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Bank closing my account what to do


bank closing my account what to do

Frequently asked questions about managing your account. Funds Access Account or Matured Funds Access ISA), can close an account via Internet Banking. For assistance with closing an account please complete our online enquiry form. For information on how to cancel or reduce the limit of your credit card. The bank will close your account and send the balance to a collection Bank fees make up a large portion of the charged-off balance. Your.

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5 things to do before closing your Simple Bank Account

Bank closing my account what to do -

A man talking to a personal banker about why his account was frozen. It’s a terrible feeling. One minute you’re minding your own business, buying groceries or doing a little shopping online. The next minute your payment is declined, and you discover the bank has blocked your account. When your bank blocks your account, they have to tell you. But they don’t have to tell you ahead of time, and they won’t always tell you why. If you suddenly had a payment declined when you know there’s money in the account, it could be days before a notice arrives in the mail. You need good information on what happened to your account, and why. Here’s the list of reasons why your bank account might have been blocked, what’s going to happen to your money, and what you need to do next.

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Why Do Banks Freeze or Close Accounts?

Banks in the U.S. have to obey a very complicated system of federal laws. Federal banking laws require banks to protect customer security. Banks have to cooperate with criminal investigations. They have to obey court orders about debt collection. The laws also hold banks responsible if one of their accounts is used for criminal activity. Bank officers can be personally fined or sent to jail if they don’t report suspicious activity or stop it when they can. To protect themselves, banks will cut off accounts that could possibly be involved in crime, even if there is no proof.

Banks have a lot of leeway to freeze or close accounts on a case-by-case basis. When you opened your checking or savings account, you signed a customer agreement, and banks usually put language into these agreements that says they can restrict or close your account at any time, for any reason or no reason. If you didn’t keep a copy of your customer agreement when you opened the account, we’ve collected links below where you can download customer agreements for the top five retail banks in the U.S.

There are two different ways your bank might block your account: by freezing it or by closing it. Make sure you know which situation you’re dealing with. Whether your account is frozen or closed makes a big difference in your options for solving the problem and in how long it can take to get access to your money.

We’ve listed below the most common reasons why a bank might freeze or close your account. Some of them can be cleared up with a phone call while others will require you to send in paperwork or get a lawyer. Unfortunately, there are also some freezes or closures you might not be able to do anything about.

For Your Security

A security freeze on your account is for your protection. If your bank notices purchases that don’t fit your normal pattern, it may suspect that your account was hacked or your wallet was stolen and put a temporary freeze on your account to keep your money safe.

You might find out about this freeze while you’re standing at the checkout counter or trying to buy something online. It’s embarrassing, but remember that these things can happen to anybody. A security freeze can usually be cleared up with a phone call to verify you are the one making the purchase.

You might get a notice in the mail about a security freeze. The notice will contain instructions on your next steps. In some cases, your bank’s fraud department will call you to verify your recent transactions.

But be very careful! According to U.S. News & World Report, scammers may contact you pretending to be your bank’s fraud department. They will try to trick you into giving them access to your bank account. Never click on any links in an email that says your bank account is frozen. Never give out your Social Security number, bank account number, or PIN number to a caller. Don’t call any phone number given to you.

Instead, find your bank’s fraud department number on the back of your debit card or on your statement and call directly. You can also use the list below of customer service links for major banks. If you get a notice or call about a security freeze that your bank didn’t send, keep an eye on all your credit and bank accounts. It’s a good idea to take precautions against identity theft.

For Unpaid Debts

A creditor can get a court order and force your bank to freeze some or all of your account. Creditors can freeze up to two times the amount you owe, and if your debt is bigger than your account balance, they may freeze the whole thing.

Creditors can freeze your account for any type of debts, including:

  • Mortgages

  • Car loans and personal loans

  • Student loans

  • Judgments or liens from civil lawsuits

  • Divorce settlements

  • Child support

  • Back taxes

It may not even be your debt! If you have someone else’s name on a joint account with you, and that person owes money, your account could still get frozen.

For Suspicious Activity

A bank can either freeze or close your count for suspicious activity — the results will be different depending on which the bank chooses.

Freezes

To prevent money laundering and terrorism, federal banking laws require that banks report certain types of suspicious activity to the Treasury Department. Most people have nothing to do with terrorists or organized crime, but certain patterns of behavior or dollar amounts can be automatic red flags in the banking system.

Suspicious activity can also mean passing bad checks, receiving money from crimes, hiding or holding money for someone who’s in trouble, making transactions with questionable people, or being investigated or convicted of a crime.

You might not do any suspicious activities yourself, and the suspicious transactions might not have happened in the same account that you’re dealing with. You could get flagged for transactions that “fit the profile” but are totally legitimate. You could be the victim of check fraud or account hacking. You could have a joint account with someone else who is in legal trouble or who had suspicious activity in a different account.

Many different activities can trigger a freeze: 

  • Large deposits and withdrawals from an unknown source. If there’s a lot of money going in and out of your account that isn’t from a recognizable job or if you didn’t list an employer when you opened the account, that can look suspicious.

  • False or misleading information in your customer record. Make sure you give a valid address and phone number when you open the account. If you move or your number changes, update the bank as soon as you can. A disconnected phone number is a red flag.

  • Withdrawals against a returned check or a pattern of depositing returned checks. Be very careful about getting paid by check. If you deposit a check that turns out to be worthless, it could trigger a freeze on your account. If you cashed the check or withdrew some of the money, the bank may think you are committing fraud on purpose.

  • Large transfers of money, especially overseas. Banks have to monitor transfers and report on specific dollar amounts, like $5,000, $10,000, $25,000, or $50,000. If you make transfers like that, or if you make a series of transactions that add up to one of those amounts, it’s a red flag.

  • Frequent cash transactions. A lot of honest people get paid or tipped in cash. Unfortunately, criminals prefer cash too.

  • Multiple accounts in the same name, or frequent transfers. If you have a lot of different accounts, especially if you move money between them frequently, the bank will wonder why. Federal law limits you to six withdrawals from savings accounts per month. If you often bump up against this limit, it can look suspicious.

  • Deposits from questionable sources. If you’re receiving money from a person or a business with suspicious activity, it can trigger an investigation

  • A sudden increase in activity. If your normal pattern of deposits and purchases goes up dramatically, either in frequency or in dollar amounts, the bank may become wary of you.

  • Buying high-risk items or large cash withdrawals. Some people like to save up for big purchases and pay cash, but this may cause the bank to wonder if you’re laundering money. Buying high-risk items like guns, coins, precious metals, or art raises the same question.

  • Out of state or foreign activity. If you don’t live or work in the same city where your account is located, it can trigger a freeze.

  • Reports of suspicious activity from other banks. Banks report customer problems and closed accounts to a central agency called ChexSystems. If you had a problem with one bank, it can affect all your accounts.

Suspicious activity freezes can be the trickiest to deal with. Sometimes law enforcement forces the bank to place a freeze. If there’s an ongoing legal investigation, the bank may be under a gag order and your customer service representative may not know what’s going on or it might be illegal for them to tell you. However, if the freeze is based on just one problematic transaction or a recent pattern that got red-flagged by coincidence, you may be able to clear it up by showing where the money came from and what it was for. 

Closures

A red flag on your account can trigger a freeze, but if you can show your transactions are legal it can usually be cleared up. Some banks won’t take a chance — they might just close your account at the first whiff of trouble. Remember, the broad discretion built into those customer agreements lets them close an account at any time.

In addition to all the suspicious activities that can trigger a freeze, the bank may close your account if you fit a profile of behavior: 

  • You’re convicted of a crime. Some banks will refuse accounts to customers with a criminal record. But if you had a previous conviction and the bank finds out, or if you’re convicted while you’re a customer, they can close your account.

  • You’re in a business considered high-risk. Banks may close or refuse to open accounts for people in certain lines of work, even if the business is legal in the state where they live. In 2011, the FDIC published a list of business categories that banks were supposed to monitor, and a lot of banks just refused to open accounts for those businesses at all. The FDIC took down the list in 2014, but some banks still don’t like to work with these businesses. Potential red-flag businesses include:

  • Gun, ammunition, and firework dealers;

  • Online gambling, escort services, and pornography;

  • Coin dealers;

  • Payday lending and check cashing;

  • Medical or recreational marijuana and drug paraphernalia;

  • Telemarketing and some multi-level marketing systems;

  • Home-based charities and advisors on getting government grants. 

For Administrative Reasons

Banks, like any large company, go through reorganizations. They may close down your branch or stop doing business in your state.

Your bank may also close your account if it is dormant, meaning you haven’t used it for a long period of time. Depending on what state you live in, an account may go unused for three to five years before it’s considered dormant. You may get a notice that the bank wants to close a dormant account, but if you’ve moved they may not be able to reach you. You can keep your accounts from going dormant with a few simple steps: review all your accounts regularly, set up automatic transfers in or out of the account, and make sure the bank has your contact information up to date. 

For Financial Problems

There’s a phrase in most bank account agreements that says the bank reserves the right to close your account if it believes there is a risk of loss or liability, meaning your account will be closed if your financial problems are costing the bank more money and hassle than it can make off of you. It really seems like being kicked when you’re down, but the bank does have the legal right to do it. 

There’s a wide range of problem financial events that can trigger the bank to close your account: 

  • Too many bounced checks or overdrafts — and they get to decide how many is “too many” on a case-by-case basis. (suggested article: How Much Can I Overdraft My Checking Account? The Answer…)

  • Too many transfers between accounts. As we explained above, there are legal limits on transfers between some kinds of accounts. Even if you’re under the legal limit, the bank can still shut down your account if they think you’re making too many transfers.

