wants us to love our marriage partner.

"Love is kind." Why is meant by kindness? Are we to 1st corinthians 13 4 8 the message of grandpa patting the head of a little one? 1st corinthians 13 4 8 the message we to think of mom kissing the scrape or cut on a elbow or finger? Kindness is how we choose to relate to people. Fifth third bank customer service reviews can choose to overpower, to manipulate, to insist on our own way; or, we 1st corinthians 13 4 8 the message choose to serve, to shower the person we have married with our love.

"It does not envy." Envy is too timid of a translation for a Greek word that actually means "jealous." Love is not jealous. How can Paul say this when the Bible even pictures our holy God as a jealous God? The jealousy Paul has in mind wants to possess the other person, to take control of them, to consume them, so they have no personal life at all. But this is not how lovers treat one another.

"It does not boast." Lovers don't blow their own horns or sing their own praises. 1st corinthians 13 4 8 the message we first meet our 1st corinthians 13 4 8 the message partner we want them to talk about themselves; we are so enthralled by the other person we want to know all about them. But after we have been around him or her for a while, it is time to go on to other subjects and topics. Love, true love, does not dwell on self. Love, true love, directs people's attention away from themselves.

"It is not proud. It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered." Love is not any of these things. None of these have a place in a Christian marriage. Yet, if we are honest, we have to admit that many times we are proud, rude, self-seeking, and easily angered. How this hurts God. And, how this hurts our marriage partner. The problem is not love. The problem is self. My natural, sinful, selfish self wants attention and wants to be the center of attention. The focus needs to be on me. That's the problem. What I must do, instead, is focus on my marriage partner and on my Father in heaven.

"It keeps no record of wrongs." Love forgives and forgets. We all have a hard time doing that, don't we?! When we have an argument with our spouse � and most couples do fight at some time or another � we tend to bring up what has happened in the past. We don't want to forgive and forget because then we don't have any ammunition to fight with. But love does not keep score. Love does not hold the sins of the past against our partner. Love forgives and forgets just as God forgives and forgets our sins.

"Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth." Some people � too many people, in fact � delight in evil. They love to suck up all the dirt they can about others. They delight in spreading malicious news and gossip. They love to run others down to their level. Love does not do this. Love sees others and accepts them for who they are without condoning the wrong they do. Love looks for the image of God in everyone.

"It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres." Love protects whenever protection is needed. Love trusts the other person. Love has hope for the future. Love endures when misunderstanding and hurt invade the relationship.

"Love never fails." A drawer of my filing cabinet at home is filled with warranties. The dishwasher, refrigerator, microwave, stove. The furnace, water heater, air conditioner, garage door opener. The stereo, TV, CD Player, computer. The car and truck. The roto-tiller, leaf-blower, weed-eater, edger. The pool and pool equipment. Everything comes with a warranty. And most of them are good for only a year or two � some for only 90 days. But love comes with a warranty that lasts for a lifetime. Love, true love, never breaks down, never stops working, never stops loving, never reaches the american express savings bank login where it no longer functions. In fact, every couple I have ever married have sworn to have this kind of love in their marriage. Yet, not every couple has kept this promise. The problem is not love. The problem is sin. Our love for each other has to be like God's love for us � never failing, never ending, a love that just keeps on going and giving.

Jack & Sandy, it should be obvious that love is not a feeling. It is not something you fall into and it is not something you fall out of. Love is a decision to act a certain way to your marriage partner. Love is a commitment to the other person and the relationship. Love is hard work and requires hard work.

Jack & Sandy, do you want this love? For the rest of your life? You know this, but let me remind you anyway � you will not find this love in yourself. You are a sinner and sinners do not have it within them to love. You can find this love and show this love only in God.

There are three Bible texts you need to have in mind as you consider this:
(1Jn 4:16) God is love. Whoever lives in love lives in God, and God in him.

(1Jn 4:10) This is love: not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son as an atoning sacrifice for our sins.

(1Jn 4:19) We love because he first loved us.
God is love. In Christ, God shows and gives love. And, only in union with Him are we able to give love.

Do you realize what this practically means? It means that your home needs to be a place where God is loved and honored and obeyed. Christ needs to be the Head of your home and the Master of your lives. You need to spend time daily in Bible reading and prayer. You need the fellowship of other Christians in a Christ-honoring church. You need to regularly attend worship.

