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What can you give a dog for stomach pain


what can you give a dog for stomach pain

Just as broth can help you when your stomach's upset, bone broth is a soothing food for dogs too. This soothing food may provide much-needed. DF: First, your dog might have acid reflux aggravated by a high-cereal-content diet. Some dogs improve when given a human antacid tablet. Apr 11, 2016 - Chicken and rice aren't the only foods that you can offer your dog when they have diarrhea or an irritated stomach. From cottage cheese to.

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What can you give a dog for stomach pain -

The Top 10 Dog Health Problems

Your dog probably knows how to beg for a treat, but she doesn’t how know to talk to you about her health — or tell you when she’s in pain. Unfortunately, pet canines may face a wide range of dog health conditions. Fortunately many of the most serious ones can be prevented with vaccinations and regular treatment.

Here are the top 10 dog health problems our four-legged friends face and dog illness symptoms to watch for.

Dog Health Condition No. 1: Heartworms

Heartworms are a serious and potentially deadly disease in which parasites infect a dog’s heart and arteries. Dogs are exposed to larvae through a mosquito bite and, if unchecked, the larvae can develop into large worms. Symptoms of heartworm disease range from coughing to lethargy, collapsing, and depression (moping or not greeting you at the door), says Bonnie Beaver, DVM, a professor at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University. A heartworm infestation can progress to heart failure and death. Though not always successful, treatment options include medications to kill the parasites and, in advanced cases, surgery. Fortunately, heartworms are easily prevented. Options include daily oral medications, topicals, injections, and a simple, once-a-month pill.

Dog Health Condition No. 2: Vomiting and Diarrhea


There are many possible causes of vomiting and diarrhea in dogs, but the most common is an infection such as parvovirus. Others include eating inappropriate foods or swallowing objects. “Dogs often eat little toys, items of clothing, chocolate, or gum wrappers,” says Beaver. “Xylitol [a sugar substitute] can shut down the kidneys. A pound of bacon can cause pancreatitis.”

An isolated bout of vomiting and diarrhea in dogs is usually not a cause for concern, but if your dog vomits repeatedly or for more than a day, take him to your veterinarian. Watch for symptoms such as blood in vomit or diarrhea, dark or black diarrhea, lethargy, weight loss, fever, or a change in appetite. To prevent dehydration, give your dog plenty of water. After a bout of vomiting, try bland foods such as boiled potatoes, rice, and cooked skinless chicken. To combat diarrhea in dogs, the general rule is to avoid feeding your dog food for 12 to 24 hours or until your vet gives you the go-ahead.

Dog Health Condition No. 3: Obesity

Obesity is a common pet health problem. Just as in people, being overweight can have negative health effects on your pooch: Overweight dogs face a higher risk of joint pain, diabetes, and liver disease. “We’re feeding them too much calorie-dense food and not giving them enough exercise,” says Beaver.

Is your dog at his best weight? If he is, you should be able to feel his backbone and ribs without pressing. When looking at your dog from above, you should see a noticeable “waist” between the lower ribs and the hips; from the side, you should be able to see the abdomen go up from the bottom of the rib cage to the thighs. If your dog doesn’t meet these standards, ask your vet to help you create a diet and exercise plan.

“Increase calorie output and decrease calorie intake,” says Beaver. Reduce snacks or treats, feed him small meals throughout the day, and make it a point to take him to the park to play and run around.

Dog Health Condition No. 4: Infectious Diseases

Another common pet health problem in dogs is infectious diseases, notably canine parvovirus and distemper. Canine parvovirus is extremely contagious and potentially deadly, contracted through contact with the feces of an infected dog. Symptoms can include bloody diarrhea, vomiting, lethargy, and loss of appetite.

Canine distemper is a virus transmitted through direct contact with an infected dog’s urine, saliva, or blood. It affects a dog’s respiratory system as well as her gastrointestinal and central nervous system and even the eyes, specifically the membranes that cover the eyeballs and the underside of the eyelid. Symptoms include sneezing, coughing and difficulty breathing, fever, sudden loss of appetite, vomiting or diarrhea, discharge of thick mucous from the eyes and nose, and possibly seizures.

Early prevention can protect your pet. “These and other common infectious diseases in dogs can be prevented by proper vaccination,” says Beaver. “Start when they are puppies.” As for treatment, options for canine parvovirus include IV fluids to prevent dehydration, anti-vomiting medication, antibiotics, and anti-pain medications. For canine distemper, treatment usually includes IV fluids, antibiotics (if your dog is coughing) to prevent pneumonia, and medications to control seizures. There are currently no medications that can destroy either virus.

Dog Health Condition No. 5: Kennel Cough

Kennel cough is a highly contagious form of bronchitis that causes inflammation in a dog’s voice box and windpipe. “The most common cause is exposure to other infected dogs, either at doggie daycare, the groomer’s, or a kennel,” says Beaver. “In most cases, the treatment is to let it run its course or to give a dog antibiotics.” You can also try using a humidifier or taking your pet into a steam-filled bathroom.

Dog Health Condition No. 6: Lower Urinary Tract Problems

Some common urinary tract problems in dogs include incontinence, bacterial infections, bladder stones, and even cancer. Symptoms include having to urinate more often, producing small amounts of urine, blood in the urine, incontinence, straining or crying in pain when trying to urinate, vomiting, fever, and weight loss. Treatment options include antibiotics, dietary changes, and surgery if needed to remove bladder stones or a tumor.

Dog Health Condition No. 7: Dental Disease

Periodontal disease, an infection of the gums, is very common in dogs, affecting an estimated 80 percent of dogs by the age of 2. It has been linked to heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, and other serious dog health problems. Symptoms range from smelly breath to difficulty eating and facial swelling, says Beaver. Treatment may include removing dental plaque and, if necessary, teeth. To prevent dental dog health problems, Beaver recommends regular check-ups with a vet dentist, giving your dog rawhide chews, and regularly brushing your pet’s teeth with dog toothpaste (your toothpaste can upset a dog’s stomach).

Dog Health Condition No. 8: Skin Problems

Most skin problems in dogs are due to parasites, skin infections, and allergies. “Probably the most common skin problem in dogs is demodectic mange, which is caused by a mite that lives in the hair follicles,” says Beaver.

Common parasites that involve the skin include fleas, ticks, ear mites, and sarcoptic mange mites, which cause scabies. Ringworm is a common skin infection; it’s a highly contagious fungal infection that can cause hair loss or short hair or scaly patches. Allergens such as pollen, mold, and dust mites can trigger itching and rashes. Dogs can also develop allergies to common dog food ingredients such as soy, corn, wheat, beef, or chicken, triggering skin problems. And some dogs may simply cause irritation of the skin by licking an area too much, possibly from boredom or stress.

You may be able to spot fleas and ticks on your pet. Treatment options include using special medicated shampoos to kill parasites, antibiotics or antifungal medications, and corticosteroids and antihistamines to control itching. Your vet may also prescribe a diet to reduce food allergies or injections to control allergic reactions. To prevent fleas and ticks, ask your vet about monthly topical agents you can easily apply.

Dog Health Condition No. 9: Broken Bones

Broken bones, also called fractures, are a common problem in dogs — often from activities like jumping out of a window, says Beaver. Symptoms include limping, not moving, and a reason to suspect trauma (if the dog had been near a road, for instance). Treatment includes surgery, a splint, or a cast.

Dog Health Condition No. 10: Cancer

“One common form of cancer in dogs is skin cancer,” says Beaver. “There may be white patches on the top of the nose and ear tips.” Other symptoms of cancer in dogs include lumps, swelling, sores, rapid weight loss, lameness, sudden decreased appetite, difficulty breathing, urinating, or defecating, lack of energy, and black stools.

Treatments include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and immunotherapy. As with people, a combination of approaches may be used, and the stage of the cancer, the type of disease, and the aggressiveness of the treatment can affect the outcome.

Regular vet visits and preventive steps can keep your dog in top pet health. And should you notice any unusual behavior or symptom, getting prompt attention at the vet’s office will often mean a speedy recovery from a dog illness.

Источник: https://www.everydayhealth.com/pet-health/common-dog-health-problems.aspx

How to Treat Upset Stomach in Dogs, Including Home Remedies

Seeing your dog experiencing stomach discomfort can be quite distressing. You want to help them feel better, but they can’t communicate what they need. Plus, human remedies don’t always work for your canine friend.

Still, there are a few things you can do if you know your dog has an upset stomach because –  let’s be honest – they often eat things they shouldn’t. 

Before we get into the details of how to treat upset stomach in dogs and how to alleviate your dog’s tummy pain, let’s go over some of the symptoms and warning signs of stomach issues in dogs.

Symptoms Your Dog Has an Upset Stomach

When we have an upset stomach, we might lie down and rest or tell someone we don’t feel good. The pain and discomfort are often written all over our faces as well. 

Dogs, however, don’t show signs of pain as openly due to their instinct to hide any weaknesses. Many symptoms are subtle, and you may be tempted to think they’re normal. However, keep an eye out for the following behaviors.

Vomiting and Diarrhea

Perhaps one of the most obvious signs of stomach problems is vomiting and diarrhea. If you see your dog vomit, take note of the color and consistency in case you end up taking your dog to the vet. Plus, while it may not be appealing, always check your dog’s stools to monitor their health. You may even find pieces of whatever shoe or toy your dog consumed!