  • Too many deposits of checks that get returned unpaid. This could happen to anybody once or twice, but you should be very careful who you accept checks from in order to stay in good standing with your bank. (suggested article: Penalty for Cashing a Check Twice: Banks Fees, Legal Claims, & More)

  • A zero balance or a negative balance. If you owe the bank money or the account is sitting empty, you can be shut down.

What Happens to Funds in a Frozen or Closed Account?

The answer to what happens to your funds depends on whether your account was frozen or closed. 

Frozen Account

A frozen bank account can still accept deposits, but the new money will probably get frozen too. It’s important to change your direct deposits right away. If your paycheck deposit has already been sent but hasn’t posted to your account yet, see if your employer will work with you to cancel or reverse it. As the payer, they may have more influence with the bank to release the money back to them.

In most situations, the law protects you from having federal benefits (like Social Security) frozen — the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has published a full list of such protected benefits. If you owe money to the federal government, like taxes or student loans, or if you have unpaid child support, the law may not protect you. Even if your benefits are protected, you might need a lawyer to help you get the money.

There’s no law that limits how long a freeze can last, and banks don’t publish policies on how they make decisions about account freezes. How long your money is tied up depends on your individual situation and the judgment call of the officers at your bank.

If the freeze is for your protection or is easily cleared up, the bank will normally release your account as soon as you get in touch and verify the right information. If your account is frozen because the bank is investigating your transactions, freezes typically last about 10 days for simpler situations or around 30 days for more complicated situations. But because there are no hard-and-fast rules on this, it’s best to assume it could last a long time. Get a backup plan in place as soon as you can.

If the freeze was placed because of a legal investigation, the account must remain frozen until law enforcement lets the bank release it. If your account was frozen for debt collection, the court decides when to lift the freeze. You may be able to get access to part or all of your money by negotiating a payment plan with your creditor. 

Closed Account

The bank has to return your money when it closes your account, no matter what the reason. However, if you had any outstanding fees or charges, the bank can subtract those from your balance before returning it to you.

The bank should mail you a check for the remaining balance in your account. Your notice letter about the account closing should tell you when to expect your check — usually within ten days. How to get money from a closed bank account is a matter of cooperating with the bank who will be looking to get your money back to you.

If it doesn’t state a time frame, or if your money doesn’t arrive on time, call the bank to follow up. You may need to call several times to get a good answer. When a bank closes your account, it isn’t trying to impress you with great customer service. Sending out your check isn’t a high priority. Be persistent, and you’re more likely to get that check quickly. 

What Happens Next?

Banks block your account first and notify you afterward. That means you’ll probably find out that your account is frozen or closed at the worst possible time — when you’re trying to make a purchase or when a check bounces. Try not to panic. Most of the time, this is a temporary inconvenience that you can straighten out pretty easily.

The first thing you should always do is get in touch with your bank. If you already have written notice, there may be more information about which department you should contact or a case number. If you have any reason to suspect the notice isn’t real, call the fraud number on the back of your bank card or call customer service directly. We’ve listed the customer service links for five major banks in the next section.

If you can’t get the problem corrected immediately, you need to make sure you’re not going to bounce any more checks or have any deposits going into a frozen account. You don’t want to rack up fees or lose access to any more of your money. A freeze or account closure might not hurt your credit, but bounced checks and declined payments will.

Call your payroll department right away, and change your direct deposits to a different account or have them cut a paper check. Do the same with any benefit agencies or family members who might send money into your account.

Look over your records for any checks you’ve sent out. Call the payee to make sure they don’t try to cash that check, and set up a different form of payment. You’ll also need to change any regular bills that are set up to auto-pay from that account.

Keep copies of all notices and letters from your bank about the situation. Take notes of every phone call, and write down the name and ID number of every person you talk to. Every piece of information might help solve the problem or clear your record later. 

If Your Account Is Frozen for Your Security

Most of the time, a simple conversation with the bank’s fraud department will solve a temporary security freeze.

If your account has been hacked or your identity stolen, the bank will work with you to report it. Check your last several bank statements carefully, and keep an eye on them going forward. There are legal limits to how much money you can lose to ID theft, based on how the thieves got access and how soon you reported it to the bank. 

  • Your loss is $0 if you report the theft before any transactions are made. If the bank allows any fraudulent transactions after you make a report, they have to reimburse you. They also have to reimburse you if you still have your debit card and your account was hacked, as long as you report it in the first 60 days after your bank statement is sent.

  • Your loss is limited to $50 or less if you report it within 2 days of finding out.

  • Your loss is limited to $500 or less if you report it more than 2 days after finding out but less than 60 days after your bank statement is sent.

  • You could lose your whole balance if you don’t report it until more than 60 days after your bank statement is mailed. You could also lose the balance in any linked accounts.

You’ll also need to report ID theft to the police, the Federal Trade Commission, or both. The FTC has published a checklist on what to do if your identity is stolen. You can also use its online reporting tool. 

If Your Account Is Frozen for Unpaid Debts

Here’s what you should do if your bank account is frozen for a debt or judgment: 

  • Find out who the creditor is. The bank may not give you information about the debt, but it should tell you who got the order for the freeze. If it’s not listed on the notice from the bank, call and find out.

  • Get legal advice. If you can’t afford a lawyer, you can find legal aid near you. If you’re in the military, you can get help at your local JAG office.

  • Consider credit counseling. A credit counselor can help you plan a realistic budget and come up with a payment plan. The court may release the freeze on your account if it accepts your plan. Find out more about working with a credit counselor.

  • Find out more from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau about judgments and liens on your account. 

If Your Account Is Frozen or Closed for Suspicious Activity

Frozen

Your bank may be able to tell you what specific transactions triggered the freeze and will walk you through what documentation could help unfreeze your account. Cooperating with them is usually the fastest way to solve the problem.

If your situation is more complicated, you may not be able to get a straight answer about the reason for the freeze or how to solve it. If you own the account jointly with anyone else, talk to them and see if you can discover anything that raised a red flag with the bank. Look over your past few months’ transactions and make sure you recognize them all.

If you can’t find out a specific reason for the freeze, or you think it was done in error, you should get legal advice. How long can a bank account be frozen? There is no time limit. 

Closed

Being reported for suspicious activity is serious. A closed account can affect you, anyone you have a joint account with, and possibly anyone you paid or did business with. The closing will be filed as Reported Information to ChexSystems and could trigger all your other accounts to get frozen or closed. The report will stay on your file for five years, and it can seriously damage your ability to open another bank account.

If you can find out what suspicious activity triggered the closing, try to clear it up as quickly as possible. It’s not likely that the bank will re-open your account, but if you can show your transactions were legitimate or that you were the victim of someone else’s bad actions, it’s possible.

If your account was closed by mistake or because of someone else’s actions, you should get legal advice. You can also dispute the information with ChexSystems or add a statement to your file.

If your bank account gets closed can you reopen it? With nearly every bank, yes. They will be happy to reactivate your account once you get in good standing again. 

If Your Account Is Closed for Administrative Reasons

If your bank is reorganizing or changing operations or if an account went dormant, you haven’t done anything wrong. It shouldn’t affect your credit report or your customer profile in ChexSystems.

It’s a good idea to look at your ChexSystems report, just to make sure the information is correct. You’re entitled to one free report each year. Request your annual Customer Disclosure Report from ChexSystems. 

If Your Account Is Closed for Financial Problems

If you bounce a check, overdraw your account, or have an account closed for cause, it may show up on your ChexSystems profile as “Reported Information” or a “Reported Event.” Reported Information stays on your file for five years.

If your bank closes your account for financial problems, it probably won’t re-open it. You may also have trouble getting a new account at another bank.

You can dispute incorrect information in your ChexSystems file. If the Reported Information is true, there’s nothing you can do to get it removed. If you pay back any money you owe the bank, the bank has to add that update to your file. It’s possible they might get ChexSystems to clear your file. They don’t have to do it, but you can ask. 

Customer Information for Major U.S. Banks

We’ve collected the links you need for the top five retail banks in the U.S. You can find out the terms of your account, see which sections apply to account freezes or closures, and contact Customer Service.

Banks offer different types of accounts in different states, so you may need to enter your ZIP Code to download your bank’s Customer Agreement. The agreements we’ve linked to below state that they apply to most checking and savings accounts in the U.S.

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Источник: https://econoagency.org/useful_information/1264

Get Answers to Your Banking Questions

No Results Found

Yes. Generally, banks may close accounts, for any reason and without notice. Some reasons could include inactivity or low usage.

Review your deposit account agreement for policies specific to your bank and your account.

If you believe your account was wrongfully closed, you can file a written complaint with the Office of the Comptroller's (OCC) Customer Assistance Group.

Last Reviewed: April 2021

Please note: The terms "bank" and "banks" used in these answers generally refer to national banks, federal savings associations, and federal branches or agencies of foreign banking organizations that are regulated by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC). Find out if the OCC regulates your bank. Information provided on HelpWithMyBank.gov should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion of the OCC.

Related Questions

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Источник: https://www.helpwithmybank.gov/help-topics/bank-accounts/opening-closing-inactive-bank-accounts/closing-a-bank-account/closing-notification.html

Close a savings account online

Overview

Some savings accounts can be closed online. You can do this if;

  • the account balance is £5 or less
  • you have another account with us to transfer the closing balance.