My prayer, Jack & Sandy, is that you will do all this so that in Christ you will never stop loving each other.
You can e-mail our pastor at: Pastor, Trinity United Reformed Church
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ky lottery 5 card cash numbers 1st corinthians 13 4 8 the message What Does 1 Corinthians 13:4 Mean?

This thirteenth chapter is considered by many to be the supreme treaties on love, and indeed, as we read through this passage, that is beloved by many, we discover that only the name,'JESUS' could justifiably easily be substituted throughout for the word 'LOVE', for Jesus is patient and Jesus is kind.

Jesus does not envy and Jesus is not boastful nor conceited. Jesus is not rude nor does He insist on His own way. Jesus is neither irritable nor resentful, and Jesus does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but He rejoices with the truth - for He is truth. And only in and through Jesus are we able to bear all things, believe all things, hope all things and endures all things.

When we consider this passage, let us look deeper in the significance of its true meaning and earnestly pray, that Christ may be formed in me, so that we are enabled to love kiss i was made for loving you drum cover He loves, for love is patient and kind nor is it jealous or boastful.

My Prayer

Heavenly Father, develop in me the godly fruit of love, and may I live in love and seek to love as Christ loved. Keep me from jealousy and boastfulness and may the love of Jesus be seen in and through me, by the power of Your Holy Spirit, in Jesus name I pray, AMEN.

Choose a Verse from 1 Corinthians 13

Источник: https://dailyverse.knowing-jesus.com/1-corinthians-13-4
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1 Corinthians 13, also referred to as "the hymn of love" is often noted for being the most loved chapter in the entire New Testament (Barclay, 116).[1] 1 Corinthians 13, following 12, reflects and adds to what Paul has just discussed in 1 Corinthians 12. Chapter 12 addresses individual's spiritual gifts and in chapter 13 he hopes to drown out the Corinthians high level of competition they hold with one another. The Corinthian are wondering whose spiritual gifts are greater and better than the others in order to establish some sort of superiority, but Paul follows up their intentions and questions with chapter 13, telling them first volunteer bank lafayette ga they need to love one another. Not only should they love each other, but they should love everyone else as well because we are all children of God. The Corinthians are wondering whose gifts are more important or considered more spiritual. Paul is trying to tell them that all of their gifts are equally important, and in exercising their gifts they should make sure that they are doing so with love seeping through their every action (Garland, 605) [2]

The setting of this letter takes place in Corinth. Note on the illustration below that the surrounding cities were other areas that Paul wrote letters to such as his letter to the Philippians in Philippi.

[3]

Structure[edit edit source]

1 Corinthians was a letter written by the Apostle Paul, addressing the Corinthians. The purpose of this passage is heavily disputed, but with proper contextual analysis, the reader can find that this passage is not one to be read at weddings in order to discuss how the new couple should treat one another, but rather it is a continuation of the issues that Paul has been discussing with the Corinthians on their gifts and how love should be at the centre of all of their actions, not self interest. This chapter addresses the connection of our spiritual gifts with the love of God and our relationship with him. These actions of love in Chapter 13 are a representation of the presence of God himself. In this Chapter, Paul really is saying that love is showing empathy and sincere concern for one's community, rather than being motivated by self interest and personal gratification. It is important to recognize that this chapter does not mention God once, but Paul's purpose is to express the connection between humans and God's love in Christ. The issues addressed in vss. 4-7 were all contemporary issues that the Corinthians were facing predominantly during their lives. Paul is trying to call out the Corinthians on their problems, and show them that the real issue at hand is not whose spiritual gifts are greater than the others, but rather the issues is their lack of love for one another. According to Paul, Christ-like love is not represented by the actions of the Corinthians and this lack of love is the root of all of their problems. The purpose of this chapter is also to recognize the call of lifestyle God asks of us, and draw out the true issues in the Church (Garland, 605–608).[9]

Themes[edit edit source]

Contextual Pre-verse Analysis: Vss. 1-3[edit edit source]

(v. 1) Even if my speech is holy, words are merely an obnoxious noise if I do not love.

(v. 2) If God has given the gift of prophecy and knowledge, with a faith that can move mountains, it means nothing unless I have love.

(v. 3) If I give of myself entirely, ridding myself of all material possessions, yet still do not have love, I have nothing.

(v. 4) Love is always patient, kind, without envy, without boasting, and never proud.

(v. chase online child support Love is not rude and selfish, angered easily, or keeps a list of what you have done wrong.