Drooling and Lip Smacking

When a dog – or a human, for that matter – vomits, the acid can damage the throat, mouth, and teeth. Dogs that experience nausea often have an overproduction of saliva, which helps counteract the effects of acidic vomit. 

As such, you may see your dog drooling more than usual or smacking their lips to contain the extra saliva. 

Eating Grass

There is much controversy about whether dogs eat grass to induce vomiting, or they eat it for fun and then it happens to cause vomiting. We’ve seen enough nauseous dogs start eating grass to believe it’s the former. But either way, if you see your dog eating grass in combination with some of these other symptoms, they likely have an upset stomach.

Gas and Burping

Burping and flatulence, like in humans, are completely natural occurrences. So, how do you know if it’s something normal or a symptom of stomach issues? Watch for increased gas, gurgling noises in the stomach, and excess burping. 

Not Eating

Like us humans, dogs often do not want to eat when their stomach hurts. If you notice that your dog is refusing things they usually love, that may be a sign of stomach pain.

Dog Stretching Neck and Looking Up

If your dog suddenly starts extending their neck and looking upwards, there’s a good chance that they are experiencing pain in their abdominal region. It’s an attempt to ease the pain in their stomach area, and often a strong sign that there is tummy trouble going on.

Can You Treat Your Dog at Home or Do You Need to Take Them to the Vet?

An upset stomach could be nothing, just some indigestion, or it could be something potentially fatal. While you don’t need to take your dog to the vet as soon as you notice symptoms of an upset stomach, you must understand warning signs of a more serious problem. If you notice any of the following, call your vet or take your dog in immediately.

  • If the above symptoms don’t improve with home remedies or they get worse
  • Blood in stools and/or vomit
  • Fever
  • Continued vomiting or diarrhea
  • Dehydration
  • Distended stomach
  • Nervous pacing

What Caused Your Dog’s Upset Stomach?

Before you start using home remedies for upset stomach to make your dog comfortable, you need to make sure they did not ingest something dangerous. 

If you have been with them all day, review where they have gone and what they might have gotten into. Check to see if you’re missing a shoe or a small toy, and look for signs of anything they might have chewed or eaten. Also, review what plants are toxic to dogs as well as human foods that are toxic to dogs, and make sure your pet hasn’t come into contact with or eaten any of them.

If you suspect your dog has ingested an object or a poisonous substance, contact your vet immediately.

Ways to Make Your Dog Feel Better

Once you’ve determined that your dog’s upset stomach does not need immediate veterinary attention, you can try some of the following tricks to keep them healthy and happy. These are the most common ways to treat an upset stomach in dogs.

1. Keep Them Hydrated

One of the most important things to do for a dog with an upset stomach is to keep them hydrated. You don’t want your dog to end up in the hospital for dehydration!

Keeping them hydrated isn’t as simple as making sure their water bowl is full. Your dog may not want to drink much water, or they might spit it right back up. You can start with giving them a couple of ice chips or water in small quantities.

2. Provide Pedialyte

Combating dehydration isn’t only about giving water. Dogs and humans alike need electrolytes to help them stay hydrated, especially when they are vomiting or have diarrhea. 

One treatment that may work is providing some Pedialyte. While children’s Pedialyte may work just fine, you can go to your local pet store and get a canine version, which usually comes in powder form.  

3. Monitor Their Temperature

If you recall, a fever was on our list of serious symptoms that require immediate medical attention. Since dogs are covered in fur, you probably won’t notice when your pet has a temperature. 

If they have an upset tummy, you should routinely check their temperature to make sure there isn’t an underlying problem.

The best way to take a dog’s temperature is by using a rectal thermometer. A normal temperature for a dog is much higher than ours. Normal dog temperatures range between 101 and 102.5 degrees Fahrenheit. If your dog’s temperature is 103 or more, take them to the vet.

4. Let Them Fast

We usually have developed strict routines for our dogs, measuring out exact amounts to feed them at certain times. However, in the wild, dogs don’t have a precise eating schedule, and they may even spend a day or two without eating.

One of the simplest ways to help a dog with an upset stomach is to remove food for 12-24 hours. The period without food will give their stomach time to settle down, letting indigestion pass. However, if you have a puppy, limit the fast to just 12 hours.  

What to Feed Your Dog

If you don’t want to let them fast, or already have and would like to introduce some foods that will help calm their stomach, here are some great ideas: 

  • Bland Diet: Forget the regular dog food and give your furry friend just plain rice and chicken. Avoid using any condiments, spices, and oils. 
  • Canned pumpkin, Sweet Potatoes, Bananas, and Oatmeal: Try offering these foods to your dog in moderation to eliminate diarrhea. Make sure there are no additives, spices, or condiments. Canned pumpkin for dog diarrhea is particularly effective.
  • Bone Broth: Combine meat, water, and apple cider vinegar and slowly cook them. The broth – minus any fat that may appear on top – can help soothe your dog’s stomach.
  • Probiotics: Just like in humans, probiotics can help dogs’ digestive tract and immune system. You can give your dog plain, unsweetened yogurt or a canine probiotic like DiarRice.
  • Slippery Elm Bark: This herb gets its name from the mucilage, which will help calm your dog’s stomach.
  • Avoid Grass: Even though this may be a dog’s go-to remedy, the grass may have dangerous chemicals from fertilizers and it will likely cause them to vomit.

Additional Tips

In addition to the home remedies for an upset stomach, we have a few more tips for you.

Over-the-Counter Medication: What to Give a Dog for Upset Stomach

Some over-the-counter medicines can help your dog, but always talk to your vet first. Some popular options include Pepcid (for acid reflux and gurgling stomach) and Pepto-Bismol (for diarrhea).

Change Their Dog Food

If your dog routinely has indigestion, consider trying a new dog food. Every dog is different, and the brand you are currently using may not be a good fit for your dog’s breed or individual digestive system. Ask your vet for some recommendations.

In Case of an Emergency

As we mentioned before, if your dog doesn’t get better or exhibits any more severe symptoms, take them to the vet immediately. If you are concerned about dehydration, especially if you don’t see any improvement after giving them Pedialyte, visit your local vet. Dehydration can be just as serious as a stomach complication. 

Final Thoughts

As you can see, there are several ways to treat upset stomach in dogs, including home remedies. If you have any concerns or aren’t sure if your dog has an urgent issue, call your vet! It’s better to be safe than sorry when it comes to your pet’s health.

Источник: https://www.superbdog.com/how-to-treat-upset-stomach-in-dogs/

How to Treat Your Dog’s Upset Stomach

dog laying on couch does not feel well

Remember your last bout of an upset stomach? That’s probably an experience you’d rather forget. Like people, dogs can get the occasional tummy ache. Fortunately, most cases of upset stomach in dogs do not require veterinary attention; a few days of good at-home care will often do the trick.

There are times, however, when stomach upset is severe enough for a veterinary visit. In this article, we’ll discuss why dogs get stomach aches, how you can treat them at home, and how to know when veterinary care is required.

Why Do Dogs Get Stomach Aches?

A comprehensive list of causes for stomach upset in dogs could stretch a mile long. Some common causes include:

  • Stomach ulcers
  • Motion sickness
  • Weak immune system
  • Diet, including food allergies
  • Gastrointestinal (GI) inflammation
  • Viral or bacterial infections in the GI tract

Dogs with stomach aches can have a variety of symptoms, ranging from mild to severe. Common symptoms include diarrhea, vomiting, reduced appetite and gas. Dogs will also eat grass to settle an upset tummy.

Not sure if your dog needs veterinary care? More severe symptoms, like those listed below, warrant a trip to the vet:

  • Collapse
  • Pale gums
  • Weight loss
  • Abdominal pain
  • Severe weakness
  • Bloody vomit or diarrhea
  • Not eating for more than two days
  • Vomiting that occurs multiple times a day or lasts for more than one day

How Do You Treat an Upset Stomach?

Treatment can be grouped into three categories: home remedies, over-the-counter (OTC) medications and veterinary care.

Home remedies
Home remedies are often all that’s needed to treat a dog’s upset stomach. First, provide your dog with unlimited amounts of fresh, clean water to stay hydrated.

Next, fast your dog for 12 to 24 hours, which probably won’t be difficult because your dog won’t feel like eating much anyway. Fasting will help the GI tract take a break. During the fasting, encourage your dog to keep drinking water to flush his system.

After fasting, feed your dog a bland diet. Here are some food suggestions:

  • Cottage cheese
  • Unseasoned ground beef
  • Canned, unseasoned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling)
  • Unseasoned chicken (boiled and cut or shredded) and white rice

A bland diet provides nutrients but doesn’t make the GI tract work too hard to digest the food. Feed your dog multiple small meals a day. Talk with your veterinarian to determine how much of each bland food to feed your dog.

OTC medications
Some human medications, like Pepto Bismol and Kaopectate, can relieve a dog’s upset stomach. If you want to give your dog an over-the-counter medicine, talk with your veterinarian first to determine which medicine to give and in what amount.

Prescription medications
If the at-home care isn’t curing your dog’s tummy ache, schedule an appointment with your veterinarian. Your vet will examine your dog and run diagnostic tests to determine the cause of the upset stomach and prescribe the appropriate treatment.

For dogs who aren’t feeling great but don’t need to be hospitalized, a veterinarian will prescribe medications that the pet parent can give at home to reduce vomiting or GI inflammation. Seriously ill dogs will need hospitalization and more advanced veterinary care, such as intravenous fluids.