Bear in mind

  • Fixed rate and monthly savers cannot be closed online - this is because they are structured to pay interest at the end of a fixed period. You might be charged for closing this type of account early. We have not made it possible to close these accounts online to protect you from accidentally being charged
  • Not all accounts that meet the criteria are eligible, due to for example, periods of inactivity or restrictions on your account
  • Your account will not be fully closed until the day after your request when it will disappear from the Your accounts page. You may not be able to open additional savings accounts until the account is fully closed.

View step by step guide

Common enquiries

What if my account is applicable, but the balance is over £5?

You will need to transfer all but £5 or less out of the account. Once the transfer is complete you will be able to see the option to close the account.

Can I close my joint account online?

Yes, unless you have previously requested that both parties named on the account sign their names to authorise any changes.

Will I get any outstanding or owed interest on my account if I close it online?

Yes, if you choose to close your savings account online we will calculate any remaining interest on the account and if applicable transfer it along with the remaining balance to an account chosen by you. A statement showing your closing balance will be shown on screen, once your account is closed. This screen can be printed or saved.

What should I do if I have closed my account online but have not received the closing balance?

Please call us on 0345 602 0304

If you are calling from abroad or would prefer not to use the 0345 number, you can call us on +44 (0) 1313 37 76 86.

If you cannot close your account online, or prefer to you can close your account at one of our branches.

Источник: https://www.bankofscotland.co.uk/aboutonline/what-can-i-do-online/close-a-savings-account.html

Ask a question

I live abroad and want to close my account

If you are unable to close your account in branch, you can choose to provide the closure request in writing - the letter should be sent to the address of your account holding branch. This would need to include:

  • Your full name
  • The sortcode and account number of the account in question.
  • Signed by the account holder(s)
  • A contact telephone number
  • A contact postal address

If the account is overdrawn or has charges outstanding on it:

  • A cheque for the outstanding balance written to yourself

If the account is in credit:

  • Details of what you want us to do with the money (e.g. send it to another account; write them a cheque for the amount).

Personal current accounts

The way accounts are closed varies depending on the account type but all closures can be initiated by visiting a branch. This takes up to 2 working days to close an account. In exceptional circumstances, if you are unable to go into a branch, you can choose to provide the closure request in writing - the letter should be sent to the address of your account holding branch.

If you decide to close your account any outstanding fees or charges owed will need to be paid before your account can be closed. This includes:

  • Transaction fees accrued to date
  • Monthly maintenance fees accrued to date

If you are aged 66 or over on the day of account closure these fees will be waived.

You will need to repay any outstanding balance on your overdraft before we can close your current account.

Please include the following details in writing to ensure we can close your account off accordingly:

  • Sort code and account number of the account you wish to close
  • Your signature as per the signing instructions on your account
  • The IBAN of the account you wish us to send any outstanding balance to.(Cheques will only be issued in exceptional circumstances)

Business current accounts

To close a Business current account you will need to visit your local Ulster Bank branch.

Ulster Bank branch locator
Find your nearest branch using our branch locator (opens in a new window).

Children/Young Person's Accounts

This depends on the account itself and who is a signatory on it:

  • If the account is an Adapt Account, then either the young person (and parent if both are signatories) need to visit branch - this also applies to urmoney savings accounts.
  • If the account is being held in trust for the child,such as a urfirst savings, then the parent/guardian/trustee will need to visit the branch to close this
Please bring along any debit/savings account cards for the account, and a proof of ID.

Ulster Bank branch locator
Find your nearest branch using our branch locator (opens in a new window).

Instant access savings accounts

If your Savings account is instant access, in a sole name and you have other connections with us you can close your account and transfer funds to another account you hold with us within Anytime Internet Banking. To close a savings account online:

  1. Log in to Anytime Internet Banking at www.ulsterbankanytimebanking.ie
  2. On the 'Account summary' page select the account you wish to close
  3. At the bottom of your mini statement for that account, select 'View account details'
  4. Below the account details, select 'Need to close your savings account?'
  5. Complete the information asked for on the form and submit

Once you've submitted the form your account will be closed within 5 working days.

Please note: You will lose access to your complete online statement history for this account from the point of closure, so please think carefully before you do this. You may wish to print or download any statements before proceeding. You can download up to one year at a time in a number of different formats using the 'Statements' option.

If you have a joint savings account, or you have no other accounts with us, you can either visit an Ulster Bank branch or write to us at the address below:

Ulster Bank - Free Post
Customer Service Centre
PO Box 5706
Dublin 2

When writing to us, please sign and date the letter and also tell us where any remaining funds in the account should be transferred to.

If you have a Youth account you'll need to visit an Ulster Bank branch.

Ulster Bank branch locator
Find your nearest branch using our branch locator (opens in a new window).

Your Ulster Bank loan account

To close your Ulster Bank Loan account you will need to visit your local Ulster Bank branch.

Ulster Bank branch locator
Find your nearest branch using our branch locator (opens in a new window).

Fixed Term Savings

Structured Deposits

At maturity the capital plus any returns earned will be transferred to the bank account that you nominated on your application form. Where an account was not nominated or has since been closed, we will send you a cheque.

If you wish to discuss your investment, please contact your local branch.

Ulster Bank branch locator
Find your nearest branch using our branch locator (opens in a new window).

Money Desk/Fixed Term Deposits

For terms greater than 1 year, on maturity your funds including all interest due, will be transferred to your Ulster Bank servicing account.

At the end of a term of 1 year or less, instructions must be provided otherwise your deposit will automatically renew for the same term at the prevailing rate.

If you do not wish to reinvest these funds, please advise us no later than two days prior to the maturity date by contacting your local branch or phoning our Money Desk/Fixed Term Deposit team on 0818 211 594.

You may be able to close your account before the end of the agreed term in exceptional circumstances, but this may incur a loss of interest.

If you wish to close your account before the end of the agreed term, you must write to your branch. You can either post your written notice or hand it in; please sign and date the letter. Your deposit and any interest earned on your account by the date of closure less any loss of interest due to closing the account early (if applicable) will be paid into your servicing account.

Ulster Bank branch locator
Find your nearest branch using our branch locator (opens in a new window).

Your Ulster Bank credit card

If you wish to cancel your Ulster Bank credit card, please contact Credit Card Services on 0818 210 261 (Classic, Gold and Zinc Credit Card holders) or 0818 210 262 (World Credit Card holders).
Open 24 hours a day. Calls may be recorded.

Bereavement

If an account needs to be closed due to bereavement, please visit our dedicated page.

Can't find an answer to your question?

Источник: https://supportcentre.ulsterbank.ie/Searchable/996981792/How-do-I-close-an-account.htm

Ask a question

If you live in the Netherlands and received communication around closing your accounts, please see our Brexit Hub (opens in a new window).

Please choose your account from the options below and you will be given further information on how you can close your account.

I live abroad and want to close my account

  • Personal Current Account closure options please see the relevant FAQ below
  • Savings Account closure options please see the relevant FAQ below
  • Credit Card closure options please see the relevant FAQ below

If you are unable to close your account in branch, you can choose to provide the closure request in writing - the letter should be sent to

Mailroom Scanning,
Account Closures,
1 Hardman Boulevard,
Manchester,
M3 3AQ.

This would need to include:

  • Your full name
  • The sortcode and account number of the account in question.
  • Signed by the account holder(s)
  • A contact telephone number
  • A contact postal address
  • The Account that you want the funds transferred to. This must include the following details: Your Swift, IBAN number, BIC, Routing Number, BSB, which you can get from your beneficiary Bank. If we do not receive these details this will delay your request to close your account

If the account is overdrawn or has charges outstanding on it:

  • Please transfer enough funds to this account to cover the outstanding balance

If the account is in credit:

  • Clear instructions on how you would like to receive your money (e.g. Foreign Payment, send it to another account & provide bank details (Account Number & Sortcode)
  • Or you can transfer any surplus balances using the mobile app, Digital Banking or by Telephone. You should make sure funds are sufficient to cover any pending transactions, and charges and fees.
  • Once the closure has been initiated, you'll no longer have access to your statements online. If you need them, please download and save them prior to instructing the closure of your current account

Personal current accounts

To close a personal current account, you have the following options:

If you are registered for Digital Banking, you may be to close a personal current account online.

Your account will need to be in your sole name, have a nil balance or you wish to transfer a balance to another account held with Royal Bank of Scotland.

To close a personal current account online:

  1. Log in to Digital Banking at www.digitalbanking.rbs.co.uk (opens in a new window).
  2. On the 'Account summary' page, select the account you wish to close.
  3. At the bottom of your mini statement for that account, select 'View account details'
  4. Below the account details, select 'If you need to close your current account we can help you with this form'
  5. Complete the information asked for on the form and submit.

Once we've received the form, your account will be closed within 5 working days.

Please note:

  • If you are switching your current account to another Bank, please use that Bank’s Switcher Process.
  • You will lose access to your complete online statement history for this account from the point of closure, so please think carefully before you do this. You may wish to print or download any statements before proceeding. You can download up to one year at a time in a number of different formats using the 'Statements' option.
  • If your account has benefits linked (e.g. Travel Insurance) these will no longer be valid from the date of closure. Due to the current environment, claims may take longer than normal to process, you may wish to retain the account until such times as any claim has been processed to ensure claims are handled as seamlessly as possible.
  • If you close or switch your current account with us, and only have an instant Access Savings you will only be able to withdraw money from your account in branch.

Royal Bank of Scotland branch locator
Find your nearest branch using our branch locator (opens in a new window).