(v. 6) Love finds joy in truth rather than evil.

(v. 7) Love stands through everything, always protecting, persevering, trusting, and hoping.

(v. 8) Love will never fall short. But where there are prophesies, there will be no more; mouths will be 1st corinthians 13 4 8 the message knowledge will dissipate.

(v. 9) We know in part and prophesy apart.

(v. 10) When perfection arrives, all imperfections go away.

(v. 11) When I was a kid, I thought and spoke as a kid, and when I became an adult I put those ways behind me.

(v. 12) Our reflection in a mirror is not clear, but we can still see face to face. In the same way, I may only know a portion, but later will know completely just as God completely knows me inside out.

(v. 13) 1st corinthians 13 4 8 the message three still exist and will indefinitely: faith, hope, and love. Of what is the routing number for first interstate bank of them, Love is the greatest.

Verse-by-Verse Analysis[edit edit source]

Immorality (including prevalent sexual immorality), Conduct of the Church, Character development, and keeping a pure heart.

Structural Analysis[edit

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1st corinthians 13 4 8 the message -

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13:8"Love never fails. But where there are prophecies, they will cease; where there are tongues, they will be stilled; where there is knowledge, it will pass away."

By combining information on verse 10 from The Expositor's Biblical Commentary (see v. 10 analysis), and the implications on being "perfect," the reader can assume that "prophesies" refers to "direct, inspired revelatory communication from the Holy Spirit or possibly to some special aid given by the Spirit to understand and present truth already revealed, as given in the written Scriptures" (Mare, 268–269).[32] When referring to love in this verse, the connection can be drawn between God's infinite self, and love in general. Previously, v. 7 talks of hope, and Paul never makes reference to God having hope, but God is said to love. This love is unending because God's love is said to be the root of all earthly love (Sampley, 954).[33]

13:9"For we know in part and we prophesy in part,"

Verse 9 is a description as to why knowledge and prophecy will disappear. Some scholars suggest that this "is an example of Christian agnosticism, which defines as the recognition of present limitation, combined with the confidence in the coming of full truth" (Garland, 622).[34]

13:10"but when perfection comes, the imperfect disappears."

Verse 10 is merely stating that the reason why prophesies, tongues, and knowledge will disappear is because they are "imperfect and partial" (Mare, 268).[35] It should be noted though that Paul does not say when these things will discontinue to exist, and some scholars have suggested that Paul was referring to the need of miraculous gifts disappearing at the end of the apostolic period (Mare, 268).[36] This connects to the use of the word "prophesies" in v. 8 by the reference towards the completion of the canon at the end of the first century A.D.[37] "Since love endures forever, it is superior to these imperfect gifts no matter how impressive they might seem in this present age" (Garland, 620).[38]

13:11"When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I put childish ways behind me."

When it comes to the translation of Childish ways, the literal Greek root translation can refer to ways or things. If the term is referenced to "things," the reader could interpret this passage as adults putting their literal, physical objects and toys from their youth such as dolls away, but if the term "ways" is used, the reader could interpret those ways as being an adults reaction to circumstances in life (Earle, 84) [39] This could in turn imply an immaturity on the individuals being discussed.

13:12"Now we see but a poor reflection as in a mirror; then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known."

This verse was one to put knowledge into perspective. Paul by far knew more than the Corinthians he was writing to, and yet he still recognizes that he doesn't know everything, and only knows partially what is to be known. By stating that "then he shall fully know" he is saying that at the end of the ages he will know far more than he currently knows. The discussion of knowledge is used to put the idea of love into perspective (Sampley, 955).[40]

Vs. 13[edit edit source]

13:13"And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love."

Stressing the importance of love in his conclusion, Paul is saying that "Great as faith and hope are, love is still greater. A faith without love is cold, and hopes without love is grim. Love is the fire which kindles faith and it is the light which turns hope into certainty" (Barclay, 126).[41] Concluding perfectly with the final word, love, characteristics of God can be seen through the interpretation of this passage. "God cannot be said to exercise faith or hope, but he certainly loves, and indeed is love" (Morris, 185).[42] We as the readers should not take the order Paul lists faith, hope, and love in precisely, because that was not Paul's intention. Instead, we should just recognize that love is the greatest of virtues desirable in any individual (Morris, 185).[43] When referring to faith, hope and love, some scholars state that these are what lie at the heart of the Christian life. "Paul cannot imagine life in Christ without each part of the triad being in place and fully functioning; all three must remain whatever else may come and go or change or however different one believer is from another" (Sampley, 955).[44]