Tummy aches, even for a fun-loving dog, are a literal pain. When you notice the signs of an upset stomach in your dog, act promptly to relieve the discomfort. Keep a close watch on your dog’s symptoms and seek veterinary care if home remedies and OTC medications aren’t helping your dog feel better.

Источник: https://www.petcoach.co/article/how-to-treat-your-dogs-upset-stomach/

When you have an upset stomach, you probably reach for ginger ale or crackers to settle your tummy. But what should you do when your dog’s stomach is out of sorts?

Here’s some information about the causes and symptoms of upset stomach in dogs and tips for how to make your pup feel better with natural remedies. 

Common Causes of Upset Stomach in Dogs

There are many reasons your dog may have an upset stomach, though there’s one common cause: they ate something they shouldn’t have, says Kathy Backus, DVM, at Holistic Veterinary Services in Kaysville, Utah.

“Dogs are curious like kids; they’re always putting things in their mouth,” she says. “Vomiting and diarrhea are signs that a dog’s body is trying to expel something that shouldn’t be in their system. In a healthy dog, it’s a protective mechanism of the body that’s totally normal.”

These are a few (of many) things that can trigger an upset stomach in dogs:

  • Ingesting something that they shouldn’t

  • Bacterial imbalances within the digestive tract

  • Chronic conditions such as food sensitivities

Symptoms of Upset Stomach in Dogs

The most common signs of upset stomach in dogs are diarrhea and vomiting. If your dog is nauseous, you may also see him eat grass to soothe his stomach or try to induce vomiting, says Jody Bearman, DVM at Anshen Veterinary Acupuncture, Madison, Wisconsin.

Watch for other signs of upset stomach in dogs, such as:

  • Decreased appetite or loss of appetite

  • Fatigue

  • Drinking less water

  • Seeming depressed

  • Looking uncomfortable and stretching more often (like they are attempting a downward dog)

  • Gulping to combat reflux

  • Licking their lips, the air, or objects

When to Call Your Vet

Monitor your pup’s symptoms. If your dog is consistently uncomfortable, or if the signs worsen at any point, call your veterinarian.

Watch for these signs:

  • Increasing discomfort

  • Vomiting or having an episode of diarrhea more than twice

  • Blood in their vomit or stool

  • Toy or other foreign object in their vomit or stool

  • Weakness or collapse

These can all be signs of something more serious, including pancreatitis, stomach bloating, a severe allergic reaction, or internal parasites.

If you realize that your dog has eaten something he shouldn’t have—a plant, food, toy, or chemical—you should seek immediate veterinary care.

If your primary veterinarian is unavailable, call your local emergency veterinary hospital. They will be able to advise whether your pet needs to be seen or whether you can continue to monitor him at home.

You can also call the ASPCA Animal Poison Control hotline at 888-426-4435 for a fee. They can also determine a poison’s level of toxicity and recommended care for your dog.

3 Remedies for Upset Stomach in Dogs

It is crucial to consult with your veterinarian before administering any home remedies to soothe your pup’s tummy troubles. If your veterinarian recommends at-home monitoring, these are a few ideas you can ask them about trying while you are at home with your dog.

Fasting

When your dog’s stomach is trying to get rid of something, it can be helpful to stop putting more things in their stomach for 12-24 hours, Dr. Backus says. “If the gastrointestinal (GI) system is having a tough time, you don’t want it to digest things.” 

Fasting may seem simple enough, but it’s important to speak with your veterinarian first because some dogs (particularly small breeds or those with prior health conditions) cannot tolerate fasting as well as others.

If your veterinarian does recommend fasting, ask whether they would like you to start a bland diet (and what they recommend) after the fasting period is complete.

Ice Cubes

When your dog is vomiting or has diarrhea, you want them to stay hydrated, but giving him too much water may make his stomach even more upset, Dr. Backus says.

Monitoring your dog’s water intake and discouraging gulping is important. Offer your dog ice chips to help encourage drinking.

If your dog can keep down small quantities of water or ice chips, you can gradually increase the amount and how often you are offering the water and ice.

Canned Pumpkin

When fighting indigestion and upset stomach in dogs, 100% canned pumpkin is a favorite of many holistic veterinarians.

“It has a low glycemic index, so it slowly absorbs, which helps with upset stomach and digestion,” Dr. Bearman says.

Make sure to get 100% canned pumpkin, not pumpkin pie mix, as you don’t want to feed your dog spices and other ingredients, she says. Check that there are no ingredients listed other than pumpkin (such as sugar or sugar substitutes).

According to Dr. Bearman, smaller dogs (approximately 5 pounds) can be fed one-half teaspoon of canned pumpkin, while larger dogs (approximately 75 pounds) can be fed 1 tablespoon.

Is Upset Stomach in Dogs a Sign of Food Allergies?

An upset stomach every once in a while can be normal in a dog, but if it happens often, it could signal that something is wrong in their GI tract, says Randy Aronson, DVM, of P.A.W.S. Veterinary Center in Tucson, Arizona.

If digestive upset is a frequent occurrence for your dog, discuss the possibility of a food allergy with your veterinarian. When food allergies are diagnosed in dogs, it is often an allergy to a protein source, which is why a more “novel” protein (one that your dog has never eaten) may be recommended.

There are many options on the market, but examples may include beef, buffalo, venison, or lamb.

How to Help Prevent Upset Stomach in Dogs

To help your dog maintain a healthy gut, consider giving them a prebiotic and probiotic, Dr. Aronson says. There are both prebiotics and probiotics that are made specifically for dogs, some of which are available over the counter. Be sure to ask your veterinarian if they have a particular brand recommendation.

Always talk to your veterinarian first to find out the best course of action.

Featured Image: Shutterstock/Igor Normann

Источник: https://www.petmd.com/dog/wellness/evr_dg_remedies-for-upset-stomach-in-dogs

Vomiting and diarrhoea in dogs

Vomiting and or diarrhoea is one of the most common reasons for a dog owner to seek veterinary advice. Dogs have a habit of eating all sorts of things that they shouldn’t, which can lead to a stomach upset. Whether the symptoms self-resolve or whether your dog needs to see a veterinarian will depend on how he or she is in themselves and what the vomit or diarrhoea looks like.

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Signs of vomiting and diarrhoea

  • Nausea before the event: drooling, lip licking, excessive swallowing
  • Vomit: note the colour, volume, frequency, and when the last meal was
  • Diarrhoea: note the colour, consistency and look for signs of blood.

Causes of vomiting and diarrhoea in dogs

Vomiting and diarrhoea occurs when the stomach and or intestines become irritated or inflamed. Common causes for this include some viruses (similar to human gastroenteritis) or when a dog eats something inappropriate (similar to human food poisoning). Other causes include swallowing an object that causes intestinal obstruction, sudden dietary changes, intestinal parasites, poisoning, parvovirus infection, pancreatitis, side effects of medication, or any other inflammatory gastrointestinal disease (similar to human IBD). Some dogs may become inappetent or lose weight when they are stressed.

Try to prevent your dog getting vomiting and diarrhoea by avoiding very salty, spicy or fatty foods. Introduce dietary changes slowly, over around seven days, to allow the intestinal bacteria to adjust. If you know that your dog is going to experience a stressful event, or if a course of antibiotics has been prescribed, then you can feed a probiotic supplement, which can help to reduce the risk of stomach upset. It is useful to have some chicken fillet or white fish in the freezer at home together with dog-specific probiotics and electrolyte powders that can be used for future episodes.

What you can do yourself

If your dog is bright and happy, and there is no blood in the diarrhoea or vomit, then you can often start by providing symptomatic treatment at home:

  • Do not starve your dog: historically, dogs have been treated by withholding food for a few hours before re-feeding. However, we now know that the gut needs to contain food to start the healing and recovery process
  • Very small dogs and puppies: starving is not appropriate because they risk getting dangerously low blood sugar levels
  • Hydration: your dog must have access to clean fresh water at all times
  • Highly digestible diet: offer this in small portions little and often. For example, a prescription intestinal diet, such as Purina EN, or boiled rice or potato with cooked white fish, chicken fillet, turkey or egg (feed ⅓ protein to ⅔ carbohydrate)
  • Electrolytes and probiotics: use these canine supplements alongside their diet, following the manufacturer’s instructions
  • If your dog eats poultry, or is a scavenger, we recommend sending a stool sample for laboratory analysis regularly to see if deworming is needed
  • We recommend vaccinating your dog against parvovirus. Puppies should be vaccinated three times, beginning at six weeks of age. Prevention of this disease is very important as this disease can cause fatalities, especially in puppies

A suggested feeding schedule:

  • Day 1: give 50% of the recommended daily amount divided into 6-8 portions
  • Day 2 and 3: give 75% divided into 4-6 portions
  • Day 4 and 5: give 100% divided into 3-4 portions
  • Once the dog has been normal for a couple of days you can gradually re-introduce the usual food

Dogs need 50ml of fluid per kg of body weight per day. That is approximately 500ml for a dog weighing 10kg, but this will be considerably more if the dog vomits and or has diarrhoea. The dog may also need a few quieter days in order to fully recover, with short walks on the lead and lower energy activities. It is also important to avoid meeting other dogs until your dog has completely recovered.