You can visit your local Royal Bank of Scotland branch along with your Debit Card, Pin and proof of ID.Please see the forms of ID we can accept (opens in a new window).

If you are unable to close your account in branch, you can choose to provide the closure request in writing - the letter should be sent to

Royal Bank of Scotland,
Mailroom Scanning,
Account Closures,
1 Hardman Boulevard,
Manchester, M3 3AQ.

This would need to include:

  • Your full name
  • The sortcode and account number of the account in question.
  • Signed by the account holder(s)
  • A contact telephone number
  • A contact postal address
  • If you are closing from abroad please include the account that you want the funds transferred to. This must include the following details: Your Swift, IBAN number, BIC, Routing Number, BSB, which you can get from your beneficiary Bank. If we do not receive these details this will delay your request to close your account

If you have regular payments on your current account, please make alternative arrangements and cancel before requesting closure of your account.

If the account is overdrawn or has charges outstanding on it:

  • Please transfer enough funds to this account to cover the outstanding balance

If the account is in credit:

  • Clear instructions on how you would like to receive your money (e.g. Send it to another account & provide bank details (Account Number & Sortcode)
  • Or you can transfer any surplus balances using the mobile app, Digital Banking or by Telephone. You should make sure funds are sufficient to cover any pending transactions, and charges and fees.
  • Once the closure has been initiated, you'll no longer have access to your statements online. If you need them, please download and save them prior to instructing the closure of your current account

Please note:

  • If you are switching your current account to another Bank, please use that Bank’s Switcher Process.
  • Once the Closure has been initiated you will no longer have access to your statements online, if you require these please arrange to download and save prior to Instructing the closure of the Current Account. You can download up to one year at a time in a number of different formats using the 'Statements' option.
  • If your account has benefits linked (e.g.Travel Insurance) these will no longer be valid from the date of closure).
  • If you close or switch your current account with us, and only have an instant Access Savings you will only be able to withdraw money from your account in branch.

Business current accounts

If you are looking to close your Business account, you can complete our digital Business Account Closure Form (opens in a new window)

The form will ask you for the email addresses of the people with signing permissions on the account.

We’ll then email your signatories and ask them to authorise the request by uploading an image of their signature.

If you have access to Digital Banking or the mobile app

You are also able to close a sterling or deposit account, when logged into Digital Banking at https://www.business.rbs.co.uk (opens in a new window) or the mobile app. Start a chat and Cora, our digital assistant, will process the request, without needing to transfer you to a person. Simply ask Cora to 'close an account'.

For more help managing your account, please visit our Managing Your Accounts Hub (opens in a new window).

Children/Young Person's Accounts

This depends on the account itself and who is a signatory on it:

  • If the account is an Adapt Account, then either the young person (and parent if both are signatories) need to visit branch - this also applies to First Savers
  • If the account is being held in trust for the child, then the parent/guardian/trustee will need to visit the branch to close this
  • If it is a Junior ISA, then, again, all signatories would need to visit branch to close this
  • Please bring along any debit/savings account cards for the account, and a form of ID. Please see the forms of ID we can accept (opens in a new window).

    Royal Bank of Scotland branch locator
    Find your nearest branch using our branch locator (opens in a new window).

Stocks and Shares ISAs

You will also need to visit your local Royal Bank of Scotland branch to close a Stocks and Shares ISA.

Savings accounts

If you are registered for Digital Banking, you can close an instant access savings account online. You can also close a Cash ISA online as long as you do not want to transfer the funds to another ISA product or provider.

Your account will need to be in your sole name. If this is your only account with us, you won't be able to close it online.

To close a savings account online:

  1. Log in to Digital Banking at www.digitalbanking.rbs.co.uk (opens in a new window)
  2. On the 'Account summary' page select the account you wish to close
  3. At the bottom of your mini statement for that account, select 'View account details'
  4. Below the account details, select 'If you need to close your savings account we can help you with this form'
  5. Complete the information asked for on the form and submit

Once we've received the form, your account will be closed within 5 working days.

Please note: You will lose access to your complete online statement history for this account from the point of closure, so please think carefully before you do this. You may wish to print or download any statements before proceeding. You can download up to one year at a time in a number of different formats using the 'Statements' option.

To close any other type of savings account, or if you prefer, you can visit your local Royal Bank of Scotland branch along with your Debit Card, Pin and proof of ID. Please see the forms of ID we can accept (opens in a new window). If you don't have a Debit card relating to your savings account, please bring in an active Debit card on any account that you hold with us.

Fixed Term Savings Accounts require 35 days written notice and an Early Closure Charge may apply.

Alternatively, if you wish to close an Instant Access savings account or a Cash ISA, you can write to:

Chatham Retail Customer Service Centre
Western Avenue, Waterside Court
Chatham Maritime, Chatham
Kent
ME4 4RT

When writing to us, please sign and date the letter and also tell us where any remaining funds in the account should be transferred to.

Your Royal Bank of Scotland loan account

To close your loan account you would need to contact our lending department.

Existing loans
0800 148 8331
Relay UK: 18001 0800 148 8331
Open Monday to Friday 8am - 8pm (excluding bank holidays), Saturday 9am - 3pm

Fixed Term Savings Accounts, Fixed Rate Bonds and Treasury products

To close a Treasury product you hold with Royal Bank of Scotland you will need to contact Telephone Banking.

You may close your Fixed Term Savings Account at any time before the Fixed Term Start Date and no Early Closure Charge will apply. After the Fixed Term Start Date you may close your Fixed Term Savings Account before the Maturity Date on giving 35 days written notice to a branch.

Please note: in order to close a Fixed Rate Bond you must give 35 days written notice of your intention to close your account before it has reached its maturity date, and you may incur an Early Closure Charge for this.

Your Royal Bank of Scotland credit card

Inform us of a bereavement

Can't find an answer to your question?

Источник: https://www.supportcentre-rbs.co.uk/Help-with-your-product/Current-Accounts/996981582/How-do-I-close-an-account.htm

Help! My Bank Closed My Account

One of the most frustrating experiences is when your bank closes your account. It is important to realize that just as you can choose which bank you do business with your bank can also choose not to do business with you. There are laws in place that prevent banks from closing accounts based on things like race, but if you are a poor customer and your account goes delinquent, then it can close your account. Usually, this only happens after your account has been negative for a set number of days, and you should have received notices from the bank about the issues.

What to Do When Your Bank Has Closed Your Account

As soon as you receive notice that your bank has closed your account, you need to take immediate action in order to be able to continue to pay your bills and manage your money. If you do not, your paycheck may go to the bank, but you will not be able to access the funds. The bank may keep them to help cover your negative balance, since you still owe them that money.

  1. Stop your direct deposit to your bank from your employer. The bank can hold any money that you currently owe in overdraft fees and charges, but you may need that money to pay your rent and other bills. Contact your human resource department immediately to set up payment by check or to have the money deposited to another bank account if you have one.
  2. Stop any automatic transfers from your account. This can save you money in overdraft fees, and you may need to suspend services for some things while you try to address your banking situation.
  3. Speak to your bank to find out exactly why they closed your account, and to learn how much money you owe them in overdraft charges and fees. Your bank will report any amount that you owe to ChexSystems. A negative ChexSystems report may stop other banks from opening an account for you. Try to set up a payment plan so that you can pay off the amount that you owe.
  4. Try to open a new bank account at a different bank. The bank may be willing to work with you, if you can bring in a written statement from your old bank that you have set up a payment plan. Often this will be a savings account instead of a checking account, which means you will not have a debit card or checks to pay your bills.

How to Avoid Having Your Bank Close Your Account

The best way to avoid having your account closed is to avoid a negative balance. Even if your account offers overdraft services, you will be paying a lot in overdraft fees, and you may become trapped in an overdraft cycle where more and more of your paycheck goes towards the overdraft fees.

Keeping a running balance of your account, and spending only the money that you have in the account will protect you from finding yourself in this situation.

If you have started an overdraft cycle, you will need to break it. You can do this by cutting back on your spending, and possibly speaking with your bank about a schedule to pay back the fees so you can still afford groceries and to pay your rent during the week. You may need to consider selling something or taking on extra work in order to recover from being overdrawn. You need to be proactive until you fix the situation.

If you have not already, you should set up a bare-bones budget and start putting all of your extra money into catching up with the bank and other bills. this does mean that you limit spending on luxuries and canceling things like your cable subscription and gym memberships.

Once you are on a tight budget, you should be able to catch up on your bills and begin to plan for future expenses so that you do not overdraw your account. 

Living Without a Bank Account

If you have your account closed, it will be difficult to find another bank or credit union that is willing to work with you. You will need to learn to operate without a bank account for a few months. You can use money orders to pay many of your bills, or you may want to try to get by with a prepaid credit card.

It can be embarrassing to talk to your job about the issues, but you will need to work out a payment method if your job will only pay you by direct deposit. Some banks may be willing to open a savings account with direct deposit for you until you can establish a checking account again.

Источник: https://www.thebalance.com/help-my-bank-closed-my-account-2385800

‘NatWest closed my account with no explanation’

How would you feel if you were dumped by your bank with no explanation?

You’ve been a loyal customer for years, but then a letter arrives saying your bank has decided it will shut your accounts, and you will have to take your business elsewhere. No reason is given and the decision is final.

Guardian Money can reveal that the numbers of people being given the boot by their bank appear to have increased sharply. And Samuel (he didn’t want us to use his full name) is the latest person to be on the receiving end of this Kafkaesque treatment. Like many of those affected by this, he believes he is a victim of discrimination.