Word Study[edit edit source]

By far, the word love is the most important and crucial word to be analyzed in this chapter of Corinthians. The main reason behind this is because the central theme is love being personified as to what it looks like in action. We can see this most easily in vss. 4-7 where love is described as being patient, kind, without envy, etc. All of these characteristics are not feelings of an individual, but rather actions. There are notable variants in translation that should be recognized such as the use of love in the King James Version of the bible. In the KJV, "charity" is replaced for love which is interesting because the "english word charity has never risen to the height of the Apostle's argument. At best it does but signify a kindly interest in and forbearance towards others. It is far from suggesting the ardent, active, energetic principle which the apostle had in view" (Earle, 79).[45]

There are three Greek verbs for the word love. These words consist of "eran, philein, and agapan" (all of which are in the infinitive forms). Some translations of the word Agape revert to Agapan which refers to the love of God, often translated into "to show love." Agapan is also known as agape which is the highest regarded word for love in the New Testament. The verb of this word, agapao, is found 142 times in the New Testament, and the King James Version translates love 135 times. The noun agape is found 116 times in the Bible, translated into love 86 times, and charity 27 times (Earle, 78–80). The significance of how often the verb agape appears in the bible can give the reader an idea of just how important love must be. If it appears this many times in the Bible in general, this must be one of the key points the author's of the Canon were trying to get across.The other forms of agape do not particularly apply to this passage, so further analysis of them will not be discussed.

It is crucial to pay attention to the role of Paul in the writing in this letter. There are many bias, or personal opinions that come into effect in the presentation of Paul's letter to the people in Corinth. One of the most vital aspects to living out the true, full potential for a Christian's life was to focus on love as the center of their faith. To Paul, this was a given. Every single letter Paul wrote in the bible had the term, love, written at least once. This is what "lies at the heart of all true Christian theology and ethics, and is important for a believer's sense of security" (Hawthorne, 576).[46] The source of love according to Paul comes through an individual's relationship with God, and we can only do this through the Holy Spirit. According to Paul, love is never merely a simple, self-attained attribute, but rather is the result of a life transformed by God's grace, and changes our hearts. When our hearts are changed, so are our actions. Often in Paul's letters, he encourages the people he is writing to, to love through a form of prayer such as in Phillipians 1:9. This can be applied to societies of any day and age because Paul implies that our actions of love will come from our relationship with God, and if anything, they would be somewhat natural (Hawthorne, 576–577).[47] To Paul, love is not solely an action, but it is a state of being. Emotion must be brought into this conversation. These verses are addressing the sincerity that must be behind the actions of caring for others. Paul is trying encourage all of the readers of his letters to show affection for one another, and do so out of a pure intentioned heart (Hawthorne, 577).[48]

Concluding the end of Chapter 13, Paul says that love never fails, and the greatest attribute of all is love. From other letters Paul has written, the implication that faith is greater than love does appear. To Paul, the "expression of love is clearly conditioned by certain theological and moral considerations of critical important; and when these are threatened, harsh words may be the truest form of love and not a violation of it" (Hawthorne, 578).[49]

Patient[edit

Biblical Studies/New Testament Commentaries/1 Corinthians/Chapter 13

1 Corinthians 13:1-13 (New International Version)
Love

1If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal. 2If I have the gift of prophecy and can fathom all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have a faith that can move mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. 3If I give all I possess to the poor and surrender my body to the flames,but have not love, I gain nothing. 4Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. 5It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. 6Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. 7It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.

8Love never fails. But where there are prophecies, they will cease; where there are tongues, they will be stilled; where there is knowledge, it will pass away. 9For we know in part and we prophesy in part, 10but when perfection comes, the imperfect disappears. 11When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I put childish ways behind me. 12Now we see but a poor reflection as in a mirror; then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known.

13And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love.

Background[edit edit source]

In the English version of the Old Testament, the word patient/patience/patiently does not appear very often. When pertaining to the New Testament though, it occurs more frequently in the King James Version. This reference could also be to the patience the Corinths needed for their modern-day in order to stay strong in their faith. Other references to this word may give it a better meaning as endurance, or steadfastness (Buttrick, 676).[50]

Words for Further Study (from the NIV)[edit
1st corinthians 13 4 8 the message

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