Treatment of vomiting and diarrhoea in dogs

Treatment focuses on replacing the fluids that have been lost. In severe cases, dehydration can lead to shock and damage internal organs, such as the kidneys. Blood tests are done to check the levels of red and white blood cells, internal organ function and to check the dog's electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride). In addition, it is important to identify what the cause of the vomiting or diarrhoea is. For example, x-rays and/or an ultrasound scan of the abdomen may be needed if the dog has swallowed an object or may have a foreign body. A surgical procedure may be required to resolve the cause.

Symptomatic treatment will be given whilst the clinical signs resolve. A bland diet that requires minimal digestion will be given in small portions, together with anti-nausea medication, antacids, pain relief, and probiotics to replace the normal gut bacteria. Antibiotics are rarely indicated in the treatment of vomiting or diarrhoea, unless there are signs of septicaemia (bacteria in the bloodstream), as they can further disrupt the normal bacterial flora in the gut.

When to see your physical veterinarian

  • Blood in the vomit
  • Frank or increasing blood in the stools or very dark/black stools
  • If your dog is increasingly lethargic, inappetent, anorexic or does not want to drink
  • Vomiting continues despite supportive treatment for 3-4 days at home (for young puppies and older dogs you should seek help earlier)
  • If your dog cannot retain water or is dehydrated
  • If a foreign body may have been swallowed that could obstruct the intestine
  • Abdominal pain or a swollen abdomen
  • If the dog has recurrent episodes of vomiting and or diarrhoea

Still worried?

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Dr Jessica May

Dr Jessica May

Last updated: 2021-10-21

Источник: https://firstvet.com/uk/articles/vomiting-and-diarrhoea-in-dogs

7 Human Foods That Can Be Fatal to Dogs

Alcohol is found in a variety of products including alcoholic beverages, perfumes, mouthwash, paint, varnish and various cleaning products.

While occasional alcohol consumption is safe for humans, dogs cannot tolerate it, even in small amounts.

Symptoms usually develop within an hour after consumption and include tiredness, depression, lack of muscle coordination, low body temperature, poor breathing, vomiting and diarrhea.

If a dog consumes too much alcohol, it can result in lung failure, seizures, coma and even death.

The toxic dose of 100% (or 200 proof) alcohol in dogs has recently been reported to be about 0.59 ounces per pound of body weight (8 ml per kg), with death occurring 12 to 24 hours after ingestion ().

Alcohol poisoning in dogs usually happens after accidental ingestion of alcoholic beverages (, , ). However, in one case, a dog died of alcohol poisoning after eating a large number of rotten apples ().

It’s also a concern if a dog eats raw dough that contains yeast. As the yeast cells ferment, they actually produce alcohol, which causes a dog’s blood alcohol level to rise and can ultimately cause alcohol poisoning and death (, ).

What’s more, the dough will expand in a dog’s stomach and can cause severe bloating. This puts pressure on the surrounding organs and can make it very difficult for the dog to breathe.

It is important to never feed raw yeast dough or alcohol to your dog. Alcoholic beverages should not be left unattended and raw dough should be kept well out of reach.

Summary

If a dog consumes alcohol, it can lead to serious health problems and even death. This can also happen if a dog eats raw yeast dough.

Источник: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/7-foods-fatal-to-dogs
what can you give a dog for stomach pain
what can you give a dog for stomach pain
what can you give a dog for stomach pain

What can I give my dog for pain? 8 common questions answered

Safe pain relief for dogs

Dogs suffer the same aches and pains as humans but because they can’t speak it’s often difficult to determine whether they’re suffering. What can you give a dog for stomach pain to advances in veterinary medicine, however, there are lots of options available to vets to both relieve pain in dogs and to assess the level of pain they are suffering.  Here we answer some of the most common questions owners ask about what can I give my dog for pain?

Dog lying on a bed looking sad for Vets Now article on pain relief for dogs
It's often difficult to determine if your dog is in pain

What are the signs a dog is in pain?

Is my dog in pain? It’s a question dog owners ask regularly. But before concerning yourself with obtaining pain relief or painkillers for your dog, you first need to know how to tell if your dog is in pain.

There are a number of signs, some more obvious than others, which can indicate pain in dogs, including excessive grooming, being more vocal and antisocial or aggressive behaviour.

Read our advice article for more information and if you’re worried your dog is suffering contact your vet or, out of hours, your nearest Vets Now.

Can I give my dog pain relief?

Owners often ask vets about safe pain relief for dogs. While humans can self-diagnose and, in many cases, self-medicate by buying over-the-counter drugs, it’s not quite the same for dogs.

It’s imperative dog owners do not try to administer pain relief to their pet without first consulting a vet. If a dog is in pain they should undergo a full veterinary examination. This will enable the vet to make a proper diagnosis in respect of what is causing the pain and draw up a treatment plan to treat it. Several painkilling drugs have been designed specifically for comenity net goodsamrewards and these are far safer and more effective than drugs intended for people. Giving dogs non-prescribed drugs can result in accidental poisoning and possibly lead to kidney failure.

Can I give my dog human painkillers?

As tempting as it may be to try to treat your dog’s pain using over-the-counter human painkillers, it’s something you should avoid.  Many dog owners wrongly assume it’s safe to give their pet human painkillers such as ibuprofen or paracetamol, but this is not the case.

Ibuprofen, for example, is toxic to dogs while paracetamol can also be highly dangerous if the wrong dosage is given. We can’t reiterate enough how vital it is you speak to your vet before attempting to treat your dog’s pain. What can you give a dog for stomach pain ever give your dog painkillers that have been prescribed by your vet. Our emergency vets have treated many pets who have been poisoned by human drugs such as ibuprofen.

Dog being petted by an owner for Vets Now blog on can I give my dog paracetamol and what can I give my dog for pain?
Always consult your vet if you think your dog is in pain

Can I give my dog aspirin?

While aspirin is sometimes used by vets to treat mild to moderate pain caused by osteoarthritis or musculoskeletal inflammation, it should never be administered by dog owners.

Even small doses can cause stomach ulcers and the stomach lining to become inflamed, while aspirin overdose can result in what’s called salicylate poisoning. This can lead to haemorrhage, seizures, coma, and death.

Can dogs have paracetamol?

You should never give dogs paracetamol at home as it can be highly toxic if they are given the wrong amount. If your dog is in pain, take them to the vet and let them decide on the best treatment.

There is a form of paracetamol for dogs which your vet may prescribe in some circumstances and you should always follow their instructions and never give more than the prescribed dose.

Is there a dog pain chart?

Most vets use pain scales to assess the level of pain a dog is suffering. However, because dogs can’t speak the results are based on the vet’s interpretation of the intensity of the pain.

There are several pain scales for veterinary patients. At Vets Now, our emergency vets use the Glasgow composite measure pain scale. It features 30 descriptor options within six behavioural categories, allen edmonds rudolph shoe each option ranked according to its pain severity. It can be applied quickly and reliably in clinical settings.

Dog lying down looking sad for Vets Now article on What can I give my dog for pain?
There are some natural remedies that can help relieve pain in dogs

How to relieve dog pain naturally?

There are some natural remedies that can help to relieve pain in dogs for specific conditions, such as Glucosamine and Chondroitin, which are used to treat arthritis. But dog owners should only ever use natural remedies if directed to do so. Our advice is always to consider the evidence for a particular treatment.

Only treatments underpinned by recognised evidence-based veterinary medicine or sound scientific principles should be considered and your vet is the best person to provide you with this guidance.

Are there other ways dogs can suffer?

Being in pain is not the only way in which our pets can be considered to be suffering. Anything which adversely impacts on their ability to exhibit normal behaviour can lead to suffering, for example not being able to breathe easily.

About the Author

About the Article

First Published
Last Updated
Disclaimer

Vets Now assumes no liability for the content of this page. This advice is not a substitute for a proper consultation with a vet and is only intended as a guide. Please contact your local veterinary practice for advice or treatment immediately if you are worried about your pet’s health — even if they are closed, they will always have an out-of-hours service available. Find out more about what to do in an emergency.

Источник: https://www.vets-now.com/pet-care-advice/what-can-i-give-my-dog-for-pain/

How to Treat Your Dog’s Upset Stomach

dog laying on couch does not feel well

Remember your last bout of an upset stomach? That’s probably an experience you’d rather forget. Like people, dogs can get the occasional tummy ache. Fortunately, most cases of upset stomach in dogs do not require veterinary attention; a few days of good at-home care will often do the trick.

There are times, however, when stomach upset is severe enough for a veterinary visit. In this article, we’ll discuss why dogs get stomach aches, how you can treat them at home, and how to know when veterinary care is required.

Why Do Dogs Get Stomach Aches?

A comprehensive list of causes for stomach upset in dogs could stretch a mile long. Some common causes include:

  • Stomach ulcers
  • Motion sickness
  • Weak immune system
  • Diet, including food allergies
  • Gastrointestinal (GI) inflammation
  • Viral or bacterial infections in the GI tract

Dogs with stomach aches can have a variety of symptoms, ranging from mild to severe. Common symptoms include diarrhea, vomiting, reduced appetite and gas. Dogs will also eat grass to settle an upset tummy.

Not sure if your dog needs veterinary care? More severe symptoms, like those listed below, warrant a trip to the vet:

  • Collapse
  • Pale gums
  • Weight loss
  • Abdominal pain
  • Severe weakness
  • Bloody vomit or diarrhea
  • Not eating for more than two days
  • Vomiting that occurs multiple times a day or lasts for more than one day

How Do You Treat an Upset Stomach?