Samuel, a father of two preschool-age children who lives in Kent, contacted Money after NatWest told him he was being dumped. He’s been with the bank for more than 10 years, but it wrote to him on 12 January to say that it had, “with regret”, decided it would be closing his four personal accounts, plus the joint account he shares with his wife. The couple also have a NatWest mortgage, and the bank is “strongly recommending” that they give serious thought to moving it to another lender.

Samuel has been given 60 days to find a bank willing to take him on, though NatWest told him: “We will not be able to provide references for you.” In the meantime he must cut up and return his debit card.

So what, some will wonder, has Samuel done to merit being treated like a pariah? He told us he can’t think of any reason why the 71% taxpayer-owned bank is so keen to be shot of him, and says he and his family have been treated like “criminals”.

With the bank refusing to say anything about Samuel’s case, it’s hard to avoid concluding that NatWest, and some other banks, are dumping customers and organisations with links to countries about which they have concerns.

Samuel was born in Nigeria and moved to the UK more than a decade ago. His full name is unmistakably of African origin, though he hasn’t been back to Nigeria for more than eight years. Notably, NatWest is not closing the accounts held solely by Samuel’s wife, who was born in mainland Europe. Both have permanent residence cards from the Home Office.

In March 2015, Money reported how economics professor Iraj Hashi had had his NatWest current account, savings accounts and credit card shut down with no explanation. The only reason he could think of was that he was born in Iran.

Last April the Guardian related how a UK law firm was handling more than 60 complaints by Iranian nationals who had had their UK accounts closed. Meanwhile the Guardian’s sister paper the Observer last year reported on the case of Mohammad Rahman, who had his bank accounts frozen and then closed by Barclays.

You can perhaps see a theme here: many of those affected are of Asian or African origin. So what’s going on? Welcome to the secretive world of bank “de-risking”.

In 2016, City regulator the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) revealed that in recent years it had become aware that banks were withdrawing banking facilities from customers – or failing to offer them in the first place – in greater numbers than before. It said there was a perception that this was driven by banks’ concerns about the money laundering and terrorist financing risks posed by certain types of customer.

A 2016 report commissioned by the FCA revealed that, between them, two large (unnamed) UK banks were closing about 1,000 personal and 600 business/corporate accounts per month for “risk appetite-type reasons”.

It also revealed that the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS) was dealing with 20 to 30 complaints a week about bank account closures. However, when Money spoke to the FOS this week, it estimated that the figure was now nearer 80-90 a week.

It follows that because countries deemed risky in terms of money laundering and financing terrorism tend to be Asian and African, people from these areas may be particularly vulnerable.

Samuel did a master’s degree at a London university and now works full-time for a construction-related company, while his wife came to the UK about 15 years ago and has been a NatWest customer since about 2003.

Samuel says their nightmare began when his accounts, including their joint account, were frozen. He says they only discovered this when the family was out shopping and his card was declined.

After many calls and branch visits, they both received formal letters saying their accounts would be closed. Samuel’s letter states that following a review, the bank had “reached the conclusion that we will no longer provide these facilities for you”, adding: “We assure you we have only reached this decision after careful consideration; however, our decision is final and we are not prepared to enter into any discussion in relation to it.”

He said: “I don’t know how I will be able to go to another bank without a reference or explanation as to why my accounts have been closed … We strongly believe there is no tangible reason relating to any actions or fault of ours. I don’t have a criminal record or any history of fraud whatsoever. I’ve also got a very good credit history.” Samuel says it is wrong that banks have the power “to wreck innocent individuals’ and families’ lives”.

NatWest told us it can’t discuss Samuel’s case.

The numbers of people being ditched by their bank look set to rise even further because UK banks and building societies have this month started carrying out immigration checks on 70m personal current accounts as part of measures agreed by parliament to encourage those living and working in the UK illegally to leave. Action taken could include closing accounts.

But critics have warned of the possibility of errors and cases of mistaken identity.

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/feb/03/natwest-closed-my-account-with-no-explanation
A man talking to a personal banker about why his account was frozen. It’s a terrible feeling. One minute you’re minding your own business, buying groceries or doing a little shopping online. The next minute your payment is declined, and you discover the bank has blocked your account. When your bank blocks your account, they have to tell you. But they don’t have to tell you ahead of time, and they won’t always tell you why. If you suddenly had a payment declined when you know there’s money in the account, it could be days before a notice arrives in the mail. You need good information on what happened to your account, and why. Here’s the list of reasons why your bank account might have been blocked, what’s going to happen to your money, and what you need to do next.

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Why Do Banks Freeze or Close Accounts?

Banks in the U.S. have to obey a very complicated system of federal laws. Federal banking laws require banks to protect customer security. Banks have to cooperate with criminal investigations. They have to obey court orders about debt collection. The laws also hold banks responsible if one of their accounts is used for criminal activity. Bank officers can be personally fined or sent to jail if they don’t report suspicious activity or stop it when they can. To protect themselves, banks will cut off accounts that could possibly be involved in crime, even if there is no proof.

Banks have a lot of leeway to freeze or close accounts on a case-by-case basis. When you opened your checking or savings account, you signed a customer agreement, and banks usually put language into these agreements that says they can restrict or close your account at any time, for any reason or no reason. If you didn’t keep a copy of your customer agreement when you opened the account, we’ve collected links below where you can download customer agreements for the top five retail banks in the U.S.

There are two different ways your bank might block your account: by freezing it or by closing it. Make sure you know which situation you’re dealing with. Whether your account is frozen or closed makes a big difference in your options for solving the problem and in how long it can take to get access to your money.

We’ve listed below the most common reasons why a bank might freeze or close your account. Some of them can be cleared up with a phone call while others will require you to send in paperwork or get a lawyer. Unfortunately, there are also some freezes or closures you might not be able to do anything about.

For Your Security

A security freeze on your account is for your protection. If your bank notices purchases that don’t fit your normal pattern, it may suspect that your account was hacked or your wallet was stolen and put a temporary freeze on your account to keep your money safe.

You might find out about this freeze while you’re standing at the checkout counter or trying to buy something bank closing my account what to do. It’s embarrassing, but remember that these things can happen to anybody. A security freeze can usually be cleared up with a phone call to verify you are the one making the purchase.

You might get a notice in the mail about a security freeze. The notice will contain instructions on your next steps. In some cases, your bank’s fraud department will call you to verify your recent transactions.

But be very careful! According to U.S. News & World Report, scammers may contact you pretending to be bank closing my account what to do bank’s fraud department. They will try to trick you into giving them access to your bank account. Never click on any links in an email that says your bank account is frozen. Never give out your Social Security number, bank account number, or PIN number to a caller. Don’t call any phone number given to you.

Instead, find your bank’s fraud department number on the back of your debit card or on your statement and call directly. You can also use the list below of customer service links for major banks. If you get a notice or call about a security freeze that your bank didn’t send, keep an eye on all your credit and bank accounts. It’s a good idea to take precautions against identity theft.

For Unpaid Debts

A creditor can get a court order and force your bank to freeze some or all of your account. Creditors can freeze up to two times the amount you owe, and if your debt is bigger than your account balance, they may freeze the whole thing.

Creditors can freeze your account for any type of debts, including:

  • Mortgages

  • Car loans and personal loans

  • Student loans

  • Judgments or liens from civil lawsuits

  • Divorce settlements

  • Child support

  • Back taxes

It may not even be your debt! If you have someone else’s name on a joint account with you, and that person owes money, your account could still get frozen.

For Suspicious Activity

A bank can either freeze or close your count for suspicious activity — the results will be different depending on which the bank chooses.

Freezes

To prevent money laundering and terrorism, federal banking laws require that banks report certain types of suspicious activity to the Treasury Department. Most people have nothing to do with terrorists or organized crime, but certain patterns of behavior or dollar amounts can be automatic red flags in the banking system.

Suspicious activity can also mean passing bad checks, receiving money from crimes, hiding or holding money for someone who’s in trouble, making transactions with questionable people, or being investigated or convicted of a crime.

You might not do any suspicious activities yourself, and the suspicious transactions might not have happened in the same account that you’re dealing with. You could get flagged for transactions that “fit the profile” but are totally legitimate. You could be the victim of check fraud or account hacking. You could have a joint account with someone else who is in legal trouble or who had suspicious activity in a different account.

Many different activities can trigger a freeze: 

  • Large deposits and withdrawals from an great america hours source. If there’s a lot of money going in and out of your account that isn’t from a recognizable job or if you didn’t list an employer when you opened the account, that can look suspicious.

  • False or misleading information in your customer record. Make sure you give a valid address and phone number when you open the account. If you move or your number changes, update the bank as soon as you can. A disconnected phone number is a red flag.

  • Withdrawals against a returned check or a pattern of depositing returned checks. Be very careful about getting paid by check. If you deposit a check that turns out to be worthless, it could trigger a freeze on your account. If you cashed the check or withdrew some of the money, the bank may think you are committing fraud on purpose.

  • Large transfers of money, especially overseas. Banks have to monitor transfers and report on specific dollar amounts, like $5,000, $10,000, $25,000, or $50,000. If you make transfers like that, or if you make a series of transactions that add up to one of those amounts, it’s a red flag.

  • Frequent cash transactions. A lot of honest people get paid or tipped in cash. Unfortunately, criminals prefer cash too.

  • Multiple accounts in the same name, or frequent transfers. If you have a lot of different accounts, especially if you move money between them frequently, the bank will wonder why. Federal law limits you to six withdrawals from savings accounts per month. If you often bump up against this limit, it can look suspicious.

  • Deposits from questionable sources. If you’re receiving money from a person or a business with suspicious activity, it can trigger an investigation

  • A sudden increase in activity. If your normal pattern of deposits and purchases goes up dramatically, either in frequency or in dollar amounts, the bank may become wary of you.

  • Buying high-risk items or large cash withdrawals. Some people like to save up for big purchases and pay cash, but this may cause the bank to wonder if you’re laundering money. Buying high-risk items like guns, coins, precious metals, or art raises the same question.

  • Out of state or foreign activity. If you don’t live or work in the same city where your account is located, it can trigger a freeze.

  • Reports of suspicious activity from other banks. Banks report customer problems and closed accounts to a central agency called ChexSystems. If you had a problem with one bank, it can affect all your accounts.

Suspicious activity freezes can be the trickiest to deal with. Sometimes law enforcement forces the bank to place a freeze. If there’s an ongoing legal investigation, the bank may be under a gag order and your customer service representative may not know what’s going on or it might be illegal for them to tell you. However, if the freeze is based on just one problematic transaction or a recent pattern that got red-flagged by coincidence, you may be able to clear it up by showing where the money came from and what it was for. 

Closures

A red flag on your account can trigger a freeze, but if you can show your transactions are legal it can usually be cleared up. Some banks won’t take a chance — they might just close your account at the first whiff of trouble. Remember, the broad discretion built into those customer agreements lets them close an account at any time.

In addition to all the suspicious activities that can trigger a freeze, the bank may close your account if you fit a profile of behavior: 

  • You’re convicted of a crime. Some banks will refuse accounts to customers with a criminal record. But if you had a previous conviction and the bank finds out, or if you’re convicted while you’re a customer, they can close your account.

  • You’re in a business considered high-risk. Banks may close or refuse to open accounts for people in certain lines of work, even if the business is legal in the state where they live. In 2011, the FDIC published a list of business categories that banks were supposed to monitor, and a lot of banks just refused to open accounts for those businesses at all. The FDIC took down the list in 2014, but some banks still don’t like to work with these businesses. Potential red-flag businesses include:

  • Gun, ammunition, and firework dealers;

  • Online gambling, escort services, and pornography;

  • Coin dealers;

  • Payday lending and check cashing;

  • Medical or recreational marijuana and drug paraphernalia;

  • Telemarketing and some multi-level marketing systems;

  • Home-based charities and advisors on getting government grants. 

For Administrative Reasons

Banks, like any large company, go through reorganizations. They may close down your branch or stop doing business in your state.

Your bank may also close your account if it is dormant, meaning you haven’t used it for a long period of time. Depending on bank closing my account what to do state you live in, an account may go unused for three to five years before it’s considered dormant. You may get a notice that the bank wants to close a dormant account, but if you’ve moved they may not be able to reach you. You can keep your accounts from going dormant with a few simple steps: review all your accounts regularly, set up automatic transfers in or out of the account, and make sure the bank has your contact information up to date. 

For Financial Problems

There’s a phrase in most bank account agreements that says the bank reserves the right to close your account if it believes there is a risk of loss or liability, meaning your account will be closed if your financial problems are costing the bank more money and hassle than it can make off of you. It really seems like being kicked when you’re down, but the bank does have the legal right to do it. 

There’s a wide range of problem financial events that can trigger the bank to close your account: 

  • Too many bounced checks or overdrafts — and they get to decide how many is “too many” on a case-by-case basis. (suggested article: How Much Can I Overdraft My Checking Account? The Answer…)

  • Too many transfers between accounts. As we explained above, there are legal limits on transfers between some kinds of accounts. Even if you’re under the legal limit, the bank can still shut down your account if they think you’re making too many transfers.

  • Too many deposits of checks that get returned unpaid. This could happen to anybody once or twice, but you should be very careful who you accept checks from in order to stay in good standing with your bank. (suggested article: Penalty for Cashing a Check Twice: Banks Fees, Legal Claims, & More)

  • A zero balance or a negative balance. If you owe the bank money or the account is sitting empty, you can be shut down.

What Happens to Funds in a Frozen or Closed Account?

The answer to what happens to your funds depends on whether your account was frozen or closed. 

Frozen Account

A frozen bank account can still accept deposits, but the new money will probably get frozen too. It’s important to change bank closing my account what to do direct deposits right away. If your paycheck deposit has already been sent but hasn’t posted to your account yet, see if your employer will work with you to cancel or reverse it. As the payer, they may have more influence with the bank to release the money back to them.

In most situations, the law protects you from having federal benefits (like Social Security) frozen — the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has published a full list of such protected benefits. If you owe money to the federal government, like taxes or student loans, or if you have unpaid child support, the law may not protect you. Even if your benefits are protected, you might need a lawyer to help you get the money.

There’s no law that limits how long a freeze can last, and banks don’t publish policies homes for sale in mueller austin tx how they make decisions about account freezes. How long your money is tied up depends on your individual situation and the judgment call of the officers at your bank.

If the freeze is for your protection or is easily cleared up, the bank will normally release your account as soon as you get in touch and verify the right information. If your account is frozen because the bank is investigating your transactions, freezes typically last about 10 days for simpler situations or around 30 days for more complicated situations. But because there are no hard-and-fast rules on this, it’s best to assume it could last a long time. Get a backup plan in place as soon as you can.

If the freeze was placed because of a legal investigation, the account must remain frozen until law enforcement lets the bank release it. If your account was frozen for debt collection, the court decides when to lift the freeze. You may be able to get access to part or all of your money by negotiating a payment plan with your creditor. 

Closed Account

The bank has to return your money when it closes your account, no matter what the reason. However, if you had any outstanding fees or charges, the bank can subtract those from your balance before returning it to you.

The bank should mail you a check for the remaining balance in your account. Your notice letter about the account closing should tell you when to expect your check — usually within ten days. How to get money from a closed bank account is a matter of cooperating with the bank who will be looking to get your money back to you.

If it doesn’t state a time frame, or if your money doesn’t arrive on time, call the bank to follow up. You may need to call several times to get a good answer. When a bank closes your account, bank closing my account what to do isn’t trying to impress you with great customer service. Sending out your check isn’t a high priority. Be persistent, and you’re more likely to get that check quickly. 

What Happens Next?

Banks block your account first and notify you afterward. That means you’ll probably find out that your account is frozen or closed at the worst possible time — when you’re trying to make a purchase or when a check bounces. Try not to panic. Most of the time, this is a temporary inconvenience that you can straighten out pretty easily.

The first thing you should always do is get in touch with your bank. If you already have written notice, there may be more information about which department you should contact or a case number. If you have any reason to suspect the notice isn’t real, call the fraud number on the back of your bank card or call customer service directly. We’ve listed the customer service links for five major banks in the next section.

If you can’t get the problem corrected immediately, you need to make sure you’re not going to bounce any more checks or have any deposits going into a frozen account. You don’t want to rack up fees or lose access to any more of your money. A freeze or account closure might not hurt your credit, but bounced checks and declined payments will.

Call your payroll department right away, and change your direct deposits to a different account or have them cut a paper check. Do the same with any benefit agencies or family members who might send money into your account.

Look over your records for any checks you’ve sent out. Call the payee to make sure they don’t try to cash that check, and set up a different form of payment. You’ll also need to change any regular bills that are set up to auto-pay from that account.

Keep copies of all notices and letters from your bank about the situation. Take notes of every phone call, and write down the name and ID number of every person you talk to. Every piece of information might help solve the problem or clear your record later. 

If Your Account Is Frozen for Your Security

Most of the time, a simple conversation with the bank’s fraud department will solve a temporary security freeze.

If your account has been hacked or your identity stolen, the bank will work with you to report it. Check your last several bank statements carefully, and keep an eye on them going forward. There are legal limits to how much money you can lose to ID theft, based on how the thieves got access and how soon you reported it to the bank. 

  • Your loss is $0 if you report the theft before any transactions are made. If the bank allows any fraudulent transactions after you make a report, they have to reimburse you. They also have to reimburse you if you still have your debit card and your account was hacked, as long as you report it in the first 60 days after your bank statement is sent.

  • Your loss is limited to $50 or less if you report it within 2 days of finding out.

  • Your loss is limited to $500 or less if you report it more than 2 days after finding out but less than 60 days after your bank statement is sent.

  • You could lose your whole balance if you don’t report it until more than 60 days after your bank statement is mailed. You could also lose the balance in any linked accounts.

You’ll also need to report ID theft to the police, the Federal Trade Commission, or both. The FTC has published a checklist on what to do if your identity is stolen. You can also use its online reporting tool. 

If Your Account Is Frozen for Unpaid Debts

Here’s what you should do if your bank account is frozen for a debt or judgment: 

  • Find out who the creditor is. The bank may not give you information about the debt, but it should tell you who got the order for the freeze. If it’s not listed on the notice from the bank, call and panic at the disco girls girls boys out.

  • Get legal advice. If you can’t afford a lawyer, you can find legal aid near you. If you’re in the military, you can get help at your local JAG office.

  • Consider credit counseling. A credit counselor can help you plan a realistic budget and come up with a payment plan. The court may release the freeze on your account if it accepts your plan. Find out more about working with a credit counselor.

  • Find out more from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau about judgments and liens on your account. 