Treatment can be grouped into three categories: home remedies, over-the-counter (OTC) medications and veterinary care.

Home remedies
Home remedies are often all that’s needed to treat a dog’s upset stomach. First, provide your dog with unlimited amounts of fresh, clean water what can you give a dog for stomach pain stay hydrated.

Next, fast your dog for 12 to 24 hours, which probably won’t be difficult because your dog won’t feel like eating much anyway. Fasting will help the GI tract take a break. During the fasting, encourage your dog to keep drinking water to flush his system.

After fasting, feed your dog a bland diet. Here are some food suggestions:

  • Cottage cheese
  • Unseasoned ground beef
  • Canned, unseasoned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling)
  • Unseasoned chicken (boiled and cut or shredded) and white rice

A bland diet provides nutrients but doesn’t make the GI tract work too hard to digest the food. Feed your dog multiple small what can you give a dog for stomach pain a day. Talk with your veterinarian to determine how much of each bland food to feed your dog.

OTC medications
Some human victoria secret gift card balance canada, like Pepto Bismol and Kaopectate, can relieve a dog’s upset stomach. If you want to give your dog an over-the-counter medicine, talk with your veterinarian first to determine which medicine to give and in what amount.

Prescription medications
If the at-home care isn’t curing your dog’s tummy ache, schedule an appointment with your veterinarian. Your vet will examine your dog and run diagnostic tests to determine the cause of the upset stomach and prescribe the appropriate treatment.

For dogs who aren’t feeling great but don’t need to be hospitalized, a veterinarian will prescribe medications that the pet parent can give at home to reduce vomiting or GI inflammation. Seriously ill dogs will need hospitalization and more advanced veterinary care, such as intravenous fluids.

Tummy aches, even for a fun-loving dog, are a literal pain. When you notice the signs of an upset stomach in your dog, act promptly to relieve the discomfort. Keep a close watch on your dog’s symptoms and seek veterinary care if home remedies and OTC medications aren’t helping your dog feel better.

Источник: https://www.petcoach.co/article/how-to-treat-your-dogs-upset-stomach/

When you have an upset stomach, you probably reach for ginger ale or crackers to settle your tummy. But what should you do when your dog’s stomach is out of sorts?

Here’s some information about the causes and symptoms of upset stomach in dogs and tips for how to make your pup feel better with natural remedies. 

Common Causes of Upset Stomach in Dogs

There are many reasons your how is merrick bank credit card may have an upset stomach, though there’s one common cause: they ate something they shouldn’t have, says Kathy Backus, DVM, at Holistic Veterinary Services in Kaysville, Utah.

“Dogs are curious like kids; they’re always putting things in their mouth,” she says. “Vomiting and diarrhea are signs that a dog’s body is trying to expel something that shouldn’t be in their system. In a healthy dog, it’s a protective mechanism of the body that’s totally normal.”

These are a few (of many) things that can trigger an upset stomach in dogs:

  • Ingesting something that they shouldn’t

  • Bacterial imbalances within the digestive tract

  • Chronic conditions such as food sensitivities

Symptoms of Upset Stomach in Dogs

The most common signs of upset stomach in dogs are diarrhea and vomiting. If your dog is nauseous, you may also see him eat grass to soothe his stomach or try to induce vomiting, says Jody Bearman, DVM at Anshen Veterinary Acupuncture, Madison, Wisconsin.

Watch for other signs of upset stomach in dogs, such as:

  • Decreased appetite or loss of appetite

  • Fatigue

  • Drinking less water

  • Seeming depressed

  • Looking uncomfortable and stretching more often (like they are attempting a downward dog)

  • Gulping to combat reflux

  • Licking their lips, the air, or objects

When to Call Your Vet

Monitor your pup’s symptoms. If your dog is consistently uncomfortable, or if the signs worsen at any point, call your veterinarian.

Watch for these signs:

  • Increasing discomfort

  • Vomiting or having an episode of diarrhea more than twice

  • Blood in their vomit or stool

  • Toy or other foreign object in their vomit or stool

  • Weakness or collapse

These can all be signs of something more serious, including pancreatitis, stomach bloating, a severe allergic reaction, or internal parasites.

If you realize that your dog has eaten something he shouldn’t have—a plant, food, toy, or chemical—you should seek immediate veterinary care.

If your primary veterinarian is unavailable, call your local emergency veterinary hospital. They will be able to advise whether your pet needs to be seen or whether you can continue to monitor him at home.

You can also call the ASPCA Animal Poison Control hotline at 888-426-4435 for a fee. They can also determine a poison’s level of toxicity and recommended care for your dog.

3 Remedies for Upset Stomach in Dogs

It is crucial to consult with your veterinarian before administering any home remedies to soothe what can you give a dog for stomach pain pup’s tummy troubles. If your veterinarian recommends at-home monitoring, these are a few ideas you can ask them about trying while you are at home with your dog.

Fasting

When your dog’s stomach is trying to get rid of something, it can be helpful to stop putting more things in their stomach for 12-24 hours, Dr. Backus says. “If the gastrointestinal (GI) system is having a tough time, you don’t want it to digest things.” 

Fasting may seem simple enough, but it’s important to speak with your veterinarian first because some dogs (particularly small breeds or those with prior health conditions) cannot tolerate fasting as well as others.

If your veterinarian does recommend fasting, ask whether they would like you to start a bland diet (and what they recommend) after the fasting period is complete.

Ice Cubes

When your dog is vomiting or has diarrhea, you want them to stay hydrated, but giving him too much water may make his stomach even more upset, Dr. Backus says.

Monitoring your dog’s water intake and discouraging gulping is important. Offer your dog ice chips to help encourage drinking.

If your dog can keep down small quantities of water or ice chips, you can gradually increase the amount and how often you are offering the water and ice.

Canned Pumpkin

When fighting indigestion and upset stomach in dogs, 100% canned pumpkin is a favorite of many holistic veterinarians.

“It has a low glycemic index, so it slowly absorbs, which helps with upset stomach and digestion,” Dr. Bearman says.

Make sure to get 100% canned pumpkin, not pumpkin pie mix, as you don’t want to feed your dog spices and other ingredients, she says. Check that there are no ingredients listed other than pumpkin (such as sugar or sugar substitutes).

According to Dr. Bearman, smaller dogs (approximately 5 pounds) can be fed one-half teaspoon of canned pumpkin, while larger dogs (approximately 75 pounds) can be fed 1 tablespoon.

Is Upset Stomach in Dogs a Sign of Food Allergies?

An upset stomach every once in a while can be normal in a pnc bank online banking help, but if it happens often, it could signal that something is wrong in their GI tract, says Randy Aronson, DVM, of P.A.W.S. Veterinary Center in Tucson, Arizona.

If digestive pnc closing stock price is a frequent occurrence for your dog, discuss the possibility of a food allergy with your veterinarian. When food allergies are diagnosed in dogs, it is often an allergy to a protein source, which is why a more “novel” protein (one that your dog has never eaten) may be recommended.

There are many options on the market, but examples may include beef, buffalo, venison, or lamb.

How to Help Prevent Upset Stomach in Dogs

To help your dog maintain a healthy gut, consider giving them a prebiotic and probiotic, Dr. Aronson says. There are both prebiotics and probiotics that are made specifically for dogs, some of which are available over the counter. Be sure to ask your veterinarian if they have a particular brand recommendation.

Always talk to your veterinarian first to find out the best course of action.

Featured Image: Shutterstock/Igor Normann

Источник: https://www.petmd.com/dog/wellness/evr_dg_remedies-for-upset-stomach-in-dogs

People who have an upset stomach usually go for remedies like ginger tea, peppermint, or some food that can help settle your tummy.

But what can you give your dog for an upset stomach?

Dogs can have an upset stomach for a variety of reasons, from severe stress to dietary changes to dehydration and swallowing foreign objects. The good news is that most of the time, you won’t need to rush to the vet in order to help your four-legged buddy.

There are plenty of natural remedies for an upset stomach in dogs out there.

In this article, we cover the list of the best things you can give your dog when picture of south america feel sick — along with several handy tips for managing their digestive health.

What Can I Give My Dog for Vomiting?

More often than not, an upset stomach is a single incident that can be easily treated at home. This section provides you with the entire arsenal of natural remedies if your dog is in gastric discomfort.

Fasting

It’s a good idea to stop putting food in your dog’s stomach when he’s trying to get rid of something. Dogs won’t digest things properly if their gastrointestinal system is having a difficult time. Before you decide to fast your dog, consult this idea with your veterinarian; they will be able to provide the guidelines for healthy fasting. The fasting period shouldn’t exceed 24 hours.

Canned Pumpkin

Many holistic vets recommend 100% canned pumpkin for fighting indigestion and upset stomach in dogs. It has a low glycemic index, so it won’t get heavy on your dog’s gut, but at the same time, it’s a perfect source of fiber, which may promote healthy digestion. Just be sure to get 100% canned pumpkin, not the one that comes with spices and other ingredients. These extra ingredients may centerstatebank com online banking necessarily work well for your dog’s tummy. Smaller dogs should eat about one-half teaspoon of canned pumpkin, while larger dogs can consume 1 tablespoon.