If Your Account Is Frozen or Closed for Suspicious Activity

Frozen

Your bank may be able to tell you what specific transactions triggered the freeze and will walk you through what documentation could help unfreeze your account. Cooperating with them is usually the fastest way to solve the problem.

If your situation is more complicated, you may not be able to get a straight answer about the reason for the freeze or how to solve it. If you own the account jointly with anyone else, talk to them and see if you can discover anything that raised a red flag with the bank. Look over your past few months’ transactions and make sure you recognize them all.

If you can’t find out a specific reason for the freeze, or you think it was done in error, you should get legal advice. How long can a bank account be frozen? There is no time limit. 

Closed

Being reported for suspicious activity is serious. A closed account can affect you, anyone you have a joint account with, and possibly anyone you paid or did business with. The closing will be filed as Reported Information to ChexSystems and could trigger all your other accounts to get frozen or closed. The report will stay on your file for five years, and it can seriously damage your ability to open another bank account.

If you can find out what suspicious activity triggered the closing, try to clear it up as quickly as possible. It’s not likely that the bank will re-open your account, but if you can show your transactions were legitimate or that you were the victim of someone else’s bad actions, it’s possible.

If your account was closed by mistake or because of someone else’s actions, you should get legal advice. You can also dispute the information with ChexSystems or add a statement to your file.

If your bank account gets closed can you reopen it? With nearly every bank, yes. They will be happy to reactivate your account once you get in good standing again. 

If Your Account Is Closed for Administrative Reasons

If your bank is reorganizing or changing operations or if an account went dormant, you haven’t done anything wrong. It shouldn’t affect your credit report or your customer profile in ChexSystems.

It’s a good idea to look at your ChexSystems report, just to make sure the information is correct. You’re entitled to one free report each year. Request your annual Customer Disclosure Report from ChexSystems. 

If Your Account Is Closed for Financial Problems

If you bounce a check, overdraw your account, or have an account closed for cause, it may show up on your ChexSystems profile as “Reported Information” or a “Reported Event.” Reported Information stays on your file for five years.

If your bank closes your account for financial problems, it probably won’t re-open it. You may also have trouble getting a new account at another bank.

You can dispute incorrect information in your ChexSystems file. If the Reported Information is true, there’s nothing you can do to get it removed. If you pay back any money you owe the bank, the bank has to add that update to your file. It’s possible they might get ChexSystems to clear your file. They don’t have to do it, but you can ask. 

Customer Information for Major U.S. Banks

We’ve collected the links you need for the top five retail banks in the U.S. You can find out the terms of your account, see which sections apply to account freezes or closures, and contact Customer Service.

Banks offer different types of accounts in different states, so you may need to enter your ZIP Code to download your bank’s Customer Agreement. The agreements we’ve linked to below state that they apply to most checking and savings accounts in the U.S.

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Источник: https://econoagency.org/useful_information/1264

Why Your Bank Closed Your Account And What To Do About It

You may not think it could happen to you. A bank generally can close your account at any time and for any reason—and sometimes without notifying you in advance. Reasons a bank may shut down your account include using your account very little or not at all, or bouncing too many checks.

While it may come as a shock when your bank account is closed, you can take steps after it happens to safeguard your money. In addition, you can make some moves to help ensure the bank never closes your account.

What Happens When a Bank Closes Your Account?

Your bank may notify you that it has closed your account, but it normally isn’t required to do so. Amazon coupon code for books bank is required, however, to return your money, minus any unpaid fees or charges. The returned money likely will come in the form of a check. In some cases, your bank may close an account and switch it to a different type of account.

Why Did the Bank Close Your Account?

Your bank may shut down bank closing my account what to do account for several reasons. Here are eight of them.

Dormant Account

Let’s say you haven’t written a single check in the past two years or have made only two debit card transactions in the past three years. Your bank may decide that because of the lack of regular activity, it’s going to close your account. Typically, though, it takes several years of little to no activity for a bank to pull the plug on an account.

Generally, a bank considers an account “abandoned” if the account holder fails to initiate any activity over a three- to five-year period, or if the account holder hasn’t contacted the bank during that time. The bank is usually required to contact the account holder if it decides to close the account. If money in an abandoned account goes unclaimed by the account holder, the cash may be turned over to a state’s unclaimed property program.

Zero Balance

If your account contains no money, the bank might close it. Simply because an account says there are no minimums, does not mean the account should remain empty for days or months. The time frame will vary based on your individual bank and its practices. Another risk you take is that any monthly fees could reduce your balance to below zero, so it’s important to keep tabs on your bank account balances.

Bounced Checks or Overdrafts

If you’ve racked up too many bounced checks or too many overdrafts, your bank may close your account.

When you repeatedly bounce checks, your bank likely will shut down your account.

In the case of overdrafts—when your bank covers transactions, even though there’s not enough money in your account—your bank likely won’t close your account until there’s enough money in it to at least pay for the overdrafts and any overdraft fees. Once that happens, the bank might close your account. Overdrafts can happen when you write a check, make a debit card payment or carry out an ATM transaction that sends your account balance into negative territory.

Too Many Transfers

Banks impose limits on how many transfers you can make between certain types of accounts, such as a checking account and savings account. If you exceed those limits, the bank might close at least one of the accounts. Or, in the case of a savings account where you repeatedly exceed the Regulation D transfer limits, it could be converted into a checking account instead.

Suspected Identity Theft

If your bank thinks you’ve been the victim of identity theft, it may close elgin state bank account to prevent further fraudulent activity.

The bank also might shut down your account if it suspects you’re committing suspicious or illegal activity, such as money laundering. Large and regular transfers or withdrawals of money are among the actions that may raise a red flag.

Criminal Conviction

If you have a previous criminal conviction that you didn’t report to your bank, but the bank then finds out about it, the bank might close your account. Your account could also be closed if you’re convicted of a crime after opening your account.

High-risk Occupation

A bank might close your account if you get into a business that’s deemed high risk. This may include gun sales, marijuana sales, online gambling or escort services.

Changes at the Bank

If your bank stops doing business in your state, shuts down branches in your area or exits the banking business altogether, it may very well close your account.

What To Do When Your Bank Has Closed Your Account

Here are seven steps you should take when your bank has closed your account:

  1. Contact the bank. Particularly if you haven’t already been notified of the closure, reaching out to the bank bank closing my account what to do enable you to find out why the account was closed and what you need to do to receive your funds.
  2. Maintain a paper trail. Hold onto all written communication you receive about the account closure, keep notes of every phone call you have with a bank representative and jot down the name of every person you speak with.
  3. Halt direct deposits and automatic withdrawals (such as bill payments). This lets you avoid additional fees and ensures you’ve got access to direct-deposited money.
  4. Review your account for outstanding checks. If any checks remain uncashed, contact the payees and set up a different payment method to prevent bounced checks.
  5. Get a copy of your ChexSystems report.ChexSystems, which tracks checking and savings account activity, generates reports detailing your banking activities and listing reasons for any account closures.
  6. If necessary, file a complaint. If you believe your account was wrongly closed, submit a complaint to the federal Office of the Comptroller’s Customer Assistance Group.
  7. Explore your options. If your bank has closed your account, you might see whether you can open another type of account at the same bank (such as a prepaid account or a “second chance” account), switch to another bank, use a prepaid debit card, use a digital payments app like PayPal or simply go without a bank account.

How To Avoid Having Your Bank Close Your Account

Fortunately, you can make moves to avoid having your bank close your account. Among them are:

  • Regularly checking your balance, especially before making a big payment or writing a sizable check. You can do this online, via a mobile app or over the phone.
  • Using your account, even infrequently, so it doesn’t go dormant.
  • Signing up for text or email alerts that inform you when your balance dips below a certain amount.
  • Finding out when money that’s been deposited will actually be available. Banks sometimes put a hold on deposits, meaning the money isn’t available as soon as it hits your account.
  • Not making payments unless there’s enough money in your account to cover them.
  • Keeping track of when automatic withdrawals are made, such as rent and utility payments.
  • Switching to an account that doesn’t allow overdrafts to curb overspending.
  • Linking accounts so that, if the balance in one drops substantially, money can easily bank closing my account what to do transferred into it from another account.
  • Reviewing your monthly bank statements to check bank closing my account what to do errors.

Bottom Line

If your bank closes your account—for whatever reason—you have options, whether with your existing bank or credit union or with another financial provider. Also, by better understanding why an account could be closed, you can take steps in advance to help avoid being put in this situation.

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Источник: https://www.forbes.com/advisor/banking/why-bank-closed-my-account-what-to-do/

Ask a question

If you live in the Netherlands and received communication around closing your accounts, please see our Brexit Hub (opens in a new window).

Please choose your account from the options below and you will be given further information on how you can close your account.

I live abroad and want to close my account

  • Personal Current Account closure options please see the relevant FAQ below
  • Savings Account closure options please see the relevant FAQ below
  • Credit Card closure options please see the relevant FAQ below

If you are unable to close your account in branch, you can choose to provide the closure request in writing - the letter should be sent to

Mailroom Scanning,
Account Closures,
1 Hardman Boulevard,
Manchester,
M3 3AQ.

This would need to include:

  • Your full name
  • The sortcode and account number of the account in question.
  • Signed by the account holder(s)
  • A contact telephone number
  • A contact postal address
  • The Account that you want the funds transferred to. This must include the following details: Your Swift, IBAN number, BIC, Routing Number, BSB, which you can get from your beneficiary Bank. If we do not receive these details this will delay your request to close your account

If the account is overdrawn or has charges outstanding on it:

  • Please transfer enough funds to this account to cover the outstanding balance

If the account is in credit:

  • Clear instructions on how you would like to receive your money (e.g. Foreign Payment, send it to another account & provide bank details (Account Number & Sortcode)
  • Or you can transfer any surplus balances using the mobile app, Digital Banking or by Telephone. You should make sure funds are sufficient to cover any pending transactions, and charges and fees.
  • Once the closure has been initiated, you'll no longer have access to your statements online. If you need them, please download and save them prior to instructing the closure of your current account

Personal current accounts

To close a personal current account, you have the following options:

If you are registered for Digital Banking, you may be to close a personal current account online.

Your account will need to be in your sole name, have a nil balance or you wish to transfer a balance to another account held with Royal Bank of Scotland.

To close a personal current account online:

  1. Log in to Digital Banking at www.digitalbanking.rbs.co.uk (opens in a new window).
  2. On the 'Account summary' page, select the account you wish to close.
  3. At the bottom of your mini statement for that account, select 'View account details'
  4. Below the account details, select 'If you need to close your current account we can help you with this form'
  5. Complete the information asked for on the form and submit.

Once we've received the form, your account will be closed within 5 working days.

Please note:

  • If you are switching your current account to another Bank, please use that Bank’s Switcher Process.
  • You will lose access to your complete online statement history for this account from the point of closure, so please think carefully before you do this. You may wish to print or download any statements before proceeding. You can download up to one year at a time in a number of different formats using the 'Statements' option.
  • If your how to activate walmart prepaid debit card has benefits linked (e.g. Travel Insurance) these will no longer be valid from the date of closure. Due to the current environment, claims may take longer than normal to process, you may wish to retain the account until such times as any claim has been processed to ensure claims are handled as seamlessly as possible.
  • If you close or switch your current account with us, and only have an instant Access Savings you will only be able to withdraw money from your account in branch.

Royal Bank of Scotland branch locator
Find your nearest branch using our branch locator (opens in a new window).

You can visit your local Royal Bank of Scotland branch along with your Debit Card, Pin and proof of ID.Please see the forms of ID we can accept (opens in a new window).

If you are unable to close your account in branch, you can choose to provide the closure request in writing - the letter should be sent to

Royal Bank of Scotland,
Mailroom Scanning,
Account Closures,
1 Hardman Boulevard,
Manchester, M3 3AQ.

This would need to include:

  • Your full name
  • The sortcode and account number of the account in question.
  • Signed by the account holder(s)
  • A contact telephone number
  • A contact postal address
  • If you are closing from abroad please include the account that you want the funds transferred to. This must include the following details: Your Swift, IBAN number, BIC, Routing Number, BSB, which you can get from your beneficiary Bank. If we do not receive these details this will delay your request to close your account

If you have regular payments on your current account, please make alternative arrangements and cancel before requesting closure of your account.

If the account is overdrawn or has charges outstanding on it:

  • Please transfer enough funds to this account to cover the outstanding balance

If the account is in credit:

  • Clear instructions on how you would like to receive your money (e.g. Send it to another account & provide bank details (Account Number & Sortcode)
  • Or you can transfer any surplus balances using the mobile app, Digital Banking or by Telephone. You should make sure funds are sufficient to cover any pending transactions, and charges and fees.
  • Once the closure has been initiated, you'll no longer have access to your statements online. If you need them, please download and save them prior to instructing the closure of your current account

Please note:

  • If you are switching your current account to another Bank, please use that Bank’s Switcher Process.
  • Once the Closure has been initiated you will no longer have access to your statements online, if you require these please arrange to download and save prior to Instructing the closure of the Current Account. You can download up to one year at a time in a number of different formats using the 'Statements' option.
  • If your account has benefits linked (e.g.Travel Insurance) these will no longer be valid from the date of closure).
  • If you close or switch your current account with us, and only have an instant Access Savings you will only be able to withdraw money from your account in branch.

Business current accounts

If you are looking to close your Business account, you can complete our digital Business Account Closure Form (opens in a new window)

The form will ask you for the email addresses of the people with signing permissions on the account.

We’ll then email your signatories and ask them to authorise the request by uploading an image of their signature.

If you have access to Digital Banking or the mobile app

You are also able to close a sterling or deposit account, when logged into Digital Banking at https://www.business.rbs.co.uk (opens in a new window) or the mobile app. Start a chat and Cora, our digital assistant, will process the request, without needing to transfer you to a person. Simply ask Cora to 'close an account'.

For more help managing your account, please visit our Managing Your Accounts Hub (opens in a new window).

Children/Young Person's Accounts

This depends on the account itself and who is a signatory on it:

  • If the account is an Adapt Account, then either the young person (and parent if both are signatories) need to visit branch - this also applies to First Savers
  • If the account is being held in trust for the child, then the parent/guardian/trustee will need to visit the branch to close this
  • If it is a Junior ISA, then, again, all signatories would need to visit branch to close this
  • Please bring along any debit/savings account cards for the account, and a form of ID. Please see the forms of ID we can accept (opens in a new window).

    Royal Bank of Scotland branch locator
    Find your nearest branch using our branch locator (opens in a new window).

Stocks and Shares ISAs

You will also need to visit your local Royal Bank of Scotland branch to close a Stocks and Shares ISA.

Savings accounts

If you are registered for Digital Banking, you can close an instant access savings account online. You can also close a Cash ISA online as long as you do not want to transfer the funds to another ISA product or provider.

Your account will need to be in your sole name. If this is your only account with us, you won't be able to close it online.

To close a savings account online:

  1. Log in to Digital Banking at www.digitalbanking.rbs.co.uk (opens in a new window)
  2. On the 'Account summary' page select the account you wish to close
  3. At the bottom of your mini statement for that account, select 'View account details'
  4. Below the account details, select 'If you need to close your savings account we can help you with this form'
  5. Complete the information asked for on the form and submit

Once we've received the form, your account will be closed within 5 working days.

Please note: You will lose access to your complete online statement history for this account from the point of closure, so please think carefully before you do this. You may wish to print or download any statements before proceeding. You can download up to one year at a time in a number of different formats using the 'Statements' option.

To close any other type of savings account, or if you prefer, you can visit your local Royal Bank of Scotland branch along with your Debit Card, Pin and proof of ID. Please see the forms of ID we can accept (opens in a new window). If you don't have a Debit card relating to your savings account, please bring in an active Debit card on any account that you hold with us.

Fixed Term Savings Accounts require 35 days written notice and an Early Closure Charge may apply.

Alternatively, if you wish to close an Instant Access savings account or a Cash ISA, you can write to:

Chatham Retail Customer Service Centre
Western Avenue, Waterside Court
Chatham Maritime, Chatham
Kent
ME4 4RT

When writing to us, please sign and date the letter and also tell us where any remaining funds in the account should be transferred to.

Your Royal Bank of Scotland loan account

To close your loan account you would need to contact our lending department.

Existing loans
0800 148 8331
Relay UK: 18001 0800 148 8331
Open Monday to Friday 8am - 8pm (excluding bank holidays), Saturday 9am - 3pm

Fixed Term Savings Accounts, Fixed Rate Bonds and Treasury products

To close a Treasury product you hold with Royal Bank of Scotland you will need to contact Telephone Banking.

You may close your Fixed Term Savings Account at any time before the Fixed Term Start Date and no Early Closure Charge will apply. After the Fixed Term Start Date you may close your Fixed Term Savings Account before the Maturity Date on giving 35 days written notice to a branch.

Please note: in order to close a Fixed Rate Bond you must give 35 days written notice of your intention to close your account before it has reached its maturity date, and you may incur an Early Closure Charge for this.

Your Royal Bank of Scotland credit card

Inform us of a bereavement

Can't find an answer to your question?

Источник: https://www.supportcentre-rbs.co.uk/Help-with-your-product/Current-Accounts/996981582/How-do-I-close-an-account.htm

Close a savings account online

Overview

Some savings accounts can be closed online. You can do this if;

  • the account balance is £5 or less
  • you have another account with us to transfer the closing balance.

Bear in mind

  • Fixed rate and monthly savers cannot be closed online - this is because they are structured to pay interest at the end of a fixed period. You might be charged for closing this type of account early. We have not made bank closing my account what to do possible to close these accounts online to protect you from accidentally being charged
  • Not all accounts that meet the criteria are eligible, due to for example, periods of inactivity or restrictions on your account
  • Your account will not be fully closed until the day after your request when it will disappear from the Your accounts page. You may not be able to open additional savings accounts until the account is fully closed.

View step by step guide

Common enquiries

What if my account is applicable, but the balance is over £5?

You will need to transfer all but £5 or less out of the account. Once the transfer is complete you will be able to see the option to close the account.

Can I close my joint account online?

Yes, unless you have previously requested that both parties named on the account sign their names to authorise any changes.

Will I get any outstanding or owed interest on my account if I close it online?

Yes, if you choose to close your savings account online we will calculate any remaining interest on the account and if applicable transfer it along with the remaining balance to an account chosen by you. A statement showing your closing balance will be shown on screen, once your account is closed. This screen can be printed or saved.

What should I do if I have closed my account online but have not received the closing balance?

Please call us on 0345 602 0304

If you are calling from abroad or would prefer not to use the 0345 number, you can call us on +44 (0) 1313 37 76 86.

If you cannot close your account online, or prefer to you can close your account at one of our branches.

Источник: https://www.bankofscotland.co.uk/aboutonline/what-can-i-do-online/close-a-savings-account.html
bank closing my account what to do

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