Bone Broth

Bone broth is one of the best foods you can give your dog for an upset stomach. You can use a crockpot for the job and simply simmer the bone and the meat on it with water and apple cider vinegar. It will take about 12 hours to make bone broth, so it’s best to make ahead and freeze. The fat on the broth’s surface should be skimmed off before freezing.

Bland Food

After your dog has fasted for 12–24 hours and you’ve already introduced bone broth, you can slowly start feeding them with the bland diet — provided that they’re not vomiting and can keep down liquids.

The bland diet consists of two basic ingredients:

  1. Boiled rice (75%)
  2. Cooked chicken meat or extra lean beef (no skin or bones)

Do not supplement any oils, fat, or spices to the bland diet. There’s a reason why it’s called “bland.”

Gradually increase the amount of food you give your dog for an upset stomach, starting with one tablespoon and waiting for about three hours to see how the dog responds to the extra amount of food. If your dog doesn’t vomit and can keep that down, continue to add more bland food to ½ – 1 cup of bland diet every 3–4 hours.

Once the dog shows signs of improvement, gradually come back to their regular food until they’re eating 100% of their normal diet again.

Ice Cubes

Keeping your dog hydrated when they’re vomiting or have diarrhea is essential to help them recover, but giving too much american savings may make their stomach even more upset. Keep track of the dog’s water intake and discourage gulping. If the dog refuses to drink more water, offer them ice cubes or ice chips to help encourage drinking. If the dog can keep down a small amount of water or ice cubes, you can gradually increase their intake and frequency at which you’re offering the water and ice.

Probiotics

Once your dog is able to digest food and appears to be feeling better, you can give them some natural probiotic like plain yogurt, or a probiotic formulated specifically for dogs, such as FortiFlora, Prostora, or Proviable. Probiotics contain living gut-friendly bacteria that occur naturally in the digestive tract. The purpose of taking probiotics is to prevent digestive issues and support your dog’s immune system.

OTC Medication

Some over-the-counter (OTC) medications for an upset stomach may help your dog, but always be sure that they are made specifically for animals, not for humans. Human OTC medications can do more harm than good for your dog. People usually turn to Imodium, Pepto-Bismol, and Pepcid to treat a stomach upset in dogs. However, they may cause adverse reactions, so it’s best to talk to your vet first.

Can I Give My Dog CBD Oil for Upset Stomach?

Dog Lying On The Shiny FloorCBD has become the go-to health supplement for millions of people around the world. Similar to humans, dogs have endocannabinoid systems that interact with plant-based cannabinoids like CBD. For this reason, CBD can also help alleviate a wide range of health conditions and their symptoms in dogs — including digestive issues.

What Is CBD and How Does It Work?

CBD stands for cannabidiol — one of the 115 active ingredients in cannabis known as cannabinoids.

Cannabinoids are the plant-based equivalents of endocannabinoids, which are natural neurotransmitters produced by the endocannabinoid system (ECS).

The ECS is the major regulatory network in all mammals. It controls the functioning of all other systems and their organs. The main role of the ECS is to help the body maintain a balance between important biological processes.

The functions controlled by the ECS control pain, sleep, mood, memory, gut motility, immune response, sensations of fear and stress, body temperature, and appetite just to name a few.

The cannabinoid receptors occur throughout the body, with the largest concentrations in the central nervous system, immune system, and peripheral nervous system. Endocannabinoids bank of america bill pay center released whenever the balance in the body is disrupted. However, they don’t last for too long and the body doesn’t store them for later.

This is where CBD steps in.

CBD signals the ECS to produce more of its own endocannabinoids. It also makes them more available for the body by inhibiting the Fatty Amino Acid Hydrolase (FAAH) enzyme that breaks them down.

On top of that, CBD acts on more than 65 molecular targets.

Here’s why you may want to consider giving CBD oil to your dog when they have an upset stomach.

Does CBD Oil Help Relieve Upset Stomach in Dogs?

Not only can CBD help with pain, stress, and constipation, but it can also relieve the symptoms of an upset stomach, such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Studies suggest that CBD indirectly engages with a receptor known as 5-HT1A, which is responsible for serotonin secretion. In a 2012 study published in the British Journal of Pharmacology, the authors found that CBD indirectly activated this receptor in the brain, reducing nausea-like behaviors in rats (1).

Research also shows that the CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors occur at key sites in the brain and gastrointestinal tract that control nausea and vomiting (2).

The activation of the CB1 receptor has been found to reduce the intensity of an upset stomach as well as curb vomiting (3).

Some studies point to CBD as an effective agent in stimulating appetite in sick dogs as well as for dogs suffering from anxiety. CBD may also promote healthy bowel movement so that the dog can pass the bronze figurine without hassle (4).

As mentioned earlier, dogs have the same endocannabinoid system as humans and other mammals, so while no studies have been conducted specifically on CBD and dogs with upset stomachs, the above findings may carry a high degree of relevance.

Is CBD Safe for Dogs?

CBD Dropper With Oil in White BackgroundSince CBD doesn’t have intoxicating properties, it is considered a safe substance for dogs. You can give your dog CBD for check if car is insured by number plate usa upset stomach without worrying about severe or life-threatening side effects. Numerous health agencies, such as the World Health Organization (WHO) have acknowledged the safety profile of cannabidiol, claiming it is safe and well-tolerated in humans and animals.

That being said, CBD may cause a few mild side effects in your dog, such as dry mouth, dizziness, and sedation. CBD is also known to interact with many medications prescribed by veterinarians due to its interaction with the cytochrome P450 (CYP450), which is a system of enzymes that metabolizes drugs (5).

If your dog takes any medication, consult the use of CBD with your vet. A holistic veterinarian will help you establish the right routine for your dog in order to avoid these interactions — and point you in the right direction when it comes to finding the right dosage for dogs.

Best CBD Oil for Dogs: Editor’s Picks

1. Royal CBD (Overall Winner)

RoyalCBD 125mg Pet Oil Bacon flavor

Get 15% off all Royal CBD products.  Use code “CFAH” at checkout.

See Lowest Price

Pros:

  • Organic, Colorado-grown hemp
  • Full-spectrum CBD
  • Up to 500 mg of CBD per bottle
  • Suitable for different breeds and sizes

Cons:

  • Not available in local stores
  • Limited choice of flavors

Royal CBD is a safe haven for new consumers because the company excels at transparency and quality of ingredients. The company’s award-winning formula for humans has been translated into the dog version to suit dogs of different breeds and sizes. What can you give a dog for stomach pain CBD uses full-spectrum CBD from organic hemp, MCT coconut oil as a carrier, and natural flavorings. Every batch of CBD oil for dogs is tested for quality and safety in a certified laboratory to provide dog parents with a healthy product for their pups.

The Royal CBD Paws oil for dogs comes in three strengths: 125 mg (small dogs), 250 mg (medium dogs), and 500 mg (large dogs).

If your dog doesn’t like the hempy taste of CBD oil, this product will change the game with a delicious bacon flavor.

2. Gold Bee (Runner Up)

Gold Bee Bones CBD Pet Oil

See Lowest Price

Pros:

  • Organic hemp from California
  • CO2 extraction
  • Full-spectrum CBD
  • 600 mg of total CBD
  • Peanut butter flavor
  • Lab-tested for potency and purity

Cons:

  • No strengths for small and extra-small dogs
  • Limited flavor options

Gold Bee is a California-based company specializing in premium CBD extracts for humans and pets. The company’s founders spent 10 years in the superfood space before hopping on the CBD market; they’ve been making organic raw honey and coconut oil.

Gold Bee has recently introduced its line of pet products, featuring CBD oil for dogs and one version of dog treats.

The Gold Bee CBD oil for dogs is available in one concentration, providing 600 mg of full-spectrum CBD per bottle. At 20 mg of CBD per milliliter, it’s a great product for medium and large dogs. That being said, we’d like to see an option for small or extra-small dogs, as the current potency may be difficult to dose in them.

All products made by Gold Bee are tested in a third-party laboratory for their phytochemical profile and purity.

Common Causes of Upset Stomach in Dogs

As mentioned, your dog may have an upset stomach for many reasons. However, the most common cause is when they eat something they shouldn’t have, according to Kathy Backus, DVM, at Holistic Veterinary Services in Kaysville, Utah.

“Dogs are curious like kids; they’re always putting things in their mouth (…) Vomiting and diarrhea are signs that a dog’s body is trying to expel something that shouldn’t be in its system. In a healthy dog, it’s a protective mechanism of the body that’s totally normal.”

Other common causes of an upset stomach in dogs include:

  • Fever–checking your dog’s temperature is one of the first steps you should take to determine why they have an upset stomach. The best tool for this is a rectal thermometer because it provides the most accurate measures. Alternatively, you can use an ear thermometer, but it’s not as precise as the rectal one. A dog’s normal body temperature is 101 to 102.5 degrees Fahrenheit. A temperature above 104 degrees indicates fever, which can cause a range of symptoms, from tiredness and loss of appetite to an upset stomach.
  • Toxic food – aside from things like chocolate and high-starch food, you should avoid houseplants that are toxic to your dog. If they nibbled on any houseplants, that’s a warning sign. Be sure to research a list of toxic houseplants for pets before buying one.
  • Dehydration – your dog needs to stay hydrated at all times. In many cases, dehydration may lead to an upset stomach, causing problems like nausea and constipation in dogs.
  • Dietary modifications – any changes that you introduce to your dog’s diet can make them feel temporarily sick. New food should always be added gradually in order to prevent incidental cases of diarrhea and vomiting.

Is an Upset Stomach a Sign of a Food Allergy?

If your dog has an upset stomach every once in a while, it’s normal and shouldn’t be considered an alarm.

Now that we’ve established the most common causes of sickness in dogs, let’s focus on its typical symptoms.

If stomach upset is a frequent occurrence for your dog, consult your veterinarian and ask them about the possibility of a food allergy. Once diagnosed, the allergy is usually associated with a protein source, which is why some “novel” protein guaranty bank and trust company denver type your dog has never eaten) may cause allergic reactions that are manifested as an upset stomach.

Symptoms of Upset Stomach in Dogs

Lonely Brown Puppy Looking Upward
The telltale signs of an upset stomach are vomiting and prolonged episodes of diarrhea in dogs. If your canine friend is nauseous, you may also see him eat grass to ease the stomach and try to trigger vomiting.

Commonly reported symptoms of sickness in dogs are as follows:

  • Low appetite (or loss of appetite)
  • Tiredness
  • Low mood
  • Stretching more often
  • Looking uncomfortable
  • Gulping to prevent reflux
  • Licking their lips or objects

When Should I Call the Vet?

Observe your pup’s symptoms and behavior. If they worsen over time, or if the dog is constantly uncomfortable, take him to the vet immediately.

Watch for these signs:

  • Vomiting or having an episode of diarrhea regularly
  • Blood in the stool what can you give a dog for stomach pain vomit
  • Dry vomit
  • Increasing discomfort
  • Weakness or collapse
  • Foreign objects in the vomit or stool

The above symptoms may indicate a more serious health problem, such as abdominal bloating, parasites, severe allergic reaction, or pancreatitis.

If you notice that your dog has eaten a foreign object or some toxic food, you should seek immediate veterinary attention. Should your primary vet be unavailable, visit your local vet emergency room.

Final Thoughts on the Best Remedies for Dogs with Upset Stomach

Whether your dog has eaten something they shouldn’t eat (e.g. a foreign body), or you’ve sharply introduced changes in their diet, an upset stomach may occur as one of the side effects.

Other potential triggers include severe or chronic stress, underlying health conditions, dehydration, or food poisoning. A normal case of an upset stomach isn’t alarming and can be easily treated at home using natural remedies such as bone broth, a bland diet, probiotics, or health supplements like CBD oil.

CBD can be particularly helpful for your dog because it regulates its endocannabinoid system. Using this mechanism, CBD provides a myriad of health benefits, including relief from an upset stomach. The mechanism behind CBD’s effects is multifaceted and can help with a range of symptoms linked to indigestion, such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and loss of appetite.

If your dog doesn’t get better over time, and the symptoms deteriorate, you should immediately take them to the veterinarian. Chronic indigestion can be a sign of a more serious health problem that requires thorough examination.

Reference links:

  1. Rock, E M et al. “Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic component of cannabis, attenuates vomiting and nausea-like behavior via indirect agonism of 5-HT(1A) somatodendritic autoreceptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus.” British journal of pharmacology vol. 165,8 (2012): 2620-34. doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01621.x
  2. Sharkey, Keith A et al. “Regulation of nausea and vomiting by cannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system.” European journal of pharmacology vol. 722 (2014): 134-46. doi:10.1016/j.ejphar.2013.09.068
  3. Parker, Linda A et al. “Regulation of nausea and vomiting by cannabinoids.” British journal of pharmacology vol. 163,7 (2011): 1411-22. doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.01176.x
  4. Zendulka, Ondřej et al. “Cannabinoids and Cytochrome P450 Interactions.” Current drug metabolism vol. 17,3 (2016): 206-26. doi:10.2174/1389200217666151210142051
  5. Kogan, Lori et al. “US Veterinarians’ Knowledge, Experience, and Perception Regarding the Use of Cannabidiol for Canine Medical Conditions.” Frontiers in veterinary science vol. 5 338. 10 Jan. 2019, doi:10.3389/fvets.2018.00338
Источник: https://cfah.org/what-can-i-give-my-dog-for-vomiting/

Vomiting and diarrhoea in dogs

Vomiting and or diarrhoea is one of the most common reasons for a dog owner to seek veterinary advice. Dogs have a habit of eating all sorts of things that they shouldn’t, which can lead to a stomach upset. Whether the symptoms self-resolve or whether your dog needs to see a veterinarian will depend on how he or she is in themselves and what the vomit or diarrhoea looks like.

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Signs of vomiting and diarrhoea

  • Nausea before the event: drooling, lip licking, excessive swallowing
  • Vomit: note the colour, volume, frequency, and when the last meal was
  • Diarrhoea: note the colour, consistency and look for signs of blood.

Causes of vomiting and diarrhoea in dogs

Vomiting and diarrhoea occurs when the stomach and or intestines become irritated or inflamed. Common causes for this include some viruses (similar to human gastroenteritis) or when a dog eats something inappropriate (similar to human food poisoning). Other causes include swallowing an object that causes intestinal obstruction, sudden dietary changes, intestinal parasites, poisoning, parvovirus infection, pancreatitis, side effects of medication, or any other inflammatory gastrointestinal disease (similar to human IBD). Some dogs may become inappetent or lose weight when they are stressed.

Try to prevent your dog getting vomiting and diarrhoea by avoiding very salty, spicy or fatty foods. Introduce dietary changes slowly, over around seven days, to allow the intestinal bacteria to adjust. If you know that your dog is going to experience a stressful event, or if a course of antibiotics has been prescribed, then you can feed a probiotic supplement, which can help to reduce the risk of stomach upset. It is useful to have some chicken fillet or white fish in the freezer at home together with dog-specific probiotics and electrolyte powders that can be used for future episodes.

What you can do yourself

If your dog is bright and happy, and there is no blood in the diarrhoea or vomit, then you can often start by providing symptomatic treatment at home:

  • Do not starve your dog: historically, dogs have been treated by withholding food for a few hours before re-feeding. However, we now know that the gut needs to contain food to start the healing and recovery process
  • Very small dogs and puppies: starving is not appropriate because they risk getting dangerously low blood sugar levels
  • Hydration: your dog must have access to clean fresh water at all times
  • Highly digestible diet: offer this in small portions little and often. For example, a prescription intestinal diet, such as Purina EN, or boiled rice or potato with cooked white fish, chicken fillet, turkey or egg (feed ⅓ protein to ⅔ carbohydrate)
  • Electrolytes and probiotics: use these canine supplements alongside their diet, following the manufacturer’s instructions
  • If your dog eats poultry, or is a scavenger, we recommend sending a stool sample for laboratory analysis regularly to see if what can you give a dog for stomach pain is needed
  • We recommend vaccinating your dog against parvovirus. Puppies should be vaccinated three times, beginning at six weeks of age. Prevention of this disease is very important as this disease can cause fatalities, especially in puppies

A suggested feeding schedule:

  • Day 1: give 50% of the recommended daily amount divided into 6-8 portions
  • Day 2 and 3: give 75% divided into 4-6 portions
  • Day 4 and 5: give 100% divided into 3-4 portions
  • Once the dog has been normal for a couple of days you can gradually re-introduce the usual food

Dogs need 50ml of fluid per kg of body weight per day. That is approximately 500ml for a dog weighing 10kg, but this will be considerably more if the dog vomits and or has diarrhoea. The dog may also need a few quieter days in order to fully recover, with short walks on the lead and lower energy activities. It is also important to avoid meeting other dogs until your dog has completely recovered.

Treatment of vomiting and diarrhoea in dogs

Treatment focuses on replacing the fluids that have been lost. In severe cases, dehydration can lead to shock and damage internal organs, such as the kidneys. Blood tests are done to check the levels of red and white blood cells, internal what can you give a dog for stomach pain function and to check the dog's electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride). In addition, it is important to identify what the cause of the vomiting or diarrhoea is. For example, x-rays and/or an ultrasound scan of the abdomen may be needed if the dog has swallowed an object or may have a foreign body. A surgical procedure may be required to resolve the cause.

Symptomatic treatment will be given whilst the clinical signs resolve. A bland diet that requires minimal digestion will be given in small portions, together with anti-nausea medication, antacids, pain relief, and probiotics to replace the normal gut bacteria. Antibiotics are rarely indicated in the treatment of vomiting or diarrhoea, unless there are signs of septicaemia (bacteria in the bloodstream), as they can further disrupt the normal bacterial flora in the gut.

When to see your physical veterinarian

  • Blood in the vomit
  • Frank or increasing blood in the stools or very dark/black stools
  • If your dog is increasingly lethargic, inappetent, anorexic or does not want to drink
  • Vomiting continues despite supportive treatment for 3-4 days at home (for young puppies and older dogs you should seek help earlier)
  • If your dog cannot retain water or is dehydrated
  • If a foreign body may have been swallowed that could obstruct the intestine
  • Abdominal pain or a swollen abdomen
  • If the dog has watch north sea texas online english subtitles episodes of vomiting and or diarrhoea

Still worried?

Book a video appointment to have a chat with one of our vets.

Dr Jessica May

Dr Jessica May

Last updated: 2021-10-21

Источник: https://firstvet.com/uk/articles/vomiting-and-diarrhoea-in-dogs

The Top 10 Dog Health Problems

Your dog probably knows how to beg for a treat, but she doesn’t how know to talk to you about her health — or tell you when she’s in pain. Unfortunately, pet canines may face a wide range of dog health conditions. Fortunately many of the most serious ones can be prevented with vaccinations and regular treatment.

Here are the top 10 dog health problems our four-legged friends face and dog illness symptoms to watch for.

Dog Health Condition No. 1: Heartworms

Heartworms are a serious and potentially deadly disease in which parasites infect a dog’s heart and arteries. Dogs are exposed to larvae through a mosquito bite and, if unchecked, the larvae can develop into large worms. Symptoms of heartworm disease range from coughing to lethargy, collapsing, and depression (moping or not greeting you at the door), says Bonnie Beaver, DVM, a professor at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University. A heartworm infestation can progress to heart failure and death. Though not always successful, treatment options include medications to kill the parasites and, in advanced memes del america vs monterrey, surgery. Fortunately, heartworms are easily prevented. Options include daily oral medications, topicals, injections, and a simple, once-a-month pill.

Dog Health Condition No. 2: Vomiting and Diarrhea


There are many possible causes of vomiting and diarrhea in dogs, but the most common is an infection such as parvovirus. What can you give a dog for stomach pain include eating inappropriate foods or swallowing objects. “Dogs often eat little toys, items of clothing, chocolate, or gum wrappers,” says Beaver. “Xylitol [a sugar substitute] can shut down the kidneys. A pound of bacon can cause pancreatitis.”

An isolated bout of vomiting and diarrhea bobby berk home nyc dogs is usually not a cause for concern, but if your dog vomits repeatedly or for more than a day, take him to your veterinarian. Watch for symptoms such as blood in vomit or diarrhea, dark or black diarrhea, lethargy, weight loss, fever, or a change in appetite. To prevent dehydration, give your dog plenty of water. After a bout of vomiting, try bland foods such as boiled potatoes, rice, and cooked skinless chicken. To combat diarrhea in dogs, the general rule is to avoid feeding your dog food for 12 to 24 hours or until your vet gives you the go-ahead.

Dog Health Condition No. 3: Obesity

Obesity is a common pet health problem. Just as in people, being overweight can have negative health effects on your pooch: Overweight dogs face a higher risk of joint pain, diabetes, and liver disease. “We’re feeding them too much calorie-dense food and not giving them enough exercise,” says Beaver.

Is your dog at his best weight? If he is, you should be able to feel his backbone and ribs without pressing. When looking at your dog from above, you should see a noticeable “waist” between the lower ribs and the hips; from the side, you should be able to see the abdomen go up from the bottom of the rib cage to the thighs. If your dog doesn’t meet these standards, ask your vet to help you create a diet and exercise plan.

“Increase calorie output and decrease calorie intake,” says Www five starbank com internet banking. Reduce snacks or treats, feed him small meals throughout the day, and make it a point to take him to the park to play and run around.

Dog Health Condition No. 4: Infectious Diseases

Another common pet health problem in dogs is infectious diseases, notably canine parvovirus and distemper. Canine parvovirus is extremely contagious and potentially deadly, contracted through contact with the feces of an infected dog. Symptoms can include bloody diarrhea, vomiting, lethargy, and loss of appetite.

Canine distemper is a virus transmitted through direct contact with an infected dog’s urine, saliva, or blood. It affects a dog’s respiratory system as well as her gastrointestinal and central nervous system and even the eyes, specifically the membranes that cover the eyeballs and the underside of the eyelid. Symptoms include sneezing, coughing and difficulty breathing, fever, sudden loss of appetite, vomiting or diarrhea, discharge of thick mucous from the eyes and nose, and possibly seizures.

Early prevention can protect your pet. “These and other common infectious diseases in dogs can be prevented by proper vaccination,” says Beaver. “Start when they are puppies.” As for treatment, options for canine parvovirus include IV fluids to prevent dehydration, anti-vomiting medication, antibiotics, and anti-pain medications. The top banks in the us canine distemper, treatment usually includes IV fluids, antibiotics (if your dog is coughing) to prevent pneumonia, and medications to control seizures. There are currently no medications that can destroy either virus.

Dog Health Condition No. 5: Kennel Cough

Kennel cough is a highly contagious form of bronchitis that causes inflammation in a dog’s voice box and windpipe. “The most common cause is exposure to other infected dogs, either at doggie daycare, the groomer’s, or a kennel,” says Beaver. “In most cases, the treatment is to let it run its course or to give a dog antibiotics.” You can also try using a humidifier or taking your pet into a steam-filled bathroom.

Dog Health Condition No. 6: Lower Urinary Tract Problems

Some common urinary tract problems in dogs include incontinence, bacterial infections, bladder stones, and even cancer. Symptoms include having to urinate more often, producing small amounts of urine, blood in the urine, incontinence, straining or crying in pain when trying to urinate, vomiting, fever, and weight loss. Treatment options include antibiotics, dietary changes, and surgery if needed to remove bladder stones or a tumor.

Dog Health Condition No. 7: Dental Disease

Periodontal disease, an infection of the gums, is very common in dogs, affecting an estimated 80 percent of dogs by the age of 2. It has been linked to heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, and other serious dog health problems. Symptoms range from smelly breath to difficulty eating and facial swelling, says Beaver. Home depot pay bill number may include removing dental plaque and, if necessary, teeth. To prevent dental dog health problems, Beaver recommends regular check-ups with a vet dentist, giving your dog rawhide chews, and regularly brushing your pet’s teeth with dog toothpaste (your toothpaste can upset a dog’s stomach).

Dog Health Condition No. 8: Skin Problems

Most skin problems in dogs are due to parasites, skin infections, and what can you give a dog for stomach pain. “Probably the most common skin problem in dogs is demodectic mange, which is caused by a mite that lives in the hair follicles,” says Beaver.

Common parasites that involve the skin include fleas, ticks, ear mites, and sarcoptic mange mites, which cause scabies. Ringworm is a common skin infection; it’s a highly contagious fungal infection that can cause hair loss or short hair or scaly patches. Allergens such as pollen, mold, and dust mites can trigger itching and rashes. Dogs can also develop allergies to common dog food ingredients such as soy, corn, wheat, beef, or chicken, triggering skin problems. And some dogs may simply cause irritation of the skin by licking an area too much, possibly from boredom or stress.

You may be able to spot fleas and ticks on your pet. Treatment options include using special medicated shampoos to kill parasites, antibiotics or antifungal medications, and corticosteroids and antihistamines to control itching. Your vet may also prescribe a diet to reduce food allergies or injections to control allergic reactions. To prevent fleas and ticks, ask your vet about monthly topical agents you can easily apply.

Dog Health Condition No. 9: Broken Bones

Broken bones, also called fractures, are a common problem in dogs — often from activities like jumping out of a window, says Beaver. Symptoms include limping, not moving, and a reason to suspect trauma (if the dog had been near a road, for instance). Treatment includes surgery, a splint, or a cast.

Dog Health Condition No. 10: Cancer

“One common form of cancer in dogs is skin cancer,” says Beaver. “There may be white patches on the top of the nose and ear tips.” Other symptoms of cancer in dogs include lumps, swelling, sores, rapid weight loss, lameness, sudden decreased appetite, difficulty breathing, urinating, or defecating, lack of energy, and black stools.

Treatments include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and immunotherapy. As with people, a combination of approaches may be used, and the stage of the cancer, the type of disease, and the aggressiveness of the treatment can affect the outcome.

Regular vet visits and preventive steps can keep your dog in top pet health. And should you notice any unusual behavior or symptom, getting prompt attention at the vet’s office will often mean a speedy recovery from a dog illness.

Источник: https://www.everydayhealth.com/pet-health/common-dog-health-problems.aspx

7 Human Foods That Can Be Fatal to Dogs

Alcohol is found in a variety of products including alcoholic beverages, perfumes, mouthwash, paint, varnish and various cleaning products.

While occasional alcohol consumption is safe for humans, dogs cannot tolerate it, even in small amounts.

Symptoms usually develop within an hour after consumption and include tiredness, depression, lack of muscle coordination, low body temperature, poor breathing, vomiting and diarrhea.

If a dog consumes too much alcohol, it can result in lung failure, seizures, coma and even death.

The toxic dose of 100% (or 200 proof) alcohol in dogs has recently been reported to be about 0.59 ounces per pound of body weight (8 ml per kg), with death occurring 12 to 24 hours after ingestion ().

Alcohol poisoning in dogs usually happens after accidental ingestion of alcoholic beverages (,). However, in one case, a dog died of alcohol poisoning after eating a large number of rotten apples ().

It’s also a what can you give a dog for stomach pain if a dog eats raw dough that contains yeast. As the yeast cells ferment, they actually produce alcohol, which causes a dog’s blood alcohol level to rise and can ultimately cause alcohol poisoning and death (, ).

What’s more, the dough will expand in a dog’s stomach and can cause severe bloating. This puts pressure on the surrounding organs and can make it very difficult for the dog to breathe.

It is important to never feed raw yeast dough or alcohol to your dog. Alcoholic beverages should not be left unattended and raw dough should be kept well out of reach.

Summary

If a dog consumes alcohol, it can lead to serious health problems and even death. This can also happen if a dog eats raw yeast dough.

Источник: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/7-foods-fatal-to-dogs